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Publication numberUS3712014 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1973
Filing dateNov 27, 1970
Priority dateDec 4, 1969
Also published asCA932973A, CA932973A1, DE2058656A1
Publication numberUS 3712014 A, US 3712014A, US-A-3712014, US3712014 A, US3712014A
InventorsWaerner T
Original AssigneeWaerner T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Embedded anchoring socket
US 3712014 A
Abstract
Anchoring means to be positioned in a concrete structure and comprising a socket adapted for reception of stud, is provided. The socket is embedded in the concrete structure and is provided with means for cooperation with the reinforcing irons in the concrete structure, whereby the force acting through the stud is transmitted to the reinforcing irons.
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United States Paten n91 Waerner Jan. 23, 1973 1 EMBEDDED ANCHORING SOCKET [76] Inventor: Thor Waerner, Graf. Reckestr. 160,

Dusseldorf, Germany 221 Filed: Nov. 27, 1970 21 App1.No,: 93,010

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Dec. 1, 1969 Norway ..4795/69 [52] US. Cl ..52/707, 52/711 [51] Int. Cl. ..E04h 1/38, E04c 5/00 [58] Field of Search ..52/701, 699, 704, 706, 707, 52/711; 248/361 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,455,641 5/1923 Mahon ..52/707 2,954,647 10/1960 Lee ..S2/707 3,371,951 3/1968 Bryant ..248/36] R 3,420,014 [/1969 Courtois et 31., ..52/706 2,772,560 12/1956 Neptune ..52/707 2,957,279 10/1960 McNair .....52/704 1,090,545 3/1914 Kneas ..52/701 875,396 12/1907 White ..52/699 1,470,727 10/1923 Hall .t ..52/699 Primary Examiner-Henry C. Sutherland Att0rney-Young & Thompson [57} ABSTRACT Anchoring means'to be positioned in a concrete structure and comprising'a socket adapted for reception of stud, is provided. The socket is embedded in the concrete structure and is provided with means for cooperation with the reinforcing irons in the concrete structure, whereby the force acting through the stud is transmitted to the reinforcing irons.

13 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJAI123I975 3.712.014

sum 1 [1F 4 INVENTOR THOR WAEE/VE/P PATENTED JAN 23 I975 SHEET 2 OF 4 FIG. 5

f 5% N 3 R H OfJN mw m W T o T W M A V B PATENTEDJAH 23 1975 SHEET 3 0F 4 INVENTOR B 7/10,? WQfE/VEK l 7 JM ATTORNEYS F IG. 6

EMBEDDED ANCHORING SOCKET The invention relates to a tubular anchoring means to be positioned in a concrete structure when casting same, and the anchoring means is adapted to receive a stud, which at the end to be inserted in the anchoring means is provided with a projecting member which by rotation may be brought into engagement with fastening means in the tubular anchoring means or socket.

When using precast concrete elements there is a requirement for rapid and safe connection of the concrete elements to hoisting equipment and transport equipment and there is also a need for means of securing the precast concrete elements to one another during the building. These needs are met to-day for example by inserting in the precast concrete elements securing means, for example in the form of projecting threaded studs, eye bolts or the like. It is also known to insert anchoring means in the form of sockets which are internally threaded and adapted to receive threaded studs. Use of threaded connections is, however, time consuming and the threads are also easily damaged. When eye bolts or projecting reinforcing rods bent to eyes are used, the embodiments are a fairly simple way of providing a connection for the hoisting equipment while such fastening means or anchoring means are not well suited for other purposes, as for example for attaching precast concrete elements to one another and as provisional means for mounting precast concrete elements to be joined together with mortar. A disadvantage encountered with the known anchoring means is also that they will develop rust stains in the finished building structure, as they are made of steel and even with a good coat of mortar such stains may develop.

It is also known to make the tubular anchoring means as a thin-walled plastic socket and provide the same with an intermediate bottom of steel, the bottom having a bore for a securing wing on that end of the stud which is inserted in the socket. The stud is secured in place by being inserted in the socket with the wing on the stud inserted through the opening in the intermediate bottom, wnereafter the stud is rotated about its longitudinal axis until the wing is in abutment with the rear side of the intermediate bottom. This design is fairly inexpensive, because the socket which afterwards is lost, is inexpensive and unsightly rust stains are avoided due to the fact that the socket is made of plastic.

The invention is a further development of the anchoring means of the latter type, and a main object is to improve said type of anchoring means. The invention is, however, not limited to use of the anchoring means in connection with precast concrete elements alone as the scope of the invention is wider and the invention therefore also has for its object to provide a tubular anchoring means which for example may be used as an anchor for for example mounting of-railings and the like.

A disadvantage encountered with known anchoring means is that the anchorage in the concrete creates certain problems. It has been attempted to solve the anchoring question by means of a helical reinforcing member which acts on a projecting collar on the socket, the intermediate bottom of steel being provided in said collar but this will increase the costs of the use of the anchoring means and the solution will further be unsatisfactory under certain conditions.

In accordance with the invention the aim is consequently to design the anchoring means in such a manner that the reinforcing bars present in the concrete structure can be used and the tubular anchoring means according to the invention is characterized in that the socket is provided with a retaining means for reinforcing irons which alone or in cooperation with the reinforcing. irons form the securing means for the stud.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention the wall of the socket may be provided with two diametrically opposed recesses or indents wherein the reinforcing irons may be inserted when providing the concrete elements with anchoring means. In this embodiment the reinforcing irons are used directly as abutment for the stud member and the reinforcing irons are held in correct position in relation to the socket, due to the fact that the reinforcing irons are located in the two diametrically opposed recesses or indents. The use of recesses or indented portions is to a large extent dependent on the conditions, but it appears to be advantageous to use recesses as a direct steel-against-steel-contact between the wing on the stud member and the reinforcing irons then is obtained. The socket will usually, as mentioned above, be made from a plastic material.

In another preferred embodiment the wall of the socket is provided with two diametrically opposed widened portions wherein the respective steel inserts are positioned, extending into the socket and forming the fastening device, as a slot remains between the steel inserts for insertion of the wing of the stud, the wing engaging the two steel inserts when the stud is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The reinforcing irons in the concrete structure are then positioned in such a manner that they abut the two widened portions externally, viewed from the inner end of the socket. The advantage of this embodiment compared to the previously known designs with a cylindrical intermediate bottom is that the steel inserts are cheaper in manufacture that the cylindrical intermediate bottom which must be provided with a securing slot for the wing on the stud and the flat and rectangular shape of the steel inserts, surrounded by the widened portions of the wall of the socket, will cooperate with the reinforcing irons in a better manner.

With this design the wall of the socket may externally of the widened portions, seen from the inner end of the socket and in direct connection to the widened portions, be provided with indented portions or recesses for reception of the reinforcing irons in the concrete structure. This provides for a better attachment for the reinforcing irons and the torques acting in the above mentioned embodiment, in which the reinforcing irons do not act directly opposed to the abutment faces on the wing of the stud, are avoided.

In order to ensure further the cooperation between the anchoring means and the reinforcing irons, the

widened portions of the wall of the socket may externally, seen from the inner end of the anchoring means, be provided with outward projections which will prevent the reinforcing irons from being displaced transversely of the longitudinal axis of the anchoring means, viz. out of the recesses or indents or out of the over riding contact with the widened portions of the socket. It may be of advantage where recesses or indents are provided in addition to the widened portions to make the projection so large that the reinforcing irons will have to be snapped in place, whereby the engagement naturally will be improved.

In accordance with the invention the steel insert can be bits cut from standard steel rods, so that the manufacture can be rationalized and inexpensive.

In order to improve the facilities for covering the socket after use when the socket opening is filled with mortar, the outer end of the socket may preferably be conical. In order to secure the stud element in the socket, known securing pins may be used and it is then advantageous to provide the conical wall with two diametrically opposed and longitudinally extending grooves for reception of such a pin which extends through a corresponding hole in the stud element. Further features of the invention will be evident from the following description and the claims.

The invention will be explained more in detail below with reference to the drawings showing various preferred embodiments for an anchoring means according to the invention.

FIG. 1 is a central longitudinal section through a tubular anchoring means in accordance with the invention, cast in concrete,

FIG. 2 is a top view of the anchoring means of FIG. 1 without stud inserted,

FIG. 3 is a bottom view or view from the inner end of the anchoring means of FIG. 1,

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of one half of a tubular element of the type shown on FIGS. 1-3, and illustrates one step of the manufacture of the tubular element.

FIG. 5 shows the attachment of an anchoring means on the inside of the wall of a casting mould.

FIG. 6 shows a further embodiment for a tubular anchoring means in accordance with the invention as front view, and

FIG. 7 shows the same anchoring means as side view.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of one half of a tubular element as shown on FIGS. 6 and 7.

FIG. 9 is a top view of that half which is shown on FIG. 8,

FIG. 10 is a section taken along the line XX on FIG. 9,

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the tubular element of FIGS. 6 and 7 provided with reinforcing irons and a particular holder for reinforcing irons,

FIG. 12 is a top view of the holder for reinforcing irons, and

FIG. 13 is a side view of the holder for reinforcing irons shown on FIG. 12.

The anchoring means shown on FIG. 1 consists of a cylindrical socket member 2 having a conically flared outer portion 17. A stud 19 having a securing wing 8 is shown inserted in the tubular element and rotated 90 to a fastening position in which the securing wing 8 is in engagement with the rear side of two steel inserts 7 and 9. The steel inserts 7 and 9 are placed in corresponding widened portions 6 and 10 of the socket 2 (see also FIGS. 2, 3 and 4). Outside the widened portions 6 and 10, seen from the inner end of the socket 2 there are provided two recesses 3 and 13 in which reinforcing irons 4 and 12 are located as shown on FIG. 1. To ensure additional securement of the reinforcing irons projections 5 and 11 are provided on the widened portions 6 and 10, and when the reinforcing irons are to be located in the indented portions 3 and 13, the reinforcing irons must be pressed past said projections 5 and 1 l At the top of the tubular element in the flared conical portion 17, there are two diametrically opposed and longitudinally extending grooves 16 and 18. The grooves act as guide grooves for the securing pin 15 which extends through a hole for same in the stud 14. There are two diametrically opposed grooves 16 and 18 so that it will always be possible to position the securing pin 15 in one of them iri'espective of which way the stud 14 is turned when fastening same to the socket. The pin 15 secures the stud 14 against rotation out of engagement with the steel inserts 7 and 9.

The steel inserts 7 and 9 form between them an elongated slot 19, through which the securing wing 8, which is formed by a flattened portion of the stud 14, can be moved when inserting and removing the stud 14 from the socket 2. When the stud 14 is inserted all the way into the socket, the stud is rotated and the securing wing 8 will then engage the rear side of the steel inserts 7 and 9. The stud is then secured in this position by means of the pin 15 shown on FIG. 1.

As will be evident from FIG. 1 it is possible to fill the tubular element when it is no longer to be used, with mortar, and the conical portion 17 provides for a better adhesion for the mortar at the same time as unsightly rust stains are avoided due to the fact that the complete socket 2, 17 consists of plastics, the only remaining steel objects being the inserts 7 and 9 which possibly may give rise to rust stains at a later date, but the steel inserts are very small and located deep in the socket.

The anchoring means shown on FIGS. 14 are preferably made by casting of two similar halves indicated by the dividing line 21 on FIG. 3, and a moulded half of a socket is shown in perspective view on FIG. 4. The central section shown on FIG. 1 follows the plane of division between the two halves.

On FIGS. 2-4 one will see that the halves 2a and 2b completes each other to form the socket 2. In the same manner the conical portion 17a completes itself with the corresponding portion 17b for formation of the conical funnel portion 17. The same is true for the portions which on FIGS. 2-4 are given the letters a and b after the reference number.

When manufacturing the anchoring means the half element on FIG. 4 is moulded, whereafter the steel inserts 7 and 9 are positioned in the widened space 64 and 10a. Then a corresponding half 2b of the socket is positioned and the components welded together to a unit preferably by ultra sonic welding. The anchoring means is now finished and is forwarded to the concrete casting form in order to be positioned in a mould for concrete casting.

When the anchoring means is to be cast into the concrete structure, the anchoring means is attached to the inside of the wall of the mould for the concrete casting in the manner shown on FIG. 5.

FIG. 5 shows how the anchoring means 2 is clamped to the inside of a wall 22 of a mould. The anchoring means 2 is held in position on the inside of the wall 22 of the mould by means of the expansion member 23, which consists of an expansion bolt 24 with a conical head 25 and three expansion clamps of which only two, viz. expansion clamps 26 and 27 are shown on the drawing. The expansion clamps 26 and 27 have an outer form corresponding to the internal form of the socket 2, and by tightening the expansion bolt 24 by means of the nut 28, the expansion clamps will expand outwardly and hold the socket 2. FIG. 5 also shows how the reinforcing irons 4 and 12 are positioned in place for anchoring of the socket 2 in the subsequently cast concrete building element. After the casting is ended, the bolt 24 and the expansion device remains in the mould wall 22 when this wall is removed.

On FIGS. 1 and 4 a stopper 43 for the wing 8 is shown, for arresting the wing in securing position. When inserting the stud 14 it is rotated so that it will abut against the two stoppers 43 and the stud will then stop in correct position for securing and for insertion of the pin 15.

The anchoring means 46 on FIG. 6 is assembled from two similar halves 47 and 48. One half 48 is shown in perspective view on FIG. 8 and is on FIG. 9 seen from that side where the joint is. On FIG. 8 the lower half of the socket is drawn transparent in order to show the internal construction.

The halves of the socket are moulded preferably of a plastic material and are provided with steel inserts 49, 50. The steel inserts are cut from standard steel profiles, the profile forming a circle segment. For reception of the steel inserts 49 and 50 each socket half is provided with reception pockets 51, 52. When manufacturing the anchoring means 46 the half shown on FIG. 8 is moulded, whereafter the steel inserts 49 and 50 are positioned in the pockets 5], 52. Then a corresponding moulded half 47 is positioned on top of the other and the two halves are welded together preferably by ultra sonic welding. The anchoring means is now ready and may be shipped to the concrete casting form in order to be included in the cast products. When the anchoring means is to be cast into the concrete it is attached in a suitable manner on the inside of the wall of a concrete casting mould in the same manner as shown on FIG. 5. The anchoring means 46 does not have the conically flared end and is therefore positioned with its open end at a distance from the wall of the casting mould for the concrete, while the clamping device is so designed that there is sufficient space for insertion of the pin. Reference is here made to the previous description of the other embodiments where the operating principle is explained more in detail.

The anchoring means 46 is suited for use in connection with a stud having securing wings in the manner explained in connection with the embodiment on FIG. 1, but the stud can also be modified in such a manner that its upper part has an enlarged diameter so that the stud will fit with a small clearance in the cylindrical space formed by the two cylinder halves 53, 54. A better support of the stud is thereby obtained and the chance of bending the stud due to obliquely acting strains are reduced. Each half is provided with a pocket shaped recess 55, 56. These pockets serve to receive the end of the pin which is inserted into the stud which is not shown, so that the pin is secured in the socket.

The anchoring means has two diametrically opposed recesses 57, 58 for reception of reinforcing irons. The recesses are at the bottom well rounded and follows the rounded shape of the steel inserts 49 and 50, so that the reinforcing irons can follow the rounded shape and recesses 57, 58 there is provided a bead 59, 60 inside which there is a bed for the reinforcing irons as particularly shown on FIG. 10.

Each half is provided with a flanged joint 61, 62, 63. The flanges are provided with guiding pins 64, 65 and corresponding holes 66, 67. The lower flange 63 has a widened portion 68 extending out from the bottom 69 of the tubular element. The widened flange part 68 serves to retain a holder 70 for reinforcing irons as explained below.

In the same manner as for the embodiments on FIGS. 1 and 4 the tubular element 46 is provided with stoppers for the securing wing on the stud to be inserted into and fastened in the tubular member. As the socket halves are similar, each half is provided with only one stopper which on FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 are referred to as 71. When inserting the stud, the stud is rotated 90 and will then be in engagement with the two stoppers 71. Then the pin may be inserted in the same manner as shown on FIG. 1, the end of the pin inserted in the stud then extending into the pocket 55 or the pocket 56.

FIG. 11 shows a perspective view of the anchoring means connected to reinforcing irons 72, 73. The reinforcing irons are positioned in the recesses 57 and 58 and rest behind the beads 59 and 60. The curved shape of the steel inserts and the wall of the socket in this area enables the reinforcing irons to have a uniform and suitable curvature.

The better to hold the reinforcing irons in correct positions, the holder for reinforcing irons which is shown on FIGS. 12 and 13, and on FIG. 11 is shown in position, can with advantage be used. The holder consists of a base plate 74 which in each corner is provided with a clip 76, 77, 78 and 79. In the center the base plate is provided with a rectangular hole 80, the length of which corresponding to the widened flange portion 68 and the width of which corresponding to. the double width of a flange. In this manner the holder 75 can be entered on the two juxtaposed flange extensions 68 as indicated by dotted lines on FIG. 6. The reinforcing irons 72, 73 are pressed into corresponding clips 76, 78 and 77, 79 as shown on FIG. 11.

The anchoring means shown on FIGS. 6-11 can, of course, be modified by being provided with a flared conical end as for example shown for the socket on FIG. 4.

For all the embodiments shown, the clamping method explained in connection with FIG. 5 can be used.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. Tubular anchoring means embedded in a reinforced concrete structure, said means having an open outer end at the surface of the structure and an inner end inwardly thereof, said means receiving and retaining a stud having a wing at an inner end thereof, said anchoring means comprising a tubular socket having transversely extending shoulders disposed on opposite sides of the socket, said wing underlying said shoulders, reinforcing members of the concrete lying on the side of said shoulders opposite said wing, and means to transmit force from said inserted wing through said shoulders to said reinforcing members, said forcetransmitting means comprising metallic inserts within said socket on opposite sides of said stud and disposed between said wing and said shoulders.

2. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 1, said socket having means enclosing said inserts on all sides.

3. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 2, said socket being a plastic material and said inserts being metal.

4. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 1, said shoulders extending inwardly of the outer contour of said tubular socket, said socket having oppositely outwardly opening imperforate recesses in its side walls for the reception of said reinforcing members, said shoulders each defining one of the side walls of one of said recesses.

5. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 4 said shoulders being convex in a direction toward the open end of said socket.

6. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 5, said inserts being convex in the direction of said open end of said socket and underlying and supporting said convex shoulders.

7. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 1, said shoulders being convex in the direction of the open end of said socket.

8. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 7, said force-transmitting means comprising inserts within said socket, said inserts being convex in the direction of the open end of the socket and underlying and supporting said shoulders.

9. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 1, said reinforcing members being disposed in imperforate oppositely outwardly opening recesses in the side wall of said socket, each of said shoulders comprising one side wall of a said recess.

10. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 1, and means within said socket for limiting rotation of said wing within said socket.

l1. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 1, said socket being of plastic material in the form of two halves with flanges along their edges, the flanges of the halves being secured together.

12. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 11, said force-transmitting means comprising steel inserts within said socket and extending between said two halves.

13. Tubular anchoring means as claimed in claim 12, each of said halves providing a recess for half of a said steel insert.

l II!

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3873147 *Nov 23, 1973Mar 25, 1975Annable Thomas MichaelLift connector for precast members
US4018470 *Jun 9, 1975Apr 19, 1977Superior Concrete Accessories, Inc.Anchor insert for embedment in a concrete slab
US4053134 *Jun 14, 1976Oct 11, 1977Peacock Bobbie DPipe mold having insert support means
US4179151 *Jan 10, 1978Dec 18, 1979Superior Concrete Accessories, Inc.Anchor insert for embedment in a concrete slab
US4512121 *May 24, 1983Apr 23, 1985Roger CarydiasHandling system for precast units
US5386675 *Jul 12, 1993Feb 7, 1995High Industries, Inc.Concrete beam connection sleeve
US6092849 *Sep 29, 1997Jul 25, 2000Zambelli; SergioDevice for lifting prefabricated components, particularly made of concrete, or the like
US6334286May 17, 2000Jan 1, 2002Sergio ZambelliDevice for lifting prefabricated components, particularly made of concrete, or the like
US6752566 *Jun 4, 2003Jun 22, 2004Works R&D, Inc.Exo-Lift
US7213795 *Apr 16, 2003May 8, 2007Ian Alexander PatersonLifting of precast bodies such as concrete panels
US7726091 *Nov 12, 2004Jun 1, 2010Halfen Gmbh & Co. KgSupport shoe for concrete pylons
US8171678Jan 28, 2009May 8, 2012Actuant CorporationSlab lift bracket
US20040012216 *Apr 16, 2003Jan 22, 2004Paterson Ian AlexanderLifting of precast concrete bodies such as concrete panels
US20050102924 *Nov 12, 2004May 19, 2005Halfen Gmbh & Co. KgSupport Shoe for Concrete Pylons
US20100186313 *Jan 28, 2009Jul 29, 2010Stanford Frantz DSlab Lift Bracket
US20120051831 *Aug 24, 2010Mar 1, 2012Waters Jr Louis AlbertQuick connect coupling for concrete rebar
EP1696085A2 *Feb 14, 2006Aug 30, 2006Pino AlbaneseAnchoring socket for anchoring consoles on a concrete wall
EP1696085A3 *Feb 14, 2006Oct 28, 2009Pino AlbaneseAnchoring socket for anchoring consoles on a concrete wall
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/707, 52/711
International ClassificationE04F13/08, E04C5/16, E04G21/14, E04H12/22
Cooperative ClassificationE04G21/142, E04F13/0832, E04H12/2269, E04C5/168
European ClassificationE04F13/08B3, E04H12/22C2, E04C5/16C, E04G21/14B