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Publication numberUS3712673 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1973
Filing dateJan 27, 1972
Priority dateJan 27, 1972
Publication numberUS 3712673 A, US 3712673A, US-A-3712673, US3712673 A, US3712673A
InventorsR Swenson
Original AssigneeSwenson Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient seat cushion with crease-preventing means
US 3712673 A
Abstract
A resilient seat cushion having a top surface and one or more side surfaces which tend to deform when the seat cushion is subjected to compressive force, comprising a resilient compressible body and a flexible cover which adheres to the body. The side surface or surfaces are provided with one or more indentations which are permanently formed in the cover and the body and are disposed transversely to the direction of the compressive force and prevent permanent deformation, wrinkling or creasing of the side surface.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ilnite Swenson tates atet H91 [54] RESILIENT SEAT CUSHION WITH GREASE-PREVENTING MEANS [75] Inventor: Richard F. Swenson, Milwaukee,

Wis.

[73] Assignee: Swenson Corporation, Red Granite,

' Wis.

[22] Filed: Jan. 27, 1972 [211 App]. No.: 221,285

[52] US. Cl. ..297/452, 297/195, 297/214, 297/459, 297/DIG. 2 [51 Int. Cl. ..A47c 7/22, B60n 1/06 [58] Field of Search.....'...15/5l E, 320, 360; 297/452,

297/458, 459, DIG. l, DIG. 8, 214, 195

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 5/l970 Wall eta]. ......5/320 51 Jan. 23, 1973 3,233,885 2/1966 Probst ..297/DIG. 8

Rich, Jr ..297/1 95 Primary Examiner-Casmir A. Nunberg Attorney-James E. Nilles [57] ABSTRACT A resilient seat cushion having a top surface and one or more side surfaces which tend to deform when the seat cushion is subjected to compressive force, comprising a resilient compressible body and a flexible cover which adheres to the body. The side surface or surfaces are provided with one or more indentations which are permanently formed in the cover and the body and are disposed transversely to the direction of the compressive force and prevent permanent deformation, wrinkling or creasing of the side surface.

16 Claims, 1 1 Drawing Figures PATENTEUJAHZIB 1975 3.7 1 2,673

SHEET 2 BF 4 RESILIENT SEAT CUSHION WITH CREASE- PREVENTING MEANS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION use. Some seats of this type, or at least the seat cushion portion thereof, are constructed of a body of resilient compressible material, such as foam rubber, polyurethane foam or the like, which is provided with a flexible exterior cover, such as treated leather, vinyl, Naugahyde, or plastic sheet material of some type, which is tough and moisture impervious. In some instances, the cover is actually bonded to or otherwise made to adhere to the resilient compressible body. Such seat cushions are structurally strong, retain their shape and appearance despite repeated use, and are relatively economical to manufacture. However, when such cushions are subjected to compressive force by the user, one or more of the sides or vertical surfaces of the cushion are compressed and become deformed or wrinkled. Normally, when the compressive forces are relieved, the cushion springs back to its normal shape but there is a tendency for the sides to develop permanent deformations, such as creases or wrinkles. This is undesirable because repeated wrinkling or creasing at the same location may gradually result in the cover becoming detached from the resilient body at that location and increases the likelihood of the cover breaking or tearing. Furthermore, the permanent wrinkles or creases are unsightly and detract from the appearance of the cushion. t

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an improved resilient seat cushion which is particularly well adapted for use on outdoor vehicles and comprises crease-preventing means which prevent wrinkling and creasing of one or more sides of the cushion during use and inhibits the formation of permanent deformation. A seat cushion in accordance with the invention comprises a resilient compressible body formed of material, such as polyurethane foam or the like, and further comprises a flexible exterior cover of material, such as Naugahyde or the like. The cover is bonded or otherwise made to adhere to the resilient body, at least at those portions of the seat cushion which tend to wrinkle or buckle when subjected to downward compressive forces, such as the front side surface or the lateral side surfaces of the seat cushion. In accordance with the present invention, those substantially flat portions of the seat cushion which tend to wrinkle or buckle, such as the front or side edges, are provided with one or more grooves or indentations which are permanently formed in the flexible cover and resilient body adhering thereto. These grooves or indentations may extend for the entire length of a surface or for only a portion thereof and are disposed transversely tothe direction of the compressive force. In use,

i.e., when compressive force is applied, the portion of the cushion along or adjacent the sides of the grooves come together and may partially or completely close thegrooves. When the force is relieved, those adjacent portions of the cushion spring apart and resume their normal shape and position. Thus, wrinkles and deformations which would otherwise occur in a surface are eliminated by the action of the grooves.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the seat cushion is fabricated by forming a flexible exterior cover into a desired shape with grooves therein on a vacuum-type, heated male mold; placing the shaped cover in a female mold of corresponding shape; and partially filling the interior of the shaped cover with a self-expanding polyurethane foam mixture which gradually fills the shaped cover and adheres to the inner surfaces thereof as it dries. If desired, a rigid baseboard may be placed on the solidified foam forming the bottom of the cushion and the loose edges of the cover folded thereover and secured thereto, as by stapling, gluing, or other suitable means.

A seat cushion in accordance with the invention substantially eliminates permanent undesirable wrinkling of those surfaces provided with a groove or grooves and subjected to compressive forces. Furthermore, such a seat cushion has a longer life and a more pleasing appearance. Also, a seat cushion in accordance with the invention is relatively easy and economical to fabricate.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear hereinafter as this disclosure progresses, reference being had to the accompanying drawings.

THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a bucket-type vehicle seat comprising a resilient cushion in accordance with the invention;

7 FIG, 2 is an exploded, perspective view of a buckettype vehicle seat comprising a seat cushion in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the rear of theseat cushion shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 44 of FIG. 1 showing how the-bucket-type seat support and seat cushion fit together;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the seat cushion taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 2;

, FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, but showing the seat cushion under compression by an occupant;

FIG. 7 is a front elevational view of a prior art seat cushion showing creases and wrinkles formed in the front side thereof when compressive'force is being applied;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a snow-mobile seat cushion in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of the snow-mobile seat cushion taken on line 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 9 but showing the snow-mobile seat cushion under compression by an occupant; and

FIG. 1 1 is a perspective view of a prior art snow-mobile seat cushion showing creases and wrinkles formed in a side thereof when compressive force is being applied.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIGS. 1 through 6 depict the invention as embodied in a resilient seat cushion for a bucket-type seat for a vehicle such as a tractor. FIGS. 8 through 10 depict the invention as embodied in a resilient seat cushion for a vehicle such as a snow-mobile.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the numeral 10 designates a bucket'type vehicle seat comprising a rigid bucket-type seat support 12, a padded backrest 14 rigidly secured to support 12, and a removable resilient seat cushion 16 in accordance with the invention for mounting on support 12.

Seat support 12 is preferably fabricated of sheet metal and, as FIG. 2 shows, comprises inwardly and downwardly sloped side walls or surfaces 18 and a similarly sloped rear wall or surface 20 which tenninate in a generally semi-circular supporting ledge 22.

As FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 show, seat cushion 16, which is removably mounted on seat support 12, comprises a top side or surface 24, a front side or surface 26, two lateral sides or surfaces 28, a rear side or surface 30, and a bottom side or surface 32. Top surface 24 is slightly cambered and is provided with grooves 34 which provide ventilation, water drainage and a decorative function. Front surface 26 is generally straight and flat and is provided with a groove or indentation 36 in accordance with the invention, as hereinafter described in detail. The lateral surface 28 and rear surface 30 taper or slope inwardly and downwardly to match or fit the surfaces 18 and 20 of seat support 12. The lateral surfaces 28 of seat cushion 16 are generally flat and straight near the front thereof but are curved at the rear where they join curved rear surface 30. FIG. 4 shows that when seat cushion 16 is in place on seat support 12, sloped lateral surface 28 of the cushion mates firmly with sloped side surface 18 of the support. It is to be understood that the other lateral surface 28 and rear surface 30 of cushion 16 are similarly supported by seat support 12. The edges of bottom surface 32 of cushion 16 rest on supporting ledge 22 of seat support 12.

Referring to FIGS. 5 and 6, resilient seat cushion 16 comprises a resilient compressible body 38 and a flexible cover 40 which is bonded or adheres to the body. Preferably, cushion 16 comprises a flat rigid baseboard 42 made of metal, wood or hardboard and having ventilation holes 44 therein, which underlies body 38 and to the underside of which the edges of cover 40 are secured, as by gluing stapling, or other suitable means, at 46. Body 38 is formed of resilient compressible material such as foam rubber, polyurethane foam or similar material which is compressible under a compressive force and resumes a predetermined or normal shape when such force is relieved. Flexible cover 40, which covers all surfaces of body 38 except the bottom surface thereof is formed of flexible, tough, moisture impervious, water repellent sheet material such as leather, vinyl, Naugahyde, sheet plastic or similar material. Cover 40 is bonded or adheres to all surfaces of body 38 with which it is in contact by suitable adhesive means.

Seat cushion 16 is fabricated, for example, by providing a vacuum-type heated male mold of desired shape (and having a groove corresponding to groove 36 there) and forming cover 40 to that shape. The shaped cover is then inverted and placed in a female mold corresponding in shape to the male mold. The interior of cover 40 is then partially filled with a commercially available self-expanding foam mixture which expands, fills the interior of cover 40 to the desired level (pressing it against the female mold in the process) and then dries or sets to form compressible resilient body 38. During the drying process, the foam material bonds or adheres to the inside surfaces of cover 40 with which it is in contact and in this manner the cover becomes securely attached to body 38. After body 38 sets, baseboard 44 is placed against the bottom surface thereof and the loose edges of cover 40 are folded thereover and secured in place.

In accordance with the invention, the groove or indentation 36 provided in front surface 26 of seat cushion 16 serves to eliminate buckling, creasing or wrinkling of front surface 26 when the latter is subjected to compressive forces. FIG. 7 shows a prior art seat cushion 50 similar in construction to seat cushion 16 but having no crease-preventing groove or indentation formed therein on its front surface 56. Cushion 50 is shown as being subjected to a downward compressive force from a human hand 52 on its top surface 54 near its front surface or side 56.

As such a force is applied, the cover 58 of cushion 50 tends to buckle inward against the interior resilient body to which it adheres and causes a plurality of large, deep deformations, creases or wrinkles 60. Such deformations 60 occur because cover 58 is relatively inelastic whereas the body is elastic and compressible and because the cover adheres to the body. Such creasing is undesirable from the standpoint of appearance. Furthermore, when the compressive force is relieved, cover 50 and the interior body of cushion 50 resume their normal shape but in many cases, especially if deep creasing occurs, the cover retains marks, traces or other evidence of such creasing and this also detracts from the appearance of the cushion. As cushion 50 is subjected to such compressive forces repeatedly and for long periods of time, there is a tendency for creasing to occur at the same locations. This gradually weakens the cover along a crease line, causes it to become detached from the body and may eventually result in the cover breaking or tearing at the crease lines.

Referring again to FIGS. 4, 5 and 6, comparison of the FIGS. 5 and 6 show how indentation 36 prevents undesirable creasing of front surface 26 of cushion 16, thereby prolonging the life of the cushion and preserving a good appearance. Indentation or groove 36 is disposed transversely to the direction of the applied compressive force. When cushion 16 is positioned on bucket seat support 12, the sloping lateral surfaces 28 and rear surface 30 are firmly supported and do not tend to crease as when a compressive force or weight is applied to upper surface 24 as by a human occupant 60. shown in FIG. 6. However, front surface 26 of cushion 16 is unsupported and tends to compress. But instead of random creasing occurring, those portions of surface 26 above and below indentation 36 are able to bulge outwardly slightly, while the edges of the indentation itself is squeezed partially or completely together, depending on the amount of force applied. When the force is relieved, the portions of cover 40 and body 38 near indentations 36 resume their normal or uncompressed state. As is apparent, indentation 36 affords a certain amount of slack in surface 26 which is let out or taken up depending on the amount of force applied. Repeated application of force always results in the same action, and thus, no new creases form and no old creases exist to be reinforced.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 through 6, only one crease-relieving indentation is provided in one surface of the cushion. However, it is apparent that more than one such indentation could be applied to a given surface and more than one surface could be provided with an indentation or indentations.

FIGS. 8 through 10 depict the invention as embodied in a resilient seat cushion 62 for a vehicle such as a snow-mobile or motorcycle.

As FIG. 8 shows, seat cushion 62 comprises a flat top side or surface 64, a front side or surface 66, two flat lateral sides or surfaces 68, a flat rear side or surface 70, and a flat bottom side or surface 72.

Referring to FIGS. 9 and 10, resilient seat cushion 62 comprises a resilient compressible body 74 and a flexible cover 76 which is bonded or adheres to the body. Preferably, cushion 62 comprises a flat rigid baseboard 78 made of metal, wood or hardboard and having ventilation holes 80 therein, which underlies body 74 and to the underside of which the edges of cover 76 are secured, as by gluing,'stapling, or other suitable means, at 82. Body 74 is formed of resilient compressible material such as foam rubber, polyurethane foam or similar material which is compressible under a compressive force and resumes a predetermined or normal shape when such force is relieved. Flexible cover 76, which covers all surfaces of body 74 except the bottom surface thereof is formed of flexible, tough, moisture impervious, water repellent sheet material such as leather, vinyl, Naugahyde, sheet plastic or similar material. Cover 76 is bonded or adheres to all surfaces of body 74 and with which it is in contact by suitable adhesive means. I

Seat cushion 68 is fabricated, for example, in the same manner as cushion 16, as hereinbefore described.

In accordance with the invention, a pair of grooves or indentations 84 and 85 are provided in each of the lateral side surfaces 68 of seat cushion 62 and serve to eliminate buckling, creasing or wrinkling of the surfaces 68 when the latter are subjected to compressive forces. FIG. 1 1 shows a prior art seat cushion 88 similar in construction to seat cushion 62, but having no crease-preventing groove or indentation formed therein on its side lateral surfaces 68. Cushion 88 is shown as being subjected to a downward compressive force from a human hand 90 on its top surface 89 near one lateral surface or side 91.

As such force is applied, the cover 92 of cushion 88 tends to buckle inward against the interior resilient body to which it adheres and causes a plurality of large, deep deformations, creases or wrinkles 94. Such deformations 94 occur because cover 92 is relatively inelastic whereas the body is elastic and compressible and because the cover adheres to the body. Such creasing is undesirable from the standpoint of appearance. Furthermore, when the compressive force is relieved, cover 92 and the interior body of cushion 88 resume their normal shape but in many cases, especially if deep creasing occurs, the cover retains marks, traces or other evidence of such creasing and this also detracts from the appearance of the cushion. As cushion 88 is subjected to such compressive forces repeatedly and for long periods of time, there is a tendency for creasing to occur at the same location. This gradually weakens the cover along a crease line, causes it to become detached from the body and may eventually result in the cover breaking or tearing at the crease lines.

Referring again to FIGS. 8, 9 and 10, comparison of the FIGS. 9 and 10 show how the indentations 84 and prevent undesirable creasing of aside surface 68 of cushion 62, thereby prolonging the life of the cushion and preserving a good appearance. The spaced apart indentations or grooves 84 and 85 on each side 68 are disposed transversely to the direction of the compressive force as applied by a human body 96 straddling the cushion. The surfaces 68 of cushion 62 are unsupported and tend to compress. But instead of random creasing occurring, those portions of the surfaces 68 between, above, and below the indentations 84 and 85 are able to bulge outwardly slightly, while the edges of the indentations themselves are squeezed partially or completely together, depending on the amount of force applied. When the force is relieved, the portions of cover 76 and body 74 near the indentations 84 and 85 resume their normal or uncompressed state. As is apparent, the indentations 84 and 85 afford a certain amount of slack in surface 68 which is let out or taken up depending on the amount of force applied. Repeated application of force always results in the same action and, thus, no new creases form and no old creases exist to be reinforced.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 8 through 10, only two crease-relieving indentations are provided in each side surface of the cushion. However, it is apparent thatmore or less than two such indentations could be applied to a given surface and more or less than two surfaces could be provided with indentations.

RESUME A resilient seat cushion having a top surface and one or more side surfaces which tend to deform when the seat cushion is subjected to compressive force comprises a resilient compressible body and a flexible cover which adheres to the body. The side surface or surfaces are provided with one or more indentations which are permanently formed in the cover and the body and are disposed transversely to the direction of the compressive force and prevent permanent deformation, wrinkling or creasing of the side surface.

Iclaim:

l. A seat cushion comprising:

a resilient compressible body having at least two transverse surfaces,

and a flexible cover for said body,

said cover adhering to said body at a portion of one of said transverse surfaces thereof which tends to deform when subjected to a compressive force applied to the other of said transverse surfaces,

said cover and said body being provided at said portion with at least one permanently formed indentation having normally spaced-apart sides which move toward each other under compressive force.

2. A seat cushion according to claim 1 wherein said indentation is disposed transversely to the direction of said compressive force.

3. A seat cushion according to claim 2 including a plurality of spaced apart indentations at said portion.

4. A seat cushion according to claim 2 including a plurality of said portions with at least one indentation in each of several of said portions.

5. A multi-sided seat cushion having at least one side which tends to deform when under compressive force and comprising a resilient compressible body and a flexible cover adhering to said body at least at said one side, said one side being provided with at least one permanently formed indentation disposed transversely to the direction of said compressive force for preventing permanent deformation of said one side of said seat cushion, said indentation having normally spaced-apart sides which move toward each other under compressive force.

6. A seat cushion according to claim 5 wherein said one side is the front side of said seat cushion.

7. A seat cushion according to claim 5 including a plurality of said indentations in said one side.

8. A seat cushion according to claim 7 wherein said seat cushion has a plurality of sides which tend to deform and including at least one of said indentations in at least two of said sides.

9. A seat cushion according to claim 8 wherein said two sides are spaced apart opposite sides of said seat cushion.

10. A seat comprising a seat support,

a seat cushion for mounting on said seat support,

said seat cushion having at least one side which tends to deform when under compressive force,

said seat cushion comprising a resilient compressible body and a flexible cover adhering to said body at least on said one side of said seat cushion,

said one side being provided with at least one permanently formed indentation disposed transversely to the direction of said compressive force for preventing permanent deformation of said one side of said seat cushion, said indentation having normally spaced-apart sides which move toward each other under compressive force.

11. A seat according to claim 10 wherein said seat support is a bucket-type seat support and wherein said one side of said seat cushion is the front side of said seat cushion.

12. A seat according to claim 11 wherein said bucket-type seat support has sloping surfaces for engaging said seat cushion and wherein said seat cushion has sloping surfaces for engagement with said sloping surfaces of said support.

13. A seat comprising a bucket-type seat support having sloping seat cushion supporting surfaces at its sides and rear, a seat cushion for mounting on said seat support, said seat cushion having a front side which tends to deform when under compressive force, and additional sloping sides for engagement with said sloping supporting surfaces of said seat support, said seat a cushion comprising a resilient compressible body and a flexible cover adhering to said body at least on said front side of said seat cushion, said front side being provided with at least one permanently formed indentation disposed transversely to the direction of said compressive force for preventing permanent deformation of said front side of said seat cushion, said indentation having normally spaced-apart sides which move toward each other under compressive force.

14. A seat according to claim 13 wherein said cover adheres tosaid body on said additional sloping sides of said seat cushion.

15. A seat cushion which is adapted to be straddled by a user and having spaced apart opposite sides which tend to deform when under compressive force,

said seat cushion comprising a resilient compressible body and a flexible cover adhering to said body at least on said opposite sides of said seat cushion, each of said opposite sides being provided with at least one permanently formed indentation disposed transversely to the direction of said compressive force for preventing permanent deformation of said sides of said seat cushion, said indentation having normally spaced-apart sides which move toward each other under compressive force.

16. A seat cushion according to claim 15 including a plurality of spaced apart indentations on each of said opposite sides.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3233885 *Jun 25, 1962Feb 8, 1966Miller Herman IncPanel having multi-directional flexibility
US3341251 *Apr 11, 1966Sep 12, 1967Coach & Car Equip CorpSeat assembly
US3512191 *Oct 23, 1967May 19, 1970Imre Jack SmithFurniture cushion and upholstery
US3588171 *Sep 12, 1968Jun 28, 1971Troxel Mfg CoCycle saddle and method of forming same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4544205 *Jun 16, 1983Oct 1, 1985Caterpillar Tractor Co.Seat and self-locking cushion assembly therefor
US4784437 *Sep 29, 1987Nov 15, 1988Tachi-S., Ltd.Automotive seat
US4995926 *Jul 19, 1989Feb 26, 1991Tachi-S Co., Ltd.Method of making a seat
US6007150 *Mar 8, 1998Dec 28, 1999Milsco Manufacturing CompanyMotorcycle seat with adjustable backrest
US6120630 *Apr 7, 1998Sep 19, 2000Milsco Manufacturing CompanyMethod of making a seat cushion
US7360831 *Nov 22, 2006Apr 22, 2008Herbert SchwarzMotorcycle seat
US7823980 *Oct 1, 2008Nov 2, 2010Toyota Boshoku Kabushiki KaishaPieces for skin members of vehicular seats and methods of manufacturing the same
US7886383 *Feb 15, 2011Wanda PlimmerReversible contoured infant nursing pad
US20070120411 *Nov 22, 2006May 31, 2007Herbert SchwarzMotorcycle seat
US20090146483 *Oct 1, 2008Jun 11, 2009Toyota Boshoku Kabushiki KaishaPieces for skin members of vehicular seats and methods of manufacturing the same
EP0566065A1 *Apr 13, 1993Oct 20, 1993FIAT AUTO S.p.A.Seat padding, for example, for vehicle seats
EP1081030A2 *Jun 27, 2000Mar 7, 2001Walter JedekBicycle stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/452.61, 297/DIG.200, 297/214
International ClassificationB60N2/58, A47C7/18, B60N2/70
Cooperative ClassificationY10S297/02, B60N2/7035, B60N2/5875, A47C7/18
European ClassificationA47C7/18, B60N2/58H8, B60N2/70W4