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Publication numberUS3714803 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1973
Filing dateNov 27, 1970
Priority dateNov 27, 1970
Publication numberUS 3714803 A, US 3714803A, US-A-3714803, US3714803 A, US3714803A
InventorsChenenko N
Original AssigneeChenenko N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski lock
US 3714803 A
Abstract
A ski lock adapted to be mounted on one of a pair of skis and being normally in the unlocked position and adapted to be altered to a locked condition whereby the pair of skis is affixed to a support. Retractable means are mounted in a housing and are adapted to be partially extended through an opening in the housing. A two-piece fastener is provided with one part of the fastener on the exterior of the housing and the other part of the fastener connected to the retractable means. There are means in the housing to facilitate the extension and retraction of the retractable means which is attachable to the support and the other ski with the two-part fastener in locked engagement thereby locking the skis to the support to minimize the danger of the skis being stolen until it is desirable to utilize the skis whereupon the parts of the fastener are unlocked and disengaged.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Chenenko 1 1 SKI LOCK [76] Inventor: Norman Chenenko, 3911 Greentree Drive, Oceanside, NY. 11572 [22] Filed: Nov. 27, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 93,220

[-52] US. Cl. ..70/58, 280/11.37 K [51] Int. Cl. ..E0 5b 73/00 [58] Field of Search ..70/14, 15,57, 58, 49, 50;

[56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 3,228,217 1/1966 Atwill ..70/58 527,418 10/1894 Free ct a1. 3,518,853 7/1970 Bolte ..70/58 Primary ExaminerRobert L. Wolfe Artorney1(ane, Dalsimer, Kane, Sullivan & Kurucz 1 1 Feb. 6, 1973 [57] ABSTRACT A ski lock adapted to be mounted on one of a pair of skis and being normally in the unlocked position and adapted to be altered to a locked condition whereby the pair of skis is affixed to a support. Retractable means are mounted in a housing and are adapted to be partially extended through an opening in the housing. A two-piece fastener is provided with one part of the fastener on the exterior of the housing and the other part of the fastener connected to the retractable means. There are means in the housing to facilitate the extension and retraction of the retractable means which is attachable to the support and the other ski with the two-part fastener in locked engagement thereby locking the skis to the support to minimize the danger of the skis being stolen until it is desirable to utilize the skis whereupon the parts of the fastener are unlocked and disengaged.

1 Claim, 3 Drawing Figures SKI LOCK BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The recreational attraction of skiing at the present time is well known to those familiar with the sport. Each year an ever-increasing number of people are indulging in this sport. In recent years, particularly with the large number of people congregated about populous ski areas, a significant problem has arisen. This problem involves stolen property, particularly the loss of skis and ski poles, for the average skier.

The thievery or misappropriation of the skis and poles generally occurs when the skier takes a break during a day. Often it is to go indoors for some reason such as for food or drink. In that instance, he must leave his skis outside the building. Many skiing areas provide a bar against which the skis and poles may be rested while the skieris inside the building. Thereafter, when the skier returns to pick up his skis, more and more frequently he is finding that they have been taken from where he has left them.

This problem has given rise to many attempts to provide a satisfactory means for protecting the skier from loss of his skis and poles in this manner. For example, many skiers are carrying a chain and lock arrangement around with them in their pocket so that they can lock the bindings of the skis to the poles and the support bar when they go indoors. This solution facilitates the locking function; however, it is quite unwieldy for a skier to carry a heavy chain and lock around on his person during the day. It is quite an inconvenience.

Another solution which has been attempted is a provision of a sophisticated locking mechanism in the ski pole itself, or alternatively, an expensive and sophisticated interlocking plate arrangement on the pair of skis. These particular solutions are quite expensive and complicated to operate. Additionally, the location suggested for these types of locking mechanisms in respect to the skis and poles creates a different problem for the skier. This is in regard to distribution of weight of the skiers equipment. Any imbalance in the weight distribution with respect to the skis and poles could naturally adversely affect the skill and control of the skier during down-hill travel. For similar reasons, the skier is not pleased with the prospect of having to carry a heavy chain and lock around in his clothing which also might affect his balance during travel down the ski slo e.

With the above in mind, it is readily apparent that an inexpensive lock which may be inconspicuously mounted on the skis without substantially affecting the weight distribution of the skier and which may be quickly and efficiently shifted between the locked and unlocked positions in order to easily protect the skis and associated poles from theft when not in use would be extremely advantageous to skiers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A ski lock is provided which is adapted to be mounted on one of a pair of skis and is normally in the unlocked position. A lock is adapted to be altered to a locked condition whereby the pair of skis is affixed to a support. The lock includes a housing mounted to one of the skis with retractable means mounted in the housing which are adapted to be partially extended through an opening in the housing. A two-piece fastener is provided with one part of the fastener on the exterior of the housing and the other 'part of the fastener connected to the retractable means. Means are positioned in the housing to facilitate the extension and retraction of the retractable means. The retractable means are attachable to the support and to the other ski with the two-part fastener in locked engagement to thereby lock the skis to the support to minimize the danger of said skis being stolen until it is desirable to utilize the skis whereupon the parts of the fastener are unlocked and disengaged.

Among the primary objectives of the invention is to provide a low cost and efficiently operable locking mechanism which may be mounted on a ski in a position and manner where it will not interferewith normal activity of the skier. Additionally, it must be a locking mechanism which may quickly and efficiently be operated to lock the skis, and if desired, the poles to a support means such as a rest bar in a ski area and which may be also easily unlocked and quickly and efficiently stored when it is desirable once again to utilize the skis. Additionally, it should be kept in mind that the locking mechanism should be unitary in construction so that no additional parts such as loose lock members, keys or chains need be employed in either locking or unlocking the ski lock. A compact one-piece system is provided.

With these and other objects in mind, reference is had to the attached drawing embodying the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As shown in FIG. 1, the ski lock 20 is adapted to be mounted in a convenient manner to one ski 21 of a pair of skis. The companion ski 22 may or may not have a receptacle 23 to receive a portion of lock 20 as will be discussed in detail below. With certain types of bindings, a receptacle 23 is not needed. In other instances, a receptacle 23 could be effectively utilized in order to lock ski 22 with ski 21 to a support bar 24 as shown in FIG. 1. Additionally, the poles 25 and 26 which the skier would utilize with his pair of skis may also be locked to support bar 24 with skis 21 and 22 by means of ski lock 20 as shown in FIG. 1 and as will be discussed in detail below.

Ski lock 20 includes a base plate 27 and a hollow cup 28 affixed to base plate 27 which together form housing 29 containing an interior chamber 30 to house the moving components of ski lock 20.

Base plate 27 of housing 29 is mounted to ski 21 in a convenient manner such as by screws or bolts 31. The preferable place for mounting of lock 20 is adjacent to and in front of binding 32 of ski 21. In this location, the lock is positioned approximately at the center of weight of the skier during actual travel down the ski slope. Consequently, there would be little or no effect on the efficiency of the skier. In any event, the housing of lock can be constructed of light-weight material such as plastic which would also greatly reduce the weight factor of the lock upon the ski. lf desired, a balancing weight can be positioned on ski 22 to maintain the uniform distribution of weight upon the respective pair of skis. The weight would be positioned at approximately the same location on ski 22 as lock 20 is positioned on ski 21. It could be made doubly functional in that it could provide the receptacle mean 23 which operates with lock 20 during the locking function. As stated above, the preferable location for the lock would be adjacent to and in front of the binding of the ski, however, it may be positioned at any other convenient location along the length of ski 21.

Housing 20 also contains a fixed central shaft 33 and a spindle 34 mounted on fixed shaft 33 and rotatable with respect thereto.

Spindle 34 has a lower cup-shaped portion 35 which provides a chamber for a fixed coiled negater spring 36.

Other well known return spring devices may also be utilized in a similar manner. Spring 36 is caged in position by means of the cup 35 of spindle 34' and the top face of the inner portion of base plate 27. The inner end 37 of spring 36 is mounted in fixed shaft 33 in any convenient manner. For example, in FIG. 3, inner end 37 is positioned in a corresponding slot in shaft 33. The outer end 38 of spring 36 is fixed to the side wall of cup portion 35 of spindle 34. Consequently, if spindle 34 is rotated in one direction, a load will be placed on negater spring 36 as it is more tightly coiled. Upon release of spindle 34, spring 36 will tend to return to its original position and will therefore rotate spindle 34 in an opposing direction.

The upper portion of spindle 34 contains two cylindrical flanges 39 and 40 which form a recess therebetween to receive a retractable chain 41. Chain 41 may be of the type having metal links, as shown, or may be a length of flexible metai cable or rope or any other well known material commonly utilized for the same purpose. It is fastened at its inner end 42 to spindle 34. It is then wound concentrically on spindle 34 between flanges 39 and 40. The opposite end 43 of chain 41 extends through opening 44 in housing 29 and has affixed thereto in a convenient manner half '45 of fastener or combination lock 46. The other half 47 of combination lock 46'is mounted permanently in a convenient manner to housing 29 such as bymeans of loop 48 extending from housing 29.

As stated above, lock 20 is preferably mounted adjacent to and in front of binding 32 of ski 21. The entire lock assembly is contained within or attached to housing 20. In the unlocked position, all of the moving elements are contained within housing 20 with the exception of combination lock 46 and the outward end 43 of chain 41.

In operation, when it is desired to lock the skis and possibly the poles to assure their safety while they are being left for a period of time, reference is made once again to FIG. 1. The skis 21 and 23 as shown are positioned against support or rest bar 24 along with poles 25 and 26. Part 45 of fastener or combination lock 46 is grasped and chain 41 is pulled from housing 20. This is facilitated by rotation of spindle 34 as chain 41 is unwound therefrom. Naturally, as discussed above, as chain 41 is pulled from housing 20, the rotation of spindle 34 places a load upon spring 36 by more tightly winding the coiled spring. As shown, the chain is passed around support bar 24, through the two hand loops of poles 2S and 26 and then through a receptacle member 23 permanently mounted on ski 22. In some instances, there are equivalent locations on the mounted binding of ski 22 which will work equally as well as a separate receptacle 23. It should be kept in mind that the provision of receptacle 23 may also be utilized as a counterweight for the added weight present in the form of lock 20. Alternatively, if desired, a separate counterweight may be mounted on. ski 22 to balance the weight added to ski 21 by lock 20. Half 45 of fastener 46 and chain 41 being withdrawn from the housing 29 should pass around support bar 24 and then through the hand loops of poles 25 and 26. Half 45 is then mated with half 47 of fastener or combination lock 46 and the locking function is accomplished. The skis and poles are locked to support bar 24 and cannot be removed from .that location without knowing the combination of fastener 46 or breaking the chain or lock. It should also be kept in mind that other locks may be employed in place of combination lock 46. For instance, a key type lock may be utilized if desired. However, the combination lock shown is the preferred embodiment since no additional elements such as a key is required for the entire lock assembly.

Naturally, when the skis are to be once again utilized, combination fastener 46 is unlocked and half 45 is released. Loaded spring 36 acting as a biasing means will then rotate spindle 34 in the opposite direction thereby winding chain 41 back upon spindle 34 within housing 29. This will continue until substantially all of chain 41 is once again contained within housing 29 and spring 36 is in substantially the relaxed position. To assure that half 45 is not drawn into housing 29 where access to it would be difficult for subsequent use, half 45 of fastener 46 has a larger diameter'than opening 44 in the housing.

In this manner, a compact low cost ski lock is provided with a minimum amount of component parts and which may be easily and inconspicuously mounted on a ski and which may be quickly and efficiently utilized to lock and unlock the skis and, if desirable, a corresponding pair of poles to a support means.

Thus, the above objectives of the invention, among others, are most effectively attained.

I claim:

1. A ski lock mounted on one of a pair of skis and being normally in the unlocked position and adapted to be altered to a locked condition whereby said pair of skis is affixed to a support, the lock comprising:

a housing having means thereon for attachment to said one ski;

a chain having one end mounted in said housing;

an opening in the exterior of said housing to permit passage of said chain therethrough;

a two-piece fastener including locking means with one part of said fastener on the exterior of said housing and the other part of said fastener connected to the other end of said chain;

a spindle rotatably mounted inside said housing;

a spring in said housing;

said chain and spring being associated with said spindle so that when said chain is pulled outwardly from the opening in said housing, said spindle will rotate in one direction and a load will be placed on said spring and when said chain is released, said spring will automatically return to its relaxed position and rotate said spindle in the opposite direction and draw said chain back into said houssaid chain being attachable to the support and said other ski withthe parts of said fastener in locked

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US527418 *Dec 28, 1893Oct 16, 1894 Bicycle-lock
US3228217 *Apr 10, 1964Jan 11, 1966Edward A AtwillSki lock
US3518853 *May 27, 1968Jul 7, 1970Bolte Allen NSki lock
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3941397 *Jun 17, 1974Mar 2, 1976Kidder Richard ASki device
US3963234 *Feb 4, 1975Jun 15, 1976Bejtlich Leonard MSki clamping apparatus
US4185361 *Apr 26, 1978Jan 29, 1980Stuart Robert BLocking device
US4630842 *Aug 2, 1985Dec 23, 1986Roda Gary EMethod and apparatus for carrying snow skis
US4680949 *Apr 22, 1986Jul 21, 1987Stewart Leo JLocking device for articles such as sailboards
US4685697 *Sep 11, 1986Aug 11, 1987Thorley Neil RRetractable ski leash device embodying dual purpose locking means
US4702495 *Aug 6, 1986Oct 27, 1987Roda Gary ESki pole receiver
US5026088 *Jun 1, 1989Jun 25, 1991Squeeze Lock, Inc.Snowboard safety strap
US6192719 *Nov 26, 1999Feb 27, 2001Alfred A. StukasSnowboard locking device
US6230526 *Mar 15, 1999May 15, 2001Spoonfish, Inc.Security locks
US6374645 *May 18, 2000Apr 23, 2002Spoonfish, Inc.Security locks
US6422048May 18, 2000Jul 23, 2002Spoonfish, Inc.Snowboard security locks
US6457762 *Nov 14, 2000Oct 1, 2002Angelo GaruttiSki carrying device
DE3818587A1 *Jun 1, 1988Dec 7, 1989Paul Gerhard SauterAnti-theft device for skis with poles
WO1983000354A1 *Jul 20, 1981Feb 3, 1983Burnett Arthur AChain lock and storage system
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/58, 280/814
International ClassificationA63C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C11/007
European ClassificationA63C11/00F6