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Publication numberUS3715081 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1973
Filing dateMar 26, 1971
Priority dateMar 26, 1971
Also published asCA954090A, CA954090A1, DE2143082A1
Publication numberUS 3715081 A, US 3715081A, US-A-3715081, US3715081 A, US3715081A
InventorsGreen E
Original AssigneeGreen E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aerosol valve and sprayhead
US 3715081 A
Abstract
An aerosol spray valve of the type which uses a reciprocable plunger moving within a valve housing that is in turn mounted to a cover member. The cover member is adapted to be crimped to a canister and has a dip tube extending from the interior or the valve housing to the bottom of the canister. Pressurized product is forced from the interior of the canister through the dip tube into the valve housing and out of the cover member through a central hole into a sprayhead that is mounted in the hole. An elastomeric gasket surrounds the hole and the upper end of the reciprocable plunger forms a valve seat that is spring-biased against the underside of the gasket to prevent pressurized product from emerging. The sprayhead has an associated stem that enters a socket formed in the plunger, the stem being slidably and sealingly engaged through the hole and the passageway in the elastomeric gasket. The stem is imperforate and hollow and has an axial end opening at its bottom. The socket of the plunger has channel means formed in its interior wall along the vertical length thereof so that there are one or more passageways formed between the outer surface of the stem and the socket to transport the pressurized product down into the socket. The socket has a central upstanding post and the bottom end of the stem fits into the annular space between the post and the inner surface of the socket wall. The post has vertically extending channels formed therein and there are grooves in the floor of the socket to convey the pressurized product from the bottom end of the channel means formed in the wall to the channels formed in the post. In this case, the bottom end of the stem is engaged against the floor of the socket. In the alternative, means may be provided to space the bottom end of the stem above the floor so that there is no need for grooves in the floor. Metering is preferably controlled by the total cross section of the channels in the post.
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United States Patent Green AEROSOL VALVE AND SPRAYHEAD [76] Inventor: Edward H. Green, 11 Army Trail Road, Addison, 111. 60101 [22] Filed: March 26, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 128,404

[52] US. Cl ..239/573, 239/579 [51] Int. Cl. ..B05b 1/30 [58] Field of Search ..239/573, 579, 337; 222/194 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,145,011 8/1964 Kappel ..239/579 X R24,981 5/1961 Bretz, Jr. ..239/573 X 3,231,153 1/1966 Green et al.... .....239/579 X 2,913,154 11/1959 Kuffer ..239/573 3,074,601 1/1963 Kuffler .....239/573 X 3,206,082 9/1965 Green ..239/573 X 3,213,153 1/1966 Green et al.... ..239/573 3,608,830 9/1971 Ramella ..239/573 Primary Examiner-Lloyd L. King Attorney-Perry Carvellas, Esq.

[5 7] ABSTRACT An aerosol spray valve of the type which uses a reciprocable plunger moving within a valve housing that is in turn mounted to a cover member. The cover member is adapted to be crimped to a canister and has a dip tube extending from the interior or the valve housing to the bottom of the canister. Pressurized 1 Feb. 6, 1973 product is forced from the interior of the canister through the dip tube into the valve housing and out of the cover member through a central hole into a sprayhead that is mounted in the hole. An elastomeric gasket surrounds the hole and the upper end of the reciprocable plunger forms a valve seat that is springbiased against the underside of the gasket to prevent pressurized product from emerging. The sprayhead has an associated stem that enters a socket formed in the plunger, the stem being slidably and sealingly engaged through the hole and the passageway in the elastomeric gasket. The stem is imperforate and hollow and has an axial end opening at its bottom. The socket of the plunger has channel means formed in its interior wall along the vertical length thereof so that there are one or more passageways formed between the outer surface of the stem and the socket to transport the pressurized product down into the socket. The socket has a central upstanding post and the bottom end of the stem fits into the annular space between the post and the inner surface of the socket wall. The post has vertically extending channels formed therein and there are grooves in the floor of the socket to convey the pressurized product from the bottom end of the channel means formed in the wall to the channels formed in the post. 1n this case, the bottom end of the stem is engaged against the floor of the socket. 1n the alternative, means may be provided to space the bottom end of the stern above the floor so that there is no need for grooves in the floor. Metering is preferably controlled by the total cross section of the channels in the post.

13 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures FEB 6l973 v 3,715,081 SHEET 10F 3 EDI MPO H Giff/V INVENTOR ATTORNEYS PATENTEUFEB' 61975 3.715081 SHEET 3 or 3 ,w' Va ED A RD 64 FfE/ INVENTOR BY W 96:14.,

ATTORNEYS A EROSOL VALVE AND SPRAYHEAD CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS The invention herein is a modification of the inventions disclosed and claimed in copending applications having the same title as the application herein, Ser. No. 124,809, filed on or about Mar. 16, 1971 and Ser. No. 122,935, filed on or about Mar. 10, 1971. The first of these will be referred to hereinafter as the first copending application, and the second of these will be referred to hereinafter as the second copending application.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention herein relates to aerosol valves and more particularly is concerned with a novel valve construction for a pressurized package in which the metering of the pressurized product remains constant for the life of the package and may be accurately established at the time of manufacture of the valve structure.

The background of the invention herein is substantially the same as that of the copending applications and reference may be had to said copending applications for the total details thereof. For the purposes of this discussion only, the manner in which the invention herein differs from those of the copending applications will be explained in detail.

In the said copending applications, there was taught the manner of constructing a valve arrangement in which metering was controlled by the cross section of channels formed in the interior wall of the socket of the valve plunger. The valve stem, as here, was hollow and imperforate except for an axial end opening at its bottom end. The pressurized product passed down the channels when the valve plunger seat was moved downward off the elastomeric gasket, across the floor of the socket in the valve plunger and then up into the bore of the stem where it expanded and was emitted by way of the external orifice in the button of the sprayhead. In both applications the presence of the central post in the bottom of the socket was not needed to assist in the transportation of the pressurized product, but if present because of its utility in gassing the package by a certain technique disclosed in U.S.

Pat. No. 3,386,479, then the diameter of the post had to be less than the internal diameter of the hollow stem. This was to permit the pressurized product to pass into the hollow bore from the floor of the socket.

Several types of construction were disclosed in the copending applications. If the stem was bottomed on the floor of the socket, then grooves were provided in the floor connecting with the bottom ends of the channels formed in the walls. This was to enable the pressurized product to pass the annular end of the stem. In some forms of the inventions of the copending applications, footings or ridges were provided in the socket to keep the stem spaced from the floor so that there was no need for grooves in the floor. The second copending application was concerned with a special form of this latter type of arrangement, there being an external shoulder formed on the stem of the sprayhead, the shoulder engaging the upper end of the valve plunger and preventing the stem from entering all the way into the socket.

In the structures described in the copending applica-' tions, the valve plunger was constructed either with or without a gallery below the valve seat; either with an integral sprayhead or with one which was formed into two parts, namely button and stem. In the latter instance, the stem was substantially permanently secured in the socket and there resulted a stem type valve construction, the button being removable from the external upper end of the stem. All of these alternatives are capable of being used in the invention herein.

One of the most important advantages of the inventions of said copending applications was the fact that the stem of the sprayhead did not have any metering holes or slots or grooves therein and hence the sprayhead, in the case of integral sprayheads, or at least the button in the case of two-piece sprayheads, could be made of so-called soft plastic. This is, for example, plastic of the polyethylene type, as opposed to the rigid types of plastic, such as for example nylon. Soft plastics are considerably more economical than rigid plastics.

In the structures of the copending applications, the post in the socket was never used for stabilizing the bottom end of the stern when the integral sprayhead was used because it had to clear the internal bore of the stem. The post only served as a means for providing a gassing recess. The metering in all cases was controlled by the cross section of the channels in the valve plunger. The total cross section of the smallest place or places in the case of multiple channels controlled the metering. Mostly, this would be in the channels in the interior of the wall of the socket. In the case of the structure of the second copending application, the shoulder on the stem partially blocks the upper ends of the channels in the valve plunger wall and hence produces a window or windows. Metering in such case would usually be controlled by the size of the window or windows.

In the instant invention, the center post is needed because it preferably has channels which provide the metering. Accordingly, it is sized to fit the bore of the stem quite closely and thereby provides a measure of stabilizing of the bottom end of the stem. The upper end of the post may or may not have the gassing recess.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the invention herein, the valve plunger of the structure has a center post which is integral with the plunger and rises from the floor of the socket formed in the valve plunger. The post has vertical channel means which preferably control the metering of the valve. The sprayhead stem has its hollow bottom end closely engaging over the post so that the only pressurized product which can get into the expansion chamber of the stem must pass through the channels in the post. The interior of the wall of the valve plunger also has channel means which open at the top end thereof adjacent the valve seat and at the bottom end thereof adjacent the floor of the socket. If the bottom end of the stem is engaged against the floor of the socket, grooves are provided in the floor to connect the bottom end of the channel means in the wall with the channel means in the post. If the bottom end of the stem is spaced above the floor by any suitable means, then no grooves are required in the floor of the socket.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary elevational view of the upper end of a pressurized package of the type in connection with which the invention is used;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary median sectional view taken through the package of FIG. 1 along the line 22 and in the indicated direction, the valve construction including a removable sprayhead;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 33 of FIG. 2 and in the indicated direction;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken through the valve plunger along the line 44 of FIG. 3 and in the indicated direction;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view on an enlarged scale of a portion of FIG. 2, illustrating the relationship of the parts during the time that the sprayhead has been depressed and pressurized product is being dispensed;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the valve plunger illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3, 4, and 5;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view with portions shown in perspective of the interior of the valve plunger of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to that of FIG. 5, but illustrating only the valve plunger and bottom of the stem ofa modified form of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 99 of FIG. 8 and in the indicated direction;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view taken generally along the line l010 of FIG. 8 and in the indicated direction;

FIG. 11 is a view similar to that of FIG. 8 but of a further modified form of the invention; and

FIG. 12 is a sectional view taken generally along the line l2l2 of FIG. 11 and in the indicated direction.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The invention is applicable to either the stem valve type of structure or to the structure in which entire sprayhead is removable in the manner taught by U.S. Pat. No. 2,777,735. In the stern valve structure, the stem is tightly and substantially permanently secured to the valve assembly with its upper end protruding from the valve cover. The button is then removably mounted on the protruding end. The invention herein is also applicable to structures which use a gallery with its accompanying narrow valve seat on the upper end of the valve plunger and to those which do not use a gallery.

In FIGS. 1 through 7 there is illustrated a type of valve construction in which the sprayhead is fully removable, there is a gallery in the upper end of the wall of the valve plunger, the bottom end of the stem engages against the floor of the valve plunger and the center post has a gassing recess.

The valve assembly of the invention is designated by the reference character 20. This valve assembly is purchased by the filler who puts it together with a canister 22 to make up the pressurized package, filling it with the propellant either before or after he installs the sprayhead or spray button, depending upon his techniques. FIG. 1 shows a canister 22 which has a cylindrical body 24 that is held to a metal pressure dome 26 by a locked and sealed seam 28. The upper end of the dome 26 provides an opening or mouth 30 that has a rolled or curled formation 32. The valve assembly 20 is adapted to be mounted in the opening 30 and crimped in place as by the crimp 34, the seal being effected by the joint to be described.

The valve assembly 20 includes a metal cover member 36 that has an annular well 38 that surrounds an upstanding central boss 40 that is integral with the floor of the well and is formed from the same integral sheet metal member that constitutes the cover member 36. The upper edge of the cover member 36 is rolled as shown at 42 and this rolled edge engages over the rolled formation 32 surrounding the mouth 30 of the dome 26. A layer of gasketing material 44 between the rolled edges seals the cover member 36 into the opening 30 of the canister 22.

The valve assembly 20 includes a valve housing 46 which is often called an eyelet in the trade, this housing in the structure being described being made out of some suitable plastic and having its upper end flared or enlarged to provide the flange 48 that engages into the boss 40 and is locked in place by means of the crimps 50. A disc-like elastomeric gasket 52 is compressed by the flange 48 against the inside of the upper wall 54 of the boss 40 so that the gasket 52 is sandwiched between the flange 48 and the upper wall 54. The upper wall 54 of the boss 40 has a central opening 56 and the gasket 52 likewise has a central passageway 58 that is aligned with the opening 56.

On its interior, the valve housing 46 provides a chamber 60 into which pressurized product is adapted to be introduced by way of the dip tube 62 that is locked to the bottom end of the housing 46 by any suitable means such as the split locking collar 64. The exact construction of this locking means is described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,159,318. Any other method of securing the dip tube 62 may be used. In the chamber 60 there is a valve plunger 66 which provides a shoulder 68 and pilot projections 70 to seat a helical spring 72 that urges the plunger 66 upwardly as viewed, against the bottom surface of the gasket 52. The interior ofthe plunger 66 provides a cylindrical socket 74 which has a blind bottom end which forms a floor 76, as best seen in FIGS. 4 to 7.

The upper end of the socket 74 has a gallery 78 that extends around the interior thereof, giving rise to a narrow section 80 that has an end surface 82. This end surface 82 is that which engages tightly against the bottom surface of the elastomeric gasket 52 as best seen in FIG. 2 and comprises the valve seat. When the valve plunger 66 moves off the gasket 52 as by being pushed downwardly, pressurized product from the chamber 60 will pass over the seat 82 and into the gallery 78, as best shown in FIG. 5. The interior of the socket 74 has channels 84 and 86 formed therein, these channels opening at their upper ends into the gallery 78 and extending to the floor 76 at their bottom ends. The channels 84 and 86 extend generally axially of the valve plunger as viewed, for example, in FIGS. 5 and 7. The floor 76 is flat except for the post 92 in its center, this post being integral with the valve plunger 66 right-cylindrical in configuration and extending upwardly from the floor.

A sprayhead 94 is mounted in association with the valve assembly 20, the sprayhead comprising a button 96 with an integral, hollow bore stem 98 depending from the bottom of the button. The stem has a central expansion chamber 100 which leads to a transverse passageway 102 in the button 96 connecting the external spray orifice 104 with the said chamber. The external spray orifice 104 may be provided in an insert 106 that is pressed into a suitable cavity formed in the button 96. The bottom end of the stem 98 may have a slight chamfer 108 as best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 to assist in guiding the stem through the gasket 52 and into the socket 74 when the sprayhead 94 is assembled to the valve assembly 20. At its bottom end, the interior hollow expansion chamber 100, which constitutes the bore of the stem 98, is of such diameter that it closely telescopes over the central post 92, and likewise the outer diameter of the stem 98 is of such diameter that it provides a close fit with the socket 74. The socket 74, as previously indicated, is formed by the inner surface of the wall 1 of the valve plunger 66.

The invention herein, as explained hereinafter, is applicable to the two general types of valve structures, namely, the ones with the integral removable sprayheads, and the ones which have the stern permanently connected to the valve assembly so that only the upper end of the stem protrudes from the cover member. In the latter type of sprayhead, the button is removable from the stem. The engagement between the stem 98 and the socket 74 of the valve plunger 66 in FIGS. 1 through 7 is relatively tight but permits ready removal of the entire sprayhead 94 including the stem from the valve assembly in accordance with the operation of known valve constructions. Likewise, this relatively tight but sliding engagement is required of the engagement of the inner bore 100 of the stem 98 with the post 92. The purpose, as will be seen, is to enable the pressurized product not to pass from the valve chamber 60 to the bore 100 except by way of the channels 84 and 86 and by way of the channels 112 and 114 which are formed in the post 92. The construction of the invention herein differs primarily from those of the copending applications in the presence of the closefitting right-cylindrical post 92 having the channels 1 12 and 114 along the axial length thereof. In the said copending applications there are no channels in the post and the post is substantially smaller in diameter than the interior diameter of the bore of the stern of the sprayhead at the post.

The fit of the lower portion of the stem in the socket 74 and around the post 92 could be made quite tight 'through the use of, for example, annular ridges on either one of the interior surface of the wall 110 or the exterior of the stem 98 so that slight cold flow after they are connected together produces practically a locked engagement. Such a tight connection would be used in the event the button and stem of the sprayhead are separable and the stem locked into the valve assembly. This is considered a substantially permanent connection.

The engagement of the stem 98 in the socket 74 and onto the post 92 stabilizes the bottom end of the removable integral sprayhead 94 in the construction illustrated and prevents wobble during use, in addition to the principal advantage of this invention. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 7, the stern of the sprayhead bottoms, that is, engages directly against the floor 76 so that means must be provided for the pressurized product to pass radially from the channels 84 and 86 past the end of the stem to the channels 112 and 114. Such means comprise grooves 116: and 118 formed in the floor 76 and connecting the respective pairs of channels 84 and 112 on the one 'side of the post 92 and 86 and 114 on the other side of the post 92. In this form of the invention, the lower ends of the channels 84, 86, 112 and 114 must extend below the level of the floor 76 in order to connect up with the grooves 116 and 118, although if the stem bottom is provided with an annular chamfer 108 that is sufficient to permit passage of pressurized product, the channels in the wall 1 10 need not extend below the level of the floor.

In operation, it will be understood that when the button 96 is not being pressed by the user, the spring 72 biases the valve plunger 66 and the sprayhead 94 upward as viewed in the figures, so that the valve seat 82 engages against the lower surface of the elastomeric gasket 52 and blocks flow of the pressurized product. When the button 96 is pressed downward, as shown in FIG. 5, the spring 72 is compressed and the valve plunger 66 moves downward also. Pressurized product follows the course of thearrows in FIG. 5. It rises up the dip tube 62, passes into the chamber 60, flows over the valve seat 82 and into the gallery 78. It moves around to the channels 84 and 86 and passes into and down these channels to the lower end of the socket 74 where it enters the grooves 116 and 118 which are formed in the floor 76. From these grooves it passes to the channels 112 and 114 and upward into the expansion chamber 100 and thence out to the atmosphere by way of the passageway 102 and the external orifice 104. Release of the button closes the valve by permitting the valve seat 82 once more to engage against the bottom surface of the gasket 52. i

It is clear that the metering of the valve assembly 20 is controlled by the channels and grooves. The crosssectional area of these formations will determine the rate at which the pressurized product is dispensed. In the embodiment illustrated, there are two transport systems for the pressurized product, one consisting of the channel 84, the groove 116 and the channel 112, the other consisting of the channel 86, the groove 118 and the channel 114. In any given transport system of this type, the location of the maximum restriction will control the rate of flow. Thus, in the arrangement shown and described, the maximum constriction could be in any one of the three locations forming a system or connected series. In the copending applications, the control was effected either by the dimensions of the channels in the wall of the valve plunger or by narrowing the entrances to these channels. Likewise, this could be done herein, but it is preferred that the metering herein be controlled by the dimensions of the channels formed in the post, namely, the channels 112 and 114. It is best that the grooves 116 and 118 be as deep as practical to provide for the draining of residue and it is best to have the channels 84 and 86 as open as possible to give free access to a large extent to the flow of pressurized product to prevent clogging and to keep the walls of the socket clean. Obviously, there could be any number of transport systems greater than two or a single system could be used, that is, a system in which there is a single channel in the wall 1 10, a single groove in the floor 76 and a single channel in the post 92. As in other cases, the smallest cross section of this system would control the metering and it is preferred that this be in the post channel.

The post 92 may have a gassing recess 120 for the purpose mentioned above, but this is not essential.

The embodiments of FIGS. 8 to 12 do not utilize any grooves in the floor of the socket as in the case of the embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 7. Instead, means are provided in each case to space the bottom end of the stem from the floor.

In FIGS. 8, 9 and 10, there is a stem 122 which has a reduced diameter lower portion 124 giving rise to a shoulder 126 that has a diameter larger than the diameter of the socket 128 of the valve plunger 130. There is no gallery in this valve seat 134, hence the wall 132 of the valve plunger 130 has uniform thickness up to its upper end, and the valve seat 134 is constituted by the upper end. The floor 136 of the socket 128 is provided with no grooves. The center post 138 is integral with the valve plunger 130 and extends upward from the center of the floor 136, its upper end having no gassing recess. It has vertically extending channels 140 and 142 which extend throughout the length of the post from its top end to the floor 136. Since the shoulder 126 has a diameter greater than that of the socket 128, it overlaps the valve seat 134 as best indicated in FIG. 10.

In order to illustrate the fact that the channels in the wall 132 of the valve plunger 130 could be substantially larger than the channels in the post, in this construction the channels 144 and 146 are made quite large. The entrances to these channels will be partially covered by the overlapping of the shoulder 126 but nevertheless such entrances will have a much greater cross-sectional area than the area of the channels 140 and 142. Accordingly, the metering from this embodiment will be controlled by the total cross-sectional area of the channels 140 and 142. The lower end of the stem is shown at 148, this spaced above the floor 136 in accordance with the teachings of the second of the copending applications, thereby giving free access for passage of pressurized product from the channels 144 and 146 to the channels 140 and 142.

In all other respects, the construction of the embodiment of FIGS. 8, 9 and and its functions are similar to those of the embodiment described in connection with FIGS. 1 to 7.

The embodiment of FIGS. 11 and 12 differs from that of FIGS. 8 to 10 in that the means for spacing the stem 152 above the floor 154 comprise ridges or footing formations 156 and 158 formed in the floor integral with the valve plunger 160 and extending upwardly from said floor. The channels 162 and 164 in the wall 166 are not as large as the channels 144 and 146 of FIGS. 8 to 10, but could be so if desired. The post 168 has channels 170 and 172 and no gassing recess. There are no grooves in the floor so that the spacing of the end 174 of the stem 152 above the floor gives free access of the pressurized product across the floor to enable its transportation by way of the channels 170 and 172 into the expansion chamber 180. In the embodiment of FIGS. 11 and 12 the metering preferably is controlled by the cross-sectional dimensions of the channels 170 and 172 but this is not necessary. It could as well be controlled by the cross-sectional dimensions of the channels 162 and 164, as is the case in the other embodiments described herein. The large volume of space available because of the spacing of the end 174 above the floor, as is the case in FIGS. 8 to 10, gives considerable room for residue to accumulate and not interfere with the operation of the valve.

The stems 122 and 152 could either be parts of integral removable sprayhead or separable from the buttons of sprayhead in which case the stems would be substantially permanently secured in their respective sockets.

The structures of the invention are capable of considerable modification without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What it is desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A valve structure for a pressurized package, comprising:

A. a cover member adapted to be installed in said package,

B. a housing connected to the bottom of the cover member and being enclosed but for a first opening through the cover member and a second opening adapted to communicate with the interior of the package,

C. an elastomeric gasket between the housing and the cover member and having a passageway aligned with the first opening,

D. a valve plunger in the housing spring-biased against the elastomeric gasket and when so biased blocking passage of pressurized product from the interior of the housing to the exterior of the cover member, said valve plunger comprising 1. a body having a right-cylindrical wall defining a central upwardly opening cylindrical socket with a blind floor arranged generally in a plane normal to the axis of the cylindrical socket, the cylindrical wall having a valve seat at its upper end around the upper entrance of the socket,

E. a sprayhead consisting of an exterior movable button having an external orifice and a hollow stem, the stem passing through the first opening and passing through the passageway of the elastomeric gasket in a sealing and sliding engagement and having its lower portion telescopically and sealingly engaged in said socket, said lower portion having an axial end opening providing the only entrance to the interior of the hollow stem from the bottom end thereof,

F. a central right-cylindrical post in the socket extending upwardly from the floor and into the said axial opening, the inner diameter of the said stem at said opening being sealingly and slidably telescoped upon said post, said post exterior having axially extending first channel means opening adjacent said floor at the bottom end thereof and opening to the interior of the hollow stem at the upper end thereof,

G. pressurized product transport means comprising second channel means formed in the interior of the socket in the said cylindrical wall and confined by the lower portion of the stem extending generally axially of said cylindrical wall, opening at the upper end thereof adjacent the valve seat and opening at the bottom end adjacent said floor, and

H. said plunger and stem having means coacting to establish a pressurized product flow path means across said blind floor between said first and second channel means when said lower portion of the stem is fully engaged in said socket.

2. The valve construction as claimed in claim 1 in which said coacting means comprise structure spacing the lower end of the stem above said floor.

3. The valve construction as claimed in claim 1 in which said coacting means comprise groove means provided in said floor connecting the first and second channel means, the bottom end of the stem being engaged against said floor.

4. The valve construction as claimed in claim 2 in which said last-mentioned structure comprise stop means on the exterior of the stem cooperating with the said cylindrical wall of the valve plunger to limit the distance to which said stem enters said socket.

5, The valve construction as claimed in claim 2 in which said last-mentioned structure comprise footing means in the socket cooperating with the stem to space the lower end thereof above the floor.

6. The valve construction as claimed in claim 4 in which the stop means comprise a shoulder formed on the exterior of the stem.

7. The valve construction as claimed in claim 1 in which said stem and button are integral and the lower portion of the stem is removably engaged in said socket.

8. The valve construction as claimed in claim 1 in which said stern and button are separable and the lower end portion of the stem is substantially engaged in said socket.

9. The valve construction as claimed in claim 7 in which there is a gallery at the upper entrance of the socket below said valve seat and in which the upper end of said second channel means open into said gallery.

10. The valve construction as claimed in claim 7 in which the upper end of said second channel means open in said valve seat.

11. In a valve structure of the type in which there is a valve assembly adapted to be sealed to the open top of a canister and adapted to have a sprayhead mounted therein, the sprayhead comprising a push button and a stem connected together, the stem extending into the valve assembly from the exterior thereof so that pushing on the button will produce a valving action and permit pressurized products in the canister to emerge and be dispensed through the button and the valve assembly, including a cover member having a central passageway for movement of the stem therethrough, a gasket, a valve housing secured to the inside of the cover member, a valve plunger in the housing having a valve seat on the upper end thereof and being springbiased upwardly against the gasket, the valve plunger having an upwardly opening socket confined by the valve seat, the gasket being sandwiched between the valve housing and the cover member and having a central passageway therethrough aligned with the central passageway in the cover member, the socket being axially aligned with the passageways, the stem slidingly and sealingly passing through the central passageways into the socket and engaged therein and having its exterior wall sealingly engaged in said socket, means communicatin between the interior of the valve housing over the va ve seat and the hollow bore of the stem so that when the push button is depressed the valve seat will move off the gasket and pressurized product will flow into the hollow bore of the stem and thence out through the push button, and when released the flow will cease, the invention herein which comprises:

the lower end of the stem that is engaged in the socket being imperforate but for an axial end opening, the socket having an upstanding central right-cylindrical post engaged sealingly and slidingly in said opening, the socket of the plunger being defined by a right-cylindrical wall and the exterior of the lower end of the stem having a cooperating cylindrical configuration engaged therewith, the post exterior having axially extending first channel means and there being second channel means formed in the interior of the socket in said cylindrical wall opening at the upper end thereof adjacent said valve seat and extending to the bottom of the socket and cooperating with the lower portion of the stem to provide conduits for flow of pressurized product, the plunger and stem having means coacting to establish pressurized product flow path means between said first and second channel means when said lower portion of the stem is engaged in said socket.

12. The construction as claimed in claim 11 in which said coacting means comprise structure spacing the lower end of the stern above said floor.

13. The construction as claimed in claim 11 in which said coacting means comprise groove means provided in said floor connecting the first and second channel means, the bottom end of the stem being engaged against said floor.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3915390 *Dec 20, 1974Oct 28, 1975Green EdwardAerosol valve and sprayhead
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/573, 239/579
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/44
European ClassificationB65D83/44