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Publication numberUS3715160 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1973
Filing dateJun 21, 1971
Priority dateJun 21, 1971
Publication numberUS 3715160 A, US 3715160A, US-A-3715160, US3715160 A, US3715160A
InventorsS Fader
Original AssigneeS Fader
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Copying and photographic contact printing machines
US 3715160 A
Abstract
A combination copying machine and photographic contact printer having two light stations; for copy making one is used for exposing the sensitive sheet material through the original and the other is used for developing the sensitive sheet material. For photographic contact print-making one or both of the stations are used as required by the photographic transparency from which the print is to be made, the type of reproduction and the reproduction material.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Fader 14 1 Feb. 6, 1973 [541 COPYING AND PHOTOGRAPHIC l,26l,l77 4/l9l8 Strong ..355 114 CONTACT PRINTING MACHINES 3,211,072 10/1965 lnventor: Seymour .I. Fader, 377 McKinley Boulevard, Paramus, NJ. 07652 Filed: June 21, 1971 Appl. No.: 155,075

Related US. Application Data Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 'l2l,385, March 5, 1971, abandoned.

References Cited U NITED STATES PATENTS Limberger ..355/l00 Pratt, Jr. et al ..355/l00 Pratt, Jr 1 ..355/106 Frantz ..355/l06 X Jonker ....355/89 X Primary Examiner-Samuel S. Matthews Assistant Examiner-RichardM. Sheer Attorney-Samuelson & Jacob [57] ABSTRACT A combination copying machine and photographic contact printer having two light stations; for copy making one is used for exposing the sensitive sheet material through the original and the other is used for developing the sensitive sheet material. For photographic contact print-making one or both of the stations are used as required by the photographic transparency from which the print is to be made, the type of reproduction and the reproduction material.

A photographic contact printer having a light station. The sensitive sheet material is exposed through the negative and the light is used for exposing-developing the sensitive sheet material.

6 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures SHEET 1 BF 2 PATEF-HEDFEB 6 i975 INVENTOR. SEYMOUR J. FADE-ZR dfi 1W FITTO NEVS PATENTEDFEB @1913 3,715,160 SHEET 20F 2 I! I l .7

INVENTOR.

Sewmoure J. FHDER FITTO NEVS COPYING AND PI-IOTOGRAPIIIC CONTACT PRINTING MACHINES This application is a continuation-in-part of my application filed Mar. 5, l97l,Ser. No. l2l,385 since abandoned.

The present invention relates to the copying of printed matter or the like and to making photographic contact prints from photographic transparencies (either black and white or color). More specifically the invention relates to copying and contact printing apparatus of maximum simplicity both in construction and in operation which makes it suitable for home, school and business use.

Most prior art copiers which are used for home, school and occasional business use are either of the wet type or of the two step type using an intermediate sheet or of the one step type producing nonpermanent copies.

It is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved copying device which requires no fluids or prior warm-up for operation, and which requires no further treatment of the finished copy or print outside the apparatus. The invention is intended for use with a single sheet of light sensitive material which enhances the simplicity of the apparatus. The invention provides an apparatus with two light stations (one for exposure and the other for developing) and is characterized by extreme simplicity and low cost. The invention provides an apparatus that is fully self-contained. It may be operated with complete safety requiring no previous training, making it ideal for use in homes, schools and business establishments.

In the apparatus of this invention a copy or print can be made by juxtaposition of the printed matter of photographic transparency to the sensitive material and their exposure to the light sources in the required sequence.

In the apparatus of this invention the two light stations need not be physically connected to one another since each station functions independently of the other. A source of electrical energy is all that is required to make each station function properly. For containment as a unit, both stations may be hinged together at the rear and opened for insertion of the materials for copying or printing or they may be permanently joined by adhesives or mechanical fasteners.

The invention also provides an apparatus with one light station which is utilized in the production of contact prints from either black and white or color transparencies. The light station in this embodiment of the invention serves ofr exposing-developing.

The foregoing and other objects, advantages, features and uses will be apparent during the course of the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a two light station machine of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the machine of FIG. 1 in the open position;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the lines 3-3 of FIG. 1 with the paper holder inserted;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the paper holder in which the material to be copied and the sensitive material are placed;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to that of FIG. 1 of a one light station machine of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken on the lines 6-6 of FIG. 5, viewed in the direction of the arrows with the paper holder inserted; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the machine of FIG. 5

with the top removed.

In the drawings, wherein, for the purpose of illustration, there are shown preferred embodiments of the apparatus of the invention and wherein like numerals designate like partsthroughout the same, the numeral 10 designates a two light station machine of the invention.

Apparatus 10 preferably includes two polyhedrons used as housings or light chamber enclosures, joined together to form a tracked opening 18 between them into which the paper holder is inserted. Chamber 15 is formed by side walls 12, end walls 13 and top wall 14.

Chamber 16 is formed by side walls 12', end walls 13' and top wall 14'. It is preferable to have chamber 15 with its opening facing upward and chamber 16 with its opening facing downward. The positions of both may be reversed, however, without affecting the operation or performance of the apparatus. The chambers, or enclosures, l5 and 16 are constructed with ledges 1 7 and 17' providing for secure mating of the chambers or enclosures and a tracked opening 18 is formed within the recessed ledges 50 and 52 to provide for insertion and containment of the paper holder. A timer switch 19 is secured to the top chambenThis switch may be of any suitable type to control the. on-off state of the light sources in each chamber. Joining both enclosures together insures the compactness of the apparatus, and the operator at no time comes in contact with the light sources within the chambers.

In FIG. 2 the enclosures are shown hinged open at the rear by means of hinge 54 to permit access to the interior of the machine 10. Each light chamber encloses its own light source. An exposure bulb 21 is located within the exposure chamber 15 and a developing bulb 22 is located within the developing chamber 16. In each chamber these bulbs, which are the light sources, are respectively backed by elongate, laterally arcuate reflectors 23 and 23' which create an even light dispersion over the surface of the sensitive material.

The circuity of the apparatus 10 is similar for each chamber and follows standard fluorescent lighting practice. An electrical cord 20 with plug 34 is provided for attachment to a source of electrical energy. One wire of the electrical cord connects to the switch 19 and then to ballasts 32 and 32 in the chambers. The ballasts are connected to their respective bulbs 21 and 22 through light sockets 33 and 33 and then to starters 31 and 31' mounted in sockets 35 and 35. The starters are connected to the other end of the bulbs through sockets and then to the other wire of cord 20.

The paper holder as shown in FIG. 4 consists of a hinged assembly 40 of two sections. One section consists of a rigid transparent material 41 set within a frame 42. The other section is joined to the first section by hinge 45 and consists of a rigid opaque material 43 to which is bonded a resilient material 44 that nests within frame 42 and presses against the transparent surface 41 when the assembly isclosed.

In a typical representative apparatus the chamber enclosures consisting of walls, ledges, top and bottom are made of H16 inch opaque panels of high impact styrene, although other opaque, rigid materials such as Bristol board, masonite, sheet metal may also be used with equal results. In the representative apparatus the reflectors are of an elongate, laterally arcuate shape, although flat, rigid pieces of reflective material placed behind and sloping away from each light source created the same reflective effect. The reflective material used in the apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 1 3 consists of thin aluminum foil bonded to a heavy paper backing that can be curved into the desired shape and inserted within the light chambers. Fluorescent lamps of suitable light output and wavelength are used as the light sources.

In the preferred form of apparatus illustrated, a transparent section 41 of the paper holder 40 is formed of 1/16 inch thick glass set within a V; inch thick tempered masonite frame 42 and the opaque section 44 is formed of 1% inch thick Bristol board to which is bonded a l/l6 inch thick layer of half hard rubber 43, both sections are joined together at one of the edges by a hinge 45 of plastic adhesive tape or similar material.

One method of using the apparatus 10 will now be briefly described. The apparatus 10 is first connected to a source of electricity, 1 10/ l volts AC. The hinged paper holder 40 is opened and the printed material'to be copied is placed face down on the inner surface of the glass 41 within the frame 42. On top of this is placed the sensitive material with the sensitive side against the back of the printed material to be copied. The paper holder is then closed with the resilient material 43 of the opaque section of the holder pressing the sensitive material against the material to be copied and in turn against the transparent surface 41.

The paper holder 40 is fully inserted in the tracked opening 18 of the apparatus 10 with the transparent section 41 facing down against the opening of the exposure chamber 15. Back ledges 51 and 51' serve as a stop to prevent further insertion of frame 40 into the opening 18. The exposure light 21 is turned on by means of the timer switch 19 for an appropriate length of time. At the end of this time the paper holder 40 is withdrawn from the apparatus and the material that is being copied is removed from the holder. The sensitive sheet is left in the paper holder 40 in its original alignment and the paper holder 40 is closed and reinserted in the opening 18 of the apparatus with the transparent surface 41 of the holder facing the opening of the developing-chamber 16 on top. The developing light 22 is turned on by means of the switch 19 for an appropriate length of time. The paper holder 40is withdrawn at the end of this time and the finished copy is removed; If further developing of the image is required, the sensitive sheet may be placed back in the paper holder 40 and inserted in track 18 for further contact with the developing light as desired or required.

Positive and negative contact prints can also be made from negative and positive transparencies using either theexposure light source or the developing light source or both in the correct sequence as required.

There is no limitation to the number of copies that can be made continuously on this apparatus, provided a fresh sheet of sensitive material is used for each copy. Suitable light-sensitive materials for use with this apparatus are readily available from existing commercial sources. This material reacts to one light spectrum for imposing an image upon the sensitive surface and to another light spectrum for developing or bringing up the image.

By way of illustration and not by way of limitation of the scope of the invention, following is an example of the parameters of a preferred form of two light station machine of the invention:

Sensitive sheet: DuPont DYLUX 503 Photosensitive Paper Exposure light: 390 to 480 nanometers Developing light: 300 to 380 nanometers Either positive or negative images may be made from either a positive or a negative transparency in the two light station machine.

To produce positive copy from positive original or negative copy from negative original:

1. Place material to be copied face down on transparent face of holder.

2. Place sinsitive sheet on top of back of material to be copied.

3. Close the holder.

4. Insert holder in track with transparent face facing exposure light.

5. Expose the proper time.

6. Remove the holder from track.

7. Remove material to be copied from holder.

8. Insert holder in track with transparent face facing developing light.

9. Expose for proper time.

10. Remove holder from track.

1 1. Remove finished copy from holder.

To produce negative copy from positive original or positive copy from negative original:

1. Place material to be copied face down on transparent face of holder. I

2. Place sensitive sheet on top of back of material to be copied.

3. Close the holder.

4. Insert holder in track with transparent face facing developing light.

5. Expose for proper time.

6. Remove holder from track.

7. Remove material to be copied from holder.

8. Insert holder in track with transparent face facing exposure light.

9. Expose for proper time. 4

10. Remove holder from track.

1 1. Remove finished copy from holder.

It is also within the contemplation of the invention to dis-pense with hinge 54 and join the two housings together permanently by means of adhesive or suitable mechanical fasteners.

Machine (FIGS. 5 7) is a single light station machine of the invention. It is utilized to produce con-' tact prints from black and white or color transparencies. The machine is seen to comprise a polyhedral housing 62 and a cover 64. Housing 62 and cover 64 are joined along line 63 by adhesive or mechanical means such as bolts and nuts. Housing 62 has a stepped ledge with upper portion 82 and recessed portion and cover 64 is similarly shaped so that a tracked opening 66 for receiving paper holder 40 is formed.

In its preferred form, a pair of bulbs 72 are mounted in chamber 62 of machine 60 and are suitably connected to the source of a-c voltage through timer switch 68 and plug 70. Starters 76 and ballasts 78 are provided in accordance with fluorescent lighting practice. A reflector 74, suitably shaped so as to concentrate the light from bulbs 72 toward the opening in housing 62, is mounted in housing 62. Reflector 72 is shown as formed from a plurality of plane surfaces but it may be arcuate, parabolic or of other shapes so long as light of the desired intensity and distribution impinges on the material in holder 40. Holder 40 is inserted in tracked opening 66 with the transparent face toward bulbs 72 in the same manner as we have described heretofore in connection with the apparatus 10.

By way of illustration and not by way of limitation of the scope of the invention, following is an example of the parameters of a preferred form of one light station machine of the invention:

Sensitive sheet: DuPont DYLUX 503 Photosensitive Paper Light: 300 to 380 nanometers Contact prints from black and white or color transparencies are made in the following manner when utilizing the photosensitive paper mentioned above.

1. Insert plug 70 into source of 110/120 volts AC.

2. Place the transparency face down on the transparent face of the holder.

3. Place sensitive sheet on top of the back of the transparency.

4. Close the holder.

5. Insert the holder in track with the transparent face toward the light source.

6. Expose for the proper time. By way of examples,

black and white negatives should be exposed between about to 30 seconds. Color trans-- parencies, depending upon negative density and contrast, should be exposed between about 1 and 3 minutes.

7. Remove the holder from the track.

8. Remove the material from the holder.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it is apparent to those skilled in the art that modifications are possible without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the sub joined claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

l. A machine for producing a copy of an original on a sensitive sheet which is developed by light comprising:

a pair of superposed housings, each having an open face, placed so that the open faces are opposed to thereon; holding means msertable in and removable from said tracked opening comprising an opaque support and a transparent sheet for holding therebetween an original and a sensitive sheet in superposition such that when the transparent sheet is facing the first light source, an undeveloped image of said original is imposed on such sensitive sheet and when such sensitive sheet is exposed to the second light source for a sufficient time, the undeveloped image of such original on such sensitive sheet is developed;

said opaque support of said holding meansprecluding light from either of said sources from simultaneously impinging upon such sheets contained in said holding means.

2. The invention of claim 1 wherein:

said housings are hinged along one edge of each of them so as to be movable between a first position wherein the open faces are close to one another and a second position wherein the open faces are spaced from one another to permit access to the interior of the machine.

3. The invention of claim 5 including:

reflecting means mounted behind each of the light sources to obtain an even distribution of light across the open face.

4. The invention of claim 1 including:

reflecting means mounted behind each of the light sources to obtain an even distribution of light across the open face. a

5. The invention of claim 1 wherein:

said two housings are affixed to each other.

6. The invention of claim 5 including:

reflecting means mounted behind each of the light sources to obtain an even distribution of light across the open face.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1261177 *Feb 2, 1916Apr 2, 1918Harry U StrongPhotographic-printing machine.
US2918857 *Jul 10, 1956Dec 29, 1959Gen Aniline & Film CorpDiazotype printing and developing apparatus
US3202070 *Nov 15, 1962Aug 24, 1965Gen Aniline & Film CorpDiazotype copying apparatus
US3211072 *Mar 14, 1961Oct 12, 1965Jonker Business Machines IncGeometric print-out for superimposable card systems
US3288047 *Mar 29, 1965Nov 29, 1966Lumonrint Zindler K GApparatus for exposing and developing sensitive sheets
US3397630 *Jun 15, 1965Aug 20, 1968Gaf CorpDiazotype copying apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3936186 *Jul 25, 1974Feb 3, 1976Ultra-Violet Products, Inc.Apparatus for exposing diazo printing plates and the like
US4343549 *Oct 2, 1980Aug 10, 1982Dainippon Screen Seizo Kabushiki KaishaBox type contact printer
US5546122 *Dec 13, 1993Aug 13, 1996Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Film image input system
Classifications
U.S. Classification355/113, 355/115
International ClassificationG03B27/30, G03D13/00, G03B27/02
Cooperative ClassificationG03B27/02, G03D13/002, G03B27/303
European ClassificationG03B27/02, G03B27/30G, G03D13/00D