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Publication numberUS3715772 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1973
Filing dateAug 31, 1971
Priority dateAug 31, 1971
Publication numberUS 3715772 A, US 3715772A, US-A-3715772, US3715772 A, US3715772A
InventorsDesjardin W, Downing G
Original AssigneeDesjardin W, Downing G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reciprocating corner and baseboard cleaning auxiliary attachment for rotary floor treatment machines
US 3715772 A
Abstract
An auxiliary attachment is provided for rotary floor treatment machines of the type having a rotary driving element extending downwardly from a generally bell shaped housing for detachable coupling with a rotary type floor treating accessory, such as a rotary brush, rotary buffer, etc. The auxiliary attachment utilizes the rotary drive of the machine to effect a reciprocating action of a floor treating accessory, such as a brush, buffer, etc. The floor treating accessory of the attachment, which may be considered generally as a rubbing element, reciprocates in guides provided in the housing of the attachment. The rubbing element extends beyond the limits of the attachment housing, and preferably includes rubbing surfaces on its upright sides, such that it can also clean baseboards. The drive assembly for the attachment is journaled in the top surface of the attachment housing, and includes at its upper end an appropriate but conventional coupling member which is adapted to detachably couple with the rotary driving element of the machine. When coupled to a machine, the lower edge of the bell shaped housing of the machine abuts against the upper surface of the attachment housing, which preferably is provided with a rubber-like mat. The auxiliary attachment is adaptable for use with different models of rotary machines through the provision of spacer rings or the like for locating the coupling member of the attachment above the top surface of the attachment such that the coupling member will readily mate with and couple to the rotary drive element of the machine, with the lower edge of the bell shaped housing of the machine abutting the upper surface of the attachment housing. By using different spacer rings or different numbers of spacer rings, the attachment is readily adaptable for use with different machines whose rotary driving elements are located differently vertically in their bell shaped housings. The rubbing element of the attachment, viewed in plan, preferably is of wedge shape at its outer end so as to facilitate reciprocation into and out of a corner. The reciprocatory action preferably is effected through a crank and rod mechanism, or an eccentric and rod mechanism, or the like. The particular coupling element used on a particular attachment is selected to be appropriate for the driving element of the machine with which the attachment is to be used. The attachment imparts to a regular rotary machine the capability of a conventional reciprocatory or oscillatory machine, while avoiding the expense of two completely separate machines.
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United States Patent 1 Downing et a1.

[54] RECIPROCATING CORNER AND BASEBOARD CLEANING AUXILIARY ATTACHIVIENT FOR ROTARY FLOOR TREATMENT MACHINES [76] Inventors: Gertrude E. Downing, 1531 K Street, SE, Washington, DC.

20003; William P. Desjardin, 5549 Gary Avenue, Alexandria, Va. 22311 [22] Filed: Aug. 31, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 176,663

, [52] U5. Cl ..15/49 RB, 15/22 A, 15/246, 51/175 [51] Int. Cl. ..A47l 11/12 [58] Field of Search ..l5/49 R, 49 RB, 50 R, 98, 246, l5/22, 22 A;5l/175 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,135,491 4/1915 Baukin ..l5/22 A 2,328,613 9/1943 Burleigh ..5l/175 3,533,120 10/1970 Mercado ..l5/50 R Primary Examiner-Edward L. Roberts Att0rneyLarsOn, Taylor & Hinds [5 7 ABSTRACT An auxiliary attachment is provided for rotary floor treatment machines of the type having a rotary driving element extending downwardly from a generally bell shaped housing for detachable coupling with a rotary type floor treating accessory, such as a rotary brush, rotary buffer, etc. The auxiliary attachment utilizes the rotary drive of the machine to effect a reciprocating action of a floor treating accessory, such as a brush, buffer, etc. The floor treating accessory of the attachment, which may be considered generally as a rubbing element, reciprocates in guides provided in the housing of the attachment. The rubbing element extends beyond the limits of the attachment housing, and preferably includes rubbing surfaces on its upright sides, such that it can also clean baseboards. The drive assembly for the attachment is journaled in the top surface of the attachment housing, and includes at its upper end an appropriate but conventional coupling member which is adapted to detachably couple with the rotary driving element of the machine. When coupled to a machine, the lower edge of the bell shaped housing of the machine abuts against the upper surface of the attachment housing, which preferably is provided with a rubber-like mat. The auxiliary attachment is adaptable for use with different models of rotary machines through the provision of spacer rings or the like for locating the coupling member of the attachment above the top surface of the attachment such that the coupling member will readily mate with and couple to the rotary drive element of the machine, with the lower edge of the bell shaped housing of the machine abutting the upper surface of the attachment housing. By using different spacer rings or different numbers of spacer rings, the attachment is readily adaptable for use with different machines whose rotary driving elements are located differently vertically in their bell shaped housings. The rubbing element of the attachment, viewed in plan, preferably is of wedge shape at its outer end so as to facilitate reciprocation into and out of a corner. The reciprocatory action preferably is effected through a crank and rod mechanism, or an eccentric and rod mechanism, or the like. The particular coupling element used on a particular attachment is selected to be appropriate for the driving element of the machine with which the attachment is to be used. The attachment imparts to a regular rotary machine the capability of a conventional reciprocatory or oscillatory machine, while avoiding the expense of two completely separate machines.

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- INVENTORS GERTRUDE E DOWNING WILLIAM P. DesJARDIN ATTORNEYS PATENTEUFEB 13 I975 3.715.772 SHEET 50F 5 FIG. 7

. v v A: 29 i 7% %5/// 1 H m E 28 INVEN TORS GERTRLDE E. DOWNING WILLIAM F DesJARDlN ATTORNEYS RECIPROCATING CORNER AND BASEBOARD CLEANING AUXILIARY ATTACHMENT FOR ROTARY FLOOR TREATMENT MACHINES FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to rotary floor cleaning or polishing machines of the type having a rotary driving element extending downwardly from a generally bell separate machine for the specialized task of cleaning shaped housing for detachable coupling with a rotary- BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION There are commercially available many types of machines for cleaning and/0r polishing floors. Perhaps the most popular type is a conventional rotary machine which has a rotary driving element (commonly referred to as clutch drive or adapter) extending downwardly from a generally bell shaped housing for detachable coupling with a rotary type floor treating accessory, such as a brush, pad, buffer, etc., having a corresponding coupling (commonly referred to as a clutch plate, or clutch ring, or brush ring). Different rotary accessories are available for the same rotary machine, so as to permit use of the machine for practically all floor treating operations. Because of the rotary action of the accessory in this type machine, and also because of the usually substantial diameter of the accessory, these machines basically are not capable of cleaning or polishing in sharp corners. There are also available machines which utilize a reciprocatory or oscillatory action of the brush or pad, and some of these machines are capable of cleaning or polishing the floor areas in corners. However, for general use in large areas these latter machines are often, if not usually, considered to be not as satisfactory as the conventional rotary machines, whether by reason of expense, or reliability, or ease of operation, etc. Therefore, perhaps the usual practice has been to utilize the rotary machines for the large floor areas, and, since it probably is not economically feasible to have a separate reciprocatory or oscillatory machine for cleaning the corners, these are often left to be done by hand. In keeping with human nature, this means that the corners often go uncleaned or polished. In buildings where a high degree of sanitation is a must, this is unsatisfactory. Additionally, the base along the lower edge of a wall where it intersects the floor is usually considered to be a hand cleaning job, and, even if there may be machines for cleaning the base, again this would involve the problem of incurring the expense of a separate machine for a specialized job.

Generally, it is an object of this invention to provide an auxiliary attachment for conventional rotary floor machines, which attachment imparts to these machines a reciprocatory cleaning or polishing action, and renders them usable for corner cleaning or polishing. In its preferred form, the attachment is also usable for corners and/or bases. In its preferred form, the attachment has what may be characterized as a universal adaptability in that the same basic attachment can be customassembled 'to be usable with most,- if not all, of the rotary machines now commercially available. This adaptability is achieved through a design which utilizes spacer members in the drive assembly of the at tachment such that the drive assembly can be custom assembled to mate with the rotary driving elements of different machines, while still maintaining an abutting relationship between the lower edge of the bell shaped housing of the machine and the upper surface of the housing of the attachment. In general the same basic housing, rubbing element, and drive assembly will be usable with most machines, and the only custom assembling that need be done to adapt the attachment to a particular machine will lie in the selection of an appropriate spacer or spacer members and an appropriate coupling member or clutch plate. The attachment as assembled for a particular machine is then ready for detachable coupling to the rotary machine in substantially the same manner as the conventional rotary accessories.

Preferably the rubbing element, that is, the brush or pad of the attachment, is of wedge shape at its outer end as viewed in plan, so as to facilitate its reciprocatory cleaning or polishing of corners. The sides of the rubbing element toward the rear thereof preferably diverge outwardly and rearwardly relative to the longitudinal center line of the rubbing element, and the sides of the rubbing element are provided with a rubbing surface such as bristles, pad, etc. for cleaning bases.

Of course, a single attachment can be provided with a plurality of different rubbing elements, such as brushes, buffers, pads, etc. The attachment is usable with a fountain-type scrubbing machine, that is, a machine with a supply of liquid cleaner. When so used, it is only necessary to run the liquid supply hose to a point above the reciprocating brush, the brush for this use being preferably provided with holes in its surface to permit the cleaning fluid to flow therethrough onto the bristles.

Other and further objects, advantages and features of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the ensuing description of a preferred embodiment, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevation view of a conventional rotary floor machine, with an auxiliary attachment in accordance with the invention coupled thereto ready for use.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation, partially in section and broken away in parts, of an attachment in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, with a rubbing element in the form of a brush, but with the coupling member or clutch plate and spacer rings not mounted on the drive assembly.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a brush rubbing element of an exemplary type usable with the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view, broken away in parts, illustrating the bottom of the housing and drive assembly with a brush of the type shown in FIG. 3 mounted in the housing and coupled to the drive assembly.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 55 of FIG. 4, but inverted to its normal orientation for clarity, and with parts omitted for clarity.

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view through a typical drive assembly in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, mounted in the attachment housing, and assembled with a clutch plate or coupling member and spacer rings.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged and exploded perspective view of a typical and conventional clutch plate or coupling member, together with two typical spacer rings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, a conventional rotary floor machine is shown generally at 1. The typical machine includes an electric motor mounted on a bell housing or bell shaped housing 3, which also carries wheels 4 which may be adjustable vertically. Conventionally in such machines the shaft of the electric motor is coupled, directly or indirectly, to a driving element which usually depends downwardly from the center of the bell housing. The driving element is commonly referred to as a clutch drive or clutch adapter, and conventionally is in the form of a cylindrical member having peripherally spaced locking lugs adjacent its lower surface. These locking lugs are intended to pass downwardly through corresponding recesses in a clutch plate or coupling member mounted centrally on a rotary brush attachment or the like, whereby the rotary brush and its clutch plate can then be given a partial turn so as to move the locking lugs angularly into grooves, and out of alignment with the recesses, so as to detachably couple the clutch plate of the brush and the clutch drive or clutch adapter of the machine. Such coupling assemblies are well known in the art and are conventional in machines of this type, and since they form no novel part of the invention of this application, they are not shown in detail, although a conventional clutch plate is illustrated in FIG. 7 in conjunction with two spacer rings. For further details of such conventional coupling assemblies, reference is made to almost any current commercial rotary floor machine.

An auxiliary attachment 2 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 1, coupled to the machine 1 to be driven thereby. As shown generally in FIG. 1, the attachment 2 includes a brush housing 6, a rubbing element such as a brush 7 and ball casters or the like 5.

Referring now to the remaining figures, particularly FIGS. 2-5, the attachment housing 6 carries ball casters 5 at its after end to provide rear support when the device is in use, and so as to provide ready transportability when moving from one area to another. The upper surface of the housing 6 has rubber matting 10 or the like adhered thereto for abutting the lower edge of the bell housing 3 of the machine and stabilizing the attachment housing relative to the bell housing when the two devices are coupled together and in use. A rubbing relative to the attachment housing. The guide tracks 8 and 9 conveniently are embraced by inwardly turned portions or flanges 6a of the housing 6. The brush has a bottom portion 16, upright side walls 15, and an upstanding portion 13 carrying the ribs 11 and 12. An opening 14a, which may be threaded, is formed in the upper surface of the upstanding portion 13 to receive a pin or bolt to pivotally couple a connecting rod 14 to the brush; The brush 7 includes a recess 13a in the upstanding portion 13 so as to provide angular clearance for the connecting rod 14 as it pivots about the pivot point 14a during operation. The bottom 16 of the brush 7 is also recessed in its rear portions to minimize the possibility of any interference between the bottom of the brush and the crank pin and drive assembly. The bottom of the brush may also be formed with numerous weep holes so as to permit cleaning liquid to pass downwardly through the bottom onto the brush bristles from a liquid hose (not shown) which may be carried by the machine in a well known manner with its discharge and extending over the front of the housing 6 so as to release the cleaning liquid onto the bottom 16 of the brush. As best shown in FIG. 3, the brush terminates at its front end in a wedge formation, the angle of the wedge being approximately to perhaps to facilitate the cleaning of the floors and bases in 90 corners. The rear wings of the brush preferably are inclined relative to the longitudinal center line of the brush so as to diverge outwardly and rearwardly by anangle of approximately 7". This divergence facilitates the cleaning of bases, that is, it avoids the need for the operator to manually force the rear wing sides of the reciprocating brush against the base. Instead, he need merely angle the reciprocating brush slightly inwardly toward the base, and the bristles on the sides of the rear wings will inherently rub against the base with more or less force, dependent upon the particular phase of the reciprocation cycle. In other words, if the reciprocating brush is angled toward the wall at approximately 7, the

bristles on the rear wings will be oriented parallel to the base, but they will move against the base with increasing force as the brush reciprocates outwardly, and with decreasing force as the brush goes through its return stroke.

The reciprocatory action of the brush is effected through a drive block assembly 17 to which the connecting rod 14 is eccentrically coupled. The details of the drive block assembly are best illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 6. Referring to these figures, the drive block assembly 17 comprises a drive block 19 which extends through the housing 6 and carries a crank disc 23 at its lower end, bolted thereto by bolts 24. The assembly of the drive block 19 and crank disc 23 is journaled in the housing by a combination of roller bearings 20, 21 and 22. It will be appreciated, of course, that the particular assemblage of bearings is merely exemplary, and numerous other arrangements of different types of bearings could be used. A crank pin 18 is carried by crank disc 23, and is pivotally coupled with the connecting rod 14. The drive block assembly 17 together with the connecting rod 14 thus forms a fairly conventional crank and rod mechanism for effecting reciprocation of the brush upon rotation of the drive block 19 and crank disc 23.

The drive block assembly is adapted to be drivably coupled to the driving element or clutch drive or clutch adapter of the rotary machine by a conventional clutch plate or brush ring 26 which is coupled to drive block 19 through bolts 27. The clutch plate 26 is appropriately positioned for the particular machine by spacer rings 25. As shown in FIG. 7 merely asan example, the clutch plate or brush ring 26 includes projections 28 for centering it inside spacer rings 25. The clutch plate 26 includes three angularly spaced recesses 29 through which the locking lugs of the drive element of the machine pass downwardly, and recesses 30 into which the locking lugs are then passed to detachably lock the two members together. The locking is easily achieved in the instant invention merely by grasping the crank disc 23 after the locking lugs have passed downwardly through recesses 29, then giving the crank disc 23 and the remainder of the assembly a partial turn so as to move recesses 30 over the locking lugs, thus detachably locking the elements together in a well known and in deed conventional manner.

As pointed out previously, different rotary machines have drive elements or clutch drives or clutch adapters of different configurations. Therefore, the particular clutch plate or brush ring 26 selected for assembly on the drive block 19 will be appropriate for the particular machine with which the attachment is to be used. Also, different models of rotary machines differ in the vertical location of the drive element or clutch drive relative to the lower edge of the bell housing of the machine. Since the housing of the instant invention is intended to abut these lower edges, this means that the vertical position of the clutch plate or brush ring must be appropriate for the particular machine. This custom vertical positioning of the clutch plate is achieved through the spacer rings 25. Preferably the basic drive block is so configured that at least one spacer ring will be used for any machine, and for machines where greater vertical height is required, it is a simple matter to assemble the device with plural spacer rings. Alternatively, single spacer rings could be custom designed for each machine model. It is within the scope of the invention to have a custom designed drive block assembly for each machine, but as a practical matter this is economically unfeasible. The use and operation of the invention will be apparent from the foregoing. In essence, an attachment in accordance with the invention is custom assembled for a particular machine. The attachment is mounted to the machine in substantially the same manner as a conventional rotary brush or the. like. In operation, the brush of the attachment reciprocates at a rate dependent upon the rotary speed of the machine. The reciprocating brush is easily guided into corners and along wall bases, to either scrub or polish the sur face, depending upon the type of rubbing element mounted on the attachment. Different rubbing elements can be interchanged on the attachment merely by disconnecting the connecting rod from the crank pin, and mounting a new rubbing element. Alternatively, provision could be made for disconnecting the connecting rod at 14a.

It will be apparent that the embodiment described and illustrated herein is susceptible of numerous modifications without departing from the scope of the invention. Therefore, it is to be understood that the embodiment-disclosed herein is merely exemplary of the invention, the scope of which is as defined in the subjoined claims interpreted in the light of the foregoing description.

We claim:

1. An auxiliary attachment for rotary floor treatment machines of the type having a rotary driving element extending downwardly from a generally bell shaped housing for detachable coupling with a rotary-type floor treating accessory, said attachment comprising a housing, a floor rubbing element reciprocably supported by said housing so as to bear against and effect a rubbing action on a floor upon reciprocation thereof, a rotatable drive assembly carried by said housing for detachable coupling with the rotary driving element of a rotary floor treatment machine so as to be rotatably driven thereby, and means for effecting reciprocation of said rubbing element in response to rotation of said drive assembly.

2. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 1 wherein said rubbing element extends beyond the limits of said housing.

3. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 2 wherein said rubbing element has rubbing surfaces formed on its bottom and on its sides such that it can effect a rubbing action on a floor and the lower portion of the adjacent wall.

4. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 2 wherein said rubbing element, viewed in plan, is of wedge shape at its outer end, the angle of the wedge being approximately and bisected by the longitudinal centerline of said rubbing element, whereby said rubbing element can be reciprocated into and out of a right angle corner defined by two upright walls and effect a rubbing action on substantially the entire floor in the area of said corner.

5. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 4 wherein said rubbing element has rubbing surfaces formed on its bottom and on its sides such that it can effect a rubbing action on the floor and the lower portions of the adjacent walls defining said corner.

6. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 3 wherein said rubbing element is a brush, and said rubbing surfaces comprise bristles.

7. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 1 wherein said housing includes rectilinear guide track means, and said rubbing element includes corresponding guide surfaces cooperating with said guide track means, so as to define the reciprocation path of said rubbing element.

8. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 7 wherein said means for effecting reciprocation of said rubbing element comprises an eccentric member mounted on said drive assembly and a connecting member coupled to said eccentric member and to said brush.

9. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 8 wherein said rotatable drive assembly comprises a drive block assembly extending through and journaled in the top surface of said housing, said drive block assembly having adjacent the upper end thereof, a coupling member for detachably coupling with the rotary driving element of a rotary floor treatment machine.

10. An auxiliary attachment as claimed in claim 9 wherein said drive block assembly includes spacer means between its upper end and said coupling member for selectively locating said coupling member above the top surface of said housing by a selected distance appropriate for a particular floor treatment machine such that the coupling member will detachably mate and couple with the rotary driving element of the machine and the lower edge of the bell shaped housing of the machine will abut the upper sur-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1135491 *Dec 23, 1914Apr 13, 1915Mattison Machine Works CRubbing or polishing machine.
US2328613 *May 2, 1940Sep 7, 1943Skilsaw IncAbrading and polishing device
US3533120 *Jul 29, 1968Oct 13, 1970Mercado Robert I DeBase and floor scrubber
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4198727 *Dec 14, 1978Apr 22, 1980Farmer Gary LBaseboard dusters for vacuum cleaners
US4358868 *May 12, 1980Nov 16, 1982Mcgraw-Edison CompanyHigh speed floor polisher
US4783872 *Nov 25, 1986Nov 15, 1988The 3J CompanyFloor and baseboard treating machine
US4797968 *May 11, 1988Jan 17, 1989Wenzlick Judy IVacuum cleaner head protector and duster
US5375287 *Nov 10, 1993Dec 27, 1994Dillahunt; Joan C.Scrub brush for flat and cornered surfaces
US6421874May 18, 2000Jul 23, 2002Matsushita Electric Corporation Of AmericaPivotal edge cleaning brushes for vacuum cleaner
US7114214Aug 2, 2004Oct 3, 2006Lavender Anthony ABaseboard brush
US7313838Nov 26, 2003Jan 1, 2008S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Powered cleaner/polisher
US7565712Sep 25, 2007Jul 28, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Powered cleaner/polisher
US9272383 *Nov 30, 2011Mar 1, 2016Dickson Industries, Inc.Surface preparation apparatus
US9517396 *Mar 7, 2014Dec 13, 2016John Albert IRELANDCurling broom incorporating a motor
US20040103490 *Nov 26, 2003Jun 3, 2004Long David C.Powered cleaner/polisher
US20060021174 *Aug 2, 2004Feb 2, 2006Lavender Anthony ABaseboard brush
US20080029134 *Sep 25, 2007Feb 7, 2008Long David CPowered cleaner/polisher
US20150209638 *Mar 7, 2014Jul 30, 2015John Albert IRELANDCurling broom incorporating a motor
EP0858749A2 *Jul 2, 1997Aug 19, 1998Bloom Work Company, IncorporatedBroom and method of cleaning with the same
EP0858749A3 *Jul 2, 1997May 17, 2000Bloom Work Company, IncorporatedBroom and method of cleaning with the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/52.2, 15/246, 451/344, 15/22.2
International ClassificationA47L11/00, A47L11/12
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4069, A47L11/4036, A47L11/12
European ClassificationA47L11/40F, A47L11/40J4, A47L11/12