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Publication numberUS3715778 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1973
Filing dateNov 18, 1970
Priority dateNov 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3715778 A, US 3715778A, US-A-3715778, US3715778 A, US3715778A
InventorsH Wilson
Original AssigneeH Wilson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self latching hinge
US 3715778 A
Abstract
A self-latching hinge having leaf spring means mounted in a non-metallic retaining cage supported by a curl portion of a first hinge leaf with the opposite ends of the cage positioned in the path of lobes protruding from curl portions of the second hinge leaf. The cage is resilient and shaped to hold itself and the spring means in assembled position behind the hinge pin. The spring operates to resiliently latch the door or the like supported by the hinge resiliently in closed position. Spring energy released during the opening movement is dissipated gradually as the door opens thereby avoiding abrupt door movement. Tangs integral with one hinge leaf are effective to align the hinge axis accurately parallel to the edge of the door while the hinge is being mounted. The other hinge leaf incorporates self-clamping means for mounting the hinge on the door frame. A pair of hinge pins interfit with one another and with the curls with a press fit.
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United States Patent 1 Wilson Feb. 13, 1973 [54] SELF LATCHING HINGE [76] inventor: Harry C. Wilson, 15126 Rayneta Drive, Sherman Oaks, Calif. 91403 22 Filed: Nov. 18, 1970 21 Appl. No.: 90,692

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Gorton et al. 16/ 142 Lickteig l 6/1 84 Primary Examiner-Bobby R. Gay Assistant ExaminerDoris L. Troutman Attorney-Sellers & Brace [5 7] ABSTRACT A self-latching hinge having leaf spring means mounted in a non-metallic retaining cage supported by a curl portion of a first hinge leaf with the opposite ends of the cage positioned in the path of lobes protruding from our] portions of the second hinge leaf. The cage is resilient and shaped to hold itself and the spring means in assembled position behind the hinge pin. The spring operates to resiliently latch the door or the like supported by the hinge resiliently in closed position. Spring energy released during the opening movement is dissipated gradually as the door opens thereby avoiding abrupt door movement. Tangs integral with one hinge leaf are effective to align the hinge axis accurately parallel to the edge of the door while the hinge is being mounted. The other hinge leaf incorporates self-clamping means for mounting the hinge on the door frame. A pair of hinge pins interfit with one another and with the curls with a press fit.

33 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures as I 25/ ii i g 22 34 L 33 35 46 771-1 d 35 s 2/ l l 22 n vac PATENTED FEB 1 3 I975 SHEET 2 OF 2 INVENTOR C. W/fiO/V SELF LATCIIING HINGE This invention relates to door hinges, and more particularly to a self-latching hinge of improved construction embodying caged leaf spring means carried by the pivoting hinge leaf and having portions located to be carried past lobes fixed to the curl portions of the stationary hinge leaf and cooperating therewith to latch the hinge and a door mounted thereon in closed position.

The present invention is related to the self latching hinge construction disclosed in my copending applica tion for U.S. letters Patent Ser. No. 807,796 filed Feb. 25,1969, now Patent No. 3,605,175.

The aforesaid earlier hinge construction has been.

eminently satisfactory but is subject to certain shortcomings avoided by the present invention. For example, the spring leaf of the earlier design included an indentation in its mid portion shaped to seat in a complementally shaped seating recess and its opposite ends where slightly curled adjacent portions of the spring wiped by the edges of the fulcrum lobes carried by the hinge curl as the hinge approaches and moves away from its closed position. In some instances, these structural features cause premature failure of the spring due to fracture of the spring in the vicinity of the indentation, as well as wear in the lobe'engaging areas, and objectionable noise and squeaking under certain adverse conditions.

Accordingly, it is a primary purpose of the present invention to provide an improved self-latching hinge avoiding the foregoing and other minor shortcomings of prior hinge designs of this type and, additionally, to include other features of a desirable and unique nature. To this end, in the hinge construction of this invention the spring means supplying the latching power is formed from one or more leaf springs captively retained within non-metallic cage means shaped to have interlocking engagement with portions of the hinge curl structure of one hinge leaf. The spring cage is interposed between the spring and camming lobes carried by the curls of the other spring leaf so that the spring means is stressed by forces transmitted through the resilient cage thereby avoiding any wiping contact between metallic components, greatly minimizing wear on the parts, and eliminating any possibility of noise.

Another feature involves the provision of tang means integral with one hinge leaf and having positioning edges accurately parallel with the hinge axis and effective to engage the edge of a door or other structure on which the hinge is being mounted to hold the hinge axis accurately parallel to the door edge while the hinge fasteners are being installed.

Still another feature of the present hinge is the provision of a pair of hinge pins designed to have a press fit with one another as well as with the interior surfaces of the hinge curl on one hinge leaf. This dual press fit provides ample insurance against the possibility of disassembly of the pins and avoids the need for fasteners or the need toupset any portion of theghinge pin to complete the assembly operation. Additionally, the present hinge pins can be disassembled and reassembled repeatedly.

Either a single or multiple spring leaf may be used to perform the latching function and this expedient makes it a simple matter to' change or adjust the strength of the spring bias. The latching lobes include two distinct surfaces located at different radial distances from the hinge axis, the higher lobe surface being effective to provide relatively strong latching action whereas the lower relatively broad lobe surface is positioned to slow the opening action of the door an-hinge after release from latched position, thereby avoiding the possibility of the door swinging open rapidly and against the operator or some other object in its path.

It is therefore a primary object. of the present invention to provide an improved, self-latching hinge Encorporating numerous novel features.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a self latching hinge designed for assembly quickly and simply utilizing components interlocking and internesting with one another.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a self-latching hinge utilizing simply formed spring means nested into non-metallic retaining cage means having an interlocking fit with portions of the hinge curls.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an improved self-latching hinge energized by a leaf spring held captive in a non-metallic cage interposed between the ends of the spring and the camming lobes carried by I one of the hinge leaves thereby eliminating the possibility of wiping contact, noise and wear between metal components. I

Another object of the invention is the provision of a self latching hinge utilizing a leaf spring to bias the hinge to its closed position and so mounted on one hinge leaf that the opposite ends of the spring never contact any part of either hinge leaf.

These and other more specific objects will appear upon reading the following specification and claims and upon considering in connection therewith the attached drawing to which they relate.

Referring now to the drawing in which a preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated:

FIG. 1 is a horizontal cross sectional view through a cabinet door supported by one preferred embodiment of the invention self latching hinge;

FIG. 2 is a view taken along line 2--2 on FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary cross sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 3-3 on FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 4-4 on FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary cross sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 5-5 on FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the spring retainer cage;

FIG. 7 is an elevational sectional view taken along line 7-7 on FIG. 8 but with the door swung counterclockwise from a fully closed position and showing the opposite ends of the spring cage supported on the end curls of the pivoting hinge leaf;

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional view taken along line 8-8 on FIG. 7 but with the door swung further open;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 except showing the door approaching its closed latched position with the spring resting against the high point of the lobes;

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 9 but showing the door moving toward a more fully open position than in FIG. 9 and with the spring resting against the lower lobe;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the hinge per se as viewed from the interior side of its stationary leaf;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary cross sectional view through the tip of the mounting screw for the stationary leaf; and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken along line 13-13 on FIG. 3.

Referring initially more particularly to FIGS. 1 and 11, there is shown a preferred embodiment of the invention self latching hinge assembly designated generally 10. Hinge includes a U-shaped first or stationary leaf 11 equipped with a clamping screw 12 holding this leaf clamped to the edge of a cabinet door frame 13. The second or pivoting hinge leaf 14 is secured to a cabinet door 15 as by screws 16. One leg of the U-shaped stationary leaf 11 is turned outwardly at substantially 90 thereto and formed into a pair of aligned but axially separated curls 23,23 (FIG. 11). These curls interleaf with axially aligned curls 24,25,26 formed on the out-turned adjacent edge of the second hinge leaf 14. When accurately intermeshed the curls are held assembled by a pair of hinge pins 20,21 (FIG. 4) the inner ends of which are forcibly telescoped together at 22, the nesting ends having a snug press fit. The interior surfaces 23 contiguous to the adjacent ends of curl 25 also have a snug frictional fit with the juxtaposed surfaces of hinge pins 20,21. Accordingly, it will be recognized that this latter press fit as well as the press fit between the telescoped ends 22 of the pins supplement one another in holding the hinge pins assembled. Should one of these press fits be defective or inadequate for any reason the other will remain effective to hold the hinge leaves assembled. The outer ends of both pins are headed, as is clearly shown in FIG. 4, and a sharp edged tool may be inserted beneath these heads and used to pry the pins apart should it be desirable for any reason to disassemble hinge leaves 11,14. After disassembly the parts are reassembled by again pressing the pins home. Disassembly may be carried out a number of times without adverse affects on the effectiveness ofthe several friction fits between the parts.

The mounting of hinge assembly 10 to door frame 13 and door 15 is preferably carried out by first securing the pivoting leaf 14 of a pair of hinges to the inner face of a door 15. As herein shown, door 15 has a bevelled edge 19 serving in part as a finger grip in opening the door and, in part, to conceal a major portion of the hinge area, as is evident from FIG. 1. The accurate positioning of a pair of the hinges preliminary to fastening them to the door with their hinge axes aligned and accurately parallel to the edge 19 of the door is greatly expedited by the provision of positioning and aligning tangs 28,28 best shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 5. These tangs are integral with hinge leaf 14 and project outwardly therefrom with one corner edge accurately spaced from and parallel to the hinge axis. Accordingly, the installer merely places a pair of the hinges against the rear face of the door and shifts them to the left as viewed in FIGS. 3 and 5 until tangs 28 are in firm abutment with door edge 19 until the fastening screws 16 are firmly tightened.

Thereafter the hinge-equipped door is easily installed by a novice by placing the U-shaped leaves 11 astride the edge of door frame 13 and holding them firmly in this position while the single clamping screw 12 of each is tightened against the inner surface of the door frame. Clamping screw 12 has a self-tapping thread 120 and the pointed forward end of which shank is forcibly threaded into a dished pressure pad such as washer 12b (FIG. 12). The sharprim edge of this pad bites into the wood as screw 12 is tightened and provides a wide area clamping base the holding action of which preferably is supplemented by sharp edged ribs 12c stamped into the inner surface of leaf 11 as is best shown in FIG. 3. These ribs are forced to bite into the outer face of door frame 13 as clamping screw 12 is tightened.

The spring subassembly comprises a spring retainer cage 30, best shown in FIG. 6, and one or more flat leaf springs 31,32. Cage 30 is preferably molded in one piece from a tough resilient thermoplastic material and embodies a considerable number of features best illustrated in FIGS. 4, 6 and 7. Cage 30 can be roughly described as generally channel shaped in cross section and is closed at its opposite ends by endwalls 33 which protrude across the opposite ends of spring leaves 31,32 and are recessed to accommodate these ends. The springs may be of different thicknesses and strength and, if desired, a single spring may be employed to provide whatever spring strength is desired for a particular installation. In this connection it will be understood that the stiffer the spring the stronger the latching action. The bottom walls of cage 30 slope upwardly and outwardly to provide camming surfaces 34 to facilitate assembly of the spring in cage 30 and beneath the flat portion of center curl 25 carried by pivoting hinge leaf 14. This detail will become more apparent from following portions of this description. The higher ends 35 of camming surfaces 34 are positioned to engage the adjacent surfaces of the leaf spring when the spring assembly is under high stress and this detail likewise will be described more fully presently.

The mid portion of cage 30 carries a pair of outwardly protruding bosses 36,37. Boss 36 extends into the space between curls 23,23 (FIGS. 4 and 7) and cooperates with these curls to lock the cage against endwise displacement, whereas boss 37 projects outwardly from one side only of cage 30 and lies flush against the interior sidewall of curl 25 (FIG. 3). It will be understood that the total width of cage 30 in a plane passing through bosses 36,37 is such that cage 30 has a sliding fit between the parallel sidewalls of curl 25, a fact made clear by FIG. 3.

Curl 25 embraces the mid portion of the hinge pin as well as straddles the adjacent portion of the spring and its retaining cage 30. Curl 25 is best shown in FIG. 3 and is generally D-shaped as viewed from either end with its curved side closely embracing the hinge pin and its flat side serving as a fixed rest for the bowed mid portion of springs 31,32. One end of the straight portion of the curl extends into and is staked to an opening 39 of hinge leaf 14, this detail being best shown in FIG.

3. Prior to assembly, spring leaves 31,32 are flat. However, owing to the dimensions of the parts, and the position of the flat shelf portions of curl 25, the springs are stressed and bowed slightly when in assembled position. This assembly is carried out by first inserting the cage until seated, and then inserting the springs endwise of the cage using cam surface 34 to cam the advance end of the spring into assembled position.

When the hinge is in open position, shallow basses 40 protruding towards the hinge pin from the bottom of cage 30 rest against the adjacent surfaces of curl 24 and 26 in the manner shown in FIG. 7. At this time the op posite ends of the springs are supported on the recesses in the rims of the cage endwall 33 (FIG. 7). However, when the spring assembly is supported on the camming lobes 45, as it is in the position of the parts shown in FIG. 4, springs 31,32 are bowed and bosses 40 are out of contact with curls 24,26. The spring ends are no longer supported on the recessed rims of endwalls 33, but instead on surfaces 35 at the upper higher ends of the camming surfaces 34 of cage 30.

The latching lobes will now be described, it being noted that curls 23 of stationary hinge leaf 11 are considerably wider than the curls of leaf 14. The adjacent ends of curls 23 encircle the hinge pins and grip these pins tightly as aforementioned, whereas the remote ends of curls 23,23 embrace somewhat less than 180 of the hinge pin, with the free end of the curls projecting tangentially to the hinge pin, as is best shown in FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 to form camming lobes 45 each having a high point 46. A supplemental high point 46 (FIGS. 9, 10) has a considerably broader surface circumferentially of the hinge pin and is spaced radially closer to the hinge pin axis than is the highest edge 46 of lobes 45.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that as door moves clockwise from an open position, such as that shown in FIG. 8, toward closed position, that the under or bottom side of the thermoplastic cage 30 will be under no stress because its bosses 40 are at rest against curls 24,26 (FIG. 7). As the door swings to the position shown in FIG. 10. cage 30 pivots in an arc in contact with the relatively low-height supplemental camming surfaces 46' and approaches a position wherein it starts to ride up onto the high portion of the latching lobes 46. Continued clockwise pivotal movement of the door then causes cage 30 to ride on the high point 46 of lobes 45, a position indicated in FIG. 9. At this time, springs 31,32 are bowed to a maximum and are stressed to swing the door closed and hold it firmly latched closed. Under these conditions the parts will be in the position shown in FIG. 4 and the springs will be bearing against surfaces 35 at the upper end of the inclined camming surfaces 34 of the cage. Any further closing pivotal movement of the door carries the springs and supporting cage clockwise beyond the high point 46 of lobes 45 with the result that the stressed condition of the spring snaps the door closed and latches it in that position with the still partially stressed springs pressing against the high edge 46 of lobes 45 from their righthand faces as viewed in FIG. 9.

Door 15 remains firmly closed against the door frame until such time as the operator grasps the left hand of the door edge, as viewed in FIG. 1, and pulls the door counterclockwise about the axis of hinge pins 20,21. In doing so, spring cage 30 rides up onto the high point 46 of the lobes. After it is opened past the position shown in FIG. 9, the released spring stresses tend to accelerate the opening movement but this movement is arrested as the rear face of cage 30 comes into bearing contact with the rising bulge on the lowheight lobes 46. These slow the opening movement as the door continues to pivot to a position generally normal to the front of the cabinet. If desired however, arresting lobe surfaces 46 may be extended to maintain bearing pressure against the bottom surface of retainer 30. When the door swings past surfaces 46' cage bosses 40 will rest against end curls 24,26 (FIG. 7). These curls are attached to the pivoting second leaf and ac-. cordingly there is no relative: wiping movement between these bosses and the curls.

All wiping movement between any part of the spring cage assembly is confined to the contact of the cage with surfaces 46,46 of camming lobes 45. Since these are located along the inner side of the hinge pins, they are concealed from view.

Reference is now had to FIGS. 2, 9, 10 and 11 from which it will be observed that stationary hinge leaf 11 is considerably larger than hinge leaf 14. This expedient not only strengthens the hinge but makes it feasible to provide a large cut-out in the b ight portion and the outer leg of leaf 1! sized to accommodate pivotal movement of smaller leaf 14 into the plane of this cutout. Thus, smaller leaf 14 can occupy a portion of opening 50 and lie in the same plane as the outer leg of binge leaf 11 in the closed position of the hinge, this position of the parts being clearly illustrated in FIGS. 1, 3 and 5.

While the particular self latching hinge herein shown and disclosed in detail is fully capable of attaining the objects and providing the advantages hereinbefore stated, it is to be understood that it is merely illustrative of the invention, and that no limitations are intended to the detail of construction or design herein shown other than as defined in the appended claims.

ICLAIM:

l. A latching hinge having first and second hinge leaves having interleaving curls pivotally interconnected, said first leaf having lobe means formed as a part of said curls of said first hinge leaf and the edge of which lobe means is closely offset from and parallel to the hinge axis, means separable from said second hinge leaf supporting stiff spring means captively thereon and lengthwise of said hinge axis with its mid-length loaded against an intermediate portion of said second leaf, and said lobe means being positioned to flex the opposite ends of said stiff spring means as said second hinge leaf approaches the normally closed position of a closure member adapted to be mounted thereon thereby to increase the stress on said stiff spring means and to utilize the stress stored in said spring means to urge a closure mounted on said second hinge leaf closed as said second hinge leaf continues toward the closed position thereof.

2. A latching hinge as defined in claim I characterized in that said spring means includes long flat leaf spring means lying in a plane closely parallel to the plane of said second leaf.

3. A latching hinge as defined in claim 1 characterized in that said lobe means are effective to pick up the loading of said spring means from the adjacent portions of said first hinge leaf as said second hinge leaf approaches said closed position.

4. A latching hinge as defined in claim 2 characterized in that said means supporting said spring means includes non-metallic means embracing major portions of said leaf spring.

5. A latching hinge as defined in claim 4 characterized in that said leaf spring supporting means comprises molded plastic material.

6. A latching hinge as defined in claim 4 characterized in that said leaf spring supporting means is interposed between said spring said lobe means and the adjacent curls of said first hinge leaf.

7. A latching hinge as defined in claim 1 characterized in that said spring means includes at least one long flat spring means and a one-piece plastic cage having a recess embracing the opposite ends of said spring means and interposed between one face of said spring means and the adjacent curls of said first hinge leaf.

8. A latching spring as defined in claim 7 characterized in that said recess in said plastic cage is sized to snugly seat and embrace said flat spring means.

9. A latching hinge as defined in claim 8 characterized in that the bottom of at least one end of said recess slopes gradually downwardly and inwardly toward the center of the recess from an area adjacent the outer end of said recess.

10. A latching hinge as defined in claim 8 characterized in that the spring embracing recess is deeper in the mid portion thereof and slopes gradually toward the shallower opposite end portions thereof to facilitate insertion of said spring means into the recess lengthwise of said recess and spring means.

11. A latching hinge as defined in claim 1 characterized in that said second hinge leaf is U-shaped with the legs thereof lying parallel to one another and spaced to embrace the edge of a fixed support for said hinge, and adjustable clamping means threaded so that one of said U-legs is remote from said second hinge leaf and effective to anchor said second leaf to said hinge support.

12. A latching hinge as defined in claim 11 characterized in that the U-leg of said second hinge leaf closer to the hinge axis and at least an adjacent portion of the bight portion of said second hinge leaf are blanked out thereby to permit said first hinge leaf to lie substantially in the plane of said last mentioned U-leg when the closure is in closed position.

13. A latching hinge as defined in claim 11 characterized in that the hinge axis thereof is designed to be mounted spaced outwardly from the exterior face of fixed support means for said hinge and rearwardly from one lateral edge of said support means thereby to support a closure for pivotal movement about the hinge axis and toward and away from said fixed support means.

14. A latching hinge as defined in claim 11 characterized in that said second hinge leaf is substantially larger than said first hinge leaf, and the U-leg nearest said hinge axis is blanked out in an area sufficient to accommodate said first hinge leaf when the latter is pivoted to lie generally in the plane of said U-leg.

15. A latching hinge as defined in claim 1 characterized in that the curls of said first hinge leaf have auxiliary lobe means on the exterior side thereof positioned to engage the adjacent surface of said stiff spring means as said second hinge leaf pivots toward the open position thereof and away from its latched position and effective to slow the opening of the second hinge leaf under the decreasing effective stress imposed thereon by said spring means.

16. A latching hinge as defined in claim 15 characterized in that said auxiliary lobe means is formed integral with the curls of said first hinge leaf.

17. A latching hinge having first and second leaves provided with interleaving curls pivotally interconnected by pivot pin means and having a hinge axis offset outwardly from the plane of a closure frame, said first leaf having a pair of curls spaced from either end of a center curl, said center curl being D-shaped and sufficiently deep in a direction normal to the hinge axis to accommodate biasing means for said hinge leaves, said biasing means including long leaf spring means and a plastic cage therefor, means holding said biasing means being assembled within said D-shaped curl with the opposite ends bearing against the adjacent ones of said pair of curls and the mid portion thereof bearing against the upright of said D-shaped curl, and said second leaf having lobes offset from the hinge axis and positioned to bear against the opposite end portions of said biasing means and effective to load said leaf spring as said hinge leaves approach one relative pivoted position thereof.

18. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that said flat spring means is straight prior to assembly to said first hinge leaf and is slightly bowed lengthwise thereof when in assembled position.

19. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that said cage means has shoulder means engageable with the hinge curls in the assembled position of said first and second hinge leaves thereby to lock said biasing means in assembled position.

20. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that said plastic cage has a shallow recess in one face thereof with means engaging the ends and edges of said spring to hold the same against relative disassembly when said biasing means is in an assembled position.

21. A latching hinge as defined in claim 20 characterized in that the spring seating recess of said cage means has a bottom sloping upwardly and outwardly toward the opposite ends thereof for camming and guiding one end of said spring means into position as the same is inserted endwise along said recess after said cage means has been assembled to said first hinge leaf.

22. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that said plastic cage has limited flexibility lengthwise thereof and flexes with the adjacent ends of said spring means as the same is placed under increasing stress by said lobes.

23. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that said cage is wider at the mid portion thereof and adapted to have a press fit with the juxtaposed interior wall surface of the center curl of said first hinge leaf and whereby the same isheld snugly and immovably in place upon being assembled to said first hinge member.

24. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that one lateral end of said D-shaped curl is integral with said first hinge leaf, and the other end of said D-shaped curl is inserted endwise into snug assembly with an opening in said first hinge member.

25. A latching hinge as defined in claim 24 characterized in that said other end of said D-shaped curl comprises the upright leg thereof.

26. A latching hinge as defined in claim 25 characterized in that the mid portion of said flat spring means bears against the interior surface of the upright leg of said D-shaped curl.

27. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that said first hinge leaf has a pair of short tangs struck outwardly therefrom having aligned outer free edges spaced closely from and parallel to said hinge axis on the side of said leaf adapted to be secured to a mounting surface, said free tang edges being engageable with the edge of the mounting surface to aid in the accurate mounting of said first hinge leaf.

28. A latching hinge as defined in claim 17 characterized in that said second hinge leaf is of U-shape with the legs thereof adapted to embrace the edge of a closure frame, and manually adjustable clamping means carried by one of the U-legs of said second leaf for clamping said hinge in its operating position with the bight portion thereof seated against the edge of the frame.

29. A latching hinge as defined in claim 27 characterized in that said second leaf is U-shaped and pro vided with clamping screw means for gripping the edge of a closure frame when assembled thereabout, the bight of said U-shaped second hinge leaf being parallel to the hinge axis and effective to assure proper positioning of the hinge prior to tightening said clamping screw means.

30. A latching hinge having first and second leaves provided with interleaving curls pivotally interconnected by pivot pin means, said first leaf being adapted to be secured to a door frame and said second leaf to the door therefor, the curls of said first leaf having a first and second lobe means of different radial heights,

spring means carried by said second hinge leaf having a portion positioned to be stressed by each of said lobe 7 means as said hinge leaves pivot relative to one another, said first lobe means being positioned to stress said spring means as a door mounted on said second hinge leaf approaches closed position and so as to hold the door closed against the door frame when in that position, and said second lobe means being located in the path of, said spring means as the latter overrides said first lobe means while said second hinge leaf is pivoting away from the closed door position thereof and said second lobe means cooperating to act as a buffer to slow the opening movement of the hinge.

31. A latching hinge as defined in claim 30 characterized in the provision of a pair of each of said first and second lobe means spaced to either side of the mid portion of said hinge pin means.

32. A latching hinge as defined in claim 30 characterized in that said spring means comprises a long leaf spring having its mid portion anchored to the mid width of said second hinge leaf with it opposite ends positioned to wipe across said first and second lobe means in succession as said second hinge leaf pivots between the open and closed positions thereof.

33. A latching hinge as defined in claim 32 characterized in the provision of a non-metallic buffer between said lobe means and said spring means to prevent metal-to-metal contact therebetween.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2174986 *Jun 23, 1937Oct 3, 1939Grand Rapids Brass CompanyHinge
US3262149 *Jan 22, 1964Jul 26, 1966Ajax Hardware Mfg CorpHinge latch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3908228 *Dec 20, 1974Sep 30, 1975Amerock CorpSelf-closing hinge
US4439888 *Dec 17, 1981Apr 3, 1984Merillat Industries, Inc.Substantially concealed hinge for door with recess
US4845810 *Jun 13, 1988Jul 11, 1989Ron BrownSelf closing hinge
US5355117 *Nov 18, 1992Oct 11, 1994Jefferson Len BVehicle warning sign
US7258386 *Mar 28, 2006Aug 21, 200789908, Inc.Fuel door assembly
US20060284440 *Mar 28, 2006Dec 21, 2006Horst LeitnerFuel door assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/278, 16/50, 16/382, 16/293
International ClassificationE05F1/12, E05D11/10, E05D5/06
Cooperative ClassificationE05D11/1014, E05F1/1284, E05D11/105, E05D5/06, E05Y2900/20
European ClassificationE05D11/10D