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Publication numberUS3715817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1973
Filing dateJan 17, 1972
Priority dateMar 9, 1971
Also published asCA939141A1, DE2202328A1
Publication numberUS 3715817 A, US 3715817A, US-A-3715817, US3715817 A, US3715817A
InventorsKnight B, White D
Original AssigneeWhite Knight Prod Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe studs
US 3715817 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 13, 1973 D, J, H ETAL 3,715,817

SHOES STUDS Filed Jan. 17, 1972 FIG. 2.

United States Patent Office 3,715,817 Patented Feb. 13, 1973 U.S. Cl. 36-67 D Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A stud assembly for shoes, for example, golf shoes comprises a flange member for engagement in a conventional socketin the sole of a shoe, the flange spreading the load over a suitable area of the sole of the shoe and a stud member removably press fitted into a central bore in the flange member.

This invention is concerned with studs for footwear, particularly sporting footwear such as golfing shoes, cricket boots, soccer and rugby boots and the like. As the invention is primarily concerned with studs for golfing shoes, such sporting footwear will be hereinafter referred to simply as shoes.

A common form of golfing stud comprises a threaded socket embedded in the sole of the golfing shoe and a stud member having a threaded pin engaging the socket, a broad flange for engaging the sole of the shoe and the stud itself extending from the flange. Therefore, as the stud member becomes worn it should be possible to unscrew it from the socket and substitute a new stud member. In practice, however, problems arise through damage to the threads of the socket or of the stud member and the assembly is also subject to corrosion through the action of the surface dressing employed on golfing greens.

It is an object of the present invention to obviate or mitigate these ditficulties.

The present invention is a flange member for shoes, including a flange for engaging the sole of a shoe, a boss projecting from the upper surface of the flange and adapted to fit a socket in the sole of the shoe, a slot extending across the boss, and a bore passing through the flange and boss and tapering from at least one end to a minimum cross-section.

The present invention is also the combination of a flange member, as defined in the last preceding paragraph, and a stud member which includes a stud, a flange engaging the lower surface of the flange of the flange member, and a pin projecting from the flange and engaging the bore of the flange member, the pin being retained in the flange member by a portion of increased cross section on that side of the bore minimum cross section which is remote from the flanges.

The present invention is further the combination as defined in the last preceding paragraph located in a socket, the pin expanding the wall of the boss into engagement with the socket. I

The present invention is additionally a shoe having embedded in the sole thereof sockets each of which has located therein the combination defined in the second last preceding paragraph.

An embodiment of the present invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of one part of a stud assembly according to the present invention; and

FIG. 2 is an elevation of another part of a stud assembly according to the present invention.

The two parts of the assembly illustrated in the drawing are intended to be used in combination with each other and a conventional threaded socket which is embedded in the sole of a golfing shoe.

In FIG. 1 a flange member 10 is illustrated having a broad flange 11 for engaging the sole of a golfing shoe. A recess 12 is provided in one surface, the lower surface 13 of the flange 11, and from the other surface 14 projects a boss 15. The external surface of the boss 15 is threaded and dimensioned to match the threaded socket in the shoe sole. A bore 18 passes through the boss 15, the bore 18 tapering from both ends to a minimum cross section at 19. A slot 20 is provided through the boss 15.

A stud member 25 is shown in FIG. 2 and comprises a stud 26, a flange 27 and a pin 28. The flange 27 and pin 28 are dimensioned to engage the recess 12 and bore 18 respectively of the flange member 10, and at its upper end the pin 28 is provided with a portion 30 of increased cross section. Adjacent the flange 27, the stud 26 is provided with a ridge 31 which allows the stud to be gripped by a tool for removal.

The complete stud assembly includes a socket which is embedded in the sole of the shoe. To fit the assembly, the boss 15 of the flange member 10 is located in the socket and pushed home so that the surface 15 of the flange 11 is located against the sole of the shoe. It is not necessary to screw the member 10 into position since the flange member is of a material such that the threads of the boss 15 are resilient and thus will adapt to the thread configuration of the socket in any relative angular position, and will yield to permit movement of the boss 15 into the socket past the threads of the socket. The stud member 25 is then taken and the pin 28 passed through the bore 18. The portion 30 forces apart the two halves of the boss one on either side of the slot, as it passes the minimum cross section 19 and is thereby retained against accidental withdrawal. The diameter of the pin is sufficient to maintain the halves of the boss in expanded position so that the threads on the boss and socket engage and the assembly is locked together in position on the shoe, the flange 27 being seated in the recess 12. The stud member may be withdrawn by an axial pull, the ridge 31 being gripped by pincers, but such an axial pull is much greater than any likely to be encountered in normal use of the shoes.

It is desirable to make the flange member of a plastics material, such as nylon, and the stud member of a corrosion resistant material such as cadmium or zinc-plated or similarly treated steel or other metal.

It is a feature of this stud that it will not damage in any way the socket in the side of the shoe and an added advantage is that sockets which would not take a conventional stud because of damage or corrosion previously mentioned will be able to be restudded by the invention.

Additionally if shoe manufacturers were to put these studs in during manufacture, the socket, even after several restuddings, would still be undamaged and able to take a conventional threaded stud if desired. Also shoe manuafcturers should find it considerably easier to assemble the studs of this invention, than to assemble conventional studs and therefore show production economies.

Modifications may be made to the embodiment described. For example, it is not necessary that the external surface of the boss be threaded. Parallel grooves would serve and indeed a smooth surface could prove adequate, the thread in the socket cutting its own grooves as the boss is expanded.

If the stud is to be subjected to particularly rough treatment, it is desirable to provide the bore in the flange member above the minimum cross section 19 with a uniform diameter defining an upwardly facing shoulder above the minimum cross section 19. In this case the pin 28 would be correspondingly stepped. This modification provides a more secure anchorage for stud memher.

We claim:

1. A flange member for shoes, including a flange for engaging the sole of a shoe, a boss projecting from the upper surface of the flange and adapted to fit a socket in the sole of the shoe, a slot extending across the boss, and a bore passing through the flange and boss and tapering from at least one end to a minimum cross section.

2. A member as claimed in claim 1, in which said bore tapers from both ends to said minimum cross section.

3. A member as claimed in claim 1, in which the external surface of the boss is threaded.

4. A member as claimed in claim 1, including a recess around said bore on the lower surface of the flange.

5'. A flange member for shoes as claimed in claim 1, in combination with a stud member comprising a stud, a flange engaging the lower surface of the flange of the flange member, and a pin projecting from the flange and engaging the :bore of the flange member, the pin being retained in the flange member by a portion of increased cross section on that side of the bore minimum cross section which is remote from the flanges.

6. A combination as claimed in claim 5, located in a socket, the pin expanding the Wall of the boss into engagement with the socket.

7. A shoe having embedded in the sole thereof sockets each of which has located therein the combination claimed in claim 5.

8. A member as claimed in claim 5, in which said bore tapers from both ends to said minimum cross section.

9. A member as claimed in claim 5, in which the ex:

ternal surface of the boss is threaded.

10. A member as claimed in claim 5, including a recess around said bore on the lower surface of the flange.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,584,182 2/1952 Bernstein 36--67 D 3,552,043 1/1971 Mofla 36-67 D 3,566,489 3/1971 Morley 36-67 D PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4360490 *Aug 16, 1979Nov 23, 1982Triman LimitedStuds for footwear and method of making same
US4380878 *Sep 26, 1980Apr 26, 1983Keds CorporationOutsole
US4651448 *May 29, 1986Mar 24, 1987Contax Sports, Inc.Golf spike assembly
US4723366 *Feb 5, 1985Feb 9, 1988Macneill Engineering Company, Inc.For attachemnt to the underside of footwear
US4922636 *Sep 15, 1987May 8, 1990Contax Sports Inc.Shoe spike/receptacle assembly
US5623774 *May 3, 1996Apr 29, 1997Greenspike, Inc.Stud for sport shoes
US5860228 *Jun 25, 1997Jan 19, 1999Bite, LlcAll purpose nubbed cleat for shoes and other non-slip applications
US5960568 *Feb 19, 1998Oct 5, 1999Michael BellTo mount to a flexible ground engaging portion of an article of footwear
US6154984 *Jun 28, 1999Dec 5, 2000Adam; John M.Golf shoe cleat
US6253468 *Jun 19, 2000Jul 3, 2001Kyowa Electric And Chemical Co., Ltd.Spike structure for sporting shoes
US6338208 *Sep 29, 1999Jan 15, 2002Concurrent Technologies CorporationShort shoe spike
US6513266 *Mar 12, 1999Feb 4, 2003Yasuhiro IjiriSlipping prevention device for footwear
US6647647Nov 20, 2001Nov 18, 2003Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a ground-engaging member and method of altering a ground-engaging member
US6722061Nov 20, 2001Apr 20, 2004Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a replaceable ground-engaging member and method of attaching the ground-engaging member
US6941684Feb 20, 2004Sep 13, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a replaceable ground-engaging member and method of attaching the ground-engaging member
US7430819Dec 22, 2004Oct 7, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with height adjustable cleat-member
US7774958 *Mar 12, 2007Aug 17, 2010Carruthers Stephen MReplaceable shoe cleat
US20130305567 *May 15, 2012Nov 21, 2013Nike, Inc.Spike for footwear having rigid portion and resilient portion
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/67.00D
International ClassificationA43C15/16, A43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/167
European ClassificationA43C15/16C1B