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Publication numberUS3716238 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1973
Filing dateJul 13, 1970
Priority dateJul 13, 1970
Publication numberUS 3716238 A, US 3716238A, US-A-3716238, US3716238 A, US3716238A
InventorsPorter B
Original AssigneePorter B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of prearranging playing cards for educational and entertainment purposes
US 3716238 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 13, 1973 METHOD OF PREARRANGING PLAYING CARDS FOR EDUCATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES B. W. PORTER Filed July 13, 1970 /ITTORNE YS United States Patent O 3,716,238 METHOD OF PREARRANGING FLAYING CARDS FOR EDUCATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES Brooks W. Porter, 9102 Tooley, Houston, Tex. Filed `Iuly 13, 1970, Ser. No. 54,431 Int. Cl., A63f l/14 U.S. Cl. 273-149 P 2 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A playing card having indicia arranged thereon permitting arrangement of a deck of such cards into a plurality of predetermined dealing sequences by a new and improved method of forming the indicia in a deck of the cards, and prearranging the deck for dealing in accordance with the indicia, which arranges decks of cards in predetermined sequences and which results in selected playing hands for educational or entertainment purposes.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (l) Field of the invention The present invention relates to playing cards and methods of prearranging decks of such cards for educational or entertainment purposes.

(2) Description of the prior art In playing duplicate bridge for competitive purposes, or for entertainment or amusement, or in learning to play bridge or teaching others to do so, the deck of playing cards was dealt, or divided, into predetermined, prearranged hands.

The prior art, such as U.S. Pats. 2,051,615; 3,169,319; and 3,222,071, taught special apparatus to accomplish the prearranged dealing.

The apparatus which automatically dealt the cards, such as that in U.S. Pat. 2,051,615, was large, bulky, complex, cumbersome and expensive, and slow in operation. The apparatus required a plurality of different selector devices r discs, each suitable for dealing only one preselected bridge hand. Conductive discs or strips were adhesively applied to the playing cards in order that the apparatus could distinguish the cards. Such discs would often loosen from the cards during shutllng, dealing, playing and other use of the cards, reducing the operating effectiveness of the dealing machine.

In the apparatus of U.S. Pats. 3,165,319 and 3,222,071, an indicator card unique to the preselected desired hand was inserted in the apparatus7 causing the apparatus to indicate which player was recipient of the sequentially presented cards. Since the cards were presented to the apparatus in no particular order, the dealing sequence was unnatural and sporadic, because one player might be dealt several cards in a sequence and then skipped for numerous cards. The dealing sequence was thus awkward and undesirable when contrasted to the standard clockwise card dealing sequence where each player sequentially received one card at a time.

Thte prior art playing cards used in prearranged dealing, such as those of U.S. Pats. 2,296,113; 3,165,319; and 3,236,524; were marked with plural coded indicia each designating which of the four players was to receive each card for one of a plurality of prearranged hands. In the 3,716,238 Patented Feb. 13, 1973 rice play of the hands, particularly in duplicate bridge, the determination of the placement of certain key cards such as aces, kings and queens among the hands of the players was critical to the success or failure of the play of the hands. During the play of a hand using prior art playing cards, a player was able to note the indicia for the next deal on the back of the key cards as they were played, and thus know in advance the placement of such cards during the next deal, frustrating the requirement that no player know the contents of his opponents hands.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION With the present invention, coded indicia determining the dealing sequence of each card in a deck of playing cards for creating one or more prearranged dealing sequences are formed in the card in corresponding preselected positions. The cards are then arranged or sorted into a prearranged dealing sequence for play of the cards for educational or entertainment purposes. After play of the first hand, the cards may be rearranged into another leading sequence for play of another prearranged hand.

The playing cards of the present invention bear coded indicia determining the dealing sequence of a deck of such cards to create a plurality of prearranged playing hands, which indicia are substantially indecipherable for purposes of determining which player will receive a particular card in subsequent dealing sequences.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved playing card and method of pre-arranging such cards.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved method of prearranging a deck of playing cards by forming coded indicia therein indicating the dealing sequence required to form desired prearranged hands, and arranging the deck for dealing in accordance with such coded indicia to create the desired prearranged hands for educational or entertainment purposes.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved playing card bearing coded indicia thereon which indicate the order of the card in the dealing sequence and yet are substantially indecipherable for determining in advance the particular placement of the cards in any future prearranged hands.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view of the playing card of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a portion of the playing card of FIG. l arranged in a different position; and

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of the method of the present invention for arranging the playing cards for educational or entertainment purposes.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the drawings, the letter P designates generally one embodiment of the new and improved playing card of the present invention in which plural coded indicia I, which determine the order in the dealing sequence of each playing card P in a deck of such playing cards, are formed to permit arrangement of the deck of cards into a plurality of sequences. When the cards are dealt in one of the sequences, they form prearranged playing hands for bridge and the like for educational and entertainment purposes.

In FIG. l a playing card P of the present invention which may be made plastic, stiff paper, celluloid, cardboard or other suitable well-known material, is shown. The card P may be coated with plastic or other suitable material to enhance the service life of such card P. The playing card P bears a rank marking 1t) representing an Ace and a suit marking Il representing a Diamond formed at two opposing corners 20 thereof. A deck of the cards P of the present invention used for bridge 1ncludes the standard thirteen ranks: Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3 and 2 in each of the four suits: Spades, Hearts, Diamonds and Clubs.

The card P is shown in a position of reading alignment as it would be held by a player during use, with the rank marking l in one of the corners 20 extending horizontally across the card P from left to right so that such marking is legible.

A portion of a corner 20a has been removed along an edge 2Gb to form a corner for alignment purposes, as will be more evident hereinafter.

A plurality of indicia I, consisting of a plurality of apertures 3G, are formed at preselected locations in the card P in a coding arrangement to be set forth below, corresponding to the numerical order in the` dealing sequence in which the card is dealt to create prearranged selected playing hands for bridge and other card games for educational and entertainment purposes and the like.

In PIG. 2, the playing card P has been rotated 90 counter-clockwise from the position of reading alignment illustrated in FIG. l in order to interpret and illustrate more clearly the coding arrangement of the indicia I on the card P. To preserve clarity in the drawings, only two sets of apertures St) serving as indicia I are illustrated in FIG. 2 although in actual operation, as many as fortyeight sets of apertures may be formed in the present embodiment of card P, as will be evident hereinafter. When the playing card P is in the position illustrated in FIG. 2,

2 across the card and which are transverse the axis of reading alignment previously set forth. This arrangement of the columns and groups G of indicia I on the player card aids in preventing deciphering of the indicia I when the playing card P is held in its normal position (FIG. l) during play of the cards.

With the card P in the position of FIG. 2, each of the groups G includes two vertical columns C, the first a units column U, and the second a tens column T. Each column C is divided into a plurality of coding rows H extending transverse the columns C, comprising a Zero row 40, a One row 41, a Two row 42, a Four row 44, and an Eight row 48. The apertures 30 are formed in preselected locations at intersections of the coding rows H with the units column U and the tens column T of each group G on the card P, forming a coded numerical representative of the order in which the card P is dealt in the dealing sequence to create a desired prearranged playing hand.

For example, in the leftmost group G in FIG. 2 representing a rst desired and prearranged dealing sequence, an aperture 30 formed in the Two row 42 represents a two in the units column U, and an aperture formed in each of the One row 4l and the Four row 44, indicate a ve in the tens column T. Thus, the playing card P will be the fifty-second in the first prearranged dealing sequence represented in the preselected location at the intersection of leftmost group G and row H.

In the rightmost group G in FIG. 2 representing a second desired prearranged dealing sequence, apertures 30 are formed in each of the One row 41 and the Two row 42, representing a three, in each of the tens column T and the units column U, indicating that the playing card P will be thirty-third in the second prearranged dealing Sequence represented by the coding arrangement of the Digit desired in Column C In the preferred embodiment of the coding arrangement of the present invention, a total of sixteen groups G and three coding rows H are formed creating a possible fortyeight (3x16) sets of indicia I representing prearranged dealing sequences to be formed in each playing card P, although other numbers of sets of indicia I may be used.

Referring now to FIG. 3, a schematic flow chart of the method of prearranging a deck of the playing cards P to form selected playing hands for educational and entertainment purposes and the like is shown.

A first playing hand for the four players is selected, for example, from hands described in publications such as instruction manuals, articles in magazines or newspapers instructing, or describing bridge matches and tournaments, books, pamphlets or circulars and the like, or from listings of bridge hands developed to be used for instructional or entertainment purposes, for example by a mechanical or automatic means of developing bridge hands, such as the memory of a computer as indicated schematically by block lOla.

A rst group G of the columns C is then preselected for use at the location wherein the coded indicia I for the dealing sequence, to form the tirst desired prearranged playing hand, are to be formed in each playing card.

A tirst card P, representing one of the thirteen cards that are to be included in the hand of the first player to the left of the dealer, is selected from the deck of cards. An aperture is formed in each of the One coding row 41 in the units column U and in the Zero coding row 4t) in the tens columns T in the group G by hand punching or by machine punching in a electronic data processing card punching machine of the well-known type, such as IBM Model 5496 or Model 5424. A card P of the thirteen to be included in the hand of the second player, the dealers partner, is then selected from the deck, and an aperture 30 is similarly formed in the Two coding row 42 in the units column U and in the Zero coding row in the ten column T. A card P from the thirteen to be included in the hand of third player is selected from the deck, and coded indicia I indicating a three, namely an aperture 30 in each of the One row 41 and the Two row 42 in the unit column U, and in the Zero coding row 40 in the tens column T. A playing card P to be included in the dealers hand, is selected from the deck and coded indicia 04 namely an aperture 30 formed in the Zero coding row 40 in the tens column T and an aperture 30 formed in the Four coding row 44 of the unit column U, are formed in the group G at the pre-selected location. A card P, representing a second card described as being in the first players hand is then selected from the deck and 05 coded indicia formed in the group G at the preselected location in a similar manner.

The above process of sequentially selecting cards and forming indicia I in increasing numerical sequence for the four playing hands is repeated until the last card in the dealers hand has been selected and marked with a 52 coded indicia I, as illustrated at the leftmost group G in FIG. 2, i

The step of forming indicia I at a preselected location of groups G f columns C corresponding to other numerical sequences of coded indicia beginning with 0l and ending with 52 to form other desired playing hands may be repeated at other preselected locations for other desired playing hands.

Alternatively, a random arrangement of playing cards P among the four players, as indicated schematically by the block 101b in FIG. 2, may be accomplished by first shuffling the cards P until they are in an unknown sequence. The irst card in the stack has coded indicia I of Ol formed at a preselected group G of columns C, the second card an 02, and so forth, until the last card is marked with a 52 coded indicia in the preselected location.

After the coded indicia I representing the desired prearranged playing hands have been formed in the playing cards P, the playing cards P are then aligned by ascertaining that the edge 2017 of each card P in the stack of cards comprising the deck is at a common location. The deck of cards is then inserted in an electronic data processing card sorting machine of the well-known type, such as IBM Model 5486.

A selected group G of columns C in a preselected location on the playing card P, corresponding to the desired prearranged playing hand, is then chosen. The card sorting machine is then adjusted to sense the coded indicia I in the unit column U of the preselected location. The cards P are inserted into a feeding hopper in the machine and the cards are sensed optically or electrically by the machine in the well-known manner as indicated schematically in FIG. 3 by block 164, and arranged into sorting pockets in the machine corresponding to the coded indicia I therein. The cards are removed from the sorting pockets in sequence from the machine and inserted into the feeding hopper. The card sorting machine is then adjusted to sense the coded indicia I in the tens column T in the preselected location, and the coded indicia I in the tens column T are sensed by the machine. The machine then a-rranges the cards P into sorting pockets. The cards are then removed from the sorting machine, and are in sequence, according to the numerical sequence of the coded indicia, to form the prearranged dealing sequence of the deck of playing cards.

The coded indicia I may alternatively be visually sensed by a user if held in the position of FIG. 2 and read and arranged into sequence by hand in accordance with the numerical sequence represented by such indicia if desired.

The cards P in the deck are then ready for dealing and play as indicated schematically `by blocks 105a and 105b in FIG. 3. The dealer may then deal the cards one at a time to the players in the natural clockwise dealing sequence rather than being forced to resort to cumbersore prior art structure or to deal in an unnatural and awkward dealing sequence.

The prearranged hand is then played, after which a review, critique and analysis of the play of the hand by the player is made and, if desired, consultation of teaching manuals may be accomplished.

After play of the prearranged hand, the deck of playing cards is reassembled, as indicated schematically by block 106b in FIG. 3, and the cards are re-sorted in a preselected location representing a new dealing sequence according to the steps of sensing and arranging previously discussed.

If the playing cards P of the present invention are to be maintained in the preselected hands, for example when being used for duplicate bridge purposes, the cards of each of the four players are maintained in a separate stack, as indicated schematically by the block 106a in FIG. 3, `and are not reassembled into a common deck. After play of the duplicate hand, the cards remain in the four prearranged hands and are available for replay or review, or are available for play by the next team of players in the duplicate bridge game, as is well known.

It should be understood that the coding arrangement described and disclosed above is for illustrative purposes, and the numerous other coding arrangement of apertures 30 to indicate the numerical order in the dealing sequence of the playing cards to form prearranged hands are equally adapted for use with the playing card of the present invention.

It should be further understood that the step of selecting a desired playing hand, either prearranged or random sequence, as previously set forth, can be performed in the memory of a computer properly programmed to perform such functions, and if desired, to punch these sequence indicia into the cards through the use of a card punching machine; or by any other suitable method of selecting desired playing hands.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape, and materials as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

l. A method of arranging a deck of playing cards into a prearranged dealing sequence so that the cards, when dealt to the players in a card game, form prearranged playing hands for educational and entertainment purposes and the like, comprising:

(a) forming coded indicia, each corresponding to the order in a numerical sequence in which each card is to be dealt to form prearranged playing hands, at common preselected locations in the cards;

(b) sensing a preselected location of each of the cards to determine the coded indicia formed therein;

(c) arranging the cards in sequence according to the numerical sequence of the coded indicia to form a prearranged dealing sequence of the deck of playing cards;

(d) sensing another preselected location of each of the cards subsequent to play of a prearranged hand to determine the coded indicia formed therein; and

(e) arranging the cards in sequence according to the numerical sequence of the coded indicia at said another preselected location to form a new prearranged dealing sequence.

2. The method of claim 1, further including the step of:

assembling the cards upon completion of play of a prearranged hand.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

209-74 R; 23S-61.12 R

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/149.00P, 235/489
International ClassificationA63F1/06, A63F1/00, A63F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02, A63F1/06
European ClassificationA63F1/02, A63F1/06