Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3717299 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 20, 1973
Filing dateMay 5, 1972
Priority dateMay 5, 1972
Publication numberUS 3717299 A, US 3717299A, US-A-3717299, US3717299 A, US3717299A
InventorsW Penn
Original AssigneeW Penn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Calendar and date computer
US 3717299 A
Abstract
A calendar to record the correct date over a span of many years, for instance from the year 1950 to the year 2025, and to count calendar days from any point in the year, either into the future or back in time. Indicia are also provided to determine what day of the week is associated with any particular date.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Feb 20, 1973 United States Patent [191 Penn 1541 CALENDAR AND DATE COMPUTER 1,495,805 /1924 Rooney............................. 2,154,013 4/1939 Schillaci.....

2,691,838 /1954 Langman....

3,374,948 3/1968 McColm.........."3::::..........235/88 FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS [22] Filed:

227,218 1/1957 Australia. ..............................235/78 586,998 12/1958 Italy 52 us. /113 a 51 Int. Cl. 3 00 Primary EmmmerRwhard Wflkmson 5s 1 Field of Search ......235/88, 84, 78, FC, 70 R, Amman Exammeristanley Wall 235 70 A; 0 3 Attorney-John Cyril Malloy [57] ABSTRACT A calendar to record the correct date over a span of [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS many years, for instance from the year 1950 to the year 2025, and to count calendar days from any point in the year, either into the future or back in time. Indicia are also provided to determine what day of the week is associated with any particular date.

10 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures m m Tm any" hh mm .m i r cn aau a MMHBTH 22809 800 2 899999 111111 Ill/ll 800 72 11 1 9002 2 789009 2034 6 07 0 27993 4 11 INDICATES 1 CALENDAR AND DATE COMPUTER O'BJECTS AND ADVANTAGES OF THE PRESENT INVENTION The present invention pertains to calendars for determining the date as well as computing future or past dates and the days of the week associated therewith.

It is a principal object of this invention to provide a calendar comprised generally of a base member with a rotatable dial and a rotatable arm assembled thereon one common pivot. It is a further object of the present invention to provide 365 numbered calibrations about the periphery of the rotatable dial, representing the days of 1 year, with indicia on each calibration identifying the days of the week.

A further object of the instant invention is to provide 365 like calibrations, on the base member, about the dial periphery which are in effect radial extensions of the dial calibrations.

A still further object of this invention is to provide twelve radially extended lines on the base member dividing the 365 calibrations thereon into properly numbered groupings representing the twelve months of the year.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide, on the dial, seven groupings of year dates, with leadlines extending from each grouping, identifying, on the first week of the year, the day of the week for each group on which the first of January falls.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a radially scribed hairline on the rotating arm.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the compute-a-date calendar of the present invention; and

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 2--2 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS With reference to the drawings, in which like reference numerals designate like or similar parts throughout the two views, the numeral indicates the calendar device, generally comprised of a base member 12, a rotatable dial 14 and an overlying, radially ex tending rotatable arm 16.

The rotatable dial and arm 14 and 16 are attached to the base member 12 on a common pivot means such as the eyelet 18 with the dial inbetween the base member 12 and the rotatable arm 16. While both the dial and arm 14 and 16 are freely movable about the pivot 18, sufficient frictional forces, to prevent accidental displacement thereof, is desirable.

Referring to FIG. 1, the dial 14 is provided with 365 equally spaced calibrations 20 which are numbered as at 22. The calibrations 20 represent the days of 1 year. As indicated at 24 on the first 20 calibrations, indicia is provided on all 365 calibrations, indicating the names of the days of the weeks. The indicia may be in the form of initials, as shown, or abbreviations.

Seven columns of year dates, 26 through 38 are provided, on the dial 14, in the annular space defined by the 365 calibrations. These year dates may cover a substantial time span, 50 to 100 years, for example, and they are grouped according to the day of the week on which the first of January falls. In other words, in all of the years indicated in column 26, the first of January occurs on a Sunday, the years in column 28, the first of January occurs on a Monday, etc.

Lead lines 40 through 52 extend from the columns 26 through 38 to the respective days of the week, in the first week of the year indicated by the calibrations 20, on which the first of January occurs.

As illustrated in FIG. 1, the base member 12 is provided with 365 calibrations 54 which are, in effect, radial extensions of the calibrations 20 on the dial 14. However, the 365 calibrations 54 on the base member 12 are provided with twelve radially extending dividing lines 56, depicting the 12 months of the year as indicated by the indicia 58, in the form of abbreviations of the respective months, between each pair of lines 56. Numeral indicia 60 is provided to indicate the number of days in each month.

It should be noted that each year date, in the columns 26 through 38, representing a leap year is identified by an asterisk,62 as noted at 64 on the base member 12.

The radially extending rotatable arm 16 extends outwardly across the calibrations 20 and 54 on the dial and base member 14 and 12. A radially extending indicator marker line 66 is scribed in the arm 16 across both sets of calibrations 20 and 54.

The year dates indicated in the columns 26 through 38 can be extended either backward, or into the future and, in fact, the calendar device of the present invention is operable with any year date, not appearing thereon, if the operator is aware ofthe day of the week on which the first of January falls and if it is a leap year.

In operation, the calendar device of the present invention can be used as a perpetual calendar as follows: the dial 14 is rotated about the axis of the pivot 18 until a lead line 40 through 52, from the proper column containing the selected year, is aligned with Jan. 1 on the base member. This would, of course, be done on the first of January, and, thereafter, the proper lead line would be advanced one calibration 54 each day to maintain a record of the date and the day of the week. If the calendar is put into operation on a date, other than the first of January, it is only necessary to ascertain the correct date and to set the proper lead line to the calibration indicating that date and to continue the daily operation as above described.

If the operator desires to count the number of calendar days from one particular date to another date, the dial 14 is rotated until the number one 70 of the dial indicia 22 is aligned with the start date. The operator then can make a direct reading from the numeral indicia 22 on the dial 14 which indicates the correct numerical calendar day span between the two dates. For instance, if it is desirable to know the number of days between Mar. 13 and Aug. 31, the lead line 42, corresponding to numeral one 70, is rotated into alignment with the calibration 72, on the base member 12, which designates Mar. 13 by means of the indicia 58 and 60. The calibration line 74 on the base member 12, will then be in radial alignment with the calibration line 76, on the dial 14, which indicates, by means of the indicia 22, that the calendar span is 171 days.

If it is further desirable to know what day of the week on which Aug. 31 falls, the rotatable arm 16 is moved until the scribed line 66 thereon is in alignment with the Aug. 3 lst calibration 74 on the base member 12. This is done for memory purposes or to permit a quick reading after the final operation which is as follows. The year date is noted in one of the columns 26 through 38 and using the year 1972, for example, the dial 14 is rotated until the lead line 52 is aligned with Jan. 1 on the base member 12, because Jan. 1 in the year 1972 fell on a Saturday. The initial or abbreviation 24 on the calibration which is then aligned with the scribed line 66 on the arm 16 will indicate the day as a Thursday. As previously stated, the initials or abbreviations 24 are on all of the calibration lines 20 but are not all illustrated on FIG. 1 for clarity reasons.

Calendar days may be added if desired by using Aug. 31 as the starting date and proceeding as above and the day of the week for any particular date may also be ascertained by proceeding as above described.

If it is desirable to count calendar days back into time, for instance, from Aug. 31 backwardly to Mar. 13, the lead line 42 is set on the earlier date, Mar. 13, and the answer would obviously be the same, 171 days, and the same method, as above described, is used to ascertain what day of the week Mar. 13 falls on. A series of time spans, either forwardly or backwardly, may be added to arrive at an overall time span.

All years marked with an asterisk 62, as stated, are leap years with an added day, Feb. 29th. After passing Feb. 28th, in these years, because of the added day, the rotatable dial 14 should be moved back one day following Feb. 28th when it is desirable to read the day of the week by means of the indicia 24. Qbviously, one day should be added when counting calendar days between two dates spanning Feb. 28th in any leap year.

Various materials, such as plastics, cardboard, fiberboard, etc., can be used in manufacturing the calendar device of the instant invention, however, the rotatable arm 16 should be transparent to permit viewing the calibrations and indicia therethrough. Other shapes can be used, for instance, a base member and two longitudinal sliding members, in the general form of a slide-rule with all of the indicia and calibrations on the respective members.

What is claimed is:

l. A calendar device comprising,

A. a first member, forming a base, including,

1. 365 equally spaced calibration lines representing the days of 1 year,

2. twelve calibration lines associated with said first 365 lines and dividing same into 12 groupings representing the 12 months of the year, each group containing a number of said first 365 lines corresponding to the number of days in the respective months,

3. indicia, indicating the names of the respective months, 4. numeral indicia, indicating the numerical order of the days of each month;

B. a second member, associated with said base member, said base and second members being movable relative to each other, said second member including,

1. a second 365 equally spaced calibration lines re resentin the da sof l ear 2. nlimeral in y y icia, indicating the numerical order of the days of 1 year,

3. indicia, indicating the names of the days of the week for 1 year, associated with said second 365 lines,

4. seven lead lines on said second member leading respectively to the seven days of the week as indicated by said name indicia.

2. The calendar device as defined in claim 1 including a third member, movable relative to said first and second members, including a scribed line therealong, positioned to register with any of said equally spaced calibration lines on said first and second members.

3. The calendar device as defined in claim 2 including seven columns of year dates, each column including a plurality of years all beginning on the same day of the week, each of said seven lead lines extending between one of said seven columns and said name indicia to indicate the name of the first day of the year of all of the years in each respective column.

4. The calendar device as defined in claim 3 including a distinctive mark, such as an asterisk, by each year date representing a leap year.

5. The calendar device as defined in claim 4 in which the one ends of said seven lead lines respectively indicate the seven days generally at the first part of the year as represented by said second 365 lines.

6. The calendar device as defined in claim 5 wherein said first member, forming said base, is composed of a generally rectangular flat board formed from any suitable material.

7. The calendar device as defined in claim 6 wherein said second member is formed in the shape of an annular dial, pivotally connected to said first member.

8. The calendar device as defined in claim 7 wherein said second 365 lines are radially disposed about the periphery of said dial and said first 365 lines are radially disposed, on said first member, outwardly of said periphery, forming, in effect, radial extensions of said first 365 lines.

9. The calendar device as defined in claim 7 wherein said third member comprises a transparent, radially disposed arm, pivotally connected to said first member on a common pivot with said second member.

10. The calendar device as defined in claim 7 wherein said seven columns are disposed in an annular center space of said dial, defined by said second 365 lines.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US262679 *Oct 20, 1881Aug 15, 1882 Mechanical contrivance for computing time
US710288 *Nov 19, 1901Sep 30, 1902Liston B ManleyComputing-chart.
US903192 *May 31, 1907Nov 10, 1908William F HuntPerpetual calendar.
US974401 *Jun 10, 1909Nov 1, 1910George I Bodine JrTime-indicator.
US1311101 *Jul 29, 1918Jul 22, 1919 Puanoqraph co
US1401692 *Aug 4, 1919Dec 27, 1921 harris
US1495805 *Apr 15, 1922May 27, 1924 Date-calculating chart
US2154013 *Jan 12, 1937Apr 11, 1939 Perpetual calendar
US2691838 *Dec 2, 1949Oct 19, 1954 Perpetual calendar
US3374948 *Oct 21, 1965Mar 26, 1968Mccolm George LCalendar calculator
AU227218A * Title not available
IT586998A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5530684 *Mar 9, 1992Jun 25, 1996Sharp Kabushiki KaishaElectronic device with calendar function
US5742563 *Sep 28, 1990Apr 21, 1998Sharp Kabushiki KaishaElectronic device with calendar function including determining the first week of the year
US5832640 *Jan 10, 1997Nov 10, 1998Cadotte; RaymondCalendric device with sensible indicia
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/88.00R, 40/113
International ClassificationG06C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG06C3/00
European ClassificationG06C3/00