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Publication numberUS3717500 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 20, 1973
Filing dateMay 3, 1971
Priority dateMay 3, 1971
Publication numberUS 3717500 A, US 3717500A, US-A-3717500, US3717500 A, US3717500A
InventorsMastrianni V
Original AssigneeOwens Corning Fiberglass Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fabric finishing method and fabric
US 3717500 A
Abstract
A fabric finishing process comprising passing fabric composed of textured and untextured yarns, through multiple colorant-finish solutions, each having at least a different color or tone, wherein the amount of adsorption of each finish by the yarns is a function of the surface area of the yarns and a function of a finish solution applied between the multiple colorant-finish solutions to induce a subsequently applied colorant-finish solution to adhere to substantially only the textured yarns, to produce a novel, decorative fabric having varying colors and tones.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D United States Patent 1 1 [111 3,717,500 Mastrianni 1 Feb. 20, 1973 s41 FABRIC FINISHING METHOD AND 3,108,897 10/1963 Hamiteret al ..117 37 FABRIC 7 3,304,195 2/1967 Ackennan ..117/37 3,488,208 1/1970 .linnette ..1 17/76 T [75] Inventor: Vincenzo Mastrianni, Cranston, R.I. 1 g owens'cm'ning Fiberglas 'l Primary Examiner-Morris Sussman tion Attorney-Staelin & Overman and Robert E. Witt [22] Filed: May 3, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 139,810 [571 v ABSTRACT Related US. Application Data A fabric finishing process comprising passing fabric I composed of textured and untextured yarns, through [63] Conunuatmn of 789,061 1969 multiple colorant-finish solutions, each having at least abandoned' a different color or tone, wherein the amount of adsorption of each finish by the yarns is a function of the U.S. surface area of the yarns and a function of a fini h [51] Int. Cl. ..B44f l/08 solution applied between the multiple colorant-finish [58] Field of Search ..l6l/l56; 117/37 P, 37, 76 T solutions to induce a subsequently applied colorantfinish solution to adhere to substantially only the tex- 5 R f en Cited tured yarns, to produce a novel, decorative fabric having varying colors and tones. UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,955,053 10/1960 Roth ..l17/37 P 16 Claims, No Drawings No. 789,061, filed Jan. 2, 1969, and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the treatment of fibrous glass and particularly to the treatment of fibrous glass fabric to improve its esthetic properties and appearance.

Fiber makers have sought to alter the shiny and slippery characteristics of glass fiber fabrics, so that they appear more like cotton and wool fabrics. The dyeability of glass fabrics presents a different problem than that presented when dyeing cotton and wool; this is especially true with respect to such properties as colorfastness, washfastness, and crocking. Many improvements have been made in these areas in the last decade.

However, when glass fabrics are treated according to the inventive concepts, hereinafter described in greater detail, the fabrics have an appearance that cannot be duplicated in conventional fabrics. Specific reference is made to the fabrics ability, through varying the amounts of filamentary and textured yarn*(*Filamentary yarns are defined herein as a generally parallel arrangement of smooth, multifilament continuous strands lying closely together, that are formed continuously, by mechanical attenuation and gathered upon a collet. Textured yarns have their genesis in filamentary yarns, but are post treated to impart bulkiness thereto. Reference is made to a text entitled Woven Stretch and Textured Fabrics" by Berkeley L. Hathome (1964), p. 9-10, which further defines textured yarns.) and by varying the weave patterns therein, to adsorb varying amounts of pigmented dispersions on the different yarns that make up the fabric and still possess good contrast between the pigmented dispersions.

The effect given to fabrics composed of filamentary and textured glass yarns when treated in accordance with the present invention, is that it appears that the fabrics were woven from yarns of different color and tone, when in fact, the fabrics were woven from undyed yarns. The degree of bulkiness possessed by glass yarns when incorporated into a fabric allows many variations in the degree of color pickup when the fabric is treated with a multiple dye system. Textured yarns, it is believed, possess a higher potential than filamentary yarns i.e. more exposed surface area carrying a negative charge, thereby enabling a fabric comprising both yarns to be selectively colored.

Glass fabrics when treated by the inventive concept show unique utility in the drapery, bedspread, and wearing apparel fields and possess good washfastness, lightfastness and crockfastness.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide methods for imparting decorative effects on the surfaces of glass fiber surfaces.

It is another object to produce glass fabrics, composed of filamentary and texturedyams, wherein it appears that the fabrics are woven from multiple colored yarns.

It is still another object to produce glass fabric composed of filamentary and textured yarns, wherein the degree of contrast in color is sharp and uniform throughout the fabric.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description.

Our glass fiber fabrics possess an advantage over glass fabrics finished by conventional methods and over fabrics composed of cotton, wool, organics, etc. because conventional apparatus is employed such as described in US. Pat. No. 3,065,103 for heat cleaning the glass fabric and for applying resin bonded pigmented finishing systems thereto comprising various colorants, including aqueous dyestuffs and pigment dispersions. Emphasis is made on the fact that in line equipment is used to get the desired effect on glass fabrics.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION When the inventive concept is employed on glass fabric composed of filamentary and textured yarn, each yarn therein is capable of adsorbing a specific amount of finish, according to the surface area of the yarn itself, the filamentary yarns of the fabric, after a first padding of finish containing a colorant, appear darker in color than the textured yarns. This effect may be theoretically credited to the fact that in filamentary yarns, the filaments are generally in a tightly packed parallel relationship, so that the amount of dye on all the filaments acts in synergism, whereas in textured yarns, composed of randomly oriented, loosely packed filaments, this effect does not appear. When the fabric is exposed to multiple finish compositions, each having a different color or tone, the textured yarns have the capacity to adsorb more than one finish, depending upon the degree of bulkiness of said yarns, whereas the filamentary yarns are substantially satisfied afteradsorbing a single finish composition.

It has been thought that by adding a cationic flocculating agent to water and applying the solution as a finish to glass fabric and drying the same, that a subsequently applied finish, containing a colorant, is caused to precipitate out or flocculate pigmented particles. These pigmented particles apparently migrate and attach to the textured yarns almost to the exclusion of the non-textured yarns in the fabric. The pigmented particles are permanently fixed on the textured yarns by drying the fabric.

Another possible explanation of why the filamentary yarns exhibit a deeper color than the textured yarns might be due to a capillary attraction of the dyestuff to the filaments making up the yarn. This capillary attraction might be stronger than the pressure used to remove/excess finish from the fabric, but only in the filamentary yarns, and in effect may hold more of the finish than the textured yarns, thereby substantially satisfying the adsorptive capacities of the filamentary yarns.

The effect of such adsorption capacities of the yarns and the effect of using a cationic flocculating agent in a separate finish, is that the fabric appears to have been woven from a number of differently colored yarns. Upon close examination of the fabrics, it is observed that the decorative effect imparted thereto is not similar to that of kiss printing or silk screening but, in fact, has a higher quality appearance.

It has been observed that after a first padding of the fabric through a finish containing a first colorant, the filamentary yarns have retained substantially more of the first colorant than the textured yams. Pressure exerted on the dyed fabric affects the textured yarns much more than it does the filamentary yarns. The textured yarns are resilient and are thereby capable of having more finish expelled therefrom than the filamentary yarns which are substantially rigid in comparison. Since the textured yarn has resiliency imparted thereto because of its bulky nature, it springs back to its original shape so that those fibers making up the parameters of the diameter of the textured yarn appear white in color or substantially void of the first dyestuff. This phenomenon is analogous to the behavior of a colored sponge, which after having squeezed liquid therefrom, the outer portion of the sponge appears lighter in color than the inner portion. However, this phenomenon does not occur in the filamentary yarns where the fibers are tightly compacted, thereby imparting to these fibers a deep shade or tone of the first colorant. The textured yarns have a larger available coatable surface area or potential than the filamentary yarns, and therefore have the capacity when passed through a subsequent finish containing a second colorant to adsorb the latter, whereas the filamentary yarns having been substantially satisfied by the first colorant, do not have this capacity to absorb the second colorant, and consequently the fabric possesses differently colored yarns showing good contrasts to provide a novel and decorative effect. However, it is not enough that the fabric be composed of filamentary and textured yarns in order that it appears as though it were woven from multiple colored yarns. There must be applied to the fabric a material, such as a cationic flocculating agent, which induces a subsequently applied colorant to selectively seek out the textured yarns of the fabric almost to the exclusion of the filamentary yarns. Furthermore, this material must be applied according to the inventive concept so that in line production equipment may be employed.

It is preferable to treat the multiple finished glass fabric with a water soluble organo-metallic complex containing from six to 24 carbon atoms, such, for example, as stearato chromic chloride, laurato chromic chloride and complexes of aluminum, zirconium and titanium, and aqueous systems of organo silicon compounds in the form of a silane, its hydrolysis product (silanols), or its polymerization product (polysiloxanes), wherein the siloxane has from one to three highly hydrolyzable groups and an organic group attached to the silicon atom containing from one to 18 carbon atoms, as represented by the formula n Si x (4-1!) wherein X is a highly hydrolyzable group such as chlorine, bromine, iodine or other halogen; methoxy, ethoxy, propoxy or the like short-chained alkoxy group. n is a whole number of from 1-3 and R is a hydrogen group or hydrocarbon radical containing from one to 18 carbon atoms, such as methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, pentyl, vinyl, allyl, methallyl, chloromethyl, dichloromethyl, heptyl to octadecyl and the like aliphatic group, an aryl or alkaryl group such as phenyl, tolyl, naphthyl, benzyl, monoand polyalkylphenyls, xylyl, mesityl, mono-, di-and tri-ethyl phenyls, methyl naphthyl, diethyl naphthyl, anthracyl, pheny] ethyl and the like, or an alicyclic group such as cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl and the like or a heterocyclic group in which the aforementioned organic groups may be substituted or unsubstituted, saturated or unsaturated. These materials normally impart hydrophobicity to glass fiber fabrics, thereby explaining why properties such as colorfastness and lightfastness are greatly improved.

Treating the fabric having a first finish dried thereon with a cationic flocculating agent and drying the same, provides a high quality contrast in color between the filamentary yarns and the textured yarns.

Any cationic flocculating agent may be used to obtain selective coloring of glass fabrics containing textured yarns or roughened surfaces. Substantially all of the flocculating agent migrates to and is fixed onto the textured yarns of a glass fabric, when a treatment containing the flocculating agent is applied to and dried upon the fabric, almost to the exclusion of the non-textured yarns in the fabric. A subsequently applied finish solution comprising a colorant and a film former migrates to substantially only the textured yarns of the fabric. It is not known for sure whether there is a mechanical or a chemical bonding of the subsequently applied finish to the textured yarns. This is especially true when it is observed that anionic and nonionic colorants or dyestufis perform equally well.

Single or multiple cationic flocculating agents may be used in an aqueous finish solution for application to glass fabric previously treated with a finish comprising a colorant and a film former or to a fabric that has been heat-cleaned. A flocculating retardant or dispersing agent may be optionally used in the finish solution that is applied after the flocculating agent is applied and dried on the fabric to control the degree of flocculation or precipitation of the colorant onto the textured yarns. By applying the flocculating agent to the-glass fabric and then drying the same before application of a finish solution comprising a colorant and a film former, the various dye baths that are employed in the inventive process are not contaminated or caused to precipitate out, thereby ensuring a continuous uninterrupted process. If the flocculating agent is not dried or if the flocculating agent is added to the finish solution comprising a colorant and a film former, a flocculated mass results which builds up on the padder apparatus in a very short time and interrupts the process.

No specific flocculating agents have to be used, but it has been determined that an aqueous solution of a high molecular weight cationic salt of a complex polyamine (Lufax 295 sold by Rohm & Haas Co.) and a modified polyarnide epichlorohydrin cationic resin (Reten 763 sold by Hercules Inc.) is especially suitable because it provides an especially good hand in the treated fabric. Another cationic flocculating agent that provides good hand is a dicyandiamide based cationic dye-fixative (Fixanol PNA sold by l.C.I. Inc.).

The percent by weight of cationic flocculating agent in an aqueous solution varies as the desired effect varies. However, it has been determined that at least about 0.02 percent by weight of the cationic flocculating agent must be used to obtain some contrast in color.

Other cationic flocculating agents may be used, including for example, deacetylated chitin (polymeric acetamino carbohydrate), polyalkyl-polyamines, polyalkyl-polyamine fatty acid reaction products, amino aldehyde condensate dye-fixatives, methylchloride quaternary of the stearic acid amide of 1-(2-aminoethyl) 2-heptadecenyl-2-imidazoline, fluid oil in water type emulsions of low molecular eight polyethylene chemically stabilized with a cationic amine acetate derivative of a long chain fatty compound, dicyandiamide formaldehyde dye-fixatives, and colloidal cationic thermosetting resinous reaction products of straight chain poly-functional amines and an aldehyde such as, for example, urea formaldehyde resins modified with (a) polyamines including ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine, tetraethylenepentamine, guanidine, phenylbiguanidine, or bisguanidine, (b) hydroxylamines such as monoethanolarnine or diethanolamine, (c) cyanoamines such as dicyandiamide, polyphenylbiguanide or polyphenyl methyl biguanide, (d) aminoamides such as guanidine, or (e) quaternary ammonium salts such as tetraethanol ammonium chloride, and methylated dimethyl aniline quaternary ammonium salts; and the reaction products of these resin-modifying agents with formaldehyde, in the absence of urea, such as tetraethylenepentamine-formaldehyde, bisbiguanidineformaldehyde, polyphenolbiguanide-formaldehyde and guanylurea-formaldehyde.

In order to control the degree of flocculation of subsequent finishes containing colorants and the deposition rate of floccules onto the textured yarns it has been found advantageous to employ a neutral sodium salt of a condensed aryl sulfonic acid '(Tamol SN sold by Rohm & Haas Co.) or the like with the subsequent finishes. These subsequent finishes are applied after the cationic flocculating agent has been applied and dried,

Our process comprises the utilization of conventional heat cleaning apparatus and padding apparatus as described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,065,103 in order to impart colorfastness to glass fabrics. The improvements in the present process lie in the treatment of the fabric after each padding-drying operation, with an aqueous solution of a cationic flocculating agent and drying the same before applying a subsequent color to the fabric. When a subsequent colorant is applied, the earlier applied flocculating agent causes the colorant to be attracted to the textured yarns and permanently fixed thereon by drying. Necessary, however, for the attainment of novel decorative effects on glass fiber fabrics is that the fabrics be composed of textured and filamentary yarns or that the fabrics have raised or roughened surfaces thereon.

Generally, during the first padding operation, the fabric is exposed to a higher padder pressure than that used in subsequent padding operations. The reason for this feature is that is has been found desirable to expel as much of the liquid finish as possible and still substantially fulfill the adsorptive capacity of the filamentary yarns within the fabric, while leaving the textured yarns therein substantially unsatisfied. Subsequently, the already treated fabric, after having been dried, is preferably directed through a padding apparatus having a dip tank containing a solution comprising a cationic flocculating agent and is dried in a conventional multiple-pass oven.

Subsequent to the above treatments, the fabric is again exposed to a differently colored finish solution and passed through the padding apparatus in such a manner that as much finish as is possible is retained by the fabric, i.e., the padder pressure is minimal in order to insure that the textured yarns in the fabric are substantially saturated. The differently colored finish migrates only to the textured yarns apparently in the form of a colloid where it is fixed by drying, which causes bonding of the colorant to the textured yarns. Subsequent to drying, the fabric is optionally treated with a stearato chromic chloride complex and dried to insure colorfastness and washfastness of the fabric.

It has been found that by applying an aqueous solution of a cationic flocculating agent as a separate finish, and drying the same, between applications of multiple finishes to the fabric, that in line apparatus may be utilized without fear of contamination or clogging. However, if the flocculating agent is added directly to a finish comprising a colorant, flocculation or precipitation occurs which after a very short time clogs or builds up on the padding apparatus, thereby requiring a disruption in the process for repeated cleanings.

The cationic flocculating agent may also be applied to the fabric by spraying, roll-coating, knife coating, etc., on one or both sides of the fabric and dried. When the cationic flocculating agent is applied to only one side of the fabric an additional effect is created, i.e., a color reversible fabric results. Such a fabric contains only one color on one side, and on the side containing the cationic flocculating agent, a multiple color effect is produced. When the fabric is coated rather than padded or immersed in a cationic flocculating agent the textured yarns in the fabric are deeper in color. When the cationic flocculating agent is applied to the fabric via spraying, it may be applied either before or after the application of a colorant thereto. However, when the cationic flocculating agent is applied prior to application of a colorant, it must first be dried in order to eliminate clogging of the apparatus. But, when the cationic flocculating agent is applied to the fabric after application of a colorant thereto, it is done prior to the drying of the colorant so that the dye particles are afforded a chance to migrate toward the textured yarns of the fabric.

Where the degree of texturization of the yarns making up the fabric varies, so too does the number of paddings with differently colored resin-pigmented systems. It has been feasible to obtain as many as three to five colors in glass fabrics, with good color contrasts by varying the weave pattern, by using yarns having different degrees of texturization, and by varying padder pressures during the padding operations. Depending upon the color and tone of pigmented dispersions used in a multiple finishing system, usually the later applied pigments completely mask the earlier applied pigments on the textured yarn, but this is a function of the concentration of the pigments used, and also their color tone. Any finishing system, such as those that use acrylthe filamentary yarns; this is not true of the textured yarns in the fabric. Consequently, when the fabric is subsequently passed through an aqueous solution containing a cationic flocculating agent and dried and subsequently passed through at least a second finish composition having a different colorant, the textured yarns pick up such a larger percentage of the second colorant than the filamentary yarns that in effect the second colorant substantially masks out the first colorant on the textured yarns resulting in a fabric composed of filamentary yarns comprising substantially only the first colorant and textured yarns comprising substantially only the second colorant. Usually, however, neither the first nor the second colorants exist in their true color in the finished fabric because of slight contamination, but this is thought to be an advantage, as long as there is good contrast, because it softens the tones of the fabric.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODMENTS The following example is provided as an illustration of the preferred embodiment of the inventive concept, but the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways.

EXAMPLE I A glass fabric composed of filamentary and textured yarns was heat-cleaned to remove protective sizing, and subsequently padded through a first aqueous finish solution (Finish A) comprising an acrylic film former, a silane, and a first colorant. The padder pressure was established to remove as much finish from the fabric as possible (about 40-50 psi) and then the fabric was dried in a multiple-pass oven for 1 minute at 350 F.

The moisture content of the fabric just after padding and before drying ranged from about 12-15 percent by weight (dependent upon the weave and the amounts of filamentary and textured yarns in the fabric). This percentage was suficient to substantially saturate the filamentary yarns of the fabric but left the textured yarns therein substantially unsaturated.

The fabric with the first finish dried thereon was then padded through an aqueous solution (Finish B) comprising a cationic flocculating agent wherein the padder pressure was established to be from about 20-30psi. The fabric was subsequently dried at 350 F. for 1 minute. The cationic flocculating agent apparently allows the textured yarns to attract a subsequently applied colorant to the exclusion of the non-textured yarns wherein the colorant is fixed onto the textured yarns of the fabric by drying. Without the use of a cationic flocculating agent between application of finishes comprising colorants, there is no sharp contrast of colors in the fabric.

Thereafter the fabric, having a dried deposit of the first finish and a cationic flocculating agent dried thereon, was padded with a second aqueous finish solution (Finish C) comprising an acrylic film former, a silane and a second colorant, different in color from the first colorant. An important feature herein was the establishment of a padder pressure that allowed as much of the second finish as possible to be adsorbed by the fabric, particularly the textured yarns therein. This padder pressure ranged from about -15 psi. Subsequent to the padding, the fabric was dried for 1 minute at 350 F. in a conventional multiple pass oven.

A high degree of contrast between the colorant of the first finish and the colorant of the second finish was observed on the fabric and it possessed good hand. The filamentary yarns of the fabric comprised substantially all of the first colorant, and the textured yarns, depending upon the degree of texturization, comprised substantially all of the second colorant. When the degree of texturization of some yarns was not as great as in other yarns, an ancillary benefit resulted because of contamination of the first and second dyestufis thereon or failure of the second dyestuff to mask over the first colorant which tended to add a third color tone to the fabric.

The fabric, as treated above, was subsequently padded through a stearato chromic chloride complex solution (Finish D) at a padder pressure of from about 20-30 psi and dried at 350 F. for 1 minute in a conventional multiple pass oven. This stearato chromic chloride padding appeared to insure good colorfastness and washfastness to the treated fabric.

The multiple-color effect was similarly effected when a glass fabric was provided with embossrnents or raised surfaces on various areas thereof so that in effect the embossed areas functioned as the textured yarns above.

Similarly, a pattern was effected on a glass fabric, whether composed of all filamentary yarns or a combination of filamentary yarns and textured yarns, when a discontinuous fihn or coating of the cationic flocculating agent was applied to the fabric, such as for example, by a roller having a disruptive surface or by printmg.

Compositions of the finishes used above were as follows:

Finish A Ingredients Weight Non-ionic self-crosslinking acrylic 2.00 emulsion having 46.0% solids Copolymer of methyl hydrogen silicone 2.00 and dimethyl silicone Glycidoxy-propyltrimethoxysilane 0.25 Methanol L00 Phthalocyanine Green, aqueous dispersion, 2.00 25.8% solids Water 92.75

Total l00.00%

Finish B Ingredients Weight I:

High molecular weight, cationic salt of 0.50 a complex polyamine solids) Modified polyamide epichlorohydrin 10.00 cationic resin having 35% solids Water 89.50

Total l00.00%

Finish C Ingredients Weight 96 Non-ionic self-crosslinking acrylic 5.00 emulsion having 46.0% solids Collodial despersion of silica in water, 2.50 having 15.0% solids Polytetrafluoroethylene dispersed 2.50 in water having 50.0% solids Neutral sodium salt of a complex, 1.00 condensed aryl sulfonic acid Brown Iron Oxide, aqueous dispersion, 10.00

54.2% solids Water 79.00

Total 100.00%

Finish D Ingredients Weight Stearato chromic chloride complex 2.00 solution Water 98.00

Total l00.00%

An ignition loss test was conducted on the fabric treated as described above. The result was as follows: After the padding and drying of Finish A on the fabric the ignition loss was approximately 1.50 percent and after the padding and drying of Finish D on the fabric the ignition loss was approximately 3.50 percent. The difference in ignition loss on the fabric from Finish A to Finish D is attributed to the largest extent by the amount of Finish C attracted by and fixed onto the textured yarns making up the fabric.

Obvious variations can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

' 1. A method for producing decorative effects on glass fiber fabrics composed of textured and non-textured yarns, comprising the steps of:

a. applying a first colored resin bonding finish to the fabric in greater amounts to the non-textured yarns thereof;

b. drying the first finished fabric;

c. applying an aqueous solution comprising a cationic flocculating agent to the fabric having the first finish dried thereon;

d. drying the aqueous solution on the fabric;

e. applying a second colored resin bonding finish to the fabric in greater amounts to the textured yarns thereof; and

f. drying the second finish on the fabric, so that the multiple finish fabric has non-textured yarns possessing substantially only the first colorant and textured yarns possessing substantially only the second colorant.

2. A method for producing decorative effects on glass fiber fabrics woven from filamentary yarns comprising a generally parallel arrangement of smooth continuous filaments lying closely together and textured yarns comprising a generally random entanglement of continuous filaments that form loops, crimps, curls, and coils at intervals along the length of said yarns, comprising the steps of:

a. heating the fabric to remove protective sizing therefrom and to thermally set the weave pattern therein in a substantially fixed relationship;

b. applying a first resin bondable pigmented finish to the heat cleaned and weave set fabric;

c. controllably removing excess first finish to expel as much first finish as possible but substantially saturating only the filamentary yarns;

. drying the first finished fabric;

. applying an aqueous solution of a cationic flocculating agent to the dried fabric to make the textured yarns capable of adsorbing additional finish to the exclusion of the filamentary yarns;

f. drying said aqueous solution on the fabric;

g. applying a second resin bondable pigmented finish to the fabric;

h. controllably removing excess second finish so that as much second finish as possible is retained by substantially only the textured yarns of the fabric;

i. drying the second finish on the fabric;

j. applying an aqueous solution of a material to the dried fabric to retain colorfastness and washfastness; and

k. drying said material on the fabric, wherein the resultant fabric has filamentary yarns possessing substantially only the first finish and textured yarns possessing substantially only the second finish.

3. The method of claim 2 wherein the first finish of step (b) comprises at least one aqueous pigmented dispersion and a resinous film former, and the second finish of step (g) comprises at least one aqueous pigmented dispersion different in color from the first finish and a resinous film former.

4. The method of claim 2 wherein the drying steps (d), (f), (i), and (k) are accomplished at 350 F. until dry.

5. The method of claim 2 wherein the aqueous solution of a cationic flocculating agent of step (e) is selected from the group consisting of aqueous solutions of polyalkyl-polyamines, polyalkyl-polyamine fatty acid reaction products, amino aldehyde condensate dye-fixatives, methylchloride quartemary of the stearic acid amide of l-(2-aminoethyl) 2-heptadecenyl-2- imidazoline, dicyandiamide formaldehyde dye'fixatives, colloidal cationic thermosetting resinous reaction products of straight chain poly-functional amines and an aldehyde, and polymeric acetamino carbohydrates.

6. The method of claim 5 wherein the cationic flocculating agent of step (e) is a blend of a high molecular weight cationic salt of a complex polyamine and a modified polyamide epichlorohydrin resin.

7. The method of claim 2 wherein the material of step (j) is selected from the group consisting of water soluble organo metallic complexes containing from six to 24 carbon atoms, complexes of aluminum, zirconium and titanium, and aqueous systems of organo silicon compounds in the form of a silane, its hydrolysis product and its polymerization product wherein the siloxane has from one to three highly hydrolyzable groups and an organic group attached to the silicon atom containing from one to 18 carbon atoms, as represented by the formula R, Si X wherein X is a highly hydrolyzable group such as halogens and shortchained alkoxy groups, and wherein n is a whole number of from l-3 and R comprises hydrogen and hydrocarbon radicals containing from one to 18 carbon atoms.

8. The method of claim 7 wherein the material of step (i) is stearato chromic chloride.

9. A method for producing decorative effects on glass fiber fabrics composed of filamentary and textured yams, comprising the steps of:

a. heating the fabric to remove protective sizing therefrom, so that a heat cleaned fabric is obtained;

b. padding the fabric through a first resin bondable colored finish comprising a first colorant, wherein the filamentary yarns exhibit a substantially deeper tone than the textured yarns;

c. drying the fabric with first finish thereon;

d. padding the dried fabric through a solution comprising a cationic flocculating agent that causes a subsequently applied finish solution comprising a second colorant to be attracted and deposited on substantially only the textured yarns;

drying the fabric having said cationic flocculating agent thereon;

f. padding the fabric through a second resin bondable colored finish comprising a second colorant, wherein substantially all of the second colorant is deposited on substantially only the textured yarns,'

substantially saturates only the filamentary yarns, but

partially satisfies the textured yarns therein.

11. The method of claim 9 wherein the padding step (f) through a second finish is done at a padder pressure that applies as much of the second finish as possible for adsorption by substantially only the textured yarns in the fabric so that a high contrast of color tone exists in the fabric between the first and second dyestuffs.

12. The method of claim 9 wherein the padding step (b) is done at a padder pressure of from about to about psi, and step (f) is done at a padder pressure of from about 10 to about l5 psi, and steps (d) and (h) are done at a padder pressure of from about 20 to about 30 psi.

13. The method of claim 9 wherein the solution of step (d) is selected from the group consisting of aqueous solutions of polyalkyl-polyamines, polyalkylpolyamine fatty acid reaction products, amino aldehyde condensate dye fixatives, methylchloride quartemary of the stearic acid amide of l-( Z-aminoethyl) 2- heptadecenyl-2-imidozoline, dicyandiamide formaldehyde dye fixatives, colloidal cationic thermosetting resinous reaction products of straight chain poly-functional amines and an aldehyde, and polymeric acetamino carbohydrates,

14. The method of claim 13 wherein the solution of step (d) is a blend of a high molecular weight cationic salt of a complex polyamine and a modified polyamide epichlor'ohydrin resin.

15. The method of claim 9 wherein the solution of step (h) is selected from the group consisting of water soluble organo metallic complexes containing from six to 24 carbon atoms, complexes of aluminum, zirconi um and titanium, and aqueous systems of organo silicon compounds in the form of a silane, its hydrolysis product and its polymerization product wherein the siloxane has from one to three highly hydrolyzable groups and an organic group attached to the silicon atom containing from one to 18 carbon atoms, as represented by the formula R Si X wherein X is a highly hydrolyzable group such as halogens and shortchained alkoxy groups, and wherein n is a whole number of from 1-3 and R comprises hydrogen and hydrocarbon radicals containing from one o 1 carbon atoms.

16. The method of claim 15 wherein the solution of step (h) is stearato chromic chloride.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2955053 *Aug 20, 1958Oct 4, 1960Hess Goldsmith & CompanyProcess for selectively coloring glass fabric and resultant article
US3108897 *May 26, 1960Oct 29, 1963United Merchants & MfgProcess for coloring glass fabrics
US3304195 *Apr 11, 1963Feb 14, 1967United Merchants & MfgProcess for tonal coloring of fabrics
US3488208 *Oct 24, 1966Jan 6, 1970Burlington Industries IncMulti-colored dyeing of textiles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification427/381, 427/389.8, 427/412, 427/407.3
International ClassificationD06Q1/00, D06M23/00, C03C25/10
Cooperative ClassificationD06M23/00, D06Q1/00, C03C25/102
European ClassificationD06Q1/00, D06M23/00, C03C25/10M
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 31, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION, FIBERGLAS TOW
Free format text: TERMINATION OF SECURITY AGREEMENT RECORDED NOV. 13, 1986. REEL 4652 FRAMES 351-420;ASSIGNORS:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, A DE. BANKING CORPORATION;WADE, WILLIAM J. (TRUSTEES);REEL/FRAME:004903/0501
Effective date: 19870730
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: TERMINATION OF SECURITY AGREEMENT RECORDED NOV. 13, 1986. REEL 4652 FRAMES 351-420;ASSIGNORS:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, A DE. BANKING CORPORATION;WADE, WILLIAM J. (TRUSTEES);REEL/FRAME:4903/501
Nov 13, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J., ONE RODNEY SQUARE NORTH, WILMIN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004652/0351
Effective date: 19861103
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, ONE RODNEY SQUARE NORTH,
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J.,DELAWARE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:4652/351
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY,DELAWARE
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, DELAWARE
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J., DELAWARE