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Publication numberUS3717936 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1973
Filing dateFeb 26, 1971
Priority dateFeb 26, 1971
Publication numberUS 3717936 A, US 3717936A, US-A-3717936, US3717936 A, US3717936A
InventorsKovacic Z, Tolmie R
Original AssigneeSperry Rand Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rigid hair dryer hood
US 3717936 A
Abstract
A rigid hair dryer hood is mounted to a conventional base containing means for supplying pressurized hot air to the hood through a generally vertical duct on which the hood is mounted. The hood has a generally circular opening at the center of the top thereof allowing the escape of hot moist air. Hot air is directed up the duct to a lower ring of vent holes located around the rear base of the hood just above the neck level approximately from ear to ear. A second ring of holes above ear level are substantially equally spaced around the back of the hood from approximately temple to temple. The first and second ring of air holes direct the air upwardly toward the head at approximately 45 DEG to the vertical. A rectangular array of air holes are located above the second ring and direct air substantially normally to the back contour of the head. An air directing bridge is provided extending from this array upwardly and across the opening in the top of the hood. Air holes therein direct hot air substantially normally across the midportion of the top of the head. A third ring of air holes direct air vertically along the inside of the front of the hood just above the forehead from substantially temple to temple.
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United States Patent [191 Tolmie et al.

[ 1 Feb. 27, 1973 RIGID HAIR DRYER HOOD [75] Inventors: Robert J. Tolmie, Fair-field; Zoran Kovacic, Bridgeport, both of Conn.

[73] Assignee: Sperry Rand Corporation, New

York, N.Y.

[22] Filed: Feb. 26, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 119,315

[52] US. Cl. ..34/99, 34/96, 34/98 [51] Int. Cl. ..A45d 20/00 [58] Field of Search ..34/96-100 [56] I References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,424,502 7/1947 Polite 034/99 3,313,036 4/1967 Fortune....... ..34/99 1,842,001 1/1932 Zainfeld ..'34/99 2,329,352 9/1943 Kruger ..34/99 1,943,579 1/1934 Blornquist r ..34/99 3,052,038 9/1962 Harris ..34/l00 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS Great Britain ..34/l00 Primary Examiner-Kenneth W. Sprague Assistant Examiner-James C. Yeung Attorney-Charles R. Miranda [5 7] ABSTRACT A rigid hair dryer hood is mounted to a conventional base containing means for supplying pressurized hot air to the hood through a generally vertical duct on which the hood is mounted. The hood has a generally circular opening at the center of the top thereof allowing the escape of hot moist air. Hot air is directed up the duct to a lower ring of vent holes located around the rear base of the hood just above the neck level approximately from ear to ear. A second ring of holes above ear level are substantially equally spaced around the back of the hood from approximately temple to temple. The first and second ring of air holes direct the air upwardly toward the head at approximately 45 to the vertical. A rectangular array of air holes are located above the second ring and direct air substantially normally to the back contour of the head. An air directing bridge is provided extending from this array upwardly and across the opening in the top of the hood. Air holes therein direct hot air sub.- stantially normally across the midportion of the top of the head. A third ring of air holes direct air vertically along the inside of the front of the hood just above the forehead from substantially temple to temple.

12 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEU FEB2 71973 SHEET 10F 7 INVENTORS ROBERT J. TOLMIE ZORAN KOVACIC B C 7 E CHARLES R. MIRANDA ATTORNEYS PATENTED FEET 7 3,717, 936

SHEET 2 OF 7 FIG.3

' INVENTORS ROBERT J. TOLMIE ZORAN KOVACICP CHARLES R. MlRANDliF ATTORNEYS PATENTED 3,717. 936

SHEET t UP 7 INVENTORS ROBERT J. TOLMIE 20mm KOVACIG' BY 0.57M

CHARLES R. MIRANDA ATTORNEY PAIENTED FEBZ? I975 3,717, 936

SHEET 50F 7 FIG. 6

INVENTORS ROBERT J. TOLMIE ZORAN KOVACIC BY JzM CHARLES FLMIRANDA ATTORNEY v PATENTEDFEBZTIQTK ,936

SHEET 6 OF 7 FIG.7

INVENTORS ROBERT J. TOLMIE ZORAN KOVACIC CHARLE S R. MIRANDA ATTORNEY SHEET 7 OF 7 INVENTORSV ROBERT J. TO LMIE ZORAN KOVACIC CHARLES R. MIRAN DA ATTORNEY SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to portable hair dryers and more particularly to rigid hoods for portable hair dryers. Rigid hoods of this type according to the prior art, usually are totally enclosed and are. provided with more or less equally spaced hot air vent holes inside the hood which direct hot air substantially straight at the head of the wearer. As the hair dries, hot moist air is allowed to exit around the lower rim of the hood. This hot moist air exiting about the ears, neck, face and shoulders makes many users very uncomfortable. The hot air directed at the temples, forehead, ears, and other exposed areas of the head of the user tends to create hot spots on the head and is most uncomfortable. Such prior art hoods provide uneven drying in that the hair dries rapidly underneath the directly applied jets of hot air but quite slowly at other places. As a result of the discomfort sufiered while using such prior art hair dryers, the users tend to decrease the hot air temperature to that which greatly increases the drying time. Some women even find these dryers too uncomfortable to use. Furthermore, the confined moist air within the hood also tends to increase drying time.

Prior art hair dryers have been devised in which there is a vent opening at the top of the hood to allow the escape of hot moist air thus reducing the discomfort of the wearer. However, such hair dryers have not been utilized very much due to the fact that the drying time is greatly increased over the area under the vent openmg. The comfort of the user can be greatly increased by providing a vent opening at the top of a rigid hood, and

by unequally distributing the hot air directing vent holes in the hood such that those areas of the head on which the major portion of the hair is disposed in a hair styling operation receive the most hot air. These feahigh velocity air exiting from the air holes and in order to minimize discomfort (hot spots). We have further found that contrary to what one might expect, air holes located adjacent to the entry of air from the chute into the hood must be larger than air holes further from the entrance in order to achieve the fairly unifonn velocities we desire.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a hair dryer hood providing increased comfort to the user.

' Another object of the invention is to provide a hair dryer hood of the-above character providing for even drying of the hair over the entire head. I

A further object of the invention is to provide a hair dryer hood of the above character which does not create hot spots on the head. 7

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a hair dryer hood of the above character capable of drying hair in a shorter length of time than hithertofore possible.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a hair dryer hood of the above character which substantially eliminates the flow of hot air over the face, ears, temples, and shoulders of the user.

A yet further object of the invention is to provide a hair dryer hood of the above character providing more hot air to the area of the head where the major portion of hair is, thanhithertofore possible.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a hair dryer hood of the above character allowing the escape of hot moist air upwardly, yet evenly drying the entire head of the user.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a hair dryer hood of the above character wherein the velocity of the air directed at the head is restricted to a narrow range of velocities about an optimum velocity.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the features of construction, combination of elements and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter set forth. The scope of the invention is indicated in the claims.

THE DRAWINGS For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed disclosure taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view, partially cut away, of a hair dryer according to the present invention ready for use;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the hair dryer of FIG. 1 showing the hood and duct thereof in their stored positions;

FIG. 3 is a top view of the base of the hair dryer of FIG. 1 with the hood removed;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of the hood of FIG. 1 taken along the line 4--4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is'a cross sectional view of the hood of FIG. 1 taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view of the hood of FIG. 1 taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view of the hood of FIG. 1 taken along the line of 7 --7 of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 8 is a bottom view of the hood of FIG. I removed from the base.

The same reference characters refer to the same elements throughout the several views of the drawings.

SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION Referring to FIG. 1, a hair dryer according to the invention comprises a base 12, a hood supporting duct 14, and a hood 16, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2. Duct 14 is hinged to the base 12 at 18 and to the hood at 20.

The hood 16 is provided with a handle 22 by which it may be grasped and lifted upwardly and to the right as seen in FIG. 1- or set upon the base 12 as seen in FIG. 2 to form a closed unit for storage. In order to keep the unit assembled for storage, a pair of latches 24 are provided on the base and a pair of cooperating pins 26 on the hood, only one each of which is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

It will be noted from FIG. 1 that the hood 16 is recessed at 28 towards the front and extended at 30 Y toward the rear so that the hood better conforms to a normal head of hair which is high above the forehead and low down the back.

Referring to FIG. 3, the base 12 is'provided with a conventional source of pressurized hot air (not shown). Air is drawn in for drying and for cooling the motor through the grills 32 and 34. A heat control 36 is provided as is conventional.

Again referring to FIG. 1, the duct 14 comprises a lower portion 38 hinged to the base 12 and an upper portion 40 hinged to the hood 16. The upper portion 40 fits within the lower portion 38 and is held at various positions by means of a spring 42. The duct 14 is substantially square in cross section (see FIG. 3). The lowermost position of the hood 16 is defined by the engagement of a stop 44 with the upper rim 46 of the lower portion 38 of the duct 1.4.

According to the invention, the hood 16 is provided with a generally round-shaped opening 48 which as best seen in FIG. 8 comprises two partial circle portions 50 and 52.

Pressurized hot air is directed up the chute 14 and as best seen in FIGS. 4 and is then conducted between the outer shell 54 of the hood 16 and an inner channel wall structure generally indicated at 56. A lowermost array of holes are provided in a conical ring 58 of wall structure 56 which directs the hot air as shown in FIGS.

4, 5 and 6 at an approximately 45 angle to the vertical towards the lowermost portion of the hair at the back of the head behind the ears. A second conical ring 60 has an array of holes, also directing the heated hot air at an angle of 45 to the vertical from temple to temple around the back of the head. A generally rectangular inner back wall portion 62 has an array of holes directing the air normally towards the head at the back portion of the head where the hair is thickest.

Referring to FIGS. 4, 5, 6, and 8, a bridge-like chute, generally indicated at 64, extends upwardly from inner wall portion 62 across the opening 48. Bridge 64 is proportion of the head, where vided with an array of holes directed downwardly, generally normal to the top of the head across the mid- A third ring-like array of holes 124, best seen in More particularly, referring to FIGS. 2, 5 and 6, the

chute 14 is hinged to the hood 16 at 20, preferably by means of a polypropelene plastic piece 70 affixed between the chute l4 and ring portion by means of rivets and/or eyelets 72. Thus, the plastic hinge may be bent as shown in FIG. 5 when the dryer is in use oras shown in FIG. 2 when the dryer is stored. Hinge 20 between chute l4 and base 12, best seen in FIG. 3, is similarly formed from a plastic piece 74 and is riveted to the base 12 and to the lower portion 38 of the chute 14 by means of rivets 76.

The hood 16 is formed of several pieces of molded plastic material such as polystyrene or. the like, the number of molded pieces employed depending upon the relative cost of manufacturing the pieces in the quantities desired. As seen in FIG. 6, the top of chute 14 is open at three sides and when in use the upper edge 78 thereof engages the lower rim 80 of the hood 16 as seen in FIG. 5. The hood is held in the position shown in FIG. 5 by means of a pair of metal latches 83, which may be unlatched by means of a pair of latch push buttons 81 (FIG. 1).

As previously stated, the outer shell 54 of the hood 16 is generally cylindrical in horizontal cross section and preferably formed of one piece of plastic material.

Referring to FIGS. 4, 5 and 6, the outer shell 54 terminates at a lower annular ring 82. The portion 84 extending below ring 82 is formed preferably of a single piece of plastic material. Another piece of plastic material 86 fits inside the shell 54 and provides rings 58, 60 and 66. The back piece 62 is also formed of a single piece of plastic material and has a depending edge 88 forming a closed cavity 90 (FIG. 5).

Now referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, the top 92 of the bridge 64 is preferably formed integral with the shell 54 and is provided with parallel downwardly depending sides 94 and 96. The bridge is closed into an airtight channel 97 by another lower bridge piece 98. Piece 98 is provided with a plurality of strengthening ribs 100 along the lower edge thereof, which are in engagement with back portion 62.

Inner portion 86, as best seen in FIG. 7, is provided with a plurality of strengthening ribs 102 forming openings 104 therein for the passage of air from the ring-like channel 105 to the channel 90 behind the back portion 62.

As best seen in FIG. 6, the underside 98 of the bridge 64 and the handle 22 are attached to the portion 92 by means of a pair of bolts 106 and 108. The remaining elements of the hood 84, 86 and 62 are glued together when assembled.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 7, contrary to what one might expect, the openings 110 and 112, 114 and 116, closest to the source of air from the chute 14 in the lower ring 58, are larger than the more distant openings 118 and120, which are substantially the same size as the openings 122 in the second ring 60.

The reason for this is that the construction provides for rather high static pressure throughout the entire duct work of the hood. This allows all of the air openings to be approximately the same diameter. However, those openings close to the entrance, that is, close to the chute l4 and not really in line with the air flow in the chute 14 would not release enough air, due to the change in direction that the air must undergo to exit from them. Therefore, they are made larger for the air flow from them to be substantially the same as the air flow from the more remote holes, such as holes 118 and 120. It will be noted that the inner air holes 110 and 112 are essentially slot-like formations between what would be a set of equally spaced holes and that holes 1 14 and 116 are merely elongated vertically to provide increased air flow.

In use, hot air under rather high static pressure is provided by a heater and centrifugal impeller (not shown) in the base 12. This hot air passes up the chute 14 and enters the channel 105 behind piece 86 (FIG. 5). The air holes 110 through 120 in ring 58 direct the air towards the back of the neck of the wearer substantially behind the ears at an angle of 45 to the vertical. The air therefore engages the hair at substantially the 7 104 behind back portion 62 and is directed normally towards the back of the head through air holes 126. Air from the channel 90 behind back portion 62 passes into the bridge 92 and is directed downwardly from the bridge 92 by the bridge air holes 128 substantially directly at the center midline area of the top of the head from back to front, where, in many hair styles, much hair will be placed on curlers. The hot moist air will exit through portions 50 and 52 of the top opening 48. Air will be directed upwardly from the air holes 124 in the upper ring 66 (FIG. 7). This air will attach itself to the inner surface of the outer shell 54 (FIG. 4) until it is redirected by engagement with the annular portions 68 downwardly against the portions of the head under the open portions 50 and 52.

As shown in FIG. 4, the annular lip portion 68 forms an angle of 7 with the vertical as this produces thebest flow of hot air down against the hair under openings 50 and 52. Fairly good results may be obtained over a range of: 5.

In order to best show the relationship of the various elements of the invention, the drawings herein are drawn to scale, that is, the sizes and shapes of the varihas a static pressure of approximately 0:85 inches of water. Holes 118 and 120 in the lower ring 58 are 0.189

inches in diameter. The circular portion of openings 110 through 116 are 0.189 inches in diameter spaced one inch apart. Holes 122 in the second ring 60 are 0.191 inches in diameter. Holes 124 in the upper or third ring 66 are 0.166 inches in diameter. Holes 126 in the back plate 62 are 0.191 inches in diameter, and the holes 128 in the bridge 64 are 0.189 inches in diameter. In the design described, the velocity of the air impinging upon the hair can be kept within the range of 1,700 to 4,000 feet per minute. The most desirable velocity is approximately 3,000 feet per minute. Substantially higher velocities produce a hot spot effect, that is, the wearer of the hood feels a hot spot under at least some of the air jets and substantially lower velocities do not dry the hair fast enough. Actually, the

lowest velocity air produced by the hood disclosed is a from the lower ring 58, due to the near right angle that is directed vertically so that it will impingeat a very slight nearly tangential angle to the inner surface of the outer shell 54 and attach itself.

The air is directed normally from the bridge and the back portion 56, since it is directed from these portions at the substantially thickest, most curler-bearing portions of the hair which require the most drying.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efficiently attained and, since certain changes may be made in the above construction without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Having described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A hair dryer hood comprising:

A. a substantially dome-shaped outer shell having a skirt-like extension along the side and rear lower portions thereof such that when mounted in vertical orientation over the head of a user the back and sides of the hair of the user are enveloped but not the forehead, face and eyes; the outer shell having an opening in the upper portion thereof and having an inwardly directed lip about the opening for directing air from the upper portion downwardly at the top of the head of the user;

B. an air duct structure mounted in the lower portion of said outer shell having holes therein for directing air at the lower portions of the sides and back of the head of the user;

C. an extension on said duct structure having holes therein for directing air substantially at the upper portions of the back of the head of a user above said lower ring; and

D. an air-directing chute mounted in the upper portion of said outer shell and extending over the top of the head of the user for directing air downwardly at the top of the head of the user beneath the opening in the upper portion of the outer shell.

2. A hair dryer hood as defined in claim 1, wherein said opening is substantially circular in cross section and said chute is adapted to direct hot air downwardly at the. top of the head substantially along the midline of the head from front to back of said opening.

3. A hair dryer hood as defined in claim 1, wherein said lipcomprises an annular inwardly .directed lip about said opening and said outer shell includes means for directing air upwardly along the inner wall of said shell for redirection by said annular lip against the top of the head of the user.

4. A hair dryer hood as defined in claim 1, wherein said duct structure is adapted for directing air upwardly 6. A hair dryer hood as defined in claim 3, wherein said last named means comprises a channel having air holes for directing air against and along the inner surface of said outer shell so that the air flow attaches itself thereto for direction to and against said depending annular lip.

7. The hair dryer hood defined in claim 6, wherein the surface of said depending lip toward the inner surface of said shell forms an angle of substantially 7 with the vertical.

8. A hair dryer hood as defined in claim 1, wherein said holes are adapted for directing air substantially normally to the rear surface of the head of a user.

- 9. The hair dryer hood defined in claim 1, wherein said opening in the upper portion of the outer shell includes an opening at the top thereof on either side of said air-directing chute.

10. The hair dryer hood defined in claim 1, wherein said lip extends about said openings and said .duct structure includes means for directing air upwardly along the inside of said outer shell to be directed at th top of the head of the user.

11. The hair dryer hood defined in claim 1, wherein said air duct structure comprises a first array of air holes about the lowermost portion thereof around the back of the head of a user substantially from ear to ear and a second array of air holes above said first array and above the ears of a user and extending around the back of the head of a user substantially from temple to temple.

12. Thehair dryer hood defined in claim 11, wherein said first and second array of air holes direct the air upwardly at substantially 45 to the vertical.

Patent Citations
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US1842001 *Jun 26, 1931Jan 19, 1932Leon ZainfeldHair drying device
US1943579 *Jul 25, 1932Jan 16, 1934Butler Manufacturing CoHair drying helmet
US2329352 *Jan 5, 1942Sep 14, 1943Krueger John HAppliance for drying hair
US2424502 *Sep 13, 1944Jul 22, 1947Polite Jacob JHair drier
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3832789 *Dec 22, 1972Sep 3, 1974Schick IncNestable hair dryer with tensioned positioning
US4015545 *Jul 24, 1975Apr 5, 1977Nittetsu Curtainwall CorporationShelf assembly
US4991314 *Apr 13, 1989Feb 12, 1991Torus CorporationFluid flow apparatus and process
US5956863 *Jan 8, 1999Sep 28, 1999Allen; Donavan J.Hair dryer apparatus and method
US6293030Jan 8, 2001Sep 25, 2001Mccurtis Martin L.Hair drying apparatus
US8702419 *Apr 5, 2011Apr 22, 2014Rickey SimpsonAutomated Candle Blower
US20110244406 *Oct 6, 2011Rickey SimpsonAutomated Candle Blower
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/99, 34/98, 34/96, D28/17
International ClassificationA45D20/00, A45D20/44
Cooperative ClassificationA45D20/44
European ClassificationA45D20/44