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Publication numberUS3718111 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1973
Filing dateApr 5, 1971
Priority dateApr 5, 1971
Publication numberUS 3718111 A, US 3718111A, US-A-3718111, US3718111 A, US3718111A
InventorsDel Vecchio M
Original AssigneeDel Vecchio M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motorized aqua disc
US 3718111 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1973 M. DEL VECCHIO MOTORIZED AQUA DISC Filed April 5, 1971 FIG.

FIG.2

INVENTOR DELVECCHIO MICHAEL ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,718,111 MOTORIZED AQUA DISC Michael Del Vecchio, 140 Regent Ave., Providence, RI. 02908 Filed Apr. 5, 1971, Ser. No. 131,214 Int. Cl. 1363b 35/00 U.S. Cl. 115-70 1 Claim ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A self-propelled recreational device for use in water having a disc-like body portion with flotation material located therein, a vertically extending opening formed in said body portion, and a motor assembly mounted on said body portion and extending downwardly through said opening and terminating in a propeller that projects below said body portion.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention is designed for use as an aquatic recreational device and is generally of the type as illustrated in Patent No. 3,434,167.

Aquatic devices for recreational use have either taken the form of the conventional boat, which if self-propelled is provided with either an inboard or outboard motor having a rearwardly located propeller, or in the non-selfpropelled variety have included various forms of skis, sleds, boards and discs. In Patent No. 3,434,167, referred to above, a tow disc is disclosed that is designed to support the weight of a user while being towed over the surface of the water. However, this form of recreational device depends upon towing for movement over the water and in this sense is analogous to water skis or sleds that are in common use. Self-propelled devices, such as boats and the like, have found considerable favor in aquatic recreation, but in most cases are relatively expensive and are somewhat conventional in the construction and use thereof.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a new form of aquatic recreational device and includes a disc-like body portion in which flotation material is located. Movement is provided for the device by means of a motor assembly that extends through an opening formed in the body portion, the opening being offset or eccentric of the vertical axis of the body portion, and preferably forwardly with respect thereto. By providing the disc-like body portion with a motor assembly, an unusual propulsion device is created that enables the occupant to obtain various movements of the device which cannot be created with the conventional boat. The device is relatively inexpensive, and the movement thereof through the water without the requirement of a towing boat provides numerous recreational possibilities.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a self-propelled recreational device in which a buoyant material is located for supporting a motor assembly and occupant.

Another object of the invention is to provide a disclike self-propelled aquatic device having buoyant material for the support thereof and including an olfset motor assembly that provides for the movement of the device over the surface of water.

Still another object is to provide a self-propelled aquatic device having a body portion of disc-like configuration in which flotation material is located, the body portion including a motor assembly which in the preferred form of the invention is offset forwardly of the vertical axis of the body portion.

Still another object is to provide a relatively inexpen- 3,718,111 Patented Feb. 27, 1973 sive aquatic device, the body portion of which is molded of plastic materials.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention shall become apparent as the description thereof proceeds when considered in connection with the accompanying illustrative drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAININGS DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to the drawing and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, one form of the self-propelled recreational aquatic device embodied in the present invention is illustrated and is generally indicated at 10. The aquatic device 10 is designed primarily for recreational use and as such deviates from the conventional boat configuration and includes a disc-like body portion generally indicated at 12. The body portion 12 is formed with an upper section 14 and a lower section 16, the sections 14 and 16 being molded of a plastic material and being hollow in configuration. Formed on the peripheral edges of the sections 14 and 16 are mating flanges 18 and 20, respectively, that are secured together, as will be described hereinafter, to form the complete body portion 12. Located Within the upper section 14 is a buoyant flotation material 22, such as polyurethane foam, the bottom section 16 having a similar material 24 located therein. It is seen that when the upper and lower sections 14 and 16 are secured together, the flotation material as located therein cooperates to produce a buoyant device that will be easily supported in water.

Secured to the mating flanges 18 and 20 by spaced apart bolts, screws or the like and extending around the periphery of the sections 14 is a resilient bumper 26 that provides for protection of the device. The resilient bumper 26 cooperates with the securing means to fix the upper and lower sections 14 and 16 together. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the bumper 26 is formed in a channel configuration and may be constructed of any convenient material, such as rubber or plastic that has resilient properties.

Formed in the upper and lower sections 14 and 16 of the body portion are openings that are aligned to define a vertically extending opening, the vertically extending opening being offset or eccentric with respect to the vertical axis of the body portion 12. As further illustrated in FIG. 2, the opening has a generally semicircular configuration in cross section. Projecting through the opening that extends through the upper and lower sections 14 and 16 is a tubular member 30 that defines an opening 28, the tubular member also being formed in a generally semi-circular configuration in cross section. Referring again to FIG. 1, the tubular member 30' is shown being formed as part of a frame structure that is defined by an inclined front plate 32 and spaced side plates 34 joined to the front plate 32, one of which is illustrated in FIG. 1. Fixed within the tubular member 30 on the forward side thereof is a mounting plate 36, the upper portion of which is exposed for receiving a bracket 37 of a motor assembly, generally indicated at 38. In order to accommodate a clamp 39 for securing the bracket 37 of the motor assembly 38 to the mounting plate 36, the upper portion of the tubular member 30 is enlarged and includes a horizontal wall 40 and a vertical wall 41 joined thereto.

In order to provide the necessary propulsion for the aquatic device 10, the motor assembly 38 is employed and is of conventional construction, incorporating an internal combustion engine 42 therein that drives a vertical shaft 43 that extends through the opening 28 in the tubular member 30 and terminating in a horizontal shaft at the lower end thereof on which a propeller 44 is secured. As further illustrated in FIG. 1, the propeller 44 faces rearwardly of the aquatic device and upon rotation thereof will propel the aquatic device in a forwardly direction.

It is seen that the aquatic device 10 is adapted to skim over the surface of the water; and during the propulsion thereof, provision must be made to prevent water from entering into the opening 28 and splashing upwardly onto the motor 42 of the motor assembly. In order to prevent water from entering into the opening 28, the forwardmost or leading edge of the tubular member 30 extends downwardly, as indicated at 50, to a point that is lower than the opposite or trailing edge thereof as indicated at 52. By locating the leading edge 50 of the tubular member 30 lower than the trailing edge 52, cavitation is prevented, and the water will flow by the opening 28 without entering therein.

In order to provide the greatest stability and control of the aquatic device 10, spaced longitudinally extending fins 54 and 56 are located on the bottom surface of the lower section 16 and extend substantially the length thereof. The fins 54 and 56 are preferably molded as an integral part of the bottom section 16 and may be formed in any desired configuration, depending upon the requirements of the aquatic device.

In order to accommodate one or more occupants in the device 10, the upper section 14 is provided with a recess 58, in which a seat 60 is located. The seat '60 which is of conventional design extends substantially the width of the body portion 12, and it is understood that the recess 58 may be enlarged to accommodate space for additional occupants, depending upon the design of the device. As further illustrated in FIG. 1, a fuel tank 62 is located directly behind the seat 60 and may be molded directly on the upper section 14. Any convenient fuel line may extend from the fuel tank 62 to the motor assembly 38 for supplying the motor 42 with fuel as required.

Although it is contemplated that the motor assembly 38 can be swiveled to effect a steering action of the aquatic device 10, the preferred form of steering mechanism as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 includes twin rudders 64 and 66 that are pivotally connected by pivot pins '67 and 68 to fixed rudder elements 69 and 70, respectively. A conventional steering control may be employed for controlling the movement of the rudders '64 and 66 and is connected thereto through tubular lines 72, one of which is illustrated in FIG. 1. A steering wheel 74 that may include a conventional steering structure for interconnection to the rudders 64 and 66 is also provided, and it is understood that movement of the steering wheel 74 will produce a corresponding pivotal movement of the rudders 64 and 66 to effect a steering action of the device.

It is seen that the aquatic device 10 is relatively inexpensive in construction, since the body portion 12 defined by the upper sections 14 and 16 is fabricated of molded plastic materials, the interior of the sections having an inexpensive flotation material, such as polyurethane foam located therein. The motor assembly 42, seat 60 and steering mechanism are easily mounted in place after the molding of the body portion sections.

In use of the aquatic device 10, the occupant steers the device by means of the steering wheel 74, and propul sion is provided by the motor assembly 42. Since the motor assembly 42 is located forwardly of the device, and

further, since the device has a generally circular configuration defining a disc-like construction, unusual and interesting effects can be obtained as the device is propelled over water.

Referring now to FIG. 3, a modified form of the invention is illustrated and is generally indicated at 80. The device includes a body portion generally indicated at 82 defined by an upper section 84 and a lower section 86 that are also molded of a plastic material and joined together at mating flanges 88 and 90, respectively. A bumper 92 is fixed around the mating flanges 88 and and may be formed of a material having suitable resilient properties. An opening is formed in the body portion 82 that is offset with respect to the vertical axis thereof and is defined by aligned openings located in the sections 84 and 86; but, in the form of the invention illustrated in FIG. 3, the opening is disposed rearwardly of the vertical axis of the body portion. A tubular member indicated at 94 is disposed in the opening formed in the body portion and includes an inclined frame member 96 that adds support thereto. Fixed in the tubular member 94 is a support plate 98 that receives a bracket 100 formed as part of a motor assembly 102. The motor assembly 102 projects through the tubular member 94 located in the opening in the body portion 82 and terminates at the lower end thereof in a propeller 104. As contrasted with the motor assembly 42 illustrated in FIG. 1, the motor assembly 102 is constructed such that the lower portion thereof, including the propeller 104, is rotatable so as to effect a steering action, as will be hereinafter described.

In order to prevent cavitation or entry of water into the tubular member 94 through which the motor assembly 102 extends, the leading edge of the tubular member 94- indicated at 106 is disposed lower than the trailing edge 108 thereof. As described hereinabove, by locating the lowermost leading edge of the tubular member at a lower position than the trailing edge 108, water is prevented from entering the tubular member 94 as the device is propelled over the surface of the water.

Formed in the upper section 84 of the device 80 and located forwardly of the vertical axis thereof is a recess 110 in which a passenger seat 112 is fixed. A steering mechanism 114 is mounted in the recess 110 and is interconnected to the motor assembly 104 through a steering line 116. Rotation of the steering mechanism 114 will produce a corresponding rotating movement of the lower portion of the motor assembly 102, thereby effecting a steering action of the device. It is seen that in the modified form of the invention as illustrated in FIG. 3, the rudders illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 are eliminated.

A suitable fuel tank 118 is located rearwardly of the seat 112 and receives fuel that may be fed to the motor assembly 102 in any conventional manner.

Spaced fins 120 are also formed on the bottom of the section 86 and provide for stability and control of the device as it is propelled over the water.

While there is shown and described herein certain specific structure embodying the invention, it will be manifest to those skilled in the art that various modifications and rearrangements of the parts may be made wihout departing from the spirit and scope of the underlying inventive concept and that the same is not limited to the particular forms herein shown and described.

What is claimed is:

1. A self-propelled aquatic device comprising a disclike body portion defined by a pair of disc-shaped sections having peripheral flanges that are secured together in mating relation for sealing said sections in a unitary construction, flotation material filing substantially the interior of said disc-shaped sections, an opening formed in said body portion, the axis of said opening being substantially vertical, the vertical opening being located forwardly of the vertical axis of said body portion so as to be offset with respect thereto, the leading edge of the opening at the bottom surface of the lowermost of the sections depending lower than the trailing edge thereof, thereby preventing cavitation during forward movement of said device in the Water, a frame fixed in said vertical opening and including a mounting plate, a motor assembly mounted on said mounting plate and extending downwardly through said opening and terminating in a propeller that projects below said body portion, a rudder located at the rear of said body portion, steering means positioned adjacent to said motor assembly and interconnected to said rudder for controlling pivotal movement thereof, spaced longitudinally extending vertical fins located on the underside of said body portion that provide Stability and directional control for said device, and a recess formed in the upper section of said body portion that receives an occupant therein, said steering means being located adjacent to said recess and being accessible to said occupant for steering said device.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS TRYGVE M. BLIX, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 9l A

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3888204 *Jun 8, 1973Jun 10, 1975Zubick Jr Frank PWater ski vehicle
US3982497 *Oct 3, 1975Sep 28, 1976Caron Charles AJet-propelled power boat
US4367689 *Aug 27, 1980Jan 11, 1983Lukehart Leonard JWater recreational vehicle
US4652245 *Jan 27, 1986Mar 24, 1987May Billy DShallow draft boat
US4664054 *Jun 21, 1985May 12, 1987Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaSmall-sized marine craft
US4730572 *Jun 13, 1986Mar 15, 1988Roundabout Boats, Inc.Rudderless circular boat
US5090930 *Jul 19, 1991Feb 25, 1992Walden Robert RPower-driven float assembly
US5375551 *Sep 24, 1993Dec 27, 1994Lunter; PaulWater jet saucer
US5401197 *Aug 31, 1993Mar 28, 1995Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki KaishaHull
US5435261 *Dec 27, 1993Jul 25, 1995Androus; RobertFloatable cooler device
US6543378 *Sep 24, 2001Apr 8, 2003Toney R. Johnson, Sr.Personal watercraft
US6962124 *Feb 17, 2004Nov 8, 2005Charles Dean NorthRound boat
US8206192 *Aug 18, 2006Jun 26, 2012Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Boat propulsion engine
US20090149090 *Aug 18, 2005Jun 11, 2009Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Boat propulsion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/55.5, 114/346
International ClassificationB63B1/00, B63B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationB63B1/041
European ClassificationB63B1/04B