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Publication numberUS3718996 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1973
Filing dateFeb 1, 1971
Priority dateFeb 1, 1971
Publication numberUS 3718996 A, US 3718996A, US-A-3718996, US3718996 A, US3718996A
InventorsAustin M
Original AssigneeAustin M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible linkages
US 3718996 A
Abstract
A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or similar purposes comprising a link structure which in section is of corrugated form and extends between and is connected with two or more members to be interconnected. The link structure distributes any bending stress applied to the structure over a greater length an thus over a greater area of material and consequently the resultant bending moment at any point along the length of the link is less than would be the case for a plain or non-corrugated link.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Austin March 6, 1973 FLEXIBLE LINKAGES FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Inventor: Marcus Luther Austin, 53 Park 659,108 3/1938 Germany ..36/67 H Avenue, Bedford, England 22 l 1 1971 Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson A -'dPtl'd'l-lk U pp No: 111,533 ttorney Gifior & a a1 is au e 57 ABSTRACT l.

g i 7 g A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or [58] i 67 B 67 D similar purposes comprising a link structure which in 36/32 30 section is of corrugated form and extends between and is connected with two or more members to be inter- 5 References Cited connected. The link structure distributes any bending stress applied to the structure over a greater length an UNITED STATES PATENTS thus over a greater area of material and consequently 2,683,317 7 1954 Sprigg ..36/32 R the resultant bending moment at any Point along h 1,791,177 .2/1931 Tassel ..36/30 A length of the link is less than would be the case for 21 3,327,412 6/1967 Wilmanns et a1. .....36/67 D plain or non-corrugated link. 2,124,819 7/1938 Halloran ..36/30A 3,559,308 2/1971 Bernier et a1. ..36/67 A 13 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures 40 H, 2 "iii? '3 C 1* I 5 L. m n l I I l 1: :3; 2

\ 1 I v::-- (are @692 A I l W19" i66 l irm .3 40 0 'L lH PATENTED R 61975 SHEET 10F 2 3 INVENTOF MHACUS L. flUSTl/V M M HTTO/FWEYJ "1 ulu SHEET 2 OF 2 PATENTED W 51 av W m Z n H s W WH 7 W mu w L 7w 1 FLEXIBLE LINKAGES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or like purposes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the invention to provide a flexible controllable link structure arranged between two or more parts or members which enables said members to maintain their relative positions but to flex or pivot independently and wherein the connecting or supporting structure can flex without inducing residual stress and fatigue within said structure.

According to one feature of this invention a link structure is of corrugated form in section and extends between two or more members to be interconnected, whereby bending stress is distributed over a greater length and thus over a larger area of material, and the resulting bending moment is less at any point along the length than in the case of a plane connection.

According to a further feature of the invention, a link or supporting or reinforcing structure is in the form of a mesh having its intersections interconnected and the portions disposed intermediate such connections being of corrugated form.

The corrugations between any two connected portions may be the same as between any other pair of such portions or may differ in wave form or thickness of material or both, to control overall deflection and permitted flexing of said portion.

The linkage in its simplest form comprises a single continuous connection along the whole or parts of the lateral length of the portions to be connected whether the lengths of the respective portions are the same or not.

The connected portions at the connections may be of flat form or curved or dome-like. Such an arrangement facilitates stress dispersal, particularly when the connection at an intersection is enclosed or partially embedded in another material. Moreover, the corrugated waveform may be of sinusoidal, cosinusoidal or double cosinusoidal form.

If desired or advisable, depending on the purpose of the link structure, some or all of the connected portions may be formed with integral or replaceable projections such as studs or spikes or with threaded thimbles or the like to receive such projections. In the case of a mesh structure some or all of the intersections may be formed as above-mentioned with projections or threaded thimbles. Alternatively, the interconnections may be threaded. 7

In a simple application the link structure may be embedded within the thickness of a sports shoe sole, the corrugated links interconnecting a series of spikes or studs projecting from the outer face of the sole.

Alternatively, a mesh structure embedded in a shoe sole may have projections formed thereon which protrude through the lower face of the sole.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS perspective view two examples of a continuous link;

FIG. 3 shows in side elevation a continuous link connecting laterally spaced members;

FIG. 4 shows in perspective a mesh type link structure;

FIG. 5 shows in examples A-E different forms of corrugations;

FIG. 6 shows diagrammatically a link interconnecting spikes embedded in the sole of a shoe;

FIG. 7 shows a mesh reinforcing linkage embedded within a soft sole; 1

FIG. 8 shows diagrammatically a mesh reinforcing structure within the upper of a soft shoe;

FIG. 9 shows a plan view of a. shoe sole having dif ferently directed reinforcing and/or connecting struc tures;

FIG. 10 shows a plan view of a linkage interconnecting members incorporating a threaded thim ble;

FIG. 11 is a section on the line XI-XI of FIG. 10; and

FIG. 12 is a section on the line XII-XII of FIG. 10.

DESCRIPTION OF SEVERAL PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIG. 1, this shows a continuous link 10 of corrugated form which extends between and interconnects two members 11, 12 of equal width, that is to say the width of the link is constant and equal to the lateral edges of the members 1 1, 12.

In FIG. 2, a corresponding continuous link 13 interconnects two members 14, 15 of different width, the link 13 tapering from the wider member 14 to the narrower member 15. Obviously, if desired, the width of the link need not be coterminous with that of the members which it interconnects.

FIG. 3 shows in side elevation a continuous corrugated link 16 interconnecting members 17, 18, 19 which as shown comprise spikes intended for a sports shoe. If desired, the connections between the link and the members may as shown at 19 be thickened to provide an anchorage for the spike or like projection or for holding a threaded thimble to receive a replaceable spike. If desired, the connections themselves may be threaded.

FIG. 4 shows a two-way mesh supporting linkage 20, the intersections of which are interconnected as shown at 21 and all of which carry spikes 22. The connected portions may be flat or thickened or domed or made to conform with the shape of the overlying or underlying member of the mesh. In the latter case and where the strips from which the mesh is made are flat, the act of making the end portions conform with the corrugated shape of the underlying or overlying member, will lead to increased flexibility in a direction transverse to the direction of the corrugation.

FIG. 5 in the examples A-E shows different forms of corrugations by way of example, intended for controlling flexibility. Examples A and B show two irregular wave forms. Examples C and D show regular wave forms with the connected portions disposed at different locations relatively to the corrugations. Example E shows the connecting link interconnecting members in different planes.

FIG. 6 shows a continuous link 24 embedded in the sole 25 of a shoe and interconnecting two spikes 26. Obviously, where spikes are to be distributed over a large surface a mesh linkage as shown in FIG. 4 may be used.

FIG. 7 illustrates a reinforcing linkage 28 consisting of strips 29 interconnected by corrugated links 30. This arrangement may additionally form a flexible protective barrier within the sole 25 and has the advantage that the sole need not be much thickened for protection of the foot.

The reinforcing strips of FIG. 7 may be replaced by the mesh described in connection with FIG. 4. In such a case a mesh made from light gauge material and hearing protru stions 22 may form a protective barrier in light weight long distance running footwear.

A mesh linkage of similar form may be inserted in the uppers of a shoe as a reinforcing layer or shaper in a shoe of soft material formed by casting or molding or injecting, as shown at 32 in FIG. 8.

FIG. 9 indicates how linkage structures 33, 34 may be disposed in the sole of a shoe, having their corrugations or direction of flexing set in different directions.

In shoes formed with soles of soft cellular material, solid objects on which the sole may be placed cause upward deflection of the soft sole and transfer pressure and discomfort to the underside of the foot. To avoid this, a flex controlling mesh may be incorporated in the forepart of the sole and especially below those parts of the foot, such as the ball thereof, which sustain the weight or change of direction during use. The capability of the mesh to flex in any direction would not detract from the flex characteristic of the sole but would protect against upward pressure.

Referring to FIGS. -12, a linkage is shown which interconnects thickened members 40 of generally circular shape, which structure is intended to be incorporated in the sole of a shoe. The linkage comprises corrugated links 42 extending from back to front of the structure and interconnecting the members 40 to allow flexibility in a heel to toe direction and further links 44 extending generally transversely of the structure and of strip-like planar form without corrugations since the degree of flexibility from side to side of a sole is less than that required in a heel to toe direction.

The members 40 have embedded therein threaded thimbles 46, as shown more particularly in FIGS. 11 and 12, which are adapted to receive threaded studs or spikes intended to project outwardly from the under face of the sole or non-slip inserts which may lie substantially flush with the-outer surface of the sole when the linkage is incorporated in a sole.

Where studs are to be formed, as by molding, casting, or injection, integrally with the outer face of the sole, which may be of soft flexible material, the studs themselves would also be soft and flexible. To provide satisfactory reinforcement, a mesh may be incorporated within the sole and have reinforcing projections which extend from the mesh intersections through the sole into the soft solid material of the stud itself in the manner described with reference to FIGS. 10-12. Alternatively, the projections of the mesh may terminate at the outer surface of the sole so that when the soft material of the sole is compressed by upward pressure the projections would act as gripping or anti-slip means protruding slightly under such conditions from the sole but practically inactive when walking over normal surfaces.

The link or mesh structure is preferably formed of a moldable, castable or injectable material, such as a plastics material, although any material may be used which is suitable to provide flexible corrugations.

A multidirectional mesh may be used by itself without projections or the like as a reinforcing flex controlling member and to impart a desired shape. For instance, a micromesh structure may be used as a reinforcing member within the thickness of any composite molded, cast or injected article as a vehicle tire, flexible belting or material of a conveyor track, or when formed as a maximesh, it may be used for barriers, resilient or vibratory materials.

When made of soft and resilient material, it would contain a latent reserve of expansion available after impact. Stress transmitted by an object forcibly impacting the same would therefore be more evenly distributed, thereby increasing the durability and strength of the material due in part to the damping effect produced by the dual shock absorption capability of the material. The structure would thus have many uses, such as trampoline mats, sock absorbers and the like.

Although I have described only a few preferred embodiments of my invention, it will be apparent that vari ous changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention as expressed by the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or like purposes comprising a link structure in the form of a mesh having its members interconnected at the intersections and the portions disposed intermediate such connections, in at least one direction of the mesh structure being of corrugated form, the mesh structure extending between and being connected to two or more elements to be interconnected whereby bending stress is distributed over substantially the entire length and thus over substantially the entire area of material encompassing said link structure and the resulting bending moment at any point along the length of the link structure is less than in the case of a plane link structure.

2. A linkage according to claim 1 wherein the con nected portions at the zone of interconnection are constructed of a shape to facilitate stress dispersal.

3. A linkage according to claim 1 wherein at least some of the connected portions are formed with integral projections such as studs or spikes.

4. A linkage according to claim 1 wherein at least some of the connected portions are threaded to receive projections such as studs.

5. A linkage according to claim 1 wherein the mesh structure is formed of a plastic material.

6. A linkage according to claim 1 and in which said mesh structure is embedded within the thickness of the sole of a shoe to act as a reinforcement of the sole.

7. A linkage according to claim 1 acting as a reinforcing flex controlling member within the thickness of an article.

8. A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or like purposes comprising a structure in the form of a mesh having its members at the intersections interconnected and wherein first portions disposed intermediate such connections extending in one direction of the mesh structure and interconnecting two adjacent connected members are formed with corrugations and second portions extending at an angle to the first portions and interconnecting two other adjacent connected members are of plane form.

9. A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or like purposes, comprising a structure in the form of a mesh having its members at the intersections interconnected and the portions disposed intermediate such connections, in at least one direction of the mesh structure, being of corrugated form, said linkage being embedded within the thickness of the sole of a shoe to act as a reinforcement for the sole of said shoe, and projections supported by said mesh structure and projecting from the'lower face of the sole of said shoe.

A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or like purposes, comprising a structure in the form of a mesh having its members at the intersections interconnected and the portions disposed intermediate such connections, in at least one direction of the mesh structure, being of corrugated form, said linkage being embedded within the thickness of a sole of relatively soft material having studs projecting from the outer face of the sole of said shoe, and projections extending from said linkage through said sole and into said studs to thereby reinforce said studs.

11. A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing or like purposes, comprising a structure in the form of a mesh having its members at the intersections interconnected and the portions disposed intermediate such connections, in at least one direction of the mesh structure, being of corrugated form, said linkage being embedded within the thickness of the sole of a shoe to act as a reinforcement for the sole of said shoe, and projections supported by said mesh structure and projecting downwardly therefrom, said projections terminating at the outer face of the sole of said shoe to form anti-slip means. t

12. A flexible linkage for supporting, reinforcing, or like purposes, comprising a structure in the form of a mesh having its members at the intersections interconnected andthe portions disposed intermediate such connections in at least one direction of the mesh structure being of corrugated form said corrugated portion tapering in width from one connected portion to another.

13. A flexible link structure for supporting, reinforc' ing or like purposes wherein the link structure is of corrugated form in section and extends between and is connected to two or more members to be interconnected whereby bending stress is distributed over a greater length and thus over a larger area of material encompassing said link structure and the resulting bending moment at any point along the length of the link is less than in the case of a plane link, and the corrugations between any two connected portions differ in wave form from the portions interconnecting another pair of portions.

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Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1791177 *Jun 25, 1928Feb 3, 1931Tassel Jr Edward D VanShoe
US2124819 *Aug 23, 1937Jul 26, 1938Halloran Henry GShoe bottom filler
US2683317 *Jun 28, 1950Jul 13, 1954David E CrookerSafety sole for footwear
US3327412 *Feb 25, 1965Jun 27, 1967Weinbrenner Shoe CorpOutsoles having calks and method of manufacturing the same
US3559308 *Sep 17, 1969Feb 2, 1971Wright & Co Inc E TCleated outsole
*DE659108A Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5932336 *Apr 18, 1997Aug 3, 1999Acushnet CompanyShoe sole
US5987783 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 23, 1999Acushnet CompanyGolf shoe having spike socket spine system
US7421805Jul 16, 2004Sep 9, 2008Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.Integral spine structure for footwear
US7818897Sep 4, 2008Oct 26, 2010Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.Integral spine structure for footwear
US7832117Jul 17, 2006Nov 16, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including full length composite plate
US8151488 *Nov 6, 2008Apr 10, 2012Nike, Inc.Linked articles
US8601720Mar 8, 2012Dec 10, 2013Nike, Inc.Linked articles
US8602274Nov 6, 2008Dec 10, 2013Nike, Inc.Method of making an article comprising links
US8707493Mar 8, 2012Apr 29, 2014Nike, Inc.Method of customizing a linked article
US8813390Oct 12, 2010Aug 26, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including full length composite plate
US20050034328 *Jul 16, 2004Feb 17, 2005Geer Kenton D.Integral spine structure for footwear
US20090211115 *Sep 4, 2008Aug 27, 2009Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.Integral spine structure for footwear
US20100107443 *Nov 6, 2008May 6, 2010Nike Inc.Linked Articles
US20110023327 *Feb 3, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of Footwear Including Full Length Composite Plate
US20110146110 *Jun 23, 2011Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.Integral spine structure for footwear
US20130067765 *Mar 21, 2013Nike, Inc.Article Of Footwear
WO1996039059A1 *May 30, 1996Dec 12, 1996Acushnet CompanyGolf shoe having spike socket spine system
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/67.00B, 36/102
International ClassificationA43C15/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/161
European ClassificationA43C15/16A