Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3719195 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1973
Filing dateJul 27, 1971
Priority dateJul 30, 1970
Publication numberUS 3719195 A, US 3719195A, US-A-3719195, US3719195 A, US3719195A
InventorsMatsuda Y
Original AssigneeHitachi Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluidic pulse counter
US 3719195 A
Abstract
In a bistable pure fluidic element there are provided a first circulation passage having an input pulse source in communication with two control nozzles, a second circulation passage connecting said input pulse source with one point of each of two output flow passages and a third circulation passage formed in the proximity of a main jet dividing or diverting edge so as to branch at leat one portion of a main jet of the element. Associated circuits are also disclosed.
Images(15)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 1 1 3,719,195 Matsuda 1 1 March 6, 1973 15 1 FLUIDIC PULSE COUNTER 3,584,635 6/1971 Warren ..l37/8l.5 [75] Inventor: Yasumasa Matsuda, Hitachi, Japan 32333 323;} [73] Assignee: Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 3,614,964 10/1971 Chen ..l37/81.5 3,640,300 2/1972 Boothe et a1. ....137/81.5 Flledi J y 27, 1971 3,667,489 6/1972 Blaiklock etal... ....137/81.5 [211 pp No: 166,472 3,667,492 6/1972 D1 Cam1llo ..l37/81.5

30 Forei n A lication Priorit Data Primary Examine' samuel Scott 1 g W Y Attorney-Craig, Antonelli & 11111 July 30, 1970 Japan ..45/66077 ABSTRACT Dec. 28, 1970 Japan............... ....45/l2()139 In a bistable pure fluldic element there are provided a May 21, 1971 Japan ..46/34036 first circulation passage having an input pulse Source in communication with two control nozzles, a second [52] [1.8. CI. 137/811, 235/201 circulation passage connecting i input pulse Source [51] Int.C1. ..Fl5c 1/12 with one point of each of two output flow passages [58] Fleld of Search and a third circulation p g formed in the p i I ty of a main jet dividing or diverting edge so as to [56] References cued branch at leat one portion of a main jet of the ele- UNITED STATES PATENTS ment. Associated circuits are also disclosed.

3,527,240 9 1970 Metzger ..137/s1.5 12 Claims, 41 Drawing Figures 3,528,442 9/1970 Campagnudo l 37/81.5 3,547,137 12/1970 Chadwick ..137/81.5 X 3,581,757 6/1971 Pavlin et a1 ..l37/81.5

PAIIQIIIIQIJ R 75 SHEET 01 0F 15 FIG. 2

F I G. I

PRIOR ART FIG. 30

FIG. 3b

THE INVENTION PRIOR ART INVENTOR UMASA MATsu DA BY IWILQ; 4r H-LQQ I ATTORNEYS MAX COUNT FREQUENCY PAIENIEDIIAR 61075 SHEET O IUF 15 F I G. 9 -W (THE INVENTION) (FIG. I) 600 /L-. (FIG. 2:1 400 I. I

o 02 0.4 Q6 as L0 L2 mm LOAD RESISTANCE ORIFICE br swPc AL I l I: ul l l l I n l I 7060 5040 30 20 l0 0 0.2 0.405 0.8 L0 {.2 l4 Pl/Ps xlOO g 3) br m NUMERALS IN FARENTHESES INDICATE FAN-OUT NUMBERS INVENTOR YA UMA A ATSUDA ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHAR ems 3,719,195.

sum new 15 FIGI3 PRIOR ART INVENTOR (A UIIASA MATSUM BY 6 W ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHAR 61m 3,719,195

SHEET O7UF 15 F l 5 PRIOR ART 1N VENTOR YASU M ASA N ATSU DA (140M900; Hum ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHAR 61913 3,719,195

SHEET UEUF 15 INVENTOR YAsuMAsA MATS u DA BY 0%. mWmwm ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHAR 6W 3,719,195

SHEET USUF 15 INVENTOR YA SUMASA NATSUDA BY armla. QMtQwJLQ4+ H-LQQ I ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHIR' 6 1 V 3.719. 195

SHEET lOIIF I5 F I G. 22

Q I400 Fu U 3 I200 POL E q- IOOO I L |6"0rl4 00 II4+I5I Pl I l I I l l l 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 L0 |.2 L4

br mm" INVENTOR YASUMASA MATSUDA BY 0%, Momma 4r m ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHAR 61w 3.719.195

' SHEET lEUF 15 INVENTOR YASUMA 5A MATfiubA BY cmg awwhm; (4.10

ATTORNEYS PATENTEU 5 I973 SHEET 1n HF 15 FIG. 35

M I 2 w e m B H P I0 O 3 m 5 P mm f w o e O r W .wP 3 .F lh lfll IQ L O o P FIG. 36

5 Preset/Ps xlOO POL INVENTOR YASUMASA M ATSU DA Y 004 M ounQQL H11 2 ATTORNEYS .PATENTEDHAR 6 ms SHEET lSUF 15 FIG. 38

FIG. 37

INVENTOR YAsuMAsA MATSUDA BY m amma; Hum

ATTORNEYS FLUIDIC PULSE COUNTER The present invention relates to a fluidic pulse counters utilizing pure fluidic elements.

There have been proposed various fluidic pulse counters utilizing pure fluidic elements, but they are still unsatisfactory in operation and difficult to design and manufacture. As a principle they may count pulses but they are based upon a more or less undependable principle. Time lags are developed in the process of switching the flip-flops for switching the output flows in the last stage because of the fluid type so that the erratic operations tend to occur. As the result the highest frequency at which the fluidic pulse counter can count is limited.

PRIOR ART The typical prior art fluidic pulse counter illustrated in FIG. 1 is based upon the simplest principle. In a flipflop element 6 for switching the output flow encircled by the dotted lines in FIG. 1, control nozzles 3 and 3 are connected to each other with passages and 5' and an input pulse port 4 is opened at the midpoint of these passages 5 and 5'. Working fluid emerges from a main jet nozzle 1 and is diverted to flow through either of the right or left output flow passages 2 or 2'. The output flow 2 or 2 remains to flow through the right or left output flow passage in a stable manner unless the signal flow emerges out of the control nozzle 3 or 3' in the flip-flop element 6. When the output flow 2 passages through the right output flow passage 2 as shown in FIG. 1, the negative pressure flow is formed in the control nozzle 3 due to the suction of the output flow 2 so that the fluid circulates through the circulation passage 3"5 =53 as indicated by the arrows. However, this circulating flow is not sufficient enough to switch the output flow 2 to flow through the left output flow passage 2'. When the input pulse is applied through the input pulse port 4, it is guided by the circulating flow and flows into the passage 5 as the signal flow 4. When the signal flow 4 is discharged from the control nozzle 3, the output flow is switched. That is working fluid now flows through the left output passage 2' as the output flow 2, and the output flow 2' remains flowing through the passage 2 even after the input pulse or signal flow 4 disappears while the circulating flow flows in the direction opposite to the direction indicated by the arrows. When the next input pulse arrives at the input pulse port 4, the output flow 2' is switched to flow through the right output flow passage 2 in a similar manner described above. That is, the flip-flop is returned to its initial state. Whenever the input pulses arrive at the input pulse port 4, above output flow switching operations are repeated, whereby the input pulses are counted in a binary mode.

However the prior art fluidic pulse counter of the type shown in FIG. 1 has many problems when used in practice. The first problem is that the matching range of the flip-flop element 6 for connection with an input pulse diverting element 6' is narrow so that the erratic operations tend to occur even when the pulse counter has a small manufacture tolerance, the design becomes difficult and a wide product variation tends to occur because the input pulse flow is diverted only by the control flow of the flip-flop element.

A first object of the present invention is therefore to provide an improved fluidic pulse counter which may overcome the problems encountered in the prior art pulse counters and whose operation is reliable and dependable with higher reproducibility.

. A second object of the present invention is to provide an improved fluidic pulse counter whose function is exceedingly improved over the prior art pulse counters.

When pure fluidic pulse counters are connected in series in fan-out l or more or connected to other fluidic elements or devices and when the fluidic element or device connected as the load of the fluidic pulse counter has a minimum allowable input level, the fluidic element or device connected cannot operate at all or erratic operation occurs unless the pressure or flow rate of the output of the pulse counter.

A third object of the present invention is therefore to increase matching range between a pure fluidic pulse counter and a fluidic element or device (which is not limited to the pure fluidic type) to be connected thereto in the next stage.

A fourth object of the present invention is to provide a pure fluidic pulse counter whose function is stable without being disturbed by the external disturbance such as the load variation.

A fifth object of the present invention is to provide a pure fluidic buffer amplification method so that the output amplification especially at a high frequency may be made in a positive manner and the function will not be lowered by the load variation.

A sixth object of the present invention is to provide a pure fluidic buffer amplification method of the type described above in which matching adjustment between a fluidic element or device and a monostable element to be connected in the next stage may be facilitated especially at high frequencies.

A seventh object of the present invention is to provide a set and reset method so that a pure fluidic pulse counter may set and reset positively regardless of the presence or absence of the input signal flow and the minimum pressure of the set and reset signals are independent upon the presence and absence of the input signal flow.

Briefly stated, the present invention provides a pure fluidic pulse counter characterized in that a bistable pure fluidic element including a main jet source, control ports and output flow passages is provided with a first circulation passage having an input pulse source in communication with said two control ports, a second circulation passage connecting said input pulse source with one point of each of said two output flow passages, and a third circulation passage formed in the proximity of a main jet dividing or diverting edge of said'element so as to pass therethrough at least one portion of the main jet, whereby the circulating flow may be positively formed either or both of said first and second circulation passages. The counting ability and reliability of the pure fluidic pulse counter may be remarkably im proved over the prior art counters.

The present invention further provides various auxiliary circuits for further improving the pulse countingcapability and reliability of the pure fluidic pulse counter of the type described above.

The present invention will become more apparent from the folowing description of the preferred embodiments thereof taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of the prior art pure fluidic pulse counter;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic view of a pure fluidic pulse counter in accordance with the present invention for accomplishing the first object thereof;

FIG. 3 is a graph of the data obtained by the experiments for explanation of the effect of the pure fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic view for explanation of the principle of forming the circulating flow in the fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a diagrammatic view for explanation how the circulating fiow is formed in order to accomplish the second object of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a view illustrating the fundamental fluid passage configuration of the present invention when it is applied to a'fluidic pulse counter;

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view of a pure fluidic pulse counter for accomplishing the second object of the present invention;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are graphs of the data obtained by the experiments of the pure fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is a view for explanation of the matching range of the pulse counter proper of the pure fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 7;

FIG. 11 is a diagrammatic view of one embodiment of the present invention for accomplishing the third and fourth objects thereof;

FIG. 12 is a graph for explanation of the effect of the element shown in FIG. 11;

' FIGS. 13 and 15 are diagrammatic views of the prior art output amplifier elements;

FIGS. 14 and 16 show the waveforms for explanation of the modes of operation of the elements shown in FIGS. 13 and 15; 1

FIG. 17 is a fundamental circuit configuration for explanation of the output amplification method in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 18 shows the waveforms for explanation of the mode of operation of the element shown in FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 shows the waveforms for explanation of the effect at a high frequency of the element shown in FIG. 17;

FIG. 20 is a diagrammatic view of one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 21 shows the pressure waveforms for explanation of the element shown in FIG. 20;

FIG. 22 is a graph for explanation of the effect of the output amplification method in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 23 is a circuit configuration when the output amplification method in accordance with the present invention is applied to a feedback type pulse counter;

FIG. 24 is a circuit configuration when the present invention is applied to one-shot multivibrator;

FIG. 25 shows the pressure waveforms for explanation of the mode of operation of the multivibrator shown in FIG. 24;

FIG. 26 is a circuit configuration when the present invention is applied to an AND circuit;

FIG. 27 shows the pressure waveforms for explanation of the AND circuit shown in FIG. 26;

FIG. 28 is a circuit configuration of a shift register;

FIGS. 29, 30 and 31 are circuit configurations of oscillators;

FIG. 32 is a diagrammatic view for explanation of the prior art method for setting and resetting a pulse counter;

FIG. 33 is also a diagrammatic view illustrating the prior art method for setting and resetting a pure fluidic pulse counter;

FIG. 34 is a diagrammatic view for explanation of the principle of the present invention for accomplishing the seventh object thereof;

FIG. 35 is a graph for explanation of the mode of operation of the element shown in FIG. 33;

FIG. 36 is a graph for explanation of the effect of the element shown in FIG. 34;

FIGS. 37 and 38 are also circuit configurations for accomplishing the seventh object of the present invention; and.

FIG. 39 is a circuit configuration in which the element or method illustrated in FIG. 34 is applied to a pure fluidic pulse counter of different type.

Referring to FIG. 2, a pure fluidic pulse counter of the present invention for attaining the first object thereof will be described. The pure fluidic pulse counter is characterized in that in addition to a circulation passage 3-5-5'-3 (to be referred to as the first circulation passage") in communication with control ports of a flip-flop element 6 for switching the output flow in a pure fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 1, there is provided at least one pair of second circulation passages 7 and 7'. The second circulation passages 7 and 7 are branched from two output flow passages 2 and 2' of the flip-flop element 6 respectively and joined to the first circulation passage at 5 and 5 respectively. That is, the second circulation passages are designated by 5-7 and 7'-5' respectively. The fluid flowing through these second circulation passages is fed back to the output flow passage of an input signal pulse branching element. Therefore, when the output flow is emerging from the output port 2, the liquid flows in the directions indicated by the solid arrows at 5 and 5'. However, when the input pulse is applied through an input port 4, it is diverted in the directions indicated by the broken arrows and a portion of it reaches a control port 3 of a flip-flop element for switching the output flow. The input pulse 4 is sufficient enough to switch the output flow to the opposite side, and the switched output fiow 2 is discharged through an output port 2' and is stabilized. Thereafter, the output flow is stably discharged even when no input pulse 4 is applied and the liquid is circulated in the directions opposite to those indicated by the arrows in FIG. 2. That is, the condition is reversed. When the next input pulse is applied, the output flow is switched in a similar manner so that the pulse counter is returned to its initial state. Thus the pulse counter reverses its state from one to the other, whereby the input pulses may be counted.

According to the present invention, the input pulse is positively and rapidly diverted by both of the control flow and the second circulation flow and the switching of the output fiow by the flip-flop element 6 in response to the input pulse is also effected at both of the control port and the diverting point of the second circulation passage. Therefore, the switching operation may be stabilized and switching time may be minimized, whereby the function and reliability of the fluidic pulse counter may be much enhanced.

Furthermore, the load resistance of the input pulse branching element is reduced so that the matching range of the two elements is increased. As a consequence the reproducibility is much increased while the range of variability of manufactured elements is much minimized as compared with the prior elements.

The advantageous feature of the second circulation passages will become more apparent when reference is made to FIG. 3 in which the upper waveforms are the output pulses P0 while the lower waveforms, the input pulses Pi. It is seen that when the second circulation passages are provided in the prior art element which cannot count as shown on the left in FIG. 3, the maching range between two elements is much increased whereby counting may be accomplished easily.

As described hereinbefore, in the improved fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 2, the direction of the input pulse is determined by both of the first and second circulating flows so that the input pulse is rapidly and securely directed, thus eliminating the crratic operation. In addition, the circulating flow is compensated to some extent by the second circulating flow so that the design of the control nozzles of the flip-flop element 6 and its adjacent portions may be mainly directed toward the attainment of the smooth and positive switching characteristics. Thus, the matching of the flip-flop element 6 may be easily attained. Therefore, as compared with the prior art element shown in FIG. 1, the fluidic pulse counter of the present invention is easy to design and less in the range of quality variability, but its function is not satisfactorily improved over the prior art element.

SECOND EMBODIMENT The second embodiment of the present invention has for its object to greatly improve the function of the fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 2 as will become apparent from the following description.

In both of the fluidic pulse counters shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the circulation flow is provided by the negative pressure produced by drawing of the output flow. That is, only when low-pressure eddy flows 9 and are formed under effect as shown in FIG. 4, the circulation flow is produced. Thus there develops some time lags and the maximum count frequency is limited.

To overcome this problem, the present invention contemplates to provide the positive generation of the circulating flow. The feature of the second embodiment of the present invention resides in the fact that, as shown in FIG. 5, the third circulation passage Ill is formed through a main jet divider 8 so that at least one portion of the output flow 2 or 2' may be branched into the third circulation passage 11. That is, when fluid is flowing through the right output flow passage 2 as shown in FIG. 5, the fluid also flows into the third circulation passage ill in the direction indicated by the arrow and thereafter into a left control nozzle 3' and left nozzle 7' in the second circulation passage 2', whereby the positive pressure flow is produced. Therefore in the fluidic pulse counter of the present invention, the circulation flow is generated positively not only by the drawing by the output flow at the second circulation passage 7 or 7' and a control nozzle 3 or 3' but also by the positive pressure flow flowing into the control nozzle 3' or 3 and the second circulation passage 7' or 7 from the third circulation passage 11. As a consequence, the quantity of circulation flow is increased, and the circulation flow velocity is also increased so that the positive and rapid distribution or divergence of the input pulse may be ensured.

The circulation passage pattern shown in FIG. 6 is a variation of the fundamental circulation passage pattern shown in FIG. 5. That is, an land 12 which is shown in FIG. 6 as having a horse-shoe shape (in practice it is not limited to this shape) and constituting one of the walls of the third circulation passage 11 is eliminated. The positive formation of the third circulation flow in the circulation passage pattern in FIG. 6 is also ensured so that the same effect as that of the pattern shown in FIG. 5 may be attained. Furthermore, the passage pattern shown in FIG. 6 is simpler than that shown in FIG. 5 so that the manufacture of the pulse counters may be much facilitated.

Next referring to FIG. 7, the mode of operation of the fluidic pulse counter in accordance with the present invention will be described. Working fluid enters into the main jet nozzle 1 and is directed into either of the right of left output passage 2 or 2'. The fluid flow in the passage 2 or 2' is stable as far as no signal flow emerges through the control nozzle 3 or 3'. When the working fluid is flowing through the right output passage 2, the negative pressure flow is produced due to the drawing or suction by the output flow. In the right control nozz le 3 and the right second circulation passage 7, fluids flow as indicated by 3 and 7, and previously or simultaneously at least one portion of the output flow 2 is divided by one of the main jet divider 13 to form the third circulation flow II, at least some portion or almost all of which flows into both or either of the left control port 3' and the left second circulation passage 7', thereby forming the positive pressure flow 3' and 7' as shown in FIG. 7. Thereafter they meet in the passage 5 to form the circulation flow 5'5 in the passages 5'-5.

Now when the input pulse 4 is applied through the input pulse port 4, it is diverted toward the direction of the circulation flow. When it flows out of the control nozzle 3, working fluid flow 2 is switched to flow from the right output passage 2 into the left output passage 2 and is stabilized. (See broad dotted line 2'). That is, the flows are reversed from those shown in FIG. 7. When the next input pulse is applied, the input pulse flow 4 flows out of the control nozzle 3' and the working liquid flow 2' is switched. Thus, the pulse counter is returned to its initial state. It is seen that binary counting of input pulses is made when the operations described above are repeated.

According to the present invention, the circulating flow which diverts the input pulse flow is generated not only by the negative pressure flow which has been also used in the prior art but also the positive pressure flow due to the third circulation flow, so that the circulation flow rate may be increased while the input pulse flow may be positively directed. In addition time lag in the process of formation of the circulating flow is remarkably minimized whereby counting at high frequency becomes possible. Thus the function of the pulse counter is remarkably improved as shown in FIG. 8 in which the diameter in milimeter of the orifice of the load of the counter is plotted against the abscissa while the circulation flow rate against the ordinate. When the working fluid (air) under the pressure of 0.1 kg/cm is made to flow through the main nozzle 1. It is seen that the flow rate is much increased than that of the fluidic pulse counter shown in FIG. 2 and that whereas the circulation flow in the pulse counter shown in FIG. 2 is generated only by the negative pressure flow, the circulation flow in the pulse counter shown in FIG. 7 is mainly generated by the positive pressure flow so that the positive formation of the circulation flow is enhanced and the time required for forming the circulation flow is much minimized.

FIG. 9 is a graph giving the maximum count frequencies of the three pulse counters described hereinabove. In the experiments the working fluid (air) under the pressure of 0.3 kg/cm was made to flow through the main nozzle, and the input pulses were so adjusted that the number of pulses counted became highest. In the pulse counter in accordance with the present invention, the input pulses were made constant over the whole range so that it is expected that the number of pulses to be counted may be much increased. From FIG. 9, it is seen that the function of the fluidic pulse counter in accordance with the present invention is remarkably increased.

When a number of pulse counters are connected in series in fan-out 1 or more or when they are connected to other fluidic elements or the like as the loads of pulse counters, the latter are not actuated when the output pressure or fiow rate of the pulse counters are not sufficient enough to meet the minimum allowable value of the input level of the fluidic control elements or the like connected. In some cases, erratic operation will occur. Not only the pure fluidic pulse counterof the type shown in FIG. 1 but also the fluidic pulse counters of the present invention of the type shown in FIGS. 2 and 7 have this problem as will become more apparent from the following description by reference to FIG. 10.

In FIG. 10 the characteristics of the pure fluidic pulse counter of the type shown in FIG. 7 are illustrated. In the first quadrant the relation between the diameter of the orifice of the load connected to the bistable pure fluidic element and the output pressure Po and the switching control pressure swPc required for switching the working fluid. The length of .the orilice is constant (7 mm). In the second quadrant, the relation between the input signal pressure Pi and the pressure P of the working fluid when it flows into the control nozzle of the bistable fluidic control element is shown. When the pure fluidic pulse counters are connected in series in fant-out l, the matching range is very much limited as shown in FIG. 10. It is seen that the input signal pressure Pi from the preceding pulse counter is about 32 percent of the supplied pressure Ps from the output pressure curve of the fan-out 1 bistable pure fluidic elements shown in the first quadrant. In this case, fan-out 1 corresponds to the diameter hr of 0.8 mm, and the process for obtaining the input signal pressure Pi is indicated by the arrow From the switching control pressure curve swPc of the bistable pure fluidic element, it is seen that the minimum input signal pressure Pi of the counter is about 25 percent of the supplied pressure Ps. Therefore the matching range of the pure fluidic pulse counters in fan-out l is only 7 percent of the input signal and only 2.5 percent when converted into the control signal pressure of the bistable pure fluidic element. The process of obtaining these values is indicated by the arrows in FIG. 1.

It is considered that the above narrow matching range might be within the product variation, so that the yield of products would become worse. Furthermore, even when the characteristics of the pure fluidic pulse counter are slightly changed due to the accumulation of foreign matters and aging, the next pulse counter will fail to function. That is the pure fluidic pulse counters of the type described hereinabove are still unreliable and undependable in operation.

The fluidic pulse counter which accomplishes the third and fourth objects of the present invention is diagrammatically shown in FIG. 11. A pure fluidic flipflop element 15 is cascaded to a pure fluidic pulse counter proper 14 which has the characteristics described above to constitute a pure fluidic pulse counter 16. The characteristics of the pure fluidic pulse counter 16 are illustrated in FIG. 12, and the matching range may be obtained from these diagrams. That is, the FIG. 12-a shows the characteristics of the pure fluidic pulse counter proper shown in FIG. 10 while the FIG. 12-b shows the relation among the output pressure Po, the switching control pressure swPc and the supplied pressure P' s (FIG. 1 l, l) of the pure fluidic pulse counter connected to a load in fan-out l.

The range A in FIG. 12-a indicates the matching range of the pure fluidic pulse counter proper 15 connected in series in fan-out 1 while the range B, the matching range enlarged by the connection of the pure fluidic flip-flop element 15. When the pure fluidic flipflop element is connected to the pure fluidic pulse counter proper, the above bistable pure fluidic element is connected to a load with br= 0.08 mm in diameter so that from FIG. l2-a it is seen that the switching control pressure swPc is 12 percent of the supplied pressure Ps and the output pressure P0 is 27 percent. Therefore the minimum input pressure is 23 percent. The minimum supply pressure min P's (0.65 Ps) required for operating the next pulse counter is obtained by drawing the straight line from the intersection where Pi Fe in parallel with the abscissa. The intersection between this straight line and the output curve of the pure fluidic flip-flop element 15 indicates the minimum supply pressure min P's. Next the intersection between the switching control pressure of the fluidic flip-flop and the output pressure curve of the bistable pure fluidic element when the orifice of the load hr 0.8 mm in diameter (the resistance of the control nozzle of the pure fluidic flip-flop element) which curve is displaced in parallel with the abscissa, is obtained to obtain the maximum supply pressure max P's required for the pure fluidic flip-flop element to cause the fluid to flow precisely through the pure fluidic pulse counter proper. The maximum supply pressure maxPs' is 1.8 Ps in FIG. 12. Therefore, the pure fluidic pulse counter may be matched even when connected in series in fan-out 1 when the supply pressure P's of the fluidic flip-flop element is within the range (0.65-1.8 Ps) obtained in the manner described above when the supply pressure Ps

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3527240 *Oct 21, 1965Sep 8, 1970Bowles Eng CorpParametric lumped circuit fluid amplifier
US3528442 *Jul 14, 1967Sep 15, 1970Us ArmyFluid modulator system
US3547137 *Feb 6, 1967Dec 15, 1970British Telecommunications ResFluid control devices
US3581757 *Dec 19, 1968Jun 1, 1971Bertin & CieArrangement which allows the alternate forcing back and sucking in of fluid
US3584635 *Apr 7, 1969Jun 15, 1971Us ArmySettable fluidic counter
US3605778 *Mar 4, 1969Sep 20, 1971Bowles Fluidics CorpVariable delay line oscillator
US3610099 *Jun 30, 1969Oct 5, 1971Us NavyFlueric diode
US3614964 *Sep 16, 1969Oct 26, 1971Sperry Rand CorpClock pulse generating system
US3640300 *Dec 10, 1969Feb 8, 1972Us Air ForceFluid amplifier frequency multiplier
US3667489 *Jan 12, 1970Jun 6, 1972Fluidic Ind IncPure fluid device
US3667492 *Feb 18, 1969Jun 6, 1972Bowles Fluidics CorpPure fluid addition and subtraction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4905909 *Sep 2, 1987Mar 6, 1990Spectra Technologies, Inc.Fluidic oscillating nozzle
US4955547 *Aug 24, 1989Sep 11, 1990Spectra Technologies, Inc.Fluidic oscillating nozzle
US8381817Mar 31, 2012Feb 26, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Vortex controlled variable flow resistance device and related tools and methods
US8424605Apr 25, 2012Apr 23, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Methods and devices for casing and cementing well bores
US8439117Mar 25, 2012May 14, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Vortex controlled variable flow resistance device and related tools and methods
US8453745Mar 22, 2012Jun 4, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Vortex controlled variable flow resistance device and related tools and methods
US8517105Mar 24, 2012Aug 27, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Vortex controlled variable flow resistance device and related tools and methods
US8517106Mar 26, 2012Aug 27, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Vortex controlled variable flow resistance device and related tools and methods
US8517107Mar 26, 2012Aug 27, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Vortex controlled variable flow resistance device and related tools and methods
US8517108Mar 29, 2012Aug 27, 2013Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc.Vortex controlled variable flow resistance device and related tools and methods
US8800894 *Aug 12, 2010Aug 12, 2014Globe Union Industrial Corp.Fluidic oscillator
US20120037731 *Aug 12, 2010Feb 16, 2012Mengfeng ChengFluidic oscillator
US20130291981 *Mar 27, 2013Nov 7, 2013Airbus Operations GmbhFluid actuator for influencing the flow along a flow surface, as well as blow-out device and flow body comprising a like fluid actuator
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/811, 235/201.0PF, 137/821, 137/839
International ClassificationF15C1/12, F15C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF15C1/12
European ClassificationF15C1/12