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Publication numberUS3719215 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1973
Filing dateAug 31, 1970
Priority dateAug 31, 1970
Also published asCA961819A1, DE2143358A1
Publication numberUS 3719215 A, US 3719215A, US-A-3719215, US3719215 A, US3719215A
InventorsR Murray
Original AssigneeR Murray
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shut-off valve for liquid dispensing nozzle
US 3719215 A
Abstract
A fuel dispensing nozzle includes a body having a spout slidably supported thereon with a valve, which is in the body and controls flow from the body to the spout, opening only when the spout is disposed in a tank to be filled. For fuel to flow through the spout, another valve, which is actuated by a manually operated lever, also must be opened in addition to the valve that is opened by the spout being properly disposed within the tank being filled.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 Murray 1 March 6, 1973 SHUT-OFF VALVE FOR LIQUID DISPENSING NOZZLE Inventor i Robert L. Murray, Dayton,l(y. Assignee: Dover Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio Filed: Aug. 31, 1970 Appl. No.: 68,153

US. Cl. ..14l/207, 141/218, 141/226, 141/351 Int. Cl. ..B65b l/04, B65b 3/04, B670 3/34 Field of Search ..l41/2062l5, 217, 141/218, 225, 226,250, 279, 291-296, 301, 302, 351, 352, 353, 354, 360, 362,198, 216, 219-224; 251/353 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1938 Payne ..l4l /208 5/1970 Limandri ..141/208 X 2/1905 Fowler ..l4l/293 816,091 3/1906 Henrich ..25l/353 X 2,548,957 4/1951 Di Rosa ..251/353 X 3,604,478 9/1971 Gowens ..l41/206 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Australia 1. 141 /351 Switzerland ..141/3 5 1 Primary Examiner-Houston S. Bell, Jr. Attorney-Kinney and Schenk [5 7] ABSTRACT A fuel dispensing nozzle includes a body having a spout slidably supported thereon with a valve, which is in the body and controls flow from the body to the spout, opening only when the spout is disposed in a tank to be filled. For fuel to flow through the spout, another valve, which is actuated by a manually operated lever, also must be opened in addition to the valve that is opened by the spout being properly disposed within the tank being filled.

6 Clalin s, Drawing Figures PATENTEUH-AR 6W 3,719,215

SHEET 1 OF 3 FIG.I

INVENTOR L. MURRAY Q ATTORNEYS PATENTED 5 73 sum 2 or 3 FIG.3

INVENTOR ROBERT L. MURRAY SHUT-OFF VALVE FOR LIQUID DISPENSING NOZZLE Because of increasing labor costs, self-service stations for dispensing gasoline are becoming more prevalent. Since most purchasers lack skill in filling a vehicle tank with gasoline, the dispensing nozzles, which are presently used in service stations having skilled employees, do not have sufficient safeguards built into them for an unskilled user. For example, to avoid loss of gasoline, the spout of a dispensing nozzle must be properly positioned within the filler pipe of a vehicle tank. If it is not, the force of the flowing gasoline may cause the spout to cease to be disposed within the filler pipe. If this were to occur with the gasoline flowing therethrough, there is not only the economic loss of the gasoline to the purchaser but also the possibility of the gasoline spilling on the purchasers clothing. Additionally, a fire hazard exists whenever gasoline is spilled.

The present invention satisfactorily overcomes the foregoing problems by providing a dispensing nozzle in which flow of gasoline to the vehicle tank can occur only when the spout of the nozzle is disposed within the filler pipe and retained therein by a positive force by the user. If the spout ceases to remain within the filler pipe, flow of gasoline to the spout is automatically stopped even though the hand-operated lever is still held by the user in a position in which a valve controlling the flow of gasoline to the body is open.

When an unskilled user is filling a tank, the possibility exists that the tank could overflow before the user could stop the flow due to the users lack of experience. The present invention includes means to automatically stop the flow when the liquid in the tank reaches a predetermined level even though the spout is still retained within the tiller pipe so that the valve, which is controlled by the position of the spout, is open.

An object of this invention is to provide a dispensing nozzle that allows flow of liquid to a tank only when the spout is properly disposed within the tank.

Other objects, uses, and advantages of this invention are apparent upon a reading of this description, which proceeds with reference to the drawings forming part thereof and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view, partly in elevation, of a portion of the nozzle of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view, partly in elevation, of the remainder of the nozzle of FIG. 1 and showing its spout entering the tiller pipe of a vehicle tank.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view, partly in elevation, of the remainder of the nozzle of FIG. I and similar to FIG. 2 but showing the spout fully inserted within the filler pipe of the vehicle tank and the opening in the filler pipe for the spout sealed.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the nozzle of FIG. 1 when the spout of the nozzle is in the position of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the nozzle of FIG. 1 when the spout of the nozzle is in the position of FIG. 2 and taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the nozzle of FIG. 1, similar to FIG. 5, but showing positions of the elements when the spout is in the position of FIG. 3 with the view being 90 to FIG. 4 and taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 7 is an end elevational view of the plunger that is slidably supported within the spout adapter.

FIG. 8 is an end elevational view of the nozzle of FIG. I and taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the nozzle of the present invention and showing a check valve used therewith.

Referring to the drawings and particularly FIG. 1, there is shown a nozzle body 10 having an inlet 11 to which a hose is connected to supply a liquid such as gasoline, for example, to the interior of the body 10. The body 10 has an outlet 12 with which a spout I4 communicates to receive liquid from the interior of the body 10. The spout 14 is adapted to be inserted within an opening 15 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) in a filler pipe 16 of a vehicle tank such as an automobile fuel tank, for example.

The body 10 has a first valve 17 supported therein for controlling the flow of liquid from the inlet 1 l to the interior of the body 10. A second valve 18 is supported within the body 10 for controlling the flow of liquid from the interior of the body 10 to the spout 14. Both of the valves 17 and 18 must be open for the liquid to flow through the spout 14.

A spring 19 continuously urges the valve 17 to its closed position. A cap 20, which is threaded in an opening in the wall of the body 10, acts against one end of the spring 19 to retain the spring 19.

A stem 21 is connected to the first valve 17 and has its lower portion extending exteriorly of the body. The valve stem 21, which is slidably disposed within the body 10, is moved by a manually operated lever or handle 22.

Liquid cannot flow from the body 10 to the exterior thereof through the passage in the body 10 for the stem 21 due to a packing 23, which is disposed in surrounding relation to the stem 21. A gland 24 is disposed above the packing 23 and has a spring 25 acting thereon. A retainer 26 acts against the spring 25 and retains the packing 23 in a position to prevent any leakage of liquid from the body 10 through the passage for the stem 21. r

A spout adapter 27 is connected to the outlet 12 of the body 10. The spout adapter 27, which has the spout 14 slidably supported thereby, is fixed to the body 10 by a screw 28.

The spout I4 is slidably supported by the spout adapter 27 by being secured to one end of a plunger 29, which extends into the spout adapter 27. The spout 14 is connected to the plunger 29 by a collar 30, which connects adjacent threaded ends of the spout l4 and the plunger 29 to each other to form a unitary assembly.

The plunger 29 is continuously urged away from the body 10 by a spring 31, which surrounds a portion of the plunger 29 and is disposed within a recess 32 in the spout adapter 27. The outer surface of the plunger 29 has a retaining ring 33 secured thereto and against which one end of the spring 31 bears. The other end of the spring 31 abuts against a shoulder 34, which defines a wall of the recess 32, in the spout adapter 27.

Outward movement of the plunger 29 by the spring 31 is limited by engagement of the retaining ring 33 with a cap 35, which is secured by a screw 36 to the spout adapter 27. Thus, the spout l4 and the plunger 29 are disposed in the position shown in FIG. 1 when- In the position of FIG. 1, the second valve 18 closes I the outlet 12 to prevent liquid from flowing from the interior of the body if the first valve 17 is open so that liquid can enter the interior of the body 10 from the inlet 11. The second valve 18 is secured to the plunger 29 for movement therewith.

The plunger 29 has a pair of tubes 37 and 38 fixed thereto. A plug 39 closes one end of the tube 37 and is secured thereto by any suitable means such as being press fitted, for example. One end of the tube 38 is closed by a plug 40, which is secured thereto by any suitable means such as a press fit, for example. The second valve 18 is secured to the plugs 39 and 40 by screws 41 and 42, respectively.

Accordingly, when the plunger 29 is in the position of FIGS. 1 and 5, the second valve 18 has a disc 43 contacting the end of the spout adapter 27 to close the outlet 12. The disc 43 may be formed of any material, which will form a seal with the end of the spout adapter 27 when in the position of FIGS. 1 and 5. For example, the disc 43 may be formed of rubber.

The second valve 18, which includes a holder 44 for the disc 43 and bonded thereto is moved to its open position only when the force of the spring 31 is overcome. This can occur only after the spout 14 is disposed within the filler pipe 16 in the manner shown in FIG. 3.

However, the liquid flow through the spout 14 to the vehicle tank does not occur by opening only the second valve 18. It also requires the first valve 17 to be opened by manually moving the lower or handle 22.

When the spout 14 is disposed within the opening in the filler pipe 16, a sealing member 45 (see FIG. 2), which is slidably supported on the spout 14, engages the end of the filler pipe 16. When the sealing member 45, which is formed of any suitable sealing material such as rubber, for example, abuts against the end of the filler pipe 16, a spring 46, which surrounds the spout 14 and has one end acting against the sealing member 45 and its other end acting against a collar 47 fixed on the spout 14, is compressed as force is exerted on the body 10.

Thus, as the spout 14 advances into the filler pipe 16, the movement of the spout 14 is eventually stopped due to the spring 46 being incapable of any further compression. At this time, the force on the body 10 causes the spring 31 to be compressed whereby the body 10 moves relatively to the plunger 29 so that the end of the spout adapter 27 moves away from the second valve 18.

This arrangement results in the second valve 18 returning to its closed position as soon as the body 10 ceases to have a force exerted thereon. It is not necessary for there to be any withdrawal of the spout 14 from the filler pipe 16 for the second valve 18 to close. However, if the spout 14 should cease to be supported within the filler pipe 16, there would not be a sufficient reactive force on the spout 14 to permit the second valve 18 to remain in its open position.

Since the tubes 37 and 38 with the plugs 39 and 40 constitute only a small portion of the total cross sectional area of the plunger 29, there is a substantial area through which the liquid can flow. This is shown in FIG. 7.

When the sealing member 45 is disposed in the position shown in FIG. 2, it seals an opening 48 in the wall of the spout 14 with which one end of a vapor recovery tube 49, which is disposed within the spout 14, communicates. The sealing member 45 seals the opening 48 by engaging the wall of the spout 14 and an inclined outer surface of a stop 50, which is fixed to the spout 14 in surrounding relation thereto. The stop 50 limits the movement of the sealing member 45 by the spring 46 as shown in FIG. 2.

When the sealing member 45 is in the position of FIG. 3 wherein the spout 14 is disposed within the filler pipe 16 so as to fill the vehicle tank, the opening 48 communicates with the interior of the filler pipe 16 to receive the vapors from the tank. Thus, the vapors flow into the vapor recovery tube 49.

By forming the inner surface of the sealing member 45 with inclined surfaces, it is not necessary that the spout 14 be centered or axially aligned in the filler pipe 16 for the sealing member 45 to seal the filler pipe 16 and the spout 14. Furthermore, the inclined surface of the stop 50 enables a seal to occur with the sealing member 45 and properly centers the sealing member 45 on the spout 14 when the spout 14 is withdrawn from the filler pipe 16 to the extent shown in FIG. 2, for example.

The upper end of the vapor recovery tube 49 is disposed within the tube 38. The tube 49 is secured to the tube 38 by any suitable means such as being press fitted in the tube 38, for example.

The spout adapter 27 has a radial passage 51 formed therein and communicating with the upper end of the vapor recovery tube 49. The radial passage 51 is connected with an annular chamber 52, which is formed between the spout adapter 27 and the body 10. Thus, the vapors may flow from the vapor recovery tube 49 through the radial passage 51 to the annular chamber 52.

The body 10 has a guard 53 connected thereto by pins 54 and 54 a. One end of a passage 55 in the guard 53 communicates with the annular chamber 52 to receive the vapors from the tank beingfilled while its other end communicates through a lateral passage 56 (see FIG. 8) with a vertical passage 57 in the guard 53. The vertical passage 57 may be connected through a hose or other suitable conduit means to vapor recovery equipment whereby the vapors from the tank, which is being filled, may be returned to the vapor recovery equipment in which the vapors may be condensed for further use.

The annular chamber 52 also communicates through a passage 58 in the body 10 with a chamber 59, which is formed between diaphragms 60 and 61. The diaphragm 61 is secured to the body 10 by screws.

A diaphragm 62 is disposed in spaced relation to the diaphragm 60 by a spacer 62a. A cap 62b cooperates with the diaphragm 62 to form a chamber 63 therebetween.

Because of the spacer 62a, the chamber 63 is separated from the chamber 59. Furthermore, the exterior side of each of the diaphragms 60 and 62 is exposed to atmospheric pressure through an opening 63a in the wall of the spacer 61a. Thus, atmospheric pressure acts on the exterior side of the diaphragm 60 and 62, which form walls of the chambers 59 and 63, respectively.

The chamber 63 communicates with a vacuum tube 64, which is supported within the spout 14, only when there has been relative movement between the body and the plunger 29 after the spout 14 is fully inserted within the filler pipe 16 as shown in FIG. 3. The vacuum tube 64 has its lower end communicating with an opening 65 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) in the wall of the spout 14. The upper end of the vacuum tube 64 is connected to the tube 37 by suitable means such as being press fitted, for example.

The chamber 63 communicates through a passage 66 in the cap 62b, a passage 66' in the spacer 62a, and a passage 67 in the body 10 with an annular chamber 68, which is formed between the body 10 and the spout adapter 27. The annular chamber 68 communicates with a radial passage 69 in the spout adapter 27. The inner end of the radial passage 69 is blocked by the plunger 29 when the nozzle is in the position of FIGS. 1 and 2.

However, when there is relative movement between the body 10 and the spout adapter 27, an opening 70 in the wall of the plunger 29 is aligned with the radial passage 69, as shown in FIG. 4, whereby the chamber 63 communicates with the vacuum tube 64. Accordingly, the chamber 63 communicates with the vacuum tube 64 only when the second valve 18 is moved to its open position.

The chamber 63 also communicates through a passage 71 in the cap 62b, a passage 71' in the spacer 62a, and a passage 72 in the body 10 with an annular chamber 73 in the body 10. A seat ring 74 is supported in the body 10 and closes the annular chamber 73 except for radial passages 75 in the seat ring 74.

A poppet valve 76 is slidably mounted on the stem 21 and is continuously urged into engagement with the seat ring 74 by a spring 77, which surrounds the stem 21 and has its lower end engaging the retainer 26. Thus, only the pressure of the liquid flowing from the inlet 11 and past the valve 17 can overcome the spring 77 and move the poppet valve 76 to an open position.

As the liquid flows between the poppet valve 76 and the seat ring 74, a venturi effect is created in the radial passage 75 in the seat ring 74. Due to the communication with the chamber 63 and with the vacuum tube 64 when the opening 70 is aligned with the radial passage 69, the venturi effect created by the flow of fluid between the inner surface of the seat ring 74 and the outer surface of the poppet valve 76 draws air through the vacuum tube 64 to creat a vacuum.

The vacuum in the chamber 63 is controlled by the position of the poppet valve 76 relative to the seat ring 74. As the flow to the interior of the body 10 increases due to the first valve 17 being opened further, the poppet valve 76 is moved further to maintain the desired vacuum within the chamber 63.

As soon as the opening 65 in the wall of the spout 14 is blocked by the liquid in the tank reaching a predetermined level, the chamber 63 has its pressure reduced due to the air therein being drawn therefrom because of the venturi effect in the passage 75 whereby the diaphragm 62 moves upwardly. Because of a connection between the diaphragms 60 and 62, the diaphragm 60 moves upwardly with the diaphragm 62 so that upward movement of the diaphragm 62 results in the first valve 17 being closed.

The diaphragm 60 has a latch retaining pin 78 secured thereto for movement therewith and disposed between three balls 79, which are positioned within passages in a latch plunger 80. When the retaining pin 78 is in the position shown in FIG. 1, the balls 79 prevent downward movement of the latch plunger 80, which is slidably mounted within the body 10.

When the retaining pin 78 is moved upwardly due to the reduction of the pressure within the chamber 63 because the liquid in the tank reaches the predetermined level, the retaining pin 78 is moved upwardly therewith. The upward movement of the retaining pin 78 disposes a tapered portion of the retaining pin 78 between the balls 79 whereby the balls 79 may move inwardly to allow the latch plunger 80 to be moved downwardly against the force of its spring 81. The correlation between the tapered portion of the pin 78 and the latch plunger 80 is more specifically shown in U.S. Pat. No. 2,582,195 to Duerr.

The lower end of the latch plunger 80 is pivotally connected to one end of the lever 22 by a pin 82. Thus, when the latch plunger 80 moves downwardly, the valve stem 21 is moved downwardly because of the force of the spring 19 whereby the first valve 17 closes. Accordingly, when the liquid in the tank reaches a predetermined level that blocks the opening 65, pressure in the chamber 63 is reduced to move the diaphragm 60 and 62 upwardly whereby the valve 17 moves to its closed position.

The previously mentioned connection between the diaphragm 60 and the diaphragm 62 includes a vacuum pin 83, which is secured to the diaphragm 62 by a screw 84. The vacuum pin 83 has an enlarged flange 85, which is slidably disposed within a hollow upstanding portion 86 of a pressure plate 87. The pressure plate 87 is secured to the diaphragm 60 by a screw 88, which also secures the diaphragm 61 and the latch retaining pin 78 to the diaphragm 60.

A spring 89 is disposed within the hollow upstanding portion 86 of the pressure plate 87 and acts against the lower surface of the flange of the vacuum pin 83. A retaining ring 90 is supported by the upstanding portion 86 of the pressure plate 87 and engages the upper surface of the enlarged flange 85 of the vacuum pin 83 to limit movement thereof by the spring 89.

Because of the resiliency of the spring 89, any downward movement of the diaphragm 62 has insignificant effect on moving the diaphragm 60. However, when the diaphragm 62 moves upwardly, the upper surface of the flange 85 of the vacuum pin 83 engages the retaining ring 90 and lifts the diaphragm 60 upwardly with the diaphragm 62. Thus, the connection between the diaphragms 60 and 62 becomes rigid when the diaphragm 62 moves upwardly but is flexible when the diaphragm 62 moves downwardly. Thus, only movement of the diaphragm 62 in its upward direction will cause significant movement of the latch retaining pin 78.

As previously mentioned, the chamber 59 communicates with the vapor recovery annular chamber 52. The diaphragm 61, which also is secured to the retaining pin 78, seals one side of the chamber 59 from the atmosphere while the diaphragm 60 seals the other side.

Accordingly, as long as the vapor from the tank can escape through the passage 55, the pressure in the chamber 59 does not exceed a predetermined pressure, which is sufficiently low so that the tank being filled will not rupture. However, if vapor could not escape through the passage 55 such as when the passage 55 might be blocked, for example, then the vapor pressure within the tank could rapidly increase to a pressure that could cause rupture of the tank. Accordingly, when the vapor pressure in the tank exceeds the predetermined value, the chamber 59 causes upward movement of t he diaphragm 60.

Because of the flexible connection between the diaphragm 60 and 62, the diaphragm 60 can move upwardly irrespective of the position of the diaphragm 62. Since the chamber 63 also is subject to the vapor pressure from the tank, the increased pressure in the tank moves the diaphragm 62 downwardly. However, because of the flexible connection between the diaphragms 60 and 62, the vapor pressure in the chamber 63 has insignificant effect on the movement of the diaphragm 60 in an upward direction. Without the flexible connection, the latch retaining pin 78 could not be moved upwardly because the upward movement of the diaphragm 60 would be opposed by the downward movement of the diaphragm 62 due to the same vapor pressure.

Accordingly, when the vapor pressure in the tank exceeds the predetermined value, the upward movement of the diaphragm 60 moves the first valve 17 to its closed position. This movement is in the same manner as described when the liquid in the tank reaches the predetermined level except that the movement of the diaphragm 60 is due to the increased vapor pressure in the chamber 39 and not due to a decreased pressure in the chamber 63 causing the diaphragm 62 to move upwardly. However, the description of the manner in which the diaphragm 60 causes the first valve 17 to be moved to its closed position is the same as described for when the liquid in the tank reaches the'predetermined level.

The vapor pressure at which the diaphragm 60 is moved upwardly is determined by the diameter of a flange 91 on the lower end of the pressure plate 87. The flange 91 bears against the upper surface of the diaphragm 69. If the diameter of the pressure plate flange 91 is increased, the diaphragm 60 moves upwardly in response to a lower pressure. If the diameter of the pressure plate flange 91 is reduced, a larger vapor pressure is required before the diaphragm 60 moves upwardly to stop flow to the tank.

An increase in the diameter of the pressure plate flange 91 causes an increased effective area, which is the area effective in moving the center of the diaphragm 60 in response to the vapor pressure. Since the force required to move the latch retaining pin 78, which is connected to the center of the diaphragm 60, the necessary distance to release the balls 79 is constant and is equal to the product of the pressure differential across the diaphragm 60 and the effective area, an increase in the effective area reduces the pressure differential required to move the diaphragm 60 upwardly to release the balls 79. Since the ambient pressure on the upper side of the diaphragm 60 is constant, the decrease in required pressure differential results in a reduction in the vapor pressure necessary on the lower side of the diaphragm 60 to move the diaphragm 60 upwardly. If the diameter of the pressure plate flange 91 is reduced so that the effective area is decreased, then the vapor pressure must be increased to obtain the constant force.

Considering the operation of the present invention, the spout 14 is inserted within the opening 15 in the filler pipe 16 until the spring 46 is compressed to the position shown in FIG. 3. At this time, further movement of the spout 14 into the tank is prevented. Thus, additional force on the nozzle body 10 moves the body 10 relative to the plunger 29 so that the end of the spout adapter 27 ceases to contact the disc 43 of the second valve 18. As a result, the second valve 18 no longer blocks flow from the interior of the body 10 to the spout 14 as shown in FIG. 6.

To have flow through the spout 14 to the tank, it also is necessary for the lever 22 to be actuated. This results in the first valve 17 being moved to an open position to allow liquid flow from the inlet 1 1 to the interior of the body 10.

Flow will continue until the handle 22 is released by the user if the tank does not become filled prior thereto or the pressure in the tank does not exceed the predetermined value. If the lever 22 is retained in a position to hold the first valve 17 open until the tank is filled, then the first valve 17 will be moved automatically to its closed position due to the diaphragm 60 moving upwardly because of the blocking of the opening 65. Likewise, if the vapor should be unable to escape through the passage 55, this will cause automatic closing of the first valve 17 irrespective of the level of the liquid in the tank.

If the user should cease to exert a sufficient force on the nozzle body 10 at any time, there will be relative movement between the plunger 29 and the body 10 to move the second valve 18 to its closed position. Thus, any release of the pressure on the nozzle body 10 tending to cause the spout 14 to not be retained in the filler pipe 16 and for the sealing member 45 to no longer seal the tank 16 automatically stops flow from the interior of the body 10 to the spout 14. When the second valve 18 closes, the chamber 63 no longer communicates with the vacuum tube 64 because of the position of the radial passage in the plunger 29.

The passage 71' has a check valve 93 mounted therein. The check valve 93 prevents the build-up of pressure in the chamber 63 from the liquid flowing into the interior of the body 10 when the first valve 17 is opened while the second valve 18 is closed.

As shown in FIG. 9, the check valve 93 includes a ball 94 supported within a body 95, which is mounted in an enlarged portion of the passage 71'. When the valves 17 and 18 are both open, the ball 94 is in the position shown in FIG. 9 whereby air can flow through openings 96 in the body from the passage 71 to the passage 71 However, if the second valve 18 is closed while the first valve 17 is open, the pressure from the passage 72 moves the ball 94 to the phantom line position of FIG. 9 where the ball 94 bears against an O-ring 97 thereby preventing rupture of diaphragm 62. The o-ring 97 is retained between the upper end of the body 95 and washer 98.

While the separate valve for allowing flow to the spout only when a predetermined force has been inserted on the nozzle body with the spout in the tank has been shown and described as being used with a vapor recovery arrangement, it should be understood that the vapor recovery arrangement is the invention of Charles Holder and is described in the copending patent application of Charles Holder for Liquid Dispensing Nozzle, Ser. No. 68,154, filed Aug. 31, 1970, and assigned to the same assignee as the assignee of the present application. Therefore, it should be understood that the vapor recovery arrangement including sealing of the tank is not a requisite for the self-service nozzle of the present invention.

It is preferred that the self-service nozzle utilize the automatic closing of the first valve 17 when the liquid in the tank reaches a predetermined level. Therefore, even through it is not necessary for the valve of the present invention to be used with the vapor recovery arrangement, it is preferred that the self-servicing nozzle of the present invention include means for closing the first valve 17 when the liquid in the tank reaches the predetermined level.

An advantage of this invention is that it prevents liquid flow through a spout of a nozzle unless the spout is properly positioned within a tank that is being filled. Another advantage of this invention is that accidental spilling of the liquid when flow starts or stops is prevented.

For purposes of exemplification, a particular embodiment of the invention has been shown and described according to the best present understanding thereof. However, it will be apparent that changes and modifications in the arrangement and construction of the parts thereof may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An automatic shut-off nozzle comprising a body having an inlet and an outlet, a first valve in the body controlling flow of liquid into the body through the inlet, manually operated means controlling the operation of the first valve, a spout communicating with the outlet, one end of the spout beingslidably mounted on the body, a second valve associated with the outlet and operated by the sliding movement of the spout, the second valve being disposed within the body, means disposed within the body and acting on the body and one end of the spout to urge the spout to a position whereby the second valve is maintained in a closed position to close the outlet, the other end of the spout being insertable into a fill opening of a tank, means mounted on the spout adjacent the other end, the mounted means engaging the tank upon insertion of the spout into the fill opening and stopping movement of the spout into the fill opening after a predetermined further movement of the spout into the tank so that the body can be moved toward the tank relative to the spout and against the urging means to open the second valve and allow flow through the spout, and automatic operating means acting on the first valve to close the same upon the liquid level reaching a predetermined point in the tank regardless of the operating position of the manually operated means.

2. The nozzle as set forth in claim 1, wherein the second valve includes a valve member connected to the spout and a valve seat formed in the body, the valve member being movable with the spout, and the second valve is opened after the predetermined further movement of the spout into the tank is stopped and the body is moved relative to the spout toward the tank to move the valve seat away from the valve member.

3. The nozzle as set forth in claim 1, wherein the urging means comprises a coil spring surrounding the spout adjacent the one end thereof and mounted between the body and the spout and the spout has means to prevent activation of the automatic operating means unless the second valve is open.

4. The nozzle as set forth in claim 1, wherein the body is provided with an adaptor adjacent the outlet, the one end of the spout being slidably mounted in the adaptor and held therein by a cap, a retaining ring on the one end of the spout and engaging the cap, the urging means including a coil spring between the one end of the spout and the adaptor, one end of the spring engaging the adaptor and the other end engaging the retaining ring, the spring urging the spout to a position wherein the second valve is closed.

5. The nozzle as set forth in claim 4, wherein the second valve includes a valve member connected to the spout and a valve seat formed in the body, the valve member being movable with the spout, and the second valve is opened after the predetermined further movement of the spout into the tank is stopped and the body is moved relative to the spout toward the tank to move the valve seat away from the valve member.

6. The nozzle as set forth in claim 1, wherein the mounted means includes a spring surrounding the spout, means fixed to the spout and engaging one end of the spring, and means slidably mounted on the spout and engaging the other end of the spring; the slidably mounted means engaging the tank when the spout is inserted into the fill opening; and the movement of the spout into the tank being stopped after the predetermined further movement by the spring of the mounted means being incapable of further compression.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3823752 *Dec 26, 1972Jul 16, 1974Dover CorpLiquid dispensing nozzle of the automatic shut-off type
US3881528 *Oct 23, 1973May 6, 1975Elbert K MackenzieHose nozzle with seal sensing system
US3908721 *May 9, 1973Sep 30, 1975Texaco IncAutomatic fuel metering nozzle for a closed system
US3911973 *Jan 18, 1974Oct 14, 1975Cities Service Oil CoFuel vapor seal device
US3921682 *May 9, 1973Nov 25, 1975Texaco IncAutomatic fuel dispensing nozzle
US3974865 *Jan 21, 1975Aug 17, 1976Emco Wheaton Inc.Vapor collecting nozzle
US3982571 *May 16, 1975Sep 28, 1976Emco Wheaton Inc.Vapor recovery nozzle with mechanical flow interlock
US3996979 *Jul 8, 1974Dec 14, 1976A. Y. Mcdonald Mfg. Co.Vapor recovery nozzle
US4031930 *Feb 9, 1976Jun 28, 1977Husky CorporationAutomatic shut-off nozzle with lockable vapor relief valve
US5450884 *Mar 22, 1994Sep 19, 1995Emco Wheaton, Inc.Multi-compartment spout for fuel dispensing nozzle
US5645116 *Nov 6, 1995Jul 8, 1997Environmental Spout CompanyMethod and assembly for preventing dripping of a liquid dispensing nozzle
US5715875 *Sep 9, 1996Feb 10, 1998Dover CorporationMethod and apparatus for dry testing vapor recovery systems
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Classifications
U.S. Classification141/207, 141/218, 141/351, 141/226
International ClassificationB67D7/54, B67D7/48
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/48, B67D7/54, B67D2007/545
European ClassificationB67D7/54, B67D7/48