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Publication numberUS3719227 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1973
Filing dateNov 9, 1970
Priority dateNov 10, 1969
Also published asDE2053718A1
Publication numberUS 3719227 A, US 3719227A, US-A-3719227, US3719227 A, US3719227A
InventorsS Jenssen
Original AssigneeThermovatic Jenssen S Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plate heat exchanger
US 3719227 A
Abstract
Heat exchange is effected through a thin plate strip having transversely extending folds which provide it with a sinuous shape, thereby forming channels extending transversely of the strip on both sides thereof for passage of the two heat exchange media, respectively. The first set of channels (those on one side of the strip) are sealed at their opposite ends, each of these channels having opposing walls which are joined together along the opposite lateral edge portions of the strip so as to form alternate folds of the strip into a continuous line along each of these lateral edge portions. The strip is sealingly and releasably connected to a surrounding casing along these continuous lines and at the opposite end portions of the strip; and when the latter is removed from the casing, the other side of the strip defining the second set of channels can be made accessible for cleaning or inspection by separating the opposing side walls of these channels like the leaves in a book.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 J enssen 1 March 6, 1973 PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER [73] Assignee: Thermovatic Sverre K. Jenssen AB,

Saltsjobaden, Sweden [22] Filed: Nov. 9, 1970 [2]] Appl. No.: 87,915

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Nov. 10, 1969 Sweden ..l5366/69 [52] US. Cl ..165/166 [Sl Int. Cl. ..F28f 3/00 [58] Field of Search ..l65/l66 MP, 166, 165, I67

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,508,607 4/1970 Herrmann 165/166 X 326,839 9/1885 Braithwaite, Jr. ..l65/l66 574,157 12/1896 Ljungstrorn .....165/166 2,240,203 4/1941 Armacost ..l65/166 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 243,093 11/1925 Great Britain ..l65/l66 Primary ExaminerMilton Kaufman Assistant Examiner-Theophil W. Streule Attorney-Davis, l-Ioxie, Faithfull & Hapgood [5 7] ABSTRACT Heat exchange is effected through a thin plate strip having transversely extending folds which provide it with a sinuous shape, thereby forming channels extending transversely of the strip on both sides thereof for passage of the two heat exchange media, respec tively. The first set of channels (those on one side of the strip) are sealed at their opposite ends, each of these channels having opposing walls which are joined together along the opposite lateral edge portions of the strip so as to form alternate folds of the strip into a continuous line along each of these lateral edge portions. The strip is sealingly. and releasably connected to a surrounding casing along these continuous lines and at the opposite end portions of the strip; and when the latter is removed from the casing, the other side of the strip defining the second set of channels can be made accessible for cleaning or inspection by separating the opposing side walls of these channels like the leaves in a book.

2 Claim, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEWR 6m 3.719.227

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PATENTEU R 75 SHEET 2 or 3 IN VEN TOR.

S vRRE Kfiur f5 u PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER The present invention relates to a heat exchanger having a heat transferring element in the form of a thin plate strip of a uniform width, which is provided with deep transverse folds or tucks forming transverse channels on both sides of the strip for the media to be treated in the heat exchanger.

It is an object of the invention to provide a compact light-weight heat exchanger of the above-noted 'kind, wherein one of the two heat exchanging surfaces of the heat transferring element is accessible for inspection and/or manual cleaning.

A further object of the invention is to provide a heat exchanger of this kind, wherein the total length of fixed seals, such as welding joints or the like, is a minimum.

It is another object of the invention to provide a heat exchanger of this kind, wherein all fixed seals, such as welding joints or the like, are accessible for inspection and/or repair.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a heat exchanger of this kind which is inexpensive and simple to produce.

These objects are fulfilled by a heat exchanger according to the present invention, wherein the channels on one side of said strip are sealed at their ends (i.e., at the opposite lateral edges of the strip), as by welding, the opposing side walls of each of these channels being joined together at the lateral edges of the strip in a way such that a continuous line is formed at each of these edges by those folds of the strip which partly define the channels on the other side of the strip. The heat trans ferring element is sealingly connected with a surrounding casing along the said continuous lines and at the ends of the strip; and the heat transferring element is releasable from the casing so that one side of the strip will be accessible for cleaning or inspection by separation of the side walls of the channels on this side of the strip like the leaves in a book, without the need of breaking the end seals of the channels on the other side of the strip.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, a flange is fixed by welding or the like to each of the strip edges along the respective continuous lines, these flanges forming together with the end portions of the strip a closed sealing flange, by means of which the strip is fastened between separable parts of the surrounding casing. The present invention is further described below with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:'

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of one embodiment of the new heat exchanger;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view on the line II-II in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of part ofa heat transferring element of the exchanger, showing the element in one stage ofits manufacture, and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of part of such an element in a finished condition.

The heat exchanger shown in FIG. 1 comprises a casing having two parts 1 and 2, and a heat transferring element 3 arranged in this casing. The element 3 consists of a folded plate strip, the shape of which can be clearly seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, the latter showing the strip when only partially folded. As can be seen from FIG. 2, the strip 3 is provided with a series of transverse folds l2 spaced along the length of the strip to give it a sinuous shape, thereby forming a first set of channels 5 on one side of the strip and a second set 4 on the other side of the strip. These channels extend in parallel relation to each other, the channels 4 being open to the left and the channels 5 being open to the right as viewed in FIGS. 1 and 2. Each channel of the first set 5 (i.e., opening to the right) is closed at its opposite ends, that is, along the opposite lateral edge portions 3): and 3y of the strip 3. As shown particularly in FIG. 4, this closing of each channels 5 at its ends is effected by deforming the strip 3 so that opposing walls of the channel 5 converge and abut each other at the two edge portions 3x and 3y, as indicated at 14. These abutting portions 14 of the opposing walls may be welded together so as to seal the opposite ends of channels 5 along the respective lateral edge portions 3x and 3y of the strip.

As will be observed from FIG. 2, alternate folds 12 of the strip 3 (i.e., the folds at the right in FIG. 2) partly define the second set of channels 4 which open to the left. Because of the above-mentioned deformation of the strip to provide the abutments at 14 (FIG. 4), these alternate folds 12 form a continuous line at each of the opposite lateral edges 3x and 3y of the strip. Welded to such lateral edges along these continuous lines are flanges 3a and 3b, respectively (FIG. 4). The flanges 3a and 3b form with the opposite end portions 30 and 3d of the strip (FIG. 2) a closed sealing flange by means of which the heat transferring element 3 is releasably connected to the surrounding casing. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, this sealing flange 3a 3d is clamped between the separable parts 1 and 2 of the casing, it being understood that these parts can be released from each other in any suitable manner.

As can be seen from FIG. 1, the part 1 of the casing has an inlet 6 and an outlet 7 for one heat exchanging medium. Since the channels 5 are closed at their ends, this medium will flow only into the channels 4, through which it will flow from the inlet 6 to the outlet 7. The part 2 of the casing forms an inlet 8 and an outlet 9 for a second heat exchanging medium, which inlet and outlet open into chambers 10 and 11, respectively. These chambers in turn communicate with all of the channels 5, since the latter are open to the right (FIG. 2). As can be seen from FIG. 1, channels 5 are covered at the right along the main part of their length by a wall 2a which is a part of the casing.

By separating the parts 1 and 2 of the casing, it is possible to have access to the heat transferring element 3. The channels 4, open to the left with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, are then accessible for thorough cleaning by separating the respective channel walls like the leaves in a book. That is, the opposing walls of each channel 5, being joined together at the ends of the channel (FIG. 4), may be considered as a book leaf; and with the casing part I removed, the alternate folds 12 at the right (FIGS. 2 and 4) serve more or less as hinges which permit turning of the leaves" so that the book" can be opened to expose the opposing walls of each channel 4 for such cleaning.

In FIG. 3, a fragment of the heat transferring element 3 is shown. This element consists of a thin, flexible plate strip provided with folds l2 and corrugated so that it has ridges 13 on both sides. The strip is uniformly corrugated along the whole of its length, having breaks only in the areas 12 where it is'to be folded. The ridges 13 of the strip 3 may be formed in many different ways. The main thing is that they cross and abut each other in the channels 4 and 5 formed on each side of the strip when it is folded. In principle, the strip could be provided with ridges extending only in one and the same direction and forming an angle with the folds of the strip. When the strip is folded, these ridges will automatically cross each other in the channels then formed. For manufacturing reasons, however, the ridges are preferablyvformed so that they extend symmetrically relative to the longitudinal center line of the strip.

Since the heat exchanging medium entering through the inlet 8 (with the construction according to FIG. 1) must flow into and out of the channels 5 in the transverse direction of the latter, certain problems may arise in achieving a proper distribution of the medium across the heat exchanging surface. If the channels 5 are very short, much more of the heat exchanging medium will flow, per unit of time, near the wall 2a than deeper in the channels 5, which will result in that the stream parts close to the wall 2a being less heated (or cooled) than the stream parts flowing deeper in the channels.

Included in FIG. 4 is a schematic showing of how to solve this problem. Dotted lines illustrate the paths taken by two stream parts A1 and A2 in flowing through one channel 5. By forming the corrugations in the strip or element 3 so that the ridges form a smaller angle with the longitudinal direction of the channel 5 along the path of the stream part A1 than along the path of the stream part A2, as shown at 13a and 13b, respectively, it is possible to arrange for a greater through-flow resistance for the stream part A2 than for the stream part Al. In this way, it is possible to achieve a proper distribution of the medium flowing in the channels 5. It should be noted, however, that the stream parts B1 and B2 of the second heat exchanging medium, flowing through the channels 4, will also be influenced by such a formation of the heat exchanging surfaces. The degree of increased through-flow resistance which is to be provided for the stream part A2 thus must be a compromise and be determined from case to case.

An alternative way of varying the through-flow resistance for the heat exchanging media is to make a smaller number of ridges 13 on one part of the heat exchanging surfaces than on another part of the same.

lclaim:

1. In a plate heat exchanger, the combination of a heat transferring element in the form of a thin plate strip of uniform width having opposite end portions and also having transversely extending folds spaced longitudinally along the strip and providing the strip with a generally sinuous shape, thereby forming channels extending transversely of the strip on both sides thereof for passage of respective media to betreated in the heat exchanger, said channels including a first set located on said edge portions, a flange secured to and extending from said strip element a ong each of said continuous lines, a casing surrounding said heat transferring element, and releasable means sealingly connecting said element with the casing along said flanges and at said opposite end portions of the strip, whereby upon release of said element from the casing said other side of the strip is accessible for cleaning or inspection by separating opposing walls of the channels of said second set like the leaves in a book, while maintaining the channels of said first set sealed at their said opposite ends.

2. A combination according to claim 1, in which each channel of said second set is open at its opposite ends along said opposite lateral edge portions of the strip, each said alternate fold forming a fulcrum about which adjacentpairs of said opposing walls are swingable away from each other.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US326839 *Sep 22, 1885 braithwaite
US574157 *Jun 19, 1896Dec 29, 1896 ljtjngstrom
US2240203 *Nov 25, 1938Apr 29, 1941Air PreheaterHeat exchanger
US3508607 *Apr 16, 1968Apr 28, 1970Motoren Turbinen UnionHeat exchanger
GB243093A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3912004 *Aug 2, 1974Oct 14, 1975William J DarmHeat exchanger apparatus with spacer projections between plates
US4140175 *Apr 11, 1975Feb 20, 1979Darm William JVertical counterflow heat exchanger apparatus
US4148293 *Apr 4, 1977Apr 10, 1979Lents James MSolar energy receptor apparatus
US6244333 *May 19, 1999Jun 12, 2001Zeks Air Drier CorporationCorrugated folded plate heat exchanger
US6742578 *Apr 2, 2002Jun 1, 2004Toyo Radiator Co., LtdHeat exchanger core
US6802365 *Feb 28, 2001Oct 12, 2004PackinoxMethod for assembling the plates of a plate pack and resulting plate pack
US6802941Jan 18, 2001Oct 12, 2004Ovation Products CorporationDistiller employing cyclical evaporation-surface wetting
US6920918 *Mar 28, 2003Jul 26, 2005Modine Manufacturing CompanyHeat exchanger
US7368039Jun 9, 2004May 6, 2008Zanaqua Technologies, Inc.Distiller employing cyclical evaporation-surface wetting
US7641772Jan 20, 2005Jan 5, 2010Zanaqua Technologies, Inc.Distiller with pressure-difference maintenance
US7854255 *Sep 27, 2005Dec 21, 2010T. Rad Co., Ltd.Heat exchanger
US8561451Aug 3, 2009Oct 22, 2013Modine Manufacturing CompanyTubes and method and apparatus for producing tubes
EP1251325A2 *Apr 16, 2002Oct 23, 2002The Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd.Heat exchanger
WO2000070287A1May 10, 2000Nov 23, 2000Zeks Air Drier CorpCorrugated folded plate heat exchanger
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/166, 165/DIG.399
International ClassificationF28D9/00, F28G13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF28D9/0025, F28G13/00, Y10S165/399
European ClassificationF28D9/00E, F28G13/00