Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3720060 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1973
Filing dateNov 19, 1970
Priority dateDec 13, 1969
Also published asDE2061425A1, DE2061425B2, DE2061425C3
Publication numberUS 3720060 A, US 3720060A, US-A-3720060, US3720060 A, US3720060A
InventorsS Davies, J Chilman
Original AssigneeDowty Rotol Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fans
US 3720060 A
Abstract
A fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type is constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such. The assembly comprises a non-rotative portion including a main body and a by-pass duct, and a rotative sub-assembly supported in bearings by the non-rotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the non-rotative by-pass duct.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Davies et al.

[ 1March 13, 1973 FANS [75] Inventors: Stuart Duncan Davies, Charlton Kings; John Alfred Chilman, Painswick, England [73] Assignee: Dowty Rotol Limited, Gloucester,

England [22] Filed: Nov. 19, 1970 [21] App]. No.: 91,000

[52] US. Cl ..60/226 R, 60/3931, 415/79, 415/201 [51] Int. Cl ..F02k 3/00 [58] Field of Search ..60/226, 39.31, 262; 415/77, 415/79, 201; 416/157; 417/360 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,616,616 11/1971 Flatt ..415/79 2,528,635 11/1950 Bell 60/226 2,711,631 6/1955 Wi11goos... ...60/39.65 3,390,527 7/1968 Decher ..60/226 3,468,473 9/1969 Davies.... ..60/226 3,476,486 11/1969 Davies ..60/226 Primary ExaminerDouglas Hart AttorneyYoung & Thompson [57] ABSTRACT 13 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENIEDMAM slsrs SHEET 1 [IF 4 Jam ,4; FffDCH/LMAN INVENTORS BY K74 4 ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHARI 3197a SHEET H1F 4 FANS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to fans for use in gas turbine engines of the ducted-fan by-pass type, and to gas turbine engines of that type.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to one aspect of the invention a fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type is constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such and comprises a non-rotative portion including a by-pass duct, and a rotative sub-assembly supported in bearings by the non-rotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the non-rotative by-pass duct.

Thus the invention provides a fan assembly, including the non-rotative duct, which is detachable and attachable as a whole thereby facilitating manufacture and maintenance of a by-pass engine. The assembly can also be designed for attachment to an existing engine of non by-pass type, thereby converting the engine to one of the by-pass type.

The fan blading is preferably arranged in a single stage and of. variable pitch with the pitch adjustable under the control of a servo-system housed, at least in part, within the hub structure. In preferred constructions the by-pass duct is supported by a main body of the non-rotative portion of the assembly through a ring of stator blading positioned downstream of the fan blading, which main body is adapted for bolting to the front of the main engine assembly and also supports the rotative sub-assembly. Preferably a spinner is provided to enclose the forward part of the hub structure and forms part of the rotative sub-assembly.

The fan may if desired be of tieredform, with an inner tier of blading adapted to charge the engine compressor and an outer tier which charges the by-pass duct. The non-rotative portion of the assembly may include a splitter structure positioned downstream of the fan blading and which separates the air flow from separate tiers. This structure may, when the assembly is fitted, define an entry portion of the engine inlet leading to the engine compressor and a ring of fixed stator blading may be fixed in this entry portion.

When the blading is of variable pitch'it is preferably reversible in pitch, and the pitch angle is desirably variable to provide positive pitch, zero or near zero pitch,

negative pitch and a feathered position in order to provide complete control of the air flow along the duct. With tiered blading, the pitch of the outer tier may be variable in this manner with the inner tier of blading of fixed pitch. In preferred constructions a pitch-change motor of vane type is employed, having two output members in the form of bevel gears of large diameter which respectively turn in opposite directions about the rotation axis of the fan and which respectively engage opposite sides of small bevel pinions fixed on the root ends of the individual fan blades.

The fan assembly may be adapted for bolting up to the main engine assembly so as to pick up a drive for the fan either from the engine shaft or a reduction gear box embodied in the engine assembly. However, and particularly when the fan assembly is designed for conversion of an existing engine, the non-rotative main body of the fan assembly may house reduction gearing which drives the fan and picks up a drive from the engine. This reduction gearing may also provide a drive for engine auxiliaries.

According to another aspect of the invention a gas turbine engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type has a front-mounted fan assembly which is detachable as a complete assembly and comprises a rotative sub-assembly, which includes blading and a hub of the fan, and a non-rotative portion by which the assembly as a whole is mounted and which includes a stationary .duct portion which surrounds the fan blading.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Three fan assemblies in accordance with the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings and will now be described, by way of example, with reference thereto. The assemblies are shown attached to the forward ends of main gas turbine engine assemblies, whereby in each case to provide a gas turbine engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type also in accordance with the invention. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an axial sectional view of one of the assemblies, only the immediately adjacent portion of the engine assembly to which it is attached being shown,

FIG. 2 is a front view of the assembly of FIG. 1, the left-hand half of this figure being shown partly in section on the line II II in FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is a view similar to that of FIG. 1 but illustrating another of the fan assemblies, and

FIG. 4 is a half view, mainly in axial section, of the third fan assembly.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In each of the illustrated embodiments the fan assembly A is attachable to and detachable from the main engine assembly B as a unit. For this purpose of differentiation the fan assemblies are shown in full lines in the drawings and the adjacent portions of the main engine assemblies in broken lines. The fan assembly of each arrangement comprises a non-rotative portion having a main body 10 which defines an interface, identified by the line C in the drawings, at which the assembly A is bolted up to the front end of the main engine assembly B. A rotative sub-assembly including a hub structure 11 and blading 12 of the fan is supported in spaced anti-friction bearings in the non-rotative main body 10. The blading 12 is of variable pitch which is reversible to produce a reverse air flow along a nonrotative by-pass duct 13 within which the fan is rotatably supported. The by-pass duct 13, which forms part of the non-rotative portion of the fan assembly A, is supported by the main body 20 through a ring of stator blades 14 disposed downstream of the fan blading 12.

The pitch of the fan blading 12 is adjustable under the control of a servo-system including a double-acting multi-vaned vane motor 15 disposed within the hub structure 11. Co-acting vanes 16 and 17 (see FIG. 2) of the motor 15 are respectively attached to bevel gear output members 18 and 19 which turn in opposite directions about the rotation axis D of the fan. Each of the large multiplicity of adjustable-pitch fan blades 12 has a relatively small bevel pinion 20 fixed to its root end, the bevel teeth 22 and 23 of the members 18 and 19 respectively meshing with each pinion 20 on diametrically opposite front and rear sides of the latter. Thus all the blades 12 are adjustable in unison, with a balanced torque applied to the blade roots from the vane motor 15.

A follow-up servo valve (not shown) controlling the blade pitch is disposed coaxially with and within the pitch change motor 15. This valve is not illustrated as it may be of known type, for example connected to a rearwardly extending pitch control member which passes out of the fan assembly A centrally and which is arranged for external remote control of pitch. Alternatively the valve may be controlled by hydraulic pressure ducted through a control duct disposed centrally of the assembly, a feedback connection from the servo valve extended back rearwardly to the control means providing the hydraulic control pressure. As a further alternative, the blading may be under governor control, in which case the governor hydraulic control pressure is supplied to the control valve within the hub 1 1.

A spinner 24 which forms part of the rotative sub-assembly encloses the forward end of the hub structure 11, and a guard ring 25 built into the duct 13, shown in FIG. 1, surrounds the tips of the fan blades 12. This protects the duct structure in the event of blade breakage.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 the fan hub structure 11 supports only a single tier of blading 12 which charges both the engine compressor (not shown) and the by-pass duct 13. The non-rotative main body of the assembly A bolts up to the front of the engine casing 26 immediately ahead of the engine compressor inlet 27. A central hollow portion 28 of the hub structure, which extends rearwardly of the fan blading 12 into the main body 10, is supported in said spaced bearings 29 and is driven by a splined quill coupling member 30 which is in splined engagement on the one hand with the hub portion 28 and, on the other hand, with a forward female end 31 of the main engine shaft. The hub portion 28 supports the remainder of the rota tive sub-assembly and is directly supported in the bearings 29 within the main body 10.

In the other two embodiments, shown respectively in FIGS. 3 and 4, two tiers of blading are provided. The outer tier is formed by the variable pitch blading l2 and charges the by-pass duct 13 and the inner tier blading 32 charges the engine compressor through the engine inlet 27, a duct 33 formed within the main body 10 leading from the inner tier blading 32 to the engine compressor inlet 27. Only the outer tier blading 12 is of variable pitch, to this end the blading roots of this tier being supported in bearings 34 in a shroud ring 35 which encircles and is attached to the tips of the inner tier blades 32. Thus the shroud ring 35 forms part of the rotative sub-assembly, and the inner tier blades 32 are hollow to allow the roots of the outer blades 12 to project through into the hub structure 11 within which the pinions are disposed for the purpose of pitch adjustment, by the vane motor 15, as already described.

A flared splitter structure 41 which forms part of the stationary main body 10 separates the two air flows, to the compressor inlet 27 and along the by-pass duct 13 respectively, and is in effect an extension of the shroud ring 35 in the aerodynamic sense. The structure 41 provides the outer wall of said duct 33 and not only supports the by-pass stator blading 14, which in turn supports the by-pass duct portion 13 of the fan assembly A, but it also in effect extends the engine compressor inlet 27 forwardly to the fixed tier blading 32. Thus the splitter structure 41 defines an entry portion of the compressor inlet, and within this entry portion a further ring of stator blading 36 is fixed within the duct 33.

In the fan assembly A of FIGS. 3 and 4 the non-rotative main body 10 houses reduction gear 37 with coaxial input and output members 38 and 39. The input member 38 picks up a quill drive from the main engine shaft 40 and the output member 39 is directly coupled to the hollow central portion 42 (FIG. 3) of the fan hub structure. The stationary main body 10 projects forwardly into the fan hub structure 11 in order to provide adequate bearing support for the latter, by way of said spaced bearings 43 (as shown in FIG. 3), forwardly of the reduction gear 37. This necessitates that the vaned motor 15 is mounted forwardly of the fan blading 12 and 32 within the front spinner 24 (as also shown in FIG. 3), the output bevel gears having appropriately cranked webs so that they project rearwardly around the forwardly projecting bearing portion 44 (see FIG. 3) for engagement with the pinions 20 of the outer tier of blading 12.

The embodiments of FIGS. 3 and 4 are generally similar, although in the construction of FIG. 4 the reduction gear 37 also provides an auxiliary drive by way ofa vertical drive shaft 45 which projects upwardly through one of the stator blades 36 into the splitter structure 41 where it drives, through right-angle bevel gearing 46, an internally splined hollow drive member 47. When the fan assembly A is fitted to the main engine assembly B the auxiliary drive from the member 47 is provided by a splined auxiliary drive shaft 48 which extends into the front of the main engine casing and is offset from the main engine shaft 40 above the engine compressor inlet 27.

In the drawings the duct portion 13 of the fan assembly A is shown as providing the complete by-pass duct of the ducted-fan engine. However, if a larger overall duct length is required the main engine assembly B may also include a stationary duct portion aligned with and providing a rearward extension of the duct portion 13 of the fan assembly A while leaving the latter still attachable to, and detachable from, the engine assembly B as a complete unit.

We claim:

1. A fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type, constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such and comprising a non-rotative portion including a by-pass duct, and a rotative subassembly supported in bearings by the nonrotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the nonrotative by-pass duct, the rotative subassembly also including a spinner which encloses the forward part of the hub structure.

2. A fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type, constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such and comprising a non-rotative portion including a by-pass duct, and a rotative subassembly supported in bearings by the nonrotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the nonrotative by-pass duct, the fan blading being of variable pitch with the pitch adjustable under the control of a servo-system housed, at least in part, within the hub structure.

3. A fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type, with a fan of tiered form having an inner tier of blading adapted to charge the engine compressor and an outer tier of blading to charge a by-pass duct, constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such and comprising a nonrotative portion including the by-pass duct,fand a rotative subassembly supported in bearings by the nonrotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the nonrotative by-pass duct, the inner tier of blading being of fixed pitch and the outer tier of fan blading being of variable pitch with the pitch adjustable under the control of a servo-system housed, at least in part, within the hub structure.

4. A fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type, constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such and comprising a nonrotative portion including a by-pass duct, and a rotative subassembly supported in bearings by the nonrotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the nonrotative by-pass duct, the fan blading being variable in pitch angle to provide positive pitch, .zero or near zero pitch, negative pitch and a feathered position in order to provide complete control of the air flow along the duct with the pitch adjustable under the control of a servo-system housed, at least in part, within the hub structure.

5. A fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type, constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such and comprises a non-rotative portion including a by-pass duct, and a rotative subassembly supported in bearings by the nonrotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the nonrotative by-pass duct, the fan assembly being adapted for bolting up to the main engine assembly so as to pick up a drive for the rotative subassembly from the main engine shaft. I

6. A fan assembly according to claim 5, wherein the fan blading is arranged in a single stage.

7. A fan assembly according to claim 5, wherein the by-pass duct is supported by a main body of said nonrotative portion through a ring of stator blading positioned downstream of the fan blading, which main body is adapted for bolting to the front of the main engine assembly and also supports the rotative sub-assembly.

8. A fan assembly according to claim 5, and gearing to drive the rotative subassembly, said gearing being housed within the fan assembly.

9. A fan assembly according to claim 8, wherein said gearinQs reduction earing. l

l0. fan assemb y according to claim 8, wherein said gearing is housed within the nonrotative portion of the fan assembly.

11. A gas turbine engine embodying a fan assembly according to claim 10, wherein the duct portion of the fan assembly provides the complete by-pass duct of the engine.

12. A fan assembly for attachment to the front of a main gas turbine engine assembly to provide an engine of the ducted-fan by-pass type, constructed as a unitary assembly which can be fitted and removed as such and comprising a nonrotative portion including a by-pass duct, and a rotative subassembly supported in bearings by the nonrotative portion and including a hub structure and fan blading positioned and rotatably supported within the nonrotative by-pass duct, the fan assembly being adapted for bolting up to the main engine assembly so as to pick up a drive for the rotative subassembly from a reduction gear box embodied in the engine assembly.

13. A fan assembly according to claim 5, wherein the fan is of tiered form with an inner tier of blading adapted to charge the engine compressor and an outer tier of blading which charges the bypass duct.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2528635 *Aug 5, 1946Nov 7, 1950Rolls RoycePower gas generator for internalcombustion power units
US2711631 *Jun 21, 1949Jun 28, 1955Hartford Nat Bank & Trust CoGas turbine power plant
US3390527 *Jul 19, 1967Jul 2, 1968Avco CorpHigh bypass ratio turbofan
US3468473 *Apr 12, 1967Sep 23, 1969Dowty Rotol LtdGas turbine engines
US3476486 *Apr 12, 1967Nov 4, 1969Dowty Rotol LtdGas turbine engines
US3616616 *Mar 11, 1968Nov 2, 1971Tech Dev IncParticle separator especially for use in connection with jet engines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3811791 *Jul 9, 1973May 21, 1974R CottonThrust augmenting device for jet aircraft
US3869221 *Feb 19, 1974Mar 4, 1975Mtu Muenchen GmbhRotor wheel fan blade adjusting apparatus for turbojet engines and the like
US3893783 *Feb 15, 1974Jul 8, 1975Dowty Rotol LtdGas turbine engines and bladed rotors therefor
US3904315 *Jul 31, 1974Sep 9, 1975United Aircraft CorpPitch change signal means with differential gearing
US3912418 *Oct 1, 1974Oct 14, 1975United Technologies CorpLubrication system for a rotor
US3924404 *Apr 19, 1973Dec 9, 1975Mtu Muenchen GmbhApparatus for adjusting fan blades in a turbojet engine
US3942911 *Feb 15, 1974Mar 9, 1976Dowty Rotol LimitedBladed rotors
US3970410 *Mar 29, 1974Jul 20, 1976Dowty Rotol LimitedRotary actuators suitable for bladed rotors
US3976397 *Mar 29, 1974Aug 24, 1976Dowty Rotol LimitedRotary actuators suitable for bladed rotors
US4005574 *Apr 21, 1975Feb 1, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationReverse pitch fan with divided splitter
US4010919 *Dec 5, 1975Mar 8, 1977Breuner Gerald LAutogyro having blade tip jets
US4239452 *Jun 26, 1978Dec 16, 1980United Technologies CorporationBlade tip shroud for a compression stage of a gas turbine engine
US4566269 *Oct 11, 1983Jan 28, 1986United Technologies CorporationJet engine removable support assembly
US4744214 *Jun 29, 1987May 17, 1988United Technologies CorporationEngine modularity
US4750862 *Nov 28, 1986Jun 14, 1988United Technologies CorporationModular propeller blade pitch actuation system
US4756153 *May 14, 1987Jul 12, 1988Rolls-Royce PlcLoad transfer structure
US4934140 *May 13, 1988Jun 19, 1990United Technologies CorporationModular gas turbine engine
US4968217 *Sep 6, 1989Nov 6, 1990Rolls-Royce PlcVariable pitch arrangement for a gas turbine engine
US5205513 *Sep 26, 1991Apr 27, 1993General Electric CompanyMethod and system for the removal of large turbine engines
US5222360 *Oct 30, 1991Jun 29, 1993General Electric CompanyApparatus for removably attaching a core frame to a vane frame with a stable mid ring
US7266941Jul 6, 2004Sep 11, 2007Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US7370467Jul 29, 2003May 13, 2008Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US7565796Jul 20, 2007Jul 28, 2009Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US7607286Dec 1, 2004Oct 27, 2009United Technologies CorporationRegenerative turbine blade and vane cooling for a tip turbine engine
US7631480Dec 1, 2004Dec 15, 2009United Technologies CorporationModular tip turbine engine
US7631485Dec 1, 2004Dec 15, 2009United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine with a heat exchanger
US7739866Jul 20, 2007Jun 22, 2010Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US7765787Jul 20, 2007Aug 3, 2010Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US7770378Jul 20, 2007Aug 10, 2010Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US7793488Jul 20, 2007Sep 14, 2010Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US7797922Jun 4, 2007Sep 21, 2010Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Gas turbine engine case and method of making
US7845157Dec 1, 2004Dec 7, 2010United Technologies CorporationAxial compressor for tip turbine engine
US7854112Dec 1, 2004Dec 21, 2010United Technologies CorporationVectoring transition duct for turbine engine
US7874163Dec 1, 2004Jan 25, 2011United Technologies CorporationStarter generator system for a tip turbine engine
US7874802Dec 1, 2004Jan 25, 2011United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine comprising turbine blade clusters and method of assembly
US7878762Dec 1, 2004Feb 1, 2011United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine comprising turbine clusters and radial attachment lock arrangement therefor
US7882694Dec 1, 2004Feb 8, 2011United Technologies CorporationVariable fan inlet guide vane assembly for gas turbine engine
US7882695Dec 1, 2004Feb 8, 2011United Technologies CorporationTurbine blow down starter for turbine engine
US7883314Dec 1, 2004Feb 8, 2011United Technologies CorporationSeal assembly for a fan-turbine rotor of a tip turbine engine
US7883315Dec 1, 2004Feb 8, 2011United Technologies CorporationSeal assembly for a fan rotor of a tip turbine engine
US7887296Dec 1, 2004Feb 15, 2011United Technologies CorporationFan blade with integral diffuser section and tip turbine blade section for a tip turbine engine
US7921635Dec 1, 2004Apr 12, 2011United Technologies CorporationPeripheral combustor for tip turbine engine
US7921636Dec 1, 2004Apr 12, 2011United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine and corresponding operating method
US7927075Dec 1, 2004Apr 19, 2011United Technologies CorporationFan-turbine rotor assembly for a tip turbine engine
US7934902Dec 1, 2004May 3, 2011United Technologies CorporationCompressor variable stage remote actuation for turbine engine
US7937927Dec 1, 2004May 10, 2011United Technologies CorporationCounter-rotating gearbox for tip turbine engine
US7959406 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 14, 2011United Technologies CorporationClose coupled gearbox assembly for a tip turbine engine
US7959532Dec 1, 2004Jun 14, 2011United Technologies CorporationHydraulic seal for a gearbox of a tip turbine engine
US7976272Dec 1, 2004Jul 12, 2011United Technologies CorporationInflatable bleed valve for a turbine engine
US7976273Dec 1, 2004Jul 12, 2011United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine support structure
US7980054Dec 1, 2004Jul 19, 2011United Technologies CorporationEjector cooling of outer case for tip turbine engine
US8024931Dec 1, 2004Sep 27, 2011United Technologies CorporationCombustor for turbine engine
US8033092Dec 1, 2004Oct 11, 2011United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine integral fan, combustor, and turbine case
US8033094Dec 1, 2004Oct 11, 2011United Technologies CorporationCantilevered tip turbine engine
US8061968Dec 1, 2004Nov 22, 2011United Technologies CorporationCounter-rotating compressor case and assembly method for tip turbine engine
US8083030Dec 1, 2004Dec 27, 2011United Technologies CorporationGearbox lubrication supply system for a tip engine
US8087885Dec 1, 2004Jan 3, 2012United Technologies CorporationStacked annular components for turbine engines
US8087890Jan 22, 2008Jan 3, 2012SnecmaTurboprop having a propeller made up of variable-pitch blades
US8096753Dec 1, 2004Jan 17, 2012United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine and operating method with reverse core airflow
US8104257Dec 1, 2004Jan 31, 2012United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine with multiple fan and turbine stages
US8152469Dec 1, 2004Apr 10, 2012United Technologies CorporationAnnular turbine ring rotor
US8276362Feb 7, 2011Oct 2, 2012United Technologies CorporationVariable fan inlet guide vane assembly, turbine engine with such an assembly and corresponding controlling method
US8365511Dec 1, 2004Feb 5, 2013United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine integral case, vane, mount and mixer
US8468795Dec 1, 2004Jun 25, 2013United Technologies CorporationDiffuser aspiration for a tip turbine engine
US8561383Dec 1, 2004Oct 22, 2013United Technologies CorporationTurbine engine with differential gear driven fan and compressor
US8602731 *Jan 11, 2012Dec 10, 2013Fred K. CarrMicroprocessor system for controlling rotor pitch
US8641367Dec 1, 2004Feb 4, 2014United Technologies CorporationPlurality of individually controlled inlet guide vanes in a turbofan engine and corresponding controlling method
US8672630Jan 16, 2012Mar 18, 2014United Technologies CorporationAnnular turbine ring rotor
US8757959Dec 1, 2004Jun 24, 2014United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine comprising a nonrotable compartment
US8807936Dec 1, 2004Aug 19, 2014United Technologies CorporationBalanced turbine rotor fan blade for a tip turbine engine
US8950171Apr 19, 2011Feb 10, 2015United Technologies CorporationCounter-rotating gearbox for tip turbine engine
US8967945Dec 23, 2013Mar 3, 2015United Technologies CorporationIndividual inlet guide vane control for tip turbine engine
US9003759 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 14, 2015United Technologies CorporationParticle separator for tip turbine engine
US9003768Feb 8, 2011Apr 14, 2015United Technologies CorporationVariable fan inlet guide vane assembly, turbine engine with such an assembly and corresponding controlling method
US9103376 *Feb 17, 2014Aug 11, 2015Hamilton Sundstrand CorporationChambered shaft for improved bearing lubrication
US9109537Dec 4, 2004Aug 18, 2015United Technologies CorporationTip turbine single plane mount
US9194397Jan 11, 2013Nov 24, 2015Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd Co KGAircraft gas turbine with adjustable fan
US9200594 *Feb 25, 2010Dec 1, 2015SnecmaGas turbine engine having fan blades of adjustable pitch with cyclic setting
US9476323 *May 31, 2012Oct 25, 2016United Technologies CorporationTurbine gear assembly support having symmetrical removal features
US9488073 *Jul 25, 2012Nov 8, 2016United Technologies CorporationTurbine gear assembly support having symmetrical removal features
US9541092Dec 22, 2011Jan 10, 2017United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine with reverse core airflow
US20050022501 *Jul 29, 2003Feb 3, 2005Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US20050109013 *Jul 6, 2004May 26, 2005Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US20070292270 *Dec 1, 2004Dec 20, 2007Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Engine Comprising Turbine Blade Clusters and Method of Assembly
US20070295011 *Dec 1, 2004Dec 27, 2007United Technologies CorporationRegenerative Turbine Blade and Vane Cooling for a Tip Turbine Engine
US20080008583 *Dec 1, 2004Jan 10, 2008Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Case, Vane, Mount And Mixer
US20080010996 *Jul 20, 2007Jan 17, 2008Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US20080014078 *Dec 1, 2004Jan 17, 2008Suciu Gabriel LEjector Cooling of Outer Case for Tip Turbine Engine
US20080014083 *Jul 20, 2007Jan 17, 2008Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US20080014084 *Jul 20, 2007Jan 17, 2008Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US20080019830 *Dec 1, 2004Jan 24, 2008Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Single Plane Mount
US20080044281 *Dec 1, 2004Feb 21, 2008Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Engine Comprising A Nonrotable Compartment
US20080087023 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 17, 2008Suciu Gabriel LCantilevered Tip Turbine Engine
US20080092514 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 24, 2008Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Engine Composite Tailcone
US20080092552 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 24, 2008Suciu Gabriel LHydraulic Seal for a Gearbox of a Tip Turbine Engine
US20080093171 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 24, 2008United Technologies CorporationGearbox Lubrication Supply System for a Tip Engine
US20080093174 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 24, 2008Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Engine with a Heat Exchanger
US20080095618 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 24, 2008Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Engine Support Structure
US20080095628 *Dec 1, 2004Apr 24, 2008United Technologies CorporationClose Coupled Gearbox Assembly For A Tip Turbine Engine
US20080124218 *Dec 1, 2004May 29, 2008Suciu Gabriel LTip Turbine Egine Comprising Turbine Clusters And Radial Attachment Lock Arrangement Therefor
US20080206056 *Dec 1, 2004Aug 28, 2008United Technologies CorporationModular Tip Turbine Engine
US20080219833 *Dec 1, 2004Sep 11, 2008United Technologies CorporationInducer for a Fan Blade of a Tip Turbine Engine
US20080226453 *Dec 1, 2004Sep 18, 2008United Technologies CorporationBalanced Turbine Rotor Fan Blade for a Tip Turbine Engine
US20080240917 *Jul 20, 2007Oct 2, 2008Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
US20080247877 *Jan 22, 2008Oct 9, 2008SnecmaTurboprop having a propeller made up of variable-pitch blades
US20090071162 *Dec 1, 2004Mar 19, 2009Suciu Gabriel LPeripheral combustor for tip turbine engine
US20090074565 *Dec 1, 2004Mar 19, 2009Suciu Gabriel LTurbine engine with differential gear driven fan and compressor
US20090120058 *Dec 1, 2004May 14, 2009United Technologies CorporationTip Turbine Engine Integral Fan, Combustor, and Turbine Case
US20090120100 *Dec 1, 2004May 14, 2009Brian MerryStarter Generator System for a Tip Turbine Engine
US20090142184 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 4, 2009Roberge Gary DVectoring transition duct for turbine engine
US20090142188 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 4, 2009Suciu Gabriel LSeal assembly for a fan-turbine rotor of a tip turbine engine
US20090145101 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 11, 2009Gabriel SuciuParticle separator for tip turbine engine
US20090145136 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 11, 2009Norris James WTip turbine engine with multiple fan and turbine stages
US20090148272 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 11, 2009Norris James WTip turbine engine and operating method with reverse core airflow
US20090148273 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 11, 2009Suciu Gabriel LCompressor inlet guide vane for tip turbine engine and corresponding control method
US20090148276 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 11, 2009Suciu Gabriel LSeal assembly for a fan rotor of a tip turbine engine
US20090148287 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 11, 2009Suciu Gabriel LFan blade with integral diffuser section and tip turbine blade section for a tip turbine engine
US20090148297 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 11, 2009Suciu Gabriel LFan-turbine rotor assembly for a tip turbine engine
US20090155057 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 18, 2009Suciu Gabriel LCompressor variable stage remote actuation for turbine engine
US20090155079 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 18, 2009Suciu Gabriel LStacked annular components for turbine engines
US20090162187 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 25, 2009Brian MerryCounter-rotating compressor case and assembly method for tip turbine engine
US20090169385 *Dec 1, 2004Jul 2, 2009Suciu Gabriel LFan-turbine rotor assembly with integral inducer section for a tip turbine engine
US20090169386 *Dec 1, 2004Jul 2, 2009Suciu Gabriel LAnnular turbine ring rotor
US20090232650 *Dec 1, 2004Sep 17, 2009Gabriel SuciuTip turbine engine and corresponding operating method
US20100187825 *Dec 30, 2009Jul 29, 2010Fred CarrMicroprocessor system for controlling rotor pitch
US20110142601 *Feb 7, 2011Jun 16, 2011Suciu Gabriel LVariable fan inlet guide vane assembly, turbine engine with such an assembly and corresponding controlling method
US20110200424 *Apr 19, 2011Aug 18, 2011Gabriel SuciuCounter-rotating gearbox for tip turbine engine
US20120055137 *Feb 25, 2010Mar 8, 2012SnecmaFan blades with cyclic setting
US20120114483 *Jan 11, 2012May 10, 2012Fred CarrMicroprocessor system for controlling rotor pitch
US20130319001 *Jul 25, 2012Dec 5, 2013John R. OttoTurbine gear assembly support having symmetrical removal features
US20150110429 *Feb 17, 2014Apr 23, 2015Hamilton Sundstrand CorporationChambered shaft for improved bearing lubrication
USB353387 *Apr 19, 1973Jan 28, 1975 Title not available
CN101230789BJan 23, 2008Dec 12, 2012斯奈克玛Turbo-propeller comprising a propeller formed by blades with adjustable orientation
EP1953346A1 *Jan 23, 2008Aug 6, 2008SnecmaTurbo-propeller comprising a propeller formed by blades with adjustable orientation
WO2005012696A1 *Jul 19, 2004Feb 10, 2005Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Turbofan case and method of making
WO2006059973A1 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 8, 2006United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine with a heat exchanger
WO2006060011A1 *Dec 1, 2004Jun 8, 2006United Technologies CorporationTip turbine engine comprising a nonrotable compartment
Classifications
U.S. Classification60/226.1, 415/79, 416/170.00R, 416/157.00A, 415/129, 60/798, 415/201, 416/193.00R
International ClassificationF01D7/00, F02K3/06, F04D29/32
Cooperative ClassificationY02T50/673, F05D2260/74, F02K3/06, F01D7/00, F05D2260/76, F04D29/323
European ClassificationF02K3/06, F04D29/32B2B, F01D7/00