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Publication numberUS3722003 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1973
Filing dateMay 18, 1971
Priority dateMay 18, 1971
Also published asCA961603A1
Publication numberUS 3722003 A, US 3722003A, US-A-3722003, US3722003 A, US3722003A
InventorsD Walchle
Original AssigneeXomox Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Molded l-shaped lenticular prosthesis
US 3722003 A
Abstract
An L-shaped lenticular prosthesis molded from FEP or medical grade silicone rubber to its final size, ready for inspection, packaging and sterilization, said prosthesis being entirely free of residual stresses.
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ilnited States Patent 91 Walchle [451 Mar. 27, 1973 MOLDED L-SHAPED LENTICULAR PROSTHESIS [75] Inventor: David L. Wal chle, Cincinnati, Ohio [73 Assignee: Xomox Ohio 22' Filed: May 18, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 144,538

Corporation, Cincinnati,

[52] US. Cl 3/1, l28/DIG. l4, l28/DIG. 21 [51] Int. Cl ..A61f 1/2A,A6lf'1/18 [58] Field of Search ..3/l; 128/350 R, DIG. Z1, 14,

[56] References Cited I UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,454,006 7/1969 Langdon ..128/214.4

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 4/1903 France ..128/349R OTHER PUBLICATIONS New Artificial Eardrums are Made from Soft Plastic" Science Illustraded, March I948, pp. 30-31.

Micro-Surgery Instruments 84 Implants Catalog, Richards Mfg. Co., I966, page (fonn 2866), Teflon Lindeman-Silverstein Arrow Drain Tube Relied Upon.

Silastic Artificial Eustachian Tube, by J. A. Donaldson, The Bulletin of the Dow Corning Center for Aid to Medical Research, Vol. 7, No. 1, Jan. 1965, page 2. Experiences with the Ossicular Chain, by B. W; Armstrong, Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, Vol. -78, N0. 5, Oct. 1969, pages 939-949.

Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-Ronald L. Frinks Attorney-J. Warren Kinney, Jr.

[57] ABSTRACT An L-shaped lenticular prosthesis molded from PE? or medical grade silicone rubber to its final size, ready for inspection, packaging and sterilization, saidprosthesis being entirely free of residualstresses.

4 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEUHARZYISYS 3,722,003

INVENTOR DAVID L. WALCHLE er I FIG- 3 FIG- 4 78 4 M i MOLDED L-SHAPED LEN'IICULAR PROSTHESIS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to otology prosthesis and particularly to an L-type lenticular prosthesis which is fabricated by molding to exact dimensions and final size.

2. Description of the Prior Art The prior art insofar as it relates to L-type lenticular prostheses for lenticular and long process replacement utilized a hollow cylindrical tube of Teflon which was substantially severed to provide a pair of hollow, cylindrical portions of unequal length interconnected by a thin, unsevered, hinge forming web. The outer ends of the hollow cylindrical portions were then provided with a V-shaped cut which imparted a certain resilience to the cylindrical portions which enabled their outer ends to be fitted over the long process of the incus and the lenticular process of the stapes for replacing the lenticular and long process of an ear.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide an L- shaped prosthesis which is fabricated as a single operation from molded FEP or medical grade silicone rubber. By molding the parts to their final size the difficulties and microscopically machining the parts is eliminated and the residual stresses ever present in the prior art devices is eliminated. Such residual stresses, in the case of an L-shaped prosthesis tend to straighten out the prostheses either before or after it is implanted in the ear.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a view partly in section of a human ear wherein the lenticular and long process have been replaced with an L-shaped prosthesis of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of the prosthesis per se of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 44 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view illustrating a diseased condition of the lenticular and long process which are to be replaced by the prosthesis of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 illustrating the subject' prosthesis having been secured to the long processes of the incus and the lenticular processes of the stapes for replacing the diseased bones of FIG. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT With particular reference to FIGS. l-6, a human ear includes a tympanic membrane 40, a middle ear 44, and an external auditory canal 46. The numerals 70 and 72 denote a pair of substantially cylindrical, elongate tubular members which are interconnected as at 74, and wherein each of said members are provided with an elongate slit 76 and 78, respectively, which extend throughout the entire length of their respective cylindrical portions. Adjacent end surfaces 80 and 82 of members 70 and 72 are disposed at substantial right angles, and each of members 70 and 72 terminate in outer, axial end surfaces 84 and 86, respectively.

' that the elongate slits 76 and 78 enable the cylindrical It should be understood that the prostheses illustrated in FIGS. 1-6 are greatly enlarged for clarity of detail and understanding, since in actual practice they have the following dimensions: cylindrical members 70 and 72 have an CD. of 0.065 inch, an ID. of 0044-0045 inch, and slits 76 and 78 are the width of a razor cut. The overall length of 70 is three-sixteenths inch, the length of 72 is but three thirty-secondths inch, and the interconnection at 74 is about 0.010 inch. When molded from medical gradesilicone rubber excellent results have been obtained when the prosthesis has a durome ter factor of 60 to 70. The molded parts may be either air or thermal cured.

When used the otologist will carefully excise the diseased portion of the ossicular chain denoted generally by the letter D of FIG. 5 for providing and exposing a free outer end of the long process of the incus and the lenticular process of the stapes after which portion 70 of the prosthesis is slipped over and attached to the end of the long process of the incus and portion 72 is slipped over and attached to the lenticular process of the stapes, as in FIGS. 1 and 6, for thereby creating an efficient and effective replacement for the aforesaid diseasedportions of the ossicular chain. j

With particular reference to Flg. 6, it will be noted members 70 and 72 to firmly engage the lenticular and long process by reason of the inherent resilience of said tubular members which are adapted to be opened incident to their attachment, as illustrated.

The aforesaid L-shaped prosthesis is adaptedto be used by otologists such as, by way of example, is more fully described in the article by B. W. Armstrong, M- D., of Charlotte, NC, appearing in the Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, Oct. 1969, Volume 78, No. 5, pages 939-949.

The prostheses of the present invention are all fabricated entirely from FEP or from medical grade silicone rubber and uniformly satisfactory results have been obtained wherein the prostheses have been molded to final size in a multicavity mold. The present ,use, upon removal from their individual package,

without requiring resterilization before use, by the otologist.

What is claimed is:

l. A one-piece, moulded, resilient L-shaped lenticular prosthesis for placement in the ossicular chain of a human ear to replace a damaged or diseased section of the ossicular chain which has been removed exposing a free outer end of the long process of the incus and the lenticular process of the stapes, comprising a pair of elongate, hollow tubes each having inner and outer ends, said tubes interconnected at a right angle to one another at an adjacent edge portion of their inner ends by an integral web at one side of the inner ends, one of said tubes being longer than the other of said tubes, and each tube slit longitudinally the entire length thereof on the side thereof opposite said web so that said tubes may be flexed open and their outer ends placed over the lenticular and long process and then allowed to close and firmly engage the lenticular and long process comprises PEP.

3. A prosthesis as in claim 1 in which the prosthesis comprises medicalgrade silicone rubber.

4. A prosthesis as in claim 3, wherein the silicone rubber has a durometer value offrom 60-70.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3454006 *Jan 28, 1966Jul 8, 1969Weck & Co Inc EdwardIntravenous catheter-needle assembly provided with needle bushing guide
FR327698A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Experiences with the Ossicular Chain, by B. W. Armstrong, Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, Vol. 78, No. 5, Oct. 1969, pages 939 949.
2 *Micro Surgery Instruments & Implants Catalog, Richards Mfg. Co., 1966, page (form 2866), Teflon Lindeman Silverstein Arrow Drain Tube Relied Upon.
3 *New Artificial Eardrums are Made from Soft Plastic Science Illustraded, March 1948, pp. 30 31.
4 *Silastic Artificial Eustachian Tube, by J. A. Donaldson, The Bulletin of the Dow Corning Center for Aid to Medical Research, Vol. 7, No. 1, Jan. 1965, page 2.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3909852 *Dec 17, 1973Oct 7, 1975Charles A HomsyImplantable substitute structure for at least part of the middle ear bony chain
US4014971 *May 11, 1973Mar 29, 1977Perkins Rodney CMethod for making a tympanic membrane prosthesis
US4215438 *Jan 22, 1979Aug 5, 1980Pappas Dennis GProsthesis for ossicular chain reconstruction
US4281419 *Dec 10, 1979Aug 4, 1981Richards Manufacturing Company, Inc.Middle ear ossicular replacement prosthesis having a movable joint
US5935167 *May 30, 1997Aug 10, 1999Heinz Kurz Gmbh MedizintechnikRising bracket prosthesis for implantation in middle ear
US6277148Feb 11, 1999Aug 21, 2001Soundtec, Inc.Middle ear magnet implant, attachment device and method, and test instrument and method
US7955386Apr 25, 2007Jun 7, 2011Clarity CorporationMiddle ear prosthesis
US8057542Feb 6, 2008Nov 15, 2011EnteroptyxOssicular prosthesis having helical coil
US8206444Oct 5, 2010Jun 26, 2012Clarity CorporationMiddle ear prosthesis
US8506628Nov 14, 2011Aug 13, 2013EnteroptyxOssicular prosthesis having helical coil
DE19744789C2 *Oct 10, 1997May 8, 2002Univ Dresden TechGehörknöchelchenprothese zur Schallübertragung im Mittelohr
EP0809982A2 *May 17, 1997Dec 3, 1997Heinz Kurz GmbH MedizintechnikStapedial prosthesis for implantation in the middle ear
WO1998016175A1Oct 10, 1997Apr 23, 1998Univ Dresden TechOssicle prosthesis for sound transmission in the middle ear
WO2000047138A1 *Feb 10, 2000Aug 17, 2000Soundtec IncMiddle ear magnet implant, attachment device and method, and test instrument and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/10, 128/DIG.210, 128/DIG.140
International ClassificationA61F2/18
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/21, A61F2/18, A61F2002/183, Y10S128/14
European ClassificationA61F2/18