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Publication numberUS3722015 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1973
Filing dateDec 10, 1970
Priority dateDec 10, 1970
Publication numberUS 3722015 A, US 3722015A, US-A-3722015, US3722015 A, US3722015A
InventorsMiller O, Miller W
Original AssigneeMiller O, Miller W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water board
US 3722015 A
Abstract
A water board for personal use includes a buoyant float designed to carry a person on the water. Longitudinal frames extend along both sides of the float, each supporting one or more submerged vanes. Each vane is transversely taut along the leading edge thereof and transversely slack along the trailing edge thereof. The user rocks the float from side to side and so flexes the vanes to propel the float forwardly.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Patent 1 Miller et al.

[ 11 3,722,015 [4 Mar. 27, 1973 WATER BOARD [76] Inventors William S. Miller; Oscar E. Miller, both of PD. Box 947, Placerville, Calif. 95667 [22] Filed: Dec. 10, 1970 [21] App1.No.: 96,936

[52] US. Cl. ..9/310 B, 115/28, 115/4 [51} Int. Cl ..A63c 15/04 [58] Field of Search ..9/310 B, 310 E, 310 R, 11 R;

[561 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,194,206 7/1965 Anderson ..9/310 E 1,222,114 4/1917 McCarthy et 3,453,981 7/1969 Gause ..l 15/4 3,440,994 4/ 1969 McGowan ..1 15/28 R 1,315,267 9/1919 White ..115/4 Primary ExaminerMilton Buchler Assistant ExaminerCarl A. Rutledge Attorney-Lothrop & West ABSTRACT A water board for personal use includes a buoyant float designed to carry a person on the water. Longitudinal frames extend along both sides of the float, each supporting one or more submerged vanes. Each vane is transversely taut along the leading edge thereof and transversely slack along the trailing edge thereof. The user rocks the float from side to side and so flexes the vanes to propel the float forwardly.

8 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATEHTFUMARZTIUYS 15 SHEET 3 OF 3 FIE E W/LL AMSM/LL5 OSCART-M/LLEE I N VEN 'TORS BY WZW WATER BOARD There is an increasing market for items which can be utilized in recreation and sports, particularly for water sports, and involving some personal skill on the part of the user. There is likewise always a field for means for navigating on water, whether for pleasure or for serious uses.

It is therefore an object of our invention to provide a water board susceptible to personal use and operable by users of more or less skill for the purpose of propelling the water board forwardly in the water and thus transporting the user.

Another object of the invention is to provide a water board as an item of personal equipment for a water board user, so that he can gain and maintain skill in its use, can use it to transport himself over water, and, when on land, can transport and stow the water board readily and easily.

A further object of the invention is to provide a water board which can be easily and economically constructed of materials presently available in a sturdy and satisfactory fashion.

A further object of the invention is to provide a water board which is safe in its operation and can be readily handled in and about the water and during transport with safety and ease.

Another object of the invention is in general to provide an improved water board.

Other objects together with the foregoing are attained in the embodiments of the invention described in the accompanying description and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan of one form of water board constructed pursuant to our invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the structure shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation of the structure shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a plan similar to FIG. 1 but showing a modified form of water board pursuant to our invention;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation of the structure of FIG. 4; FIG. 6 is a bottom plan view of the structure of FIG.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view from below and ahead showing the general appearance of the water board of FIG. 4 from beneath the surface of the water; and

FIG. 8 is a cross section to an enlarged scale, the plane of section being indicated by the line 8-8 of FIG. 5.

Pursuant to our invention, a water board can be constructed in various different fashions, in different configurations and in different sizes,'depending somewhat on the nature of its intended use and the size and weight of the intended user or users. In a representative form which has become popular, the water board, as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, takes the form of a navigable structure symmetrical about a longitudinal center line and including a central float 6 having a rounded bow section 7, a truncated stern section 8 and lateral sections 9 and 10 tapered slightly from the bow section to the stern section. Within the compass of the float there is a downwardly depressed recess 12 extending throughout substantially the width and length of the unit. Conveniently, the float can be fabricated of a plastic material, such as a molded plastic material,

preferably of the foamed plastic type, so as to afford considerable buoyancy when the float is in the water. This construction also affords a comfortable and firm supporting surface for the user, particularly in the area of the central depression 12, and is of sufficient rigidity to maintain the desired shape and to fend off minor flotsam without damage.

In this form of the device the generally streamlined float 6 is supplemented witha pair of substantially horizontal frame arms 13 and 14 which are substantially identical. The arms have transverse portions emerging from the float at transversely aligned lateral points somewhat ahead of the' geometrical center thereof, and then, in curvilinear fashion merge with longitudinal portions 18 and 19 extending rearwardly and downwardly, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, to end at points in the vicinity of the stern section 8. Conveniently, the frame arms 13 and 14 in this instance are unitary in nature and are fabricated of a single tubular member 16 configured to have a slightly dished but generally horizontal, sinuous central portion 17 embedded in the material of the float. The central portion 17 lies between and extends to the rear of the approximately aligned transverse portions of the arms 13 and 14 in order to afford adequate resistance to torque on the arms 13 and l4 and tending to twist them about the common transverse axis of the transverse portions. Preferably the longitudinal portions 18 and 19 of the arms 13 and 14 as they diverge downwardly and rearwardly from the float 6 are diminished in size and taper to the rear.

Arranged to span the space between each of the frame arms 13 and 14 and the hull of the float 6 is one of of a pair of vanes 20 and 21. These vanes are substantially identical, so the description of one applies equally to the other. Each vane is preferably a thin, sheet-like, flexible member of water impervious material that is anchored along its inboard longitudinal edge 22 to the hull of the float and is similarly anchored along its outboard longitudinal edge 23 to the adjacent one of the frame arms. Each vane in undistorted plan and before mounting is somewhat more trapezoidal than is the space between the hull and the adjacent arm. Thus, when the vane is mounted, its leading or forward edge 24 is disposed in a taut fashion between its supports and is located about at the center of the float in a fore and aft direction. At the same time, the rearward or trailing edge 25 of the vane when mounted is quite slack and spans the space between the hull and the adjacent frame member in a bellying or curvilinear fashion. The intermediate portions of the vane between the leading and trailing edges have intermediate amounts of slack, so that the vane is generally evenly configured from forward to rearward portions.

The proportions of the parts are such that a user, or sometimes more than one user, can readily stand, sit or lie on the float within the central depression 12, being somewhat protected from waves or chop in the water by the amount of freeboard provided. When a user is occupying the float in the water, the float is about half submerged and the frame arms 13 and 14 then are substantially entirely submerged and extend rearwardly and downwardly through the water in a dihedral fashion. This keeps the vanes 20 and 21 similarly submerged and disposed at a dihedral angle with regard to each other and with regard to the general, horizontal plane of the hull or float.

In operation, the user launches the float or water board in the customary fashion and then when aboard 13, for example, as the other frame arm 14, for example, is lifted. The frame motion induces a corresponding flexure of the two vanes 20 and 21 especially in their rearward portions. As the rocking transfers from side to side; that is, as the hull rocks from side to side, there results a motion like a sculling motion or an undulatory wave motion of .the vanes somewhat similar to that of the fins of a skate or stingray. Due to the users muscular weight-shifting activity, there is a forward component driving the water board ahead in the water.

In a modified version of the water board, as shown in FIGS. 4 to 8 inclusive, a somewhat larger construction is available. In this instance there is likewise provided a hull 26 generally comparable to the hull previously described and fabricated of similar material and having similar characteristics. In this instance there is embedded in the hull, preferably during manufacture, an interior, generally rectangular frame 27 serving not only as a reinforcement of the hull but likewise as a place of attachment for a pair of lateral frames 28 and I 29. These frames are substantially identical, so that the description of one applies also to the other. Each of the frames includes a forward arcuate cross member 31 and a rearward arcuate cross member 32. Each of these members has a slot 33 to receive a removable fastening 34 effective to secure the cross member in tight abutment with the wall 36 of an arcuate cut-out 37 in the float 26. The cross member can occupy and be held in any one of several adjusted positions transversely of the float. Conveniently, the securing device 34 is anchored within the adjacent portion of the frame 27. In this fashion, each of the cross members 31 and 32 can in effect be rotated about the center of curvature of the cross member, changing the relative position of the ends of the cross member with respect to the float.

Joining the ends of the forward and rearward cross members are pairs of bars 38 and 39 extending parallel to each other and longitudinally of the float and serving to support a plurality of vanes 41. Each of the vanes is preferably fabricated of a flexible, water impervious material and along its two longitudinal edges is provided with hems 42 and 43 of sufficient size readily to accommodate the bars 38 and 39. The originally trapezoidal shape of the vanes 41 is such that when the vane hems are assembled on the parallel rods 42 and 43 the leading edge 44 of each vane is quite taut and relatively straight and inflexible, whereas the trailing edge 46 thereof is quite slack and readily flexible, the intervening portions of the vane partaking of intermediate amounts of flexure. Although any number of vanes can be installed on either side of the float, a convenient number of vanes such as five or six is customarily employed.

In the operation of this structure, after the frames, including the cross members 31 and 32, have been set at the desired dihedral angles, the float is launched, as before, and the user occupies (or the users occupy) the central depression 47 therein. By rocking his body from side to side or shifting his weight in a comparable fashion in a transverse direction, a user alternately depresses and lifts the vanes on one side while lifting and depressing the vanes on the other side. All of the vanes on one side act substantially simultaneously to deflect in one direction, while all of the vanes on the other side act substantially simultaneously to deflect in the other direction. This transverse rocking motion of the float or hull, being translated into the flexing motion of the vanes, produces a forward component driving the float forwardly in the water.

We claim:

1. A water board comprising:

a. a float buoyant in water under the weight of a person and having an elongated contour in plan;

b. means on said float defining a central depression of a size to accommodate a person;

c. means defining substantially horizontal frames on each side of said float extending outboard of and substantially longitudinally of said float;

d. a plurality of flexible, sheet-like vanes;

e. means including said frames for supporting said vanes in positions extending longitudinally of said float; and

f. means for holding said vanes substantially stationary along both longitudinal edges thereof, each of said vanes when in engagement with said holding means being substantially taut along a leading transverse edge and being substantially slack along a trailing transverse edge.

2 A water board as in claim 1 including means for mounting at least one of said frames on said float in various positions.

3. A water board as in claim 2 in which said mounting means includes a reinforcement in said float.

4. A water board as in claim 1 in which said frames are mounted on said float in position to submerge said vanes.

5. A water board as in claim 4 in which said frames support said vanes with the outboard longitudinal edges of said vanes lower than the inboard longitudinal edges of said vanes;

6. A water board comprising:

a. a float buoyant in water under the weight of a person and having an elongated contour in plan;

b. means defining substantially horizontal frames on each side of said float extending outboard of and substantially longitudinally of said float;

c. a plurality of flexible sheet like vanes;

d. means including said frames for supporting said vanes in positions extending longitudinally of said float, at least one of said vanes including an edge hem and at least one of said frames having a rod disposed in said edge hem.

7. A water board comprising:

a. a float buoyant in water under the weight of a person and having an elongated contour in plan;

b. means defining substantially horizontal frames on each side of said float extending outboard of and substantially longitudinally of said float;

c. a plurality of flexible, sheet-like vanes having a pair of opposite, longitudinal sides;

d. means including said frames for supporting said vanes in positions extending longitudinally of said float by engagement with said opposite longitudinal sides, a plurality of said vanes being disposed in a longitudinal row on at least one side of said float.

8. A water board comprising: a. a float buoyant in water under the weight of a person and having an elongated contour in plan;

b. means defining a substantially horizontal frame on each side of said float extending outboard of and substantially longitudinally of said float; and,

. at least one flexible, sheet-like vane having a pair

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1222114 *Feb 16, 1916Apr 10, 1917Gordon Matzene RSurf diving and skimming device.
US1315267 *Jul 6, 1917Sep 9, 1919 Morkis columbus white
US3194206 *Dec 20, 1963Jul 13, 1965Robert B AndersonAquatic device
US3440994 *Nov 8, 1966Apr 29, 1969Mcgowan Thomas LSwimming appliance
US3453981 *Apr 24, 1967Jul 8, 1969Gause Joseph AWater-borne vessel comprising propulsion system incorporating flexible fin propulsion members
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4214547 *Jul 31, 1978Jul 29, 1980Hetland Philip RRider propelled boat
US4894034 *Oct 2, 1987Jan 16, 1990KranscoBodyboard with integrally-contoured hand-holds for enhancing control during riding
US5116269 *Feb 22, 1991May 26, 1992KranscoBodyboard with side grip contour
US5498184 *Mar 15, 1995Mar 12, 1996Saghri; AbdolhamidBody board having a hydrodynamic propulsion surface
US5738555 *Dec 2, 1996Apr 14, 1998Abdolhamid SaghriAttachment assembly for securing a hydrodynamic propulsion surface to a body board
US5810630 *Jun 24, 1997Sep 22, 1998Saghri; AbdolhamidAttachment assembly for securing a hydrodynamic propulsion surface to a body board
US6595813 *Mar 28, 2002Jul 22, 2003Gregory LekhtmanFeet-propelled water vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification441/65, 440/22
International ClassificationB63B35/73
Cooperative ClassificationB63B35/73
European ClassificationB63B35/73