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Publication numberUS3722136 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1973
Filing dateOct 27, 1971
Priority dateOct 27, 1971
Also published asCA970969A1, DE2252445A1
Publication numberUS 3722136 A, US 3722136A, US-A-3722136, US3722136 A, US3722136A
InventorsBerkin H, Thorn H
Original AssigneeIdeal Toy Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Housekeeping doll having reversible motor driving selectively movable arms
US 3722136 A
Abstract
A toy doll is provided which has a reversible electric motor therein operatively connected to a gear train for separately and independently oscillating the arms of the doll, with one of the arms being mounted for oscillation about a horizontal axis and the other arm being mounted for oscillation about a vertical axis. Separate oscillation of the arms is accomplished by means of unidirectional clutches which permit movement of only one of the arms in accordance with the direction of rotation of the motor. In addition, the same reversible motor is operably connected to the doll's head and a mounting structure for the doll's legs so as to oscillate the doll's head about a vertical axis while simultaneously oscillating the doll's torso about a fore-and-aft axis, to simulate human movement, irrespective of the direction of rotation of the motor.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite ates atent Thorn et al.

W m mm Em M T K We m MW mm N m mu L mam mov To G M m mum mw L m m [57] ABSTRACT A toy doll is provided which has a reversible electric [75] Inventors: Herbert Thorn, Flushing; Harvey Berkin, Merrick, both of N.Y. motor therein operatively connected to a gear train [73] Asslgnee: Ideal Toy Corpomhon Hollis for separately and independently oscillating the arms 22 i Oct 27 1971 of the doll, with one of the arms being mounted for oscillation about a horizontal axis and the other arm being mounted for oscillation about a vertical axis. Separate oscillation of the arms is accomplished by means of unidirectional clutches which permit movement of only one of the arms in accordance with the direction of rotation of the motor. In addition, the' 040 2 2 v 1 5 h.4 & MA /,2 Q "9 am In "3" "6m 3 9 mime 1 Mr In 1 m d S .l P .m..m A UIF 1]] l 21 0 2 555 [[l same reversible motor is operably connected to the dolls head and a mounting structure for the dolls legs [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS so as to oscillate the dolls head about a vertical axis while simultaneously oscillating the doll s torso about .u r em e h mt 01 m0 mm u hm e0 mm U0 mn Sb t ma .md Me m. mf .0 6 mW ea re m 3... 7 7% 4/ 26 WA A B 01 77 99 ll 36 78 79 03 08 33 Bear et al.

30 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEBHARZYISH SHEET 30F 4 AXIS OF Toeso Ear/a r/o/v PATENTEDHARZTIBTS 722,136

SHEET u 0F 4 FIG.

HOUSEKEEPING DOLL HAVING REVERSIBLE MOTOR DRIVING SELECTIVELY MOVABLE ARMS The present invention relates to doy dolls and in particular to motorized dolls which are assembled and driven to simulate human movements.

A number of mechanized dolls of the above type have been previously proposed in which both the torso and one or more limbs of the doll are moved to simulate human movements. However, in most of those dolls, both, arms of the doll are driven for simultaneous movement with the body or head and selective operation of only one of the arms with simultaneous movement of the head or torso is not possible. As a result,

the variety of movements possible with such dolls and I the number of simulated motions or activities performed by the doll is limited.

One such doll is described and claimed in copending U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 1 18,388 to Adolf E. Goldfarb (filed Feb. 24, 197 l which illustrates a mechanical doll in the shape of a human figure in which means is provided for selectively causing movement of the torso portion of the doll relative to the stationary lower body portion. Control means is provided within that doll so as to achieve an orbital movement of a hand or the hands of the doll in conjunction with a side-toside movement of the torso portion of the body. The movement of the dolls hands, as described in that patent application, is dependent upon the selected movement of the torso since thehands are not independently driven. By varying the position of the control mechanisms within the doll, the movement of the torso and thus the movement of the extremity of the dolls limbs can be varied in order to provide different types of motion; for example, fore-and-aft swinging of the arm, lateral movement of the arm, or component motion only as the child or user may determine in the course of play. Thus, if the doll were adjusted to provide an orbital movement of the hands in a horizontal plane, a broom or spatula could be placed in the dolls hand so that the orbital motion of the hand would give the appearance of the doll sweeping or stirring. Accordingly, the doll can be utilized by the child to simulate the performance of numerous types of house cleaning functions, which will be determined by the selected movement set on the control mechanism of the doll and theutensil or accessory selected for use with the doll in that motion.

The present invention is an improvement upon the doll disclosed in the above-mentioned Goldfarb patent application and provides separate control for the arms so that the child can conveniently select the specific type of movement which the doll can carryout. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the toy doll includes a torso having a head pivotally mounted thereon for oscillation about a substantially vertical axis and a leg connector frame pivotally mounted in the torso along a fore-and-aft axis. A pair of legs are operatively connected to the frame and provide a stable support for the doll in a standing position. One of the dolls arms is pivotally mounted to the torso for oscillation about a generally horizontal axis while the other arm is pivotally mounted for oscillation about a vertical axis. At the ends of the arms the doll s fingers are shaped in a predetermined fashion to grasp and hold various toy utensils, appliances or the like placed therein for movement with the arm to simulate the desired operation.

A reversible electric motor is mounted in the torso and a transmission system, having first and second gear trains, operatively connects the motor to the respective arms to oscillate the arms about their pivotal mountings. Each of the gear trains includes a unidirectional clutch and these clutches are oppositely operative so that their associated arms are selectively oscillated in accordance with the driving direction of the motor. The transmission system also includes drive means for oscillating the torso about its fore-and-aft pivotal mounting with the frame and for simultaneously oscillating the head about its vertical mounting axis,

both independently of the driving direction of the motor.

The electric motor is controlled by a hand-held remote control unit including a battery case and a reversing switch remote from the doll for controlling the direction of current supplied to the motor through a flexible connector cord. 7

As a result of this construction, the dolls arms may be independently operated to oscillate about their respective mounting axes. Simultaneously with the oscillation of the selected arm, the torso of the doll oscillates or tilts sideways about the fore-aft mounting axis while the dolls head oscillates about its mounting axis. In this manner, the doll performs three separate and distinct movements simulating actual human movements.

It is contemplated that the doll can be utilized as a housekeeping doll and be operated with a variety of toy utensils or appliances such as a vacuum cleaner or iron. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arm which oscillates about a horizontal axis is adapted to engage a toy vacuum cleanerand the oscillating motion of the arm will cause the vacuum cleaner to move back and forth, simulating the actual action of a human homemaker. The other arm of the doll, which oscillates on a vertical axis, will move its hand across the fore-aft axis of the doll in a substantially horizontal plane. This hand is constructed to engage or hold a toy iron and simulate the action of a housewife doing her ironing.

Thus, it is seen that independent and distinct motions of the doll are available and can be selected as desired bythe child. In addition, more than mere arm movement'is provided, since the torso and head of the doll move in synchronous motion, as described hereinafter, so as to simulate closely the actual movements of a human being.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to selectively simulate various human body movements with a toy doll.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a toy doll whose arms may be selectively actuated for oscillating movement along different paths, while simultaneously oscillating the head and torso of the doll with a single electric motor.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a toy doll having the capacity to simulate human body movements and including the capacity for selected arm movements, which doll-is relatively simple in construction and inexpensive to manufacture.

The above, and other objects, features and advantages of this invention, will be apparent in the following detailed description of an illustrative embodiment thereof which is to be read in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective sectional view of a mechanized doll constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view, partly in section, of the doll illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partial side sectional view taken on line 33 of FIG. 2; I

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 44 of FIG. 2, illustrating the motion of the arms and the operation of the device in one driving direction of the motor; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 4 illustrating the actuation of the arms in the other driving direction of the motor.

Referring to the drawings in detail, and initially to FIG. 1 thereof, it will be seen that a toy doll 10, embodying the present invention, as shown therein, has a torso 12, head 14 and arms 16 and 18. Torso 12 includes a drive system mounted therein for selectively moving the arms 16 and 18 independently of each other while head 14 and torso 12 are respectively rocked. about vertical and horizontal axes to simulate human movement.

Torso 12 is supported by a pair of legs 22, 24 which are pivotally secured to the torso by connecting mechanisms 26 and a'frame 28 mounted in the torso. Frame 28 includes a pair of generally U-shaped members 30, 32, with the legs 34 of member 32 having aligned circular apertures 36 therein for pivotally receiving stud' members 38 formed on the interior of torso 12. In this manner, the torso is pivotally mounted on the frame 28 for rocking movement about the foreand-aft axis defined by the stud members 38.

Connecting members 26, are formed in the manner fully' described in copending application Ser. No. 183,897, filed Sept. 27, 1972 and commonly assigned herewith. The connecting members (FIG. 2) each include a connecting stud 40 and an annular disc 42 positioned on the inside of a rim 44 which defines an aperture 46 at the upper end of its associated leg. Connecting studs 40 extend through discs 42, apertures 46 and apertures 48 in the legs 50 of frame member into the interior of the torso. Cap members 52 are positioned between rims 44 and legs 50 and the assembly is held together, as illustrated in FIG. 2, by a compression spring 54 having its opposed ends bearing respectively upon the inner surface'of leg '50 and the notch 56 formed at the free end of the connecting stud 40. In this manner, the legs are rigidly assembled to the torso while pivotal movement therebetween is permitted. Caps 52 and frame legs 50 have cooperating detents, as described in the last above-mentioned patent application, so as to define a plurality of stable positions to which the legs may be rotated. In particular, these detents cooperate to define a stable standing position and a sitting position for the legs with respect to the torso. In the standing position, legs 22 24 and frame member 28 provide a stable platform upon which torso 12 is adapted to rock as more fully described hereinafter.

A reversible electric motor 60 (FIGS. 1 and 2) is mounted in a frame 62 secured within torso 12 of the doll. The motor is driven by a current source comprising a plurality of batteries maintained in a remote control unit 64. This unit consists of a battery case which is 'adapted to hold two dry cell flashlight batteries 66, 68

and a reversing switch 70 by which the direction of current supplied to the motor 60 may be varied. This switching arrangement is of conventional construction and therefore is not illustrated or described in detail herein.

Control unit 64 is connected to the dolls body by an external connecting cord 72 running from the control unit and terminating in an electrical connector plug 74 (FIG. 3) which is adapted to mate witha receptacle 76 to complete the circuit and supply power to the motor. Plug 74 and receptacle76 are provided for the convenience of a child playing with the doll so that the control unit may be readily disconnected from the doll to allow the child to play with the doll without utilizing the control unit to provide the various motions of the doll.

Arm 16 is mounted to permit rocking movement and is driven through a drive train 80 (FIG. 2) from motor 60. The mounting of arm 16 is provided by a bearing member 82, formed of a relatively hard plastic and mounted on the upper end of the arm. The bearing defines an annular slot 84 that is r'otatably held in an aperture 86 formed in the torso and permits pivotal movement of arm 16 along a generally horizontal axis 88 so that the hand 90 at the end of the arm can be moved in a fore-and-aft direction with respect to torso l2. Bearing 82 also includes an extension 92 located interiorly of torso 12 and has an elongated slot 94 therein extending substantially transversely to the fore-and-aft direction of the doll. Extension 92 provides a lever which is rocked about horizontal axis 88 by'the drive train 80, as more fully described hereinafter. In addi tion, arm '16 is itself pivotable within bearing 82 so that its attitude with respectto torso 12 may be varied. The cylindrical portion 81 of ami'16- is frictionally engaged with the inner surface of the bearing to permit this adjustment while maintaining the selected attitude once the adjustment is made.

Left arm 18 is mounted on torso 12 for movement about a substantially vertical axis 96. The mounting arrangement for the arm includes a rigid frame 98 secured in the torso which frame has an elongated arm 100 extending from the torso through an aperture 102 in the upper end of the arm. The free end of extension 100 provides a pivot opening 104 therein for receipt of a pivot pin 106. Extension 100 is connected to arm 18 by means of an insert 108, also formed of relatively.

serted to pivotally interconnect the extension and the 7 arm. Insert 108 also includes an .extension 112 extending interiorly of torso l2, which extension acts as a lever cooperating with a crank in the drive train 80 for selectively oscillating arm 18 about axis 96.

Drive train 80 is activated from motor 60, as seen in 3, by a spur gear .114 mounted on the end of the take-off shaft 116 of the motor. Spur gear 114 drives a compound gear 118, of larger diameter, which gear is the first of a plurality of gears in a speed reduction gear train which reduces the speed of rotation of the motor as applied to the arms and the various other components of the doll in order to recreate and simulate life-like actions of a small child. If the speed reduction provided by the gear system were not provided, arms 16 and 18, and the other components of the doll which are moved, would move too rapidly in violent gyrations which would not be life-like nor consistent with those of a small child. Moreover, the gearing arrangement serves to increase the torque applied to the arms and the other moving portions of the doll.

The transmission system includes a main driven shaft 120 mounted for rotation in frame 62 on a substantially vertical axis adjacent motor 60. Gear 1 18 and a second compound gear 122 are rotatably mounted at the upper end of shaft 120 for independent rotation thereon and each is integrally formed with a second, smaller gear 124, 125 respectively, on their upper surfaces. A gear 126 is secured to the top of shaft 120 for rotation therewith and includes an extended portion 127 on its upper surface which has a crank pin 128 projecting therefrom. This pin is utilized to provide a driving force for oscillating head 14.

Gears 124 and 125 are respectively mated with compound gears 129 and, 1311. The latter' are rotatably mounted on a shaft 131 which is rotatably mounted in frame 62 for rotation independently of gears 129 and 130. Gears 129 and 130 include smaller diameter gear sections 132, 134, respectively engaged with gears 122 and 126. Gear 130 is also engaged with a spur gear 139 (FIGS. 2 and 3) rotatably mounted in frame 62, rearwardly of shaft 129, on a shaft 140 for independent rotation with respect thereto. Gear 139 includes an upstanding stud member 142 on its upper surface 144, as seen in FIG. 2, upon which one end 146 of a spring clutch member 148 is secured. A clutch drive or crank member 150 is rotatably mounted on shaft 140 above gear 139 and includes a lower cylindrical stem portion 152 received within the windings of spring 148. Crank member 150 includes a pin 154 on its upper surface 156, which pin is inserted within slot 94 of extension 92. Accordingly, upon actuation of motor 61 gear train 80 is activated to rotate gear 139 and crank 156 through the clutch 148. The latter is a conventional spring-type clutch which is wound so as to firmly engage stem 152 in one direction of rotation of the gear 130 and to slip upon stem 152 when gear 139 is rotated in the opposite direction and a resistive force is applied to the crank. For example, as illustrated in FIG. 4, when the motor 60 is operated to rotate gears 1 18, 122, in a generally counterclockwise direction, crank 150 and gear 139 also rotate in a counterclockwise direction, which direction corresponds to the direction of winding of spring 148, so that crank pin 154 moves in a circular path while remaining within slot 94, thereby to oscillate arm 16 about horizontal axis 88 and cause fore-and-aft movement of the hand 90. The resistance applied to crank 154 by the weight of arm 16 tends to resist movement of the crank, however, this resistance increases the engaging force of the spring windings about stem 152 thereby to insure a positive drive between gear 139 and crank member 1511. This fore-and-aft motion, in combination with the lateral oscillating motion of the torso 12 described hereinafter, effects a controlled and slightly circular movement of arm 16 so as to realistically simulate hand movements and in particular, the movement of the hand of a child or adult while performing a vacuum cleaning operation. Moreover, since arm 16 is adjustable within bearing 82, the attitude of the oscillating hand 96 may be varied during play. Thus, for example, with hand in a low position adjacent the dolls hip, the hand can be used to move a toy vacuumcleaner, while in a higher attitude, e.g., above the waist, the hand can be used to hold a toy dust brush or the like.

When the direction of drive of motor 60 is reversed, by switch '76, so that gears 118, 122 are driven in a generally clockwise direction, crank member and gear 139 also are driven in a clockwise direction, as seen in FIG. 5, while the weight of arm 16 again provides resistance to movement of the crank 154 in its circular path and causes clutch 148 to slip. This occurs because the new direction of movement is counter to the direction of winding of the spring 148 and as a result, the spring relaxes its gripping engagement with the stern 152 and slips about the stem so that crank 15.0 is not driven and arm 16 remains stationary. Accordingly, arm 16 is selectively actuated by the motor 60, depending upon the direction of current flow from source 64 as determined by the operation of switch 70.

Transmission system 80 also includes a gear train by which the arm 18 is selectively oscillated about its pivot pin 1116. Referring again to FIGS. 1 and 2, it is seen that gear 122 on shaft also drives a clutch gear 160 rotatably mounted on a shaft 162 for movement independent thereof. Gear 160 includes a pin 164 on its upper surface 166, on which the end 168 of a second spring clutch 170 is secured. A clutch member or crank 172 is rotatably mounted at the upper end of shaft 162 and includes a crank pin 174 and a stem 176 received within the windings of spring clutch 170. The latter is wound in the same direction as spring clutch 148, so that it tightly grips stem 176 when gear 160 is driven in a counterclockwise direction and slips on stem 176 when that gear is driven in a clockwise direction.

Because the drive train for arm 16 has an additional gear, i.e., gear 130, between compound gear 122 and spur gear 139, than does the drive train for arm 18, gears 139 and 160 are always driven in opposite directions whenever motor 611 is operated. Thus, when gear 139 is driven in a counterclockwise direction, its spring clutch 148 engages stern 156 to drive arm 16 and gear 166 is simultaneously driven in a clockwise direction so that its spring clutch 170 slips on stem 176 and whereby arm 18 is idle. On the other hand, when the drive direction of motor 611 is reversed, so that gear 139 is driven clockwise and gear 166 is driven counterclockwise (FIG. 5), spring clutch 148 slips on stem 156 so am 16 is idle while spring clutch 170 grips stem 176 to drive arm 18. In this manner, selective actuation of the arms is provided depending upon the direction of current flow to the motor 60.

As an alternative embodiment, it is contemplated that the respective gear trains for arms 16 and 18 may have the same number of gears so that clutch gears 139 and 166 will both be driven either clockwise or counterclockwise depending on the driving direction of motor 60. lln that case, the spring clutches associated with gears 139 and 160 would be oppositely wound. As a result, when the gears 139, 16% are driven in a clockwise direction, the clutch associated with one of the arms would slip on its crank stem while the clutch associated with the other of the arms would tightly engage its associated crank stem to drive that arm. On the other hand, when the gears 139, 160 are driven in a counterclockwise direction, the operation of their associated clutches would be reversed.

Referring again to the illustrative embodiment of the present invention, as shown in FIGS. 1, 4 and 5, extension 112 on insert 102 includes a pair of spaced legs 178, 180, defining a'slot 182 therebetween. Leg 180 is substantially longer than leg 178 and thus an opening 184 is provided through which crank 174 may enter slot 182. When motor 60 is driven to drive gears 118 122, in a clockwise direction, as seen in FIG. 5, (i.e., in the direction in which spring clutch 148 slips and does not effect oscillation of arm 16) gear 122 effects rotation of gear 160 in a counterclockwise direction. As a result, pin 174 is moved against the end. 186 of arm 180, as the pin moves towards the 6 oclock position in FIG. and is guided thereby into slot 182. Continued counterclockwise movement of gear 160, and thus crank 172 causes crank pin 1'74 to move into slot 182 and its eccentric portion 202 applies a biasing force to frame 28 thereby causing torso 12 to tilt about'the foreand-aft pivot axis defined by stud members 38. This oscillating movement is effected irrespective of the direction of drive of motor 60, since shaft 120 is driven no matter which direction motor 60 is operating in. Moreover, since shaft 120 is driven through gear 126, the speed of rotation of the shaft has been substantially reduced through the reduction gears and thus the torso oscillates at a realistic simulated rate compatible to the oscillating movement of the arms 16 and 18.

As mentioned, head 14 is rotatably mounted upon a vertical axis and includes a plug or insert 208 snapfit in an aperture 210 formed in the neck portion of the head. Insert 208 has a generally rectangular collar 212, formed with a rectangular slot 214 therein, which receives the rectangular extension portion 216 of a pivot shaft 218. The latter is pivotally mounted in a bearing 220 mounted in torso 12 above motor 60. Ex-

' tension 216 is formed by three resilient arrow-headed extensions 222 which are inserted through slot 214 and with their heads 224 snapping on the exterior thereof to and causes extension 112 to move therewith, into the dotted line position shown in FIG. 5 to effect oscillation of arm 18. Further movement causes the pin 174 to escape from slot 182, past end 188 of arm 178, so that arm 18 is no longer driven. As pin 174 returns towards the 6 oclock position it again engages end 186 of arm 180 and returns arm 18 to the solid line position in FIG. 5, thereby causing oscillation of arm 18 about axis 96. It is thus seen that by this oscillation the hand 190 at the end of arm 18 is caused to oscillate along a path substantially transverse to the fore-and-aft axis of the doll. Accordingly, the hand is moved in a'rnanner simulatin g the action of a child at play ironing or performing a similar task requiring a similar lateral movement.

It is noted that both hands 90 and 198 are molded in a configuration by which the hand-is adapted to firmly grasp and frictionally engage a toy utensil or appliance such as a vacuum cleaner in the hand 90 or an iron in the hand 190 so as to permit the doll to carry out the simulated actions.

When motor 60 is operated in the reverse direction, as illustrated in FIG. 4, to oscillate arm 16 in the manner described above, gear 122 drives gear 160 and thus crank 172 in a generally clockwise direction and engages the surface 192 of leg 178 and is stopped by this surface from further movement. The resistance to movement provided by arm 16 in this position causes spring clutch 170 to slip on stem 176 so that power is not applied to .the clutch and the full power of the motor is utilized to oscillate arm 16 and carry out the remaining functions of the doll.

Transmission system 80 is also adapted to provide simultaneous movement of head 14 and torso 12 with oscillation of either of the arms 16 or 18. In this regard, the lower end 194 of shaft 120 is provided with a cylindrical cam member 196 eccentrically mounted for rotation with the shaft. Cam 196 is received in a generally rectangular slot 198 formed in a horizontal projecting portion 200 of forward frame leg 34. As shaft 120 is rotated, the cam member moves in the slot rigidly interconnect the head to the shaft. Shaft 218 also includes a lever arm 226 at its lower end, which lever has a slot 228 formed therein extending generally along the fore-and-aft axis of the doll. Crank 128 of gear 126 is received in slot 228 and, as seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, as the crank is rotated with gear 126, lever 226 is oscillated about the vertical axis 218 defined by pivot shaft218. It is thus seen that as either one of the arms 16 or 18 is oscillated, torso 12 oscillates about the foreand-aft axis upon which it is mounted while head 14 simultaneously rotates about axis 218'. Since the head is also driven through gear 126, it moves at a reduced speed corresponding substantially to the speed of oscillation of the torso so as to provide a more realistic simulated movement to the doll.

The movement of torso l2 and head 14 can be synchronized by fabricating drive train 80 such that crank pin 128 is in substantially vertical alignment with eccentric portion 202 of the cam 198. By arranging the components in this manner, the torso will be tilted by cam 196 in one direction while the head 14 will be simultaneously pivoted to face in an opposite direction. Thus, for example, as seen in FIG. 2, if the eccentric portion of the cam 196 is to the right of the drawing,

single motor is adapted to selectively drive arms 16 and 18 while it simultaneously oscillates the torso and head of the doll so that a plurality of combinations of movement of the doll are effected. Moreover, the provision of the pivotal mounting of legs 22, 24, about the torso permits the doll-to be seated, without effecting the oscillating movement of the torso or head or the arms so that other types of playing motions can be effected by the child if desired.

Although an illustrative embodiment of the present invention has been described herein with reference to the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to that precise embodiment and that various changes and modifications may be effected therein by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A toy doll comprising, a torso, a head, and a pair of arms pivotally mounted on said torso, a selectively operative reversible electric motor mounted in said torso, means for selectively varying the operative driving direction of 1 said motor, and transmission means mounted in said torso and operatively connecting said motor to said arms for selectively oscillating one or the other of said arms about its pivotal mounting, in accordance with the selected driving direction of the motor.

2. The toy doll as defined in claim 1 wherein one of said arms is pivotally mounted on a substantially vertical axis and the other of said arms is pivotally mounted on a substantially horizontal axis.

3. The toy doll as defined in claim 1 wherein said transmission means includes first and second unidirectional clutches respectively associated with said arms whereby when said motor is operating in one direction said first clutch is operative to oscillate its associated arm and said second clutch is inoperative so that its associated arm is idle, and when said motor is operating in its other direction said second clutch is operative to oscillate its associated arm and said first clutch is inoperative so that its associated arm is idle.

4. The toy doll as defined in claim 1 including a leg connector frame pivotally mounted in said torso along a fore-and-aft axis with respect to the torso, a pair of legs, operatively connected to said frame, providing a stable support for the doll in a standing position and drive means operatively connected between said motor and said frame for oscillating said torso about said foreand-aft axis during actuation of said motor.

5. The toy doll as defined in claim 4 wherein said frame has an elongated fore-and-aft slot therein and said drive means includes a driven shaft rotated by said motor and an eccentric cam mounted on said shaft and received in said slot.

6. The toy doll as defined in claim 1 including means pivotally mounting said head on said torso about a substantially vertical axis and drive means operatively connected between said motor and said head for oscillating the head about said vertical axis during actuation of said motor.

7. A toy doll comprising, a torso, a head, and a pair of arms pivotally mounted on said torso, a reversible electric motor mounted in said torso and transmission means operatively connecting said motor to said arms to oscillate the arms about their respective pivotal mountings, said transmission means including first and second unidirectional clutches respectively associated with said arms, and a reversing switch electrically connected to said motor for selectively varying the operative driving direction thereof, said first clutch being operative to oscillate its associated arm when said motor is operating in one direction and being inoperative when said motor is operating in its other direction so that its arm is idle and said second clutch being operative to oscillate its associated arm when said motor is operating in said other direction and being inoperative when said motor is operating in said one direction so that its associated arm is idle.

8. The toy doll as defined in claim 7 wherein said transmission means comprises first and second gear trains respectively operatively associated with said arms, said first and second clutches being respectively located in said first and second gear trains and comprising'driven spring clutches.

9. The toy doll as defined in claim 8 wherein said first and second gear trains each include a clutch gear drivingly engaged with the spring clutch in its gear train.

10. The toy doll as defined in claim 9 wherein said transmission means includes a plurality of operably engaged gears for driving said clutch gears in opposite directions during operation of said motor and said spring clutches are wound in the same direction.

11. The toy doll as defined in claim 9 wherein said transmission means includes a plurality of operably engaged gears for driving said clutch gears in the same direction during operation of said motor and said spring clutches are oppositely wound.

12. The toy doll as defined in claim 7 wherein one of said arms is pivotally mounted on a substantially vertical axis and the other of said arms is pivotally mounted on a substantially horizontal axis.

13. The toy doll as defined in claim 7 including a leg connector frame pivotally mounted in said torso along a fore-and-aft axis with respect to the torso and a pair of legs operatively connected to said frame, providing a stable support for the doll in a standing position, said transmission means including means for oscillating said torso about said fore-and-aft axis during actuation of the motor and independent of the driving direction thereof.

14. The toy doll as defined in claim 13 wherein said frame has an elongated fore-and-aft slot therein substantially in vertical alignment with said fore-and-aft pivot axis, and said oscillating means comprises a driven shaft and a cylindrical cam eccentrically mounted on the shaft, said cam having a diameter substantially equal to the width of said slot and received therein whereby engagement of said cam in said shaft causes said torso alternately to tilt to opposite sides of said axis.

15. The toy doll as defined in claim 7 including means pivotally mounting said head on said torso about a substantially vertical axis and wherein said transmission means includes means for oscillating said head about said vertical axis during actuation of said motor and independently of the driving direction thereof.

16. Amy doll comprising, a torso, a head pivotally mounted on said torso for oscillation about a substantially vertical axis, a leg connector frame pivotally mounted in said torso along a fore-and-aft axis with respect thereto, a pair of legs operatively connected to said frame, providing a stable support for the doll in a standing position, a first arm pivotally mounted on the torso for oscillation about a generallyhorizontal axis and a second arm pivotally mounted on the torso for oscillation about a substantially vertical axis, a reversible electric motor mounted in said torso, and a transmission system, including first and second gear trains operatively connecting said motor to said first and second arms respectively, to oscillate the arms about their respective pivotal mountings, 1 said gear trains respectively including first and second oppositely operative'unidirectional clutches for selective oscillation of their associated arm in accordance with the selected driving direction of said motor, said transmission system further including drive means for oscillating said torso about said fore-and-aft axis and for oscillating said head about said vertical axis during actuation of said motor and independently of the driving direction thereof, and a reversing switch remote from said doll and electrically connected to said motor for selectively varying the operative driving direction thereof, whereby said arms are selectiveiy oscillated while said torso and head are simultaneously oscillated about their respective pivotal-mountings for simulated human movement.

17. The toy doll as defined in claim 16 wherein said gear trains each include a plurality of rotatably mounted gears operatively connected between said motor and their associated arm and are adapted to reduce the speed of rotation of said motor to provide a more life-like motion to said arms and to increase the torque of the motor.

18. The toy doll as defined in claim 16 wherein said clutches comprise spring clutches.

19. The toy doll as defined in .claim 18 wherein said first and second gear trains each include a clutch gear drivingly engaged with the spring clutch in its gear train.

20. The toy doll as defined in claim 19 wherein said transmission system includes a plurality of operably engaged gears for driving said clutch gears in opposite directions during operation of said motor and said spring clutches are wound in the same direction.

21. The toy doll as defined in claim, 19 wherein said transmission system includes a plurality of operably en'- gaged gears for driving said clutch gears in the same direction during operation of said motor and said spring clutches are oppositely wound.

22. The toy doll as defined in claim 18 wherein said first arm includes an elongated actuator extending within said torso and having a generally rectangular slot therein extending substantially transversely of said fore-and-aft axis, and said first gear train includes a rotatably mounted crank engaged in said slot and driven through said first spring clutch and said first gear train to oscillate said first arm about said horizontal axis upon rotation thereof, said crank having a stem portion received within the windings of said spring clutch, said spring clutch being connected to and driven by its associated gear train to tightly engage said stem as said gear train is driven in a first direction to drive said crank and oscillate said first arm,- and to slip on said stem, against the weight of said first arm as said gear train is driven in a second direction upon reversal of said motor.

23. The toy doll as defined in claim 22 wherein said second arm includes an elongated actuator extending within said torso and having a pair of spaced leg members, said leg members being of different length and defining a slot therebetween opening towards the interior of said torso and said second gear train including a rotatably mounted crank driven through said second gear train and said second clutch, said crank'having a stem portion received within the windings of said second spring clutch with the latter being connected to and driven b its associated ear train to ti htl en a e said stem only in the second drive d1rectio% oi the m% tor, said leg members being arranged with respect to each other and said crank so that in said second drive direction of the motor the crank engages the longer of the two leg members and is guided thereby into said slot to oscillate the second arm about said vertical axis and in the first drive direction of the motor the crank engages the shorter of said leg members, whereby said crank is prevented from entering the slot and its stem slips in said spring clutch to eliminate application of a driving force to the second arm.

24. The toy doll as defined in claim 23, wherein said legs are pivotally mounted on said frame and cooperating means are provided on the frame and legs for defining. a standing and seated position of the legs with respect to the torso.

25. The toy doll as defined in claim 16 wherein said first and second arms have fingers at the ends thereof fixed in a predetermined configuration for grasping and holding a selected toy appliance therein.

26. The toy doll as defined in claim 16 wherein said frame has an elongated fore-and-aft slot therein located substantially in vertical alignment with said fore-andaft axis, said head includes a slotted lever secured thereto inside said torso, and said drive means for oscillating said torso and head comprises a generally vertically extending shaft mounted in said torso and driven by said motor, a generally cylindrical vcam 'eccentrically mounted on said shaft, said cam having a diameter substantially equal to the slot in said frame and being received therein to effect tilting of said torso to opposite sides of said fore-and-aft axis upon actuation of said motor, and a crank secured to the upper end of said shaft and received in the slot in said lever for oscillating said head aboutits pivot axis.

27. The toy doll as defined in claim 26 wherein said crank and the major portion of said cam are located substantially in vertical alignment and are driven at the same speed whereby the motion of said head and torso are synchronized and a more life-like motion of the doll is effected.

28. The toy doll as defined in claim 16 wherein said second arm is also mounted for oscillating movement about a substantially horizontal axis.

29. The toy doll as defined in claim 16 including a remote source of current to activate said motor, said reversing switch controlling the direction of current to said motor. I

30. The toy doll as defined in claim 29 including a hand held remote control unit having a battery case and containing said source of current and 'said reversing switch, and a flexible connector cord connecting said control unit to the motor in the doll.

Patent Citations
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US3583098 *Jun 2, 1969Jun 8, 1971Mattel IncDancing walking doll
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4124952 *Feb 14, 1977Nov 14, 1978Marvin Glass & AssociatesArticulated doll
US4795395 *Feb 6, 1987Jan 3, 1989Iwaya CorporationAnimal motion toy having an automatic action switching drive mechanism
US4799915 *Dec 4, 1987Jan 24, 1989Lehmann Roger WRadio-controlled robot operator for battery-powered toys
US4828530 *Sep 30, 1987May 9, 1989Lee Yeong RApparatus for activating doll's limbs
US4900289 *Jan 29, 1988Feb 13, 1990Cal R&D, Inc.Mechanism for animating a doll's facial features
US4968280 *Sep 29, 1989Nov 6, 1990Mattel, Inc.Animated figure with interactive head and torso
US5201683 *Aug 7, 1991Apr 13, 1993Fabricas Agrupadas De Munecas De Onil S.A.Internal structure for a crawling and talking doll
US5784815 *Oct 4, 1996Jul 28, 1998Mr. Christmas IncorporatedLighted sculpture with plural synchronized motions
US5823845 *Mar 12, 1996Oct 20, 1998Kieran Bergin, Inc.Mobile, gyroscopically stabilized toy with controlled multi-action movements
US6273782 *Feb 4, 2000Aug 14, 2001Mattel, Inc.Walking animal toy with controlling tether
US6773326 *May 7, 2002Aug 10, 2004Hasbro, Inc.Toy razor having simulated sound-producing capability
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/354
International ClassificationA63H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/00
European ClassificationA63H13/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 21, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC., 200 FIFTH AVENUE, N
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. AS OF JANUARY 21, 1986.;ASSIGNOR:CBS INC., A CORP OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004648/0575
Effective date: 19861107
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CBS INC., A CORP OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004648/0575
Owner name: VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC., A CORP OF DE,NEW YO
Nov 16, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: CBS INC., 51 WEST 52ND STREET, NEW YORK, NY 1001
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:IDEAL TOY CORPORATION, A CORP OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004210/0055
Effective date: 19831108
Owner name: IDEAL TOY CORPORATION 184-10 JAMAICA AVENUE HOLLIS
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:IDEAL TOY CORPORATION, A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004210/0050
Effective date: 19720410