Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3722306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1973
Filing dateNov 1, 1971
Priority dateNov 1, 1971
Publication numberUS 3722306 A, US 3722306A, US-A-3722306, US3722306 A, US3722306A
InventorsW Campbell, W Brackbill
Original AssigneeSperry Rand Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apron drive for a manure spreader
US 3722306 A
Abstract
A main drive for a manure spreader including a pair of sheaves adapted to be conveniently interchanged between an input shaft and a propeller or output shaft for maintaining a relatively constant output speed for two different input speeds from a tractor's PTO.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Campbell et al. 1451 Mar. 27, 1973 [54] APRON DRIVE FOR A MANURE [56] I References Cited SPREADER UNITED STATES PATENTS [75] Inventors: Willis R. Campbell Leola Warren 2,804,308 8/1957 Neighbour et al ..74/1 1 X Brackblu, 3,059,505 10/1962 Reicks ..74/11 x [73] Assignee: Sperry Rand Corporation, New Holland, p 1 Primary Examiner-Leonard H. Gerin Attorney-John C. Thompson, Joseph A. Brown and 22 Filed: I Nov. 1, 1971 James J. Kennedy [2]] Appl. No.: 194,234

[ M81 RACT s2 U.S. c1 ..74/219, 74/1 1 A main drive for a manure spreader including a Pair 0f 51 1111. c1. ..F16h 7/02, Fl6h 37/00 Sheaves adapted to be nvenienfly interchanged 58 Field of Search ..74/11, 219, 217 R between an input Shaft and a pmpellef outPut Shaft for maintaining a relatively constant output speed for two difierent input speeds from a tractors PTO.

14 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures PATUJHTRHmz 7 m3 SHEET 10F 3 INVENTOR. I W/LL/S R OQMPBELL WQFEEN BRQCKB/LL BY ATTORNEY BRIEF DESCRIPTIOn OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic foreshortened side elevational view of a manure spreader wagon body illustrating drive mechanism constructed in accordance with the invention applied thereto;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary end view, on a somewhat enlarged scale, as viewed from the left in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross section taken approximately on the irregular line 3--3 of FIG. 2 with the belt tightener pulley of FIG. 2 omitted and with the wagon body shown in elevation; 7

FIG. 4 is a face view of the propeller shaft sheave as viewed from the left in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a face view of the pto shaft sheave as viewed from the left in FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is an exploded view of the sheave and associated parts of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is an exploded view of the sheave and associated parts of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a detail view of the hub member of the sheave of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a detail view of the hub portion of the sheave of FIG. 4;

FIG. 10 is a detail view of the hub member of the sheave of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 11 is adetail view of the hub portion of the sheave of FIG. 5;

FIG. 12 is a diagrammatic view illustrating an interchange of the sheaves of FIG. 2.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings the load carrying wagon body of the manure spreader illustrated is of well known form and comprises in general side walls 15, a front wall 16, a'floor 17 and an open rear at which a beater unit 18 is located. Extending along the floor from front to rear is an apron conveyor 19 having slats 20 for advancing manure from the front of the wagon to the rear thereof for scattering by the scattering blades 21 of the beater unit 18.

Suitable drive mechanism is provided for the beater unit 18 which in this instance includes a right angle gear unit 22, an output or propeller shaft 23 connected to the input shaft 24 of the gear unit 22, and a clutch 25 controlling the input shaft 24. Suitable drive mechanism is also provided for the apron conveyor 19 which in this instance includes a lay shaft 26, constituting the input shaft of a worm gear unit 27, drivingly connected to the propeller shaft 23 by sprocket and chain drives 28 and 29 adapted to be selectively connected to the input shaft 26 by the clutch 25. The output shaft 30 of the worm gear unit 27 is drivingly connected to the drive shaft 31 of the apron conveyor 19 by means of sprockets 32 and 33 and drive chain 34. The clutch 25 is adapted to be controlled by a clutch actuator 35 and yoke 36 which is actuated by means of a quadrant control lever 37 having a pawl 38 (FIGS. 1 and 2) operating in notches 39 of a quadrant 40.

The quadrant control lever 37 and the manner in which it controls the beater unit 18 and apron conveyor 19 form no part of the present invention, per se, and therefore detailed description thereof is not necessary. It is also pointed out that other known forms of beater and apron conveyor drives may be employed without departing from the scope of the present invention.

The present invention is primarily concerned with the main drive mechanism 45 from the pto shaft of an associated tractor to the aforesaid propeller shaft 23 and to the adaptability of this drive mechanism for use with tractors, having for example rpms of say either 540 and 1000 rpm. The invention contemplates, by simple and efiective means, the driving of the apron conveyor and beater unit at the same pre-determined speeds whether a tractor having a standard 540 rpm input or a tractor having a standard 1000 rpm input is employed to operate the manure spreader.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3 it will be seen that a large diameter sheave 46 is secured on the propeller shaft 23 and that a smaller diameter sheave 47 is secured on the lower shaft 48. The lower shaft 48 is connected to the pto shaft of the tractor (not shown) in known manner. A drive belt 49 connects the sheaves 46 and 47.

The sheave 46 is mounted on the propeller shaft 23 by means of a hub member 50. The hub member 50 is keyed to the propeller shaft 23 by a key 51 and firmly secured in place by a set screw 52. The hub member has a flange 53 to which the sheave is secured by means of a shear bolt 54. A snap ring 55 laterally positions the sheave on the hub member. In the event that any jam conditions occur in the beater or apron conveyor drive areas the shear bolt will shear to prevent damage to the mechanism. As seen in FIG. 3 the bore of the sheave is provided with a bearing sleeve 56 for free rotation of the sheave when shear occurs.

Similarly the smaller sheave 47 is mounted on the lower shaft 48 by means of a hub member 60 which is keyed to the shaft 48 by a key 61 and firmly secured in place by a set screw 62. The hub member 60 has a flange 63 having three equally radially spaced holes 64 registering with three similar holes 65 in the sheave 47 for the reception of securing bolts 66.

An important feature of the present invention resides in the simple manner in which the sheaves 46 and 47 can be interchanged to suit the two driver speeds of 540 and 1000 rpm mentioned above. The sheaves 46 and 47 arranged as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 are for 1000 rpm, i.e., the smaller sheave 47 is the driver rotating at 1000 rpm.

When the lower shaft 48 is being rotated at 540 rpm the larger sheave 46 is secured on the shaft 48 andthe smaller sheave 47 is secured on eht shaft 48 and the smaller sheave 47 is secured on the propeller shaft 23 (FIG. 12). As shown in the exploded view of FIG. 6 in order to remove the large sheave 46 from the propeller shaft the snap ring 55 is removed from the hub member 50, the shear bolt 54 is removed, the set screw 52 is loosened and the hub member is removed from the sheave.

As shown in the exploded view of FIG. 7, in order to remove the small shave 47 from the shaft 48 the three bolts 66 are removed and shaft 48 and its hub member 60 are withdrawn from the sheave 47. Then the sheave 47 is slipped onto the hub member 50, the snap ring 55 is inserted, the shear bolt 54 is secured in place, and finally this assembly is slipped onto the propeller shaft 23 and the set screw 52 is tightened, then the large sleeve 46 is aligned onto the hub member 60 and the three securing bolts 66 tightened to secure the sheave in place. This interchange of pulleys is diagrammatically shown in FIG. 12.

1 APRON DRIVE FOR A MANURE SPREADER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to manure Spreaders and the like, and more particularly to a drive system therefore.

In the past, most tractors, particularly the type adapted to be used in conjunction with agricultural implements, have been provided with a 540 rpm pto drive. But in the last years, tractor manufacturers have been increasing both the size and the horsepower of the tractors being produced. With this growth in size of tractors has come a new pto system, namely a system with a 1000 rpm output rating. The situation of having tractors with rated outputs of both 540 rpm and 1000 rpm has created a delimina for the agriculture engineer, because he is not aware of what particular type of tractor the farmer who purchases the implement he is designing will employ. Consequently, the engineer does not know what type of drive to design for a particular implement. In the manure spreader for example, the engineer must design the drive such that the spreading mechanismand apron drive function in-an efficient manner. The same principle is equally applicable to other tractor drawn implements as well, since the drive therefore normally dictates the relative speeds of the implements working elements.

In light of the foregoing remarks it is apparent that some type of device is needed to adapt a particular implement to a tractor having either 1000 or 540 rpm pto systems. One form of solution that has been given some attention concerns the use of a gearbox to step-up or step-down an input speed. For example, one is directed to US. Pat. No. 3,059,505 to L. J. Reicks which discloses a portable speed adapter for the power takeoff of a tractor. In this particular disclosure, Reicks, like others, has suggested the use of a gearbox to reduce or step-up the input from the tractor as may be desired by the farmer relative to an agricultural implement that is to be employed in conjunction with the tractor. But it is clear that the addition of a gearbox to reduce and stepup the input speed in a very costly addition, besides sometimes being quite awkward to adapt between the tractor and the particular agricultural implement being drawn thereby.

7 SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In view of the foregoing remarks, applicants have designed a drive system for a manure spreader that includes a pair of interchangeable sheaves that may be a relatively constant output seed to the various power consuming mechanisms of the particular agricultural implement. I

Another object of the present invention resides in the provision of interchangeable drive elements within the main drive of an agricultural implement, the drive elements being adapted to be selectively interchanged in response to a change between two input speeds to maintain a relative constant output speed for either of the two input speeds.

More particularly, it is the object of the present invention to provide the main drive of an agricultural implement with drive elements in the form of a pair of drivingly interconnected sheaves, wherein the radius of one sheave is less than the radius of the other sheave such that the sheaves may be selectively interchanged as two different input speeds are interchanged to maintain a relatively constant output speed.

A further object of the present invention resides in the provision of a main drive for an agricultural implement including a pair of different sized interchangeable sheaves, the ratio of the radii of the two sheaves being selectively interchanged relative to the particular tractor pto speed to yield a generally constant output speed, thereby providing a relatively constant input speeds to the working components of the manure spreader, namely the spreading mechanism andv the apron drive. More particularly, the present pair of interchangeable sheaves includes a smaller sheave and a larger sheave with the radii of each yielding a particular ratio relative to two input speeds, a low and high input speed, such that the resultant output speed remains nearly constant irrespective of the particular input speed applied.

It is therefore the principle object of the present invention to provide an agricultural implement having a main drive that is adaptable to receive two substantially different input speeds and yet, in either case, maintain preselected such that by interchanging the two sheaves relative to either of two input speeds an output speed that falls within a range of values generally midway between the values of the two input speeds is maintained.

, More particularly, it is the object of the present invention to provide a pair of interchangeable sheaves, one sheave being smaller than the other, with the ratio of the smaller sheaves radius to the larger sheaves radius being approximately equal to the square root of the value of a high input speed divided by a low input speed. I

Another object of the present invention resides in the provision of detachable securing means associated with each said sheaves, whereby they maybe quickly and easily attached and detached from the main drive.

Another particular object of the present invention resides in the provision of a main drive for a manure spreader that is adapted to be pulled behind and powered by a tractor having a PTO speed of either 540 rpm or 1000 rpm, the main drive of the present manure spreader including a pair of interchangeable sheaves each adapted to be selectively mounted on one of a pair of drive shafts, the drive shafts being termed an input drive shaft and a propeller or output drive shaft, the pair of sheaves having radii particularly selected relative to each other to yield a ratio that enable the main drive to yield a relatively constant output speed for either input speeds of 540 or 1000 rpm, the relatively constant output speed being achieved by selectively interchanging the pair of sheaves in response to a change in the input rpm speed such. that the smaller sheave is fixed on the input shaft when the smaller rpm input of 540 rpm is being used, and wherein the larger sheave is placed on the input shaft when the larger input rpm speed 1000 rpm is employed.

In regard to the aboveobject, it is a particular object of the present invention to provide the above pair of sheaves with a particular radii, the particular radii being such that the ratio of the smaller radii to the larger radii equals approximately the square root of 1000 rpm divided by 540 rpm or approximately 1.36, thereby yielding a relatively constant output speed of approximately 735 rpm.

In connection with this interchange of sheaves it will be observed that the large sheave 46 has three bolt holes 70 and a shear bolt hole 71 (FIG. 9) and similarly the small sheave 47 has three bolt holes 65 and a shear bolt hole 72 (FIG. 11). The hub member 50 only has a shear bolt hole 73 (FIG. 8) and the hub member 60 only has three bolt holes 64 (FIG. It is noted that the three holes in the sheaves are located on a radius R which is larger than the radius R on which the shear bolt hole is located. This arrangement avoids putting a shear bolt in any of the three securing bolt holes.

Referring to FIG. 2 it is pointed out that the drive system is protected against overload by a spring loaded idler pulley 75 which allows for-controlled slip during initial start up and acts as a cushion for peak torques.

The real essence of the present invention lies in the provision of a manure spreader drive system that yields a constant output speed for two different input speeds. This is accomplished by providing a pair of sheaves 46,47 with radii of a preselected ratio relative to the two input speeds to be'employed by the spreader drive system. Once the operator changes from one input speed to another, the same output speed or nearly the same may be maintained by simply interchanging the two sheaves 46,47.

For purposes of explanation let, us refer to the radii of the small sheave 46 as R the radii of the larger sheave 47 as R the two input speeds as low input speed 5,, and high input speed S and since a constant output speed is always desired this will be referred to by the letter K. It is well known that in the case of two successively driven sheaves or pulleys the radius of one is inversely proportional to the speed of the other. Moreover, to obtain a constant output speed, which must be between 8,, andS the larger sheave 46 will be used as the input sheave when the low input speed 5,, is employed and the smaller sheave 47 will be used as the input sheave when the high input speed is employed. Therefore for the two different situations we can write the following two equations:

RS/RL K/SL L/ s u Solving each equation for K yields the following:

K 1. SH/RS Since the output speed K is constant for either input speed S or S one can set the right sides of the above equations equal to each other and solve for the ratio R /R as follows:

s 81., 1. RL SH/RS sheaves 46,47 when the input speed is changed such that when 540 rpm is used as an input, the larger sheave 46 turns with the input shaft and the smaller sheave 47 is fixed to the output or propeller shaft 23, and visa versa when the high input speed of i000 rpm is used.

It follows that for any two given input speeds S S a constant output speed can be maintained for either input speed by substituting the values of S and S in equation 7 above and solving for the ratio R /R which, as previously pointed out, is the ratio of the radius of one sheave to the radius of another sheave.

As is apparent from the foregoing, a ratio of R; to S,, can be determined which will yield an almost exact constant output speed for either input of 8,, or S But in practice, one, of course, finds variables within the drive system which tends to make a desire for exactness meaningless. For example, the input speeds of 540 and 1000 rpm vary with the throttling of the tractor. Therefore, it is obvious that the output speed will most often fall within a range of values, the range being a function of the input speeds and various step-ups and reductions in the entire main drive. Since in the present case, the pair of interchangeable sheaves 46,47 make up the drive, the range of output speeds will necessarily fall within the range between 540 and 1000 rpm.

The terms, upper, lower, forward, rearward etc, have been used herein merely for the convenience of the foregoing specification and in the appended claims to describe the main drive for a manure spreader and its parts as oriented in the drawings. It is to be understood, however, that these terms are in no way limiting to the invention since the main drive for a manure spreader may obviously be disposed in many different positions when in actual use.

The present invention, of course, may be carried out in other specific ways than those herein set forth without departing from the spirit and essential characteristics of the invention. The present embodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, and all changes coming within the meaning and equivalency range are intended to be embraced herein.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim 1. In a manure spreader of the type adapted to be pulled behind a tractor and having a wagon type body structure, a manure spreading mechanism disposed transversely the rear of the wagon body structure, an

pto drive having either a low input speed 8,, or a high input speed S b. a propeller shaft rotatively mounted to said manure spreader and having one end operatively connected to said means for driving said manure spreading mechanism and said apron drive;

c. a pair of interchangeable sheaves each detachably mounted to either of said input or propeller shafts such that they may be interchanged. therebetween, said pair of sheaves including a small sheave having a radius R and a larger sheave having a radius R the ratio R; to R or vice versa being preselected relative to the two input speeds S and 8,, such that a relatively constant propeller shaft speed can be maintained by interchanging said sheaves between said shafts such that when the low input speed 8,, is drivingly connected to the input shaft the small sheave with radii R; will be mounted on said input shaft and the larger sheave with radii R will be mounted on the propeller shaft, and when the high input speed S is drivingly connected to said input shaft the sheaves are interchanged such that the larger sheave with radii R is mounted on the input shaft and the smaller sheave with the radii R; is mounted on the propeller shaft to -yield a propeller shaft speed comparable to that when the sheaves were reversed on the respective shafts; and

propeller shaft speed the ratio 4. A main drive for a manure spreader as recited in claim 3 wherein thelow input speed 8,, is 540 rpm and the high input speed 8,, is 1000 rpm, thereby yielding a value for the ratio R; to R of approximately 1.36.

5. In a manure spreader having a wagon type body structure, a spreading mechanism disposed transversely the rear thereof, and apron conveyor disposed within the body structure for conveying manure rearwardly to the spreading mechanism, and a main drive associated with said manure spreader for driving said spreading mechanism and said apron drive comprising:

a. an input drive shaft having one end rotatively mounted within said manure spreader and the other end adapted to be connected to a tractor power take-off drive having either a low input speed 8;, or a high input speed S b. a propeller shaft rotatively mounted to said manure spreader and having one end operatively connected to said spreading mechanism and said apron drive for driving both;

0. a pair of interchangeable sheaves each being provided with detachable securing means and adapted to be secured to either of said shafts, said interchangeable sheaves being particularly sized with the radius of one being smaller than the radius of the other such that by selectively interchanging the sheaves relative to the particular input speed being employed results in a propeller shaft speed that falls within a range of medium values between S and S,,, the selective interchanging of said a drive belt drivingly interconnected between said sheaves entailing the maintenance of the smaller radius sheave on said input shaft when 8,, is drivingly connected thereto and the interchanging of said sheaves such that the larger radius sheave is mounted on the input shaft when S is employed; and

. a belt drive drivingly interconnecting the sheaves such that the torque imparted to the input shaft is transferred to the propeller shaft with the speed of the propeller shaft being maintained within the medium range of speeds defined in paragraph c above.

6. A main drive for a manure spreader, as recited in claim 5, wherein said detachable securing means includes a hub member and means for securing said hub member to a respective shaft and means for securing either of said sheaves to said hub members.

7. A main drive system for an agricultural implement adapted to be coupled to and powered by a tractor, comprising in combination: an agricultural implement having a power consuming mechanism associated therewith; an input drive shaft carried by said agricultural implement and adapted to be connected to a pto drive extending from said tractor and having either a low input speed or a high input speed; an output drive shaft mounted to said agricultural implement and operatively connected to said power consuming mechanism for driving the same; a drive interconnecting said input shaft with said output shaft for transferring the torque delivered to said input shaft by said tractor pto to said output shaft, said drive including a pair of interchangeable drive elements adapted to be selectively interchanged within said drive for maintaining a relatively constant output speed for either of said low or high pto input speeds.

8. A main drive for an agricultural implement, as recited in claim 7, wherein each of said drive elements are provided with detachable securing means for securing each drive element to either said input or output Q shafts.

9. A main drive, as recited in claim 7, wherein said drive elements are disposed adjacent each other and are provided with interconnecting means for transferring the torque of one directly to the other.

10. A main drive system for an agricultural implement, as recited in claim 9, wherein said means interconnecting said drive elements includes an endless flexible driving member trained around both driving elements for conveying the torque delivered to one to the other.

11. A main drive system for an agricultural implement, as recited in claim 10, wherein said drive elements includes a pair of interchangeable sheaves with each sheave being provided with detachable securing means such that each sheave may be selectively attached to either said input or output shafts.

12. A main drive system for an agricultural implement, as recited in claim 1 1, wherein an endless flexible drive belt is trained around said sheaves for transferring the torque of one sheave to the other sheave.

13. A main drive system for an agricultural implement, as recited in claim 12, wherein one sheave is smaller than the other sheave and wherein the ratio of the radius of the smaller sheave to the radius of the larger sheave is preselected relative to the values of the low and high pto input speeds.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2804308 *Apr 30, 1954Aug 27, 1957Deere & CoConvertible ground or power drive for material spreader
US3059505 *Jun 2, 1958Oct 23, 1962James Reicks LeoPortable speed adapter for power take-off systems
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4241879 *Feb 2, 1979Dec 30, 1980Sperry CorporationDrive system for a manure spreader
US4498630 *Aug 30, 1982Feb 12, 1985Sperry CorporationDrive mechanism for a manure spreader
US5236397 *May 3, 1991Aug 17, 1993Rover Mowers LimitedBelt tension adjustment mechanism
US5345850 *Aug 9, 1993Sep 13, 1994S-B Power Tool CompanyBelt tensioning device for band saws
US5941464 *Sep 3, 1997Aug 24, 1999Seymour; Shaun A.Manure spreading apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/661, 74/11, 474/903, 474/135, 474/69, 239/670, 239/677
International ClassificationA01C19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01C19/00, A01C3/066, Y10S474/903
European ClassificationA01C3/06C, A01C19/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 25, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FORD NEW HOLLAND, INC., 500 DILLER AVENUE, NEW HOL
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:NEW HOLLAND INC., A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004879/0501
Effective date: 19871222
Owner name: FORD NEW HOLLAND, INC., A CORP. OF DE., PENNSYLVAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEW HOLLAND INC., A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004879/0501
Nov 17, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: NEW HOLLAND INC., 500 DILLER AVENUE, NEW HOLLAND,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS OF AGREEMENT RECITED;ASSIGNOR:SPERRY RAND CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004623/0904
Effective date: 19860327