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Publication numberUS3722450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1973
Filing dateMay 15, 1970
Priority dateMay 15, 1970
Publication numberUS 3722450 A, US 3722450A, US-A-3722450, US3722450 A, US3722450A
InventorsArimura K
Original AssigneeArimura K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High speed vehicle for traveling on water
US 3722450 A
Abstract
A high speed vehicle for traveling on water is provided. The vehicle includes a body having a plurality of projecting legs for mounting a plurality of pontoons and hydrofoils. In a preferred embodiment the pontoons are slidably mounted on the legs for movement relative to the hydrofoils so that during movement of the vehicle at high speed the pontoons can be raised completely out of the water. The preferred embodiment also includes a plurality of elevators pivotally mounted on the hydrofoils for varying the angle of attack of the hydrofoils relative to the water surface. In addition, the legs of the vehicle are adjustable so that the body of the vehicle can be moved downward toward the water surface during high speed movement of the vehicle to lower its center of gravity and enhance its stability.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Arimura [451 Mar. 27, 1973 HIGH SPEED VEHICLE FOR TRAVELING ON WATER [76] Inventor: Kunitaka Arimura, One Washington Circle, Washington, DC. 20037 22 Filed: May 15, 1970 21 Appl.No.:37,573

3,425,383 2/1969 Scherer ..l14/66.5 H

Primary Examiner-Milton Buchler Assistant Examiner-B. Kelmachter AttorneyFinnegan, Henderson, Farabow and Garrett [57] ABSTRACT A high speed vehicle for traveling on water is provided. The vehicle includes a body having a plurality of projecting legs for mounting a plurality of pontoons and hydrofoils. In a preferred embodiment the pontoons are slidably mounted on the legs for movement relative to the hydrofoils so that during movement of the vehicle at high speed the pontoons can be raised completely out of the water. The preferredembodiment also includes a plurality of elevators pivotally mounted on the hydrofoils for varying the angle of attack of the hydrofoils relative to the water surface. In addition, the legs of the vehicle are adjustable so that the body of the vehicle can be moved downward toward the water surface during high speed movement enhance its stability.

16 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEDIARZYIQB 3 722,450

SHEET 10F 3 INVENTOR I KUNITAKA ARIMURA $120620, 1 1 00 (fuse/2 1 ATTORNEYS PATEHIEDmzvms SHEET 2 BF 3 mvnm'on KUNITAKA ARIMURA $212620, f/en damn QYaizaZw ATTOR N BY 5 SHEET 3 [IF 3 FIG. 9

INVENTOR KUNITAKA ARIM URA ATTORNEYS HIGH SPEED VEHICLE FOR TRAVELING ON WATER The present invention relates to a high speed vehicle for traveling on water and, more particularly, to a hydrofoil arrangement for a high speed water vehicle.

In the prior art, water vehicles which utilize hydrofoils have been designed to carry a relatively large number of passengers. The water vehicles have usually been in the form of a ship or boat having hydrofoils mounted on the sides or bottom of its hull. In the vehicles of the prior art, the shape of the hull produces a large water resistance. In addition, the prior art vehicles become unstable and are difficult to maneuver at high speeds.

The present invention provides a versatile, high speed water vehicle which is particularly suitable for transporting a relatively small number of passengers. The high speed water vehicle is easily maneuvered during its movement over a water surface. In addition, the vehicle is small enough to be conveniently transported on land. The high speed vehicle can be used for a variety of activities in water navigation, including racing, water skiing, fishing, and rescue work.

In accordance with the invention, a high speed vehicle for traveling on water includes a body, a plurality of pontoons mounted on the body for providing buoyancy to support the vehicle on the surface of the water, and drive means mounted on the body for propelling the vehicle across the surface of the water. In addition, the vehicle includes a plurality of hydrofoils mounted on the body for engaging the water as the vehicle is propelled across its surface to produce a lift force to raisethe body relative to the water surface, and means for imparting relative movement to the pontoons and hydrofoils to remove the pontoons from the water during movement of the vehicle across the surface of the water. By removing the pontoons from the water, the water resistance of the vehicle is decreased and the vehicle can readily achieve very high speed.

A preferred embodiment of the invention includes a steering column pivotally mounted on the body of the vehicle for movement between'first and secondoperating positions to control the positions of the pontoons relative to the hydrofoils.

The preferred embodiment of the vehicle includes a plurality of adjustable legs projecting from the body. The hydrofoils are secured to the legs, and the pontoons are slidably mounted on the legs for movement relative to the hydrofoils. The legs are adjustable for moving the body toward the surface of thewater to lower the center of gravity of thevehicle during its movement across the water surface. By lowering the center of gravity, the stability of the vehicle is increased.

The preferred embodiment of the vehicle includes a plurality of elevators pivotally mounted on the hydrofoils, and means foradjusting the position of the elevators relative to the hydrofoils to vary the angle of attack of the hydrofoils relative to the surface of the water.

The accompanying drawings illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention and, together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

OF THE DRAWINGS:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a high speed vehicle for traveling on water constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention which includes a body having front and rear legs for supporting aplurality of pontoons and hydrofoils and a plurality of elevatorspivotally mounted on the hydrofoils;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the high speed water vehicle of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partially cutaway view of one of the front legs of the vehicle illustrating a mechanism operated by the steering column of the vehicle for raising the pontoon relative to the hydrofoil mounted on the front leg;

FIG. 4 is a partial sectional view of the pontoon taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the mechanism for raising the pontoon;

FIG. 6 illustrates an arrangement for mounting the pontoons and hydrofoils in a preferred embodiment of the vehicle in which the front legs of the vehicle are pivotally connected to the body ofthe vehicle;

FIG. 7 illustrates an alternative arrangement for mounting the pontoons and hydrofoils of a preferred embodiment in which the front legs of the vehicle are adjustable in length;

FIG. 8 illustrates an operating mechanism for adjustingthe position of the elevators relative to the hydrofoils of the vehicle; and

FIG. 9 illustrates an alternative operating mechanism for con-trolling the position of the elevators relative to the hydrofoils.

In accordance with the invention, a high speed vehicle for traveling on water includes a body and a plurality of pontoons mounted on the body for providing buoyancy to support the vehicle on the surface of the water. In a preferred embodiment of the vehicle, the body has a plurality of projecting legs for supporting the pontoons. Referring to FIG. 1, a preferred embodiment of the vehicle includes a body 20 having a pair of front legs 22 and a pair of rear legs 24. As shown in FIG. 2, a first pair of pontoons 26 is mounted on front legs 22 and a second pair of pontoons 28 is mounted on rear legs 24. A seat 25 mounted on body 20 is provided for supporting a driver on the vehicle. g

In accordance with the invention, the high speed vehicle includes drive means mounted on the body for propelling the vehicle across the surface of the water. In the preferred embodiment, the drive means comprise an outboard motor mountedon the body of the vehicle. Referring to FIG. I, an outboard motor 29 is mounted at the rear of body 20. The outboard motor has a propeller 30 which is rotated by the motor to provide propulsion for the vehicle.

In addition, the vehicle has a steering column 31 mounted on body 20 for supporting a handlebar 32. The handlebar is connected to a steering mechanism (not shown) for controlling the orientation of outboard motor 29 relative to body 20 to determine the direction of movement of the vehicle.

In accordance with the invention, a plurality of hydrofoils are mounted on the body of the vehicle for engaging the water as the vehicle is propelled across its surface to produce a lift force to raise the body relative to'the water surface. In the preferred embodiment of the vehicle, the hydrofoils are mounted on the legs of the vehicle body. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a first pair of hydrofoils 34 is mounted on the front legs of the vehicle, and a second pair of hydrofoils 36 is mounted on the rear legs.

In the preferred embodiment, the pontoons are slidably mounted on the legs of the vehicle for movement relative to the hydrofoils. Referring to FIG. 3, pontoon 26 is mounted for sliding movement on a vertical portion 38 of front leg 22. Similarly, the remaining pontoons are slidably mounted on the legs of the vehicle for movement relative to the hydrofoils.

As shown in FIG. 4, pontoon 26 has an outer wall 40 which defines an air-tight chamber to provide buoyancy for the vehicle. Pontoon 26 also includes a rectangular interior wall or nacelle 42 which provides a vertical opening in the pontoon for receiving vertical portion 38 of front leg 22. A shaft 44 connected at both ends to the outer wall of the pontoon extends through sealed openings formed in opposite sides of interior wall 42. A pair of vertical slots 46 is formed in vertical section 38 of front leg 22 for slidably receiving shaft 44. The vertical slots permit pontoon 26 to be raised and lowered relative to hydrofoil 34-which is secured to the lower end of the vertical portion of leg 22.

In accordance with the invention, means are provided for imparting relative movement to the pontoons and hydrofoils to remove the pontoons from the water during movement of the vehicle across the surface of the water. In the preferred embodiment, this means for imparting relative movement to the pontoons and hydrofoils comprise means for raising the pontoons relative to the hydrofoils to remove the pontoons from the water during movement of the vehicle.

Referring to FIG. 3, the means for raising the pontoons include steering column 31 of the vehicle which is pivotally mounted on body by a pivot pin 47 for movement between first and second operating positions. A finger 48 is connected to steering column 31 and is mounted for rotationabout pivot pin 47.

The means for raising the pontoons also include a plurality of gears operatively connectedto the steering column to rotate when the steering column is moved between its first and second operating positions. As shown in FIG. 3, a gear 50 having a plurality of gear teeth 52 is mounted for rotation on front leg 22 of the vehicle. The movement of steering column 31 about pivot pin 47 is transmitted to gear 50 by finger 48 which engagesa lever 56 mounted on front leg 22 by pivot pin 58 and a connecting rod 60 pivotally connected at its opposite ends to gear 50 and lever 56. In the preferred embodiment of the vehicle, each leg has a similar gearing arrangement operatively connected to steering column 31.

The means for raising the pontoons also include a plurality of racks mounted on the pontoons and having teeth operatively associated with the gears. Referring to FIG. 3, a vertical rack 62 having teeth 64 for engaging gear teeth 52 of gear 50 is provided. As shown in F IG. 4, rack 62 is connected to pontoon 26 by shaft 44 which extends through an opening formed in the rack. In addition, the bottomend of rack 62 is secured to the interior surface of outer wall 40 of the pontoon. A similar rack is provided for each of the remaining pontoons of the vehicle.

During movement of the vehicle across a water surface, the pontoons can be raised relative to the hydrofoils of the vehicle by pulling downward on handlebar 32 to move steering column 31 from its first operating position to its second operating position, as indicated by arrow 66 (FIG. 3). As steering column 31 is pivoted, finger 48 of the steering column rotates lever 56 in a counterclockwise direction about pivot pin 58, and connecting rod 60 transmits the movement of lever 56 to gear 50 to rotate the gear in a counterclockwise direction about pivot pin 54. The counterclockwise rotation of gear 50 results in upward movement of rack 62 to raise pontoon 26 relative to hydrofoil 34. Thus, the movement of steering column 31 from its first to its second operating position results in upward movement of pontoons 26 and 28 relative to hydrofoils 34 and 36. The pontoons can be moved downward to their original positions by returning steering column 31 to its first operating position.

FIG. 5 illustrates an alternative arrangement for operatively connecting gear teeth 52 of gear 50 to teeth 64 of rack 62. In the alternative arrangement, a first pinion 68 is mounted for rotation adjacent to gear 50 and has a plurality of teeth for engaging gear teeth 52. A second pinion 70 is mounted for rotation adjacent to rack 62 and has a plurality of teeth for engaging teeth 64 of the rack. A chain or belt 72 is provided for transmitting rotational movement of pinion 68 to pinion 70. When gear 50 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction by upward movement of connecting rod 60, pinions 68 and 70 are rotated in clockwise directions and rack 62 is driven upward.

In the preferred embodiment of the vehicle, the front and rear legs are adjustable and means are provided for adjusting the legs to move the body of the vehicle toward the surface of the water to lower the center of gravity of the vehicle during its movement across the water. surface. In a first arrangement for a vehicle having adjustable legs, the front and rear legs of the vehicle are pivotally connected to the body. As shown in FIG. 6, each front leg 22 includes a pair of parallel rods 74 pivotally connected at one end to body 20. The opposite ends of rods 74 are pivotally connected to a vertical member 76. Pontoons 26 are slidably mounted on vertical members 76 and hydrofoils 34 are secured to the lowerends of the vertical members. In a similar manner, the rear legs of the vehicle are pivotally mounted to body 20.

In this first arrangement including adjustable legs for the vehicle, means are provided for pivoting the legs apart to move the body of the vehicle toward the surface of the water. This means includes a pair of fluidoperated cylinders 78 having shafts 80 connected to rods 74 of the front legs. The fluid-operatedcylinders are secured to a platform 82 mounted on body 20. A fluid supply line 83 connects cylinders 78 to a source 84 of pressurized-fluid mounted on body 20. A valve 85 is provided to control the application of pressurized fluid to the cylinders. A similar arrangement of fluidoperated cylinders (not shown) is provided for operating the rear legs of the vehicle.

When valve 85 is opened to apply pressurized fluid to cylinders 78 throughfluid supply line 83, shafts 80 of the fluid-operated cylinders are retracted and rods 74 are pivoted to move front legs 22 apart, as indicated in FIG. 6. In a similar manner, rear legs 24 of the vehicle are moved apart. Thus, body 20 of the vehicle is moved toward the surface of the water to lower the center of gravity of the vehicle, and the stability of the vehicle during the movement across the water surface is increased.

H6. 7 illustrates a second arrangement for the vehicle in which the legs are adjustable. In the second arrangement, legs 22 of the vehicle comprise telescoping members 86 and 88 which are adjustable in length. Pontoons 26 are slidably mounted on vertical sections of telescoping members 88, and hydrofoils 34 are secured to the lower ends of the vertical sections. Similarly, the rear legs of the vehicle include telescoping members.

In this second arrangement, means are provided for decreasing the length of the legs to move the body of the vehicle toward the surface of the water. As shown in FIG. 7, this means comprise a first pair of fluidoperated cylinders 90 mounted on members 86 of the front legs. The cylinders have shafts 92 which are connected to members 88 of the front legs. In addition, a

second pair of cylinders (not shown) is provided for operating the rear legs of the vehicle.

A pair of fluid supply lines 94 connects cylinders 90 to a source of pressurized fluid 95 mounted on body 20. A valve 96 is provided to control the application of pressurized fluidto the cylinders. In the operation of the vehicle, valve 96 is opened to apply pressurized fluid to cylinders 90 to retract shafts 92 into the cylinders to decrease the length of legs 22 of the vehicle. Thus, body 20 of the vehicle is moved toward the surface of the water, and the center of gravity of the vehicle is lowered during its movement across the surface of the water. The lower center of gravity increases the stability of the vehicle.

A preferred embodiment of the vehicle includes a plurality of elevators pivotally mounted on the hydrofoils. The preferred embodiment also includes means for adjusting the position of the elevators relative to the hydrofoils to vary the angle of attack of the hydrofoils relative to the surface of the water.

' As shown in FIG. 1, an elevator 100 is pivotally mounted on hydrofoil 34 of the vehicle, and an elevator 102 is pivotally mounted on hydrofoil 36. Referring to FIG. 8, elevator 100 is pivotally connected to hydrofoil 34 in hinge-like fashion. An operating mechanism for adjusting the position of elevator 100 relative to hydrofoil 34 includes a cable 104 slidably received in a hollow tubular casing 106. The casing is connected at one end to handlebar 32 of the vehicle. A handle 108 is pivotally mounted on handlebar 32 and one end of cable 104 is connected to handle 108. The other end of the cable is connected to a lever 110 pivotally mounted on the front leg of the vehicle by a pivot pin 111. A connecting rod 112 is pivotally connected at one end to lever 1 and at its opposite end to elevator 100.

In the operation of the vehicle, when handle 108 is gripped and pivoted toward handlebar 32, the end of cable 104 connected to lever 110 is drawn into hollow tubular casing 106 and lever 1101pivots in a clockwise direction. The clockwise movement of lever 110 is transmitted to elevator 100 by connecting rod 112 and results in the pivoting of elevator 100 outward from hydrofoil 34, as indicated by arrow 1 13. By pivoting the elevator relative to hydrofoil 34, the angle of attack of the hydrofoil relative to the water surface can be varied. In the preferred embodiment, a similar operating mechanism can be provided for the elevators mounted on the remaining hydrofoils.

FIG. 9 illustrates an alternative operating mechanism for the elevators including a fluid-operated cylinder 114 having a shaft 116 connected to elevator 100. The cylinder is mounted on the front leg of the vehicle. Cylinder 114 is supplied with pressurized fluid by a fluid supply line 118 7 connected to a source (not shown) to move shaft 116 outward from cylinder 114 and pivot elevator outward relative to hydrofoil 34. A valve (not shown) is provided for controlling the supply of pressurized fluid to the cylinder. Similarly, the remaining elevators of the vehicle are provided with the same type of operating mechanism to vary the angle of attack of the hydrofoils during movement of the vehicle across the water.

The elevator arrangement of the present invention permits a driver of the vehicle to perform jump maneuvers during movement of the vehicle across a water surface. In addition, it allows the driver to create upward and downward motions by adjusting the angle of the elevators relative to the hydrofoils.

The principles of this invention are illustrated in relation to a high speed water vehicle for transporting a single passenger. The inventive principles are not limited to such a vehicle, and larger vehicles for carrying more than one passenger can be constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

The invention in its broader aspects is not limited to the specific details shown and described, and modifications may be made in the details of the high speed water vehicle without departing from the principles of the present invention.

What is claimed is;

1. A high'speed vehicle for traveling on water, which comprises:

a body having a plurality of legs projecting therefrom;

a plurality of pontoons slidably mounted on said legs for providing buoyancy to support the vehicle on the surface of the water;

a plurality of hydrofoils mounted on said legs for engaging tlie water as the vehicle is propelled across the surface to produce a lift force to raise said body relative to the water surface; and

means for imparting relative movement to said pontoons and said hydrofoils to remove said pontoons from the water during movement of the vehicle across the surface of the water.

2. The vehicle of claim 1, wherein:

said means for imparting relative movement to said pontoons and said hydrofoils comprises means for raising said pontoons relative to said hydrofoils to remove said pontoons from the water during movement of the vehicle across the surface of the water.

3. The vehicle of claim 2, wherein the means for raismovement between first and second operating positions;

a plurality of gears operatively connected to said steering column to rotate when said steering column is moved between its first and second operating positions; and

tackduring movement of the -vehicle across the surface of the water. 8. 'The vehicle of claim 7, which includes a seat of gravity of the vehicle during its movement across the water surface.

10. The vehicle of claim 9, wherein:

said legs are pivotally connected to said body; and

a plurality of racks, each rack being mounted on one said means for adjusting said legs includes means for of said pontoons and having teeth operatively aspivoting said legs apart to move said body toward sociated with one of said gears, for raising said the surface of the water. pontoons relative to said hydrofoils when said 11. The vehicle of claim 9, wherein: steering column is moved from its first operating said legs are adjustable in length; and position to its second operating position. 10 said means for adjusting said legs includes means for 4. The vehicle of claim 1, wherein: decreasing the length of said legs to move said said legs are pivotally connected to said body; and body toward the surface of the water.

which includes 12. A high speed vehicle for traveling on water,

means for pivoting said legs apart to move said body which comprises:

toward the surface of the water. a body having a plurality of legs projecting 5. The vehicle of claim 1, wherein: therefrom' said legs are adjustable in length; and which includes Pluramy 9i P slldably mounted on 2 legs means for decreasing the length of said legs to move for provld'hg buoyancy to support the veh'ele Oh said body toward the surface of the water. Surface of the water;

6. The vehicle of claim 1, which includes a seat dnve hleahs mounted Oh Sale body for Propelhhg the mounted on said body for supporting a rider on the l across the Shrfaee efthe water; vehicle a plurality of hydrofoils mounted on said legs for en- 7. In a high speed vehicle for traveling on water a gaging the water as the vehicle is propelled across frame having a plurality eflegs projecting therefrom; its surface to produce a lift force to ralse the body a plurality of hydrofoils mounted on said legs for enrelahve to thewatehsurfaeei and gaging the water as the vehicle moves across the .means for raising said pontoons relative to sald surface of the water to produce a lift force to raise hych'efohs to remove Sald pohteehs from the water the vehicle relative to the water Surface; during movement of the vehicle across the surface a plurality of elevators mounted on said hydrofoils of the e for varying the angle of attack of said hydrofoils The veh'ele Ofelahh wherein: relative to the Surface of the water; said legs are pivotally connected to said body; and

a plurality of pontoons slidably mounted on said legs wh'eh h e for providing buoyancy to Support the vehicle on means for plvotlng said legs apart to move said body the Surface of the water; toward the surface of the water.

means for imparting relative movement to said pon- "ehleleof elahh wherelhi teens and said hydrofoils to remove Said pontoons said legs are ad ustable in length; and which includes from the water during movement of the vehicle means for decreasing the length of said legs to move across the surface of the water; and sald body toward the surface of the water.

means for adjusting the position of said elevators h h Yehlele ofelahh wh'eh 'helhdes:

relative to said hydrofoils to vary the angle of at- 40 a Plurahty of elevators Plvetahy mounted 531d hydrofoils; and means for adjusting the position of said elevators relative to said hydrofoils to vary the angle of attack of said hydrofoils relative to the surface of the water. 16. The vehicle of claim 12, which includes a seat said legs are adjustable; and which includes mohmed Said body for Supporting a driver on the means for adjusting said legs to'move said body etoward the surface of the water to lower the center mounted on said frame for supporting a rider on the vehicle. 45

9. The high speed vehicle of claim 7, wherein:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491744 *Jul 15, 1944Dec 20, 1949Edwin A LinkAquatic device
US2804038 *Jan 19, 1954Aug 27, 1957Nat Res DevSailing vessels
US3425383 *Aug 11, 1965Feb 4, 1969Scherer Paul AHydrofoil method and apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5311832 *Dec 20, 1991May 17, 1994Dynafoils, Inc.Advanced marine vehicles for operation at high speeds in or above rough water
US5469801 *May 19, 1993Nov 28, 1995Dynafoils, Inc.Advanced marine vehicles for operation at high speed in or above rough water
US5653189 *Jun 7, 1995Aug 5, 1997Dynafoils, Inc.Hydrofoil craft
US6178905 *Oct 23, 1998Jan 30, 2001Waveblade CorporationPersonal hydrofoil water craft
US7047901Jan 17, 2003May 23, 2006Shane ChenMotorized hydrofoil device
US20070039534 *Mar 31, 2006Feb 22, 2007Reilly Michael BPontooned Watercraft
DE3701945A1 *Jan 23, 1987Aug 4, 1988Stefan SchulzRightable two-masted catamaran
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/280
International ClassificationB63B1/28, B63B1/16
Cooperative ClassificationB63B1/28
European ClassificationB63B1/28