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Publication numberUS3722508 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1973
Filing dateOct 26, 1970
Priority dateOct 26, 1970
Publication numberUS 3722508 A, US 3722508A, US-A-3722508, US3722508 A, US3722508A
InventorsD Roberts
Original AssigneeD Roberts
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infusion guard and immobilizer
US 3722508 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Roberts 154] INFUSION GUARD AND IMMOBILIZER [76] Inventor: Donald B. Roberts, 355 S. 8th Ave.,

Pocatello, Idaho 83201 [22] Filed: Oct. 26, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 83,898

[52] U.S. Cl. ..l28/l33, 128/214 R, l28/D1G. 6, 128/D1G. 26 [51] Int. Cl. ..A6lm 05/00 [58] Field of Search..128/D1G. 6,133, 214 R, 350 R, 128/215, 348, DIG. 26, 132 R; 248/74 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 Mar. 27, 1973 Primary ExaminerDalton L. Truluck Att0rneyChristie, Parker & Hale 57 ABSTRACT A combined immobilizer and guard particularly useful for intravenous infusions or the like is described in several embodiments. The immobilizer is a rigid member having one surface conforming to a portion of a limb spanning a joint, such as, for example, an elbow, wrist or ankle. Velcro hook and eye straps are employed for fastening the immobilizer to a limb or extremity. The infusion guard comprises an arch extending from one side of the immobilizer to the other side and connected thereto by complementary connectors running along the length of he immobilizer and the guard. The guard includes means for clamping an intravenous tube thereto and a slit for passing and protecting the loop of tubing between the clamp and an intravenous needle. The guard prevents either an inadvertent pull on the tubing or a blow at the infusion site from dislodging the needle or causing infiltration.

13 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures INFUSION GUARD AND IMMOBILIZER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A variety of techniques are presently employed for intravenous infusions which are commonly employed in medical practice for augmenting body fluids or administering medication. Most of the arrangements presently employed are jury rigged as may be required in a particular situation.

Just as one example, in making an infusion at the elbow joint, the patients arm is often taped or strapped to a board which may be cushioned with gauze in order to hold the joint immobile. The intravenous injection Is made with a needle, the hub thereof being taped to the patient adjacent the infusion site. In addition, the infusion tubing is typically taped to the patients arm at one or two points to keep it from being dislodged during the infusion. The skin of some patients, particularly chronic ones, may be sensitive to taping and the taping does not provide adequate protection if there is any substantial tug on the tubing such as, for example, by the patient moving the arm or due to inadvertent contact with the tubing by other people in the room. In some cases a butterfly needle is used with'the wings taped to the patients skin.

Similarly, during infusion the needle and adjacent tubing is exposed so that an accidental blow such as, for example, from the bed clothing, may also cause the needle to move with respect to the vein. Without protection, needles being used for infusions frequently get bumped, pulled, twisted or rolled upon by the patient, which may cause the needle to cut the vein wall or to pull out from the vein, causing the infusion to infiltrate in the region surrounding the vein. This necessitates restarting the intravenous infusion with its additional pain and inconvenience and, further, the length of time between infiltration and restarting is time without intravenous therapy.

The problems of intravenous infusion in the elbow joint or volar forearm of an adult are even more aggravated in other intravenous infusions, such as, for example, on the dorsum of the hand or foot, particularly of children.

A variety of immobilizers have been proposed for the elbow joint, such as, for example, those shown in U. S. Pat. Nos. 1,709,046, 2,266,230, 2,693,794, and 3,196,870. Most of these are merely arm restraints substituting for the aforementioned board and gauze to which a patients arm may be strapped. They make no particular provision for an intravenous infusion or they provide for rigid holding of the needle relative to the immobilizer and make no provision for protecting the tubing leading to the needle. Rigid holding of the needle is not satisfactory since relatively minor motion of the limb within the limits imposed by the restraint may still cause infiltration of the infusion site.

It is therefore desirable to provide an infusion guard and immobilizer for a joint that permits the needle to remain in position relative to the vein in the presence of small motions and also protect the needle from direct blows or from movement in case of blows or tugs on the tubing leading thereto.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION There is, therefore, provided in practice of this invention according to a presently preferred embodiment a combined immobilizer and infusion guard comprising a rigid member having a surface conforming to a portion of a limb or extremity spanning a joint. A guard rigidly fastened on the immobilizer arching over an infusion site includes means for clamping the intravenous tubing and also a shielding portion for protecting an infusing needle and a principal portion of intravenous tubing between the means for clamping and the infusion site.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These and other features and advantages of this invention will be appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description of a presently preferred embodiment when considered in connection with these accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates in perspective a combined immobilizer and infusion guard incorporating principles of this invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates in perspective an immobilizer similar to that illustrated in FIG. I and particularly useful for infusions in the dorsum of the hand or forearm;

FIG. 3 illustrates an immobilizer suitable for infusions in the dorsum of a foot such as is preferably employed for children;

FIG. 4 illustrates in perspective an infusion guard particularly suitable for use for a scalp infusion such as is commonly employed with infants; and

FIG. 5 illustrates in transverse cross-section an immobilizer and guard having a different embodiment of means for clamping the two together.

DESCRIPTION FIG. 1 illustrates in perspective a combined elbow immobilizer and infusion guard constructed according to principles of this invention. As illustrated in this embodiment, the immobilizer comprises a. central open ended U-shaped channel 10. The upstanding edges 11 of the U-shaped channel 10 extend parallel to each other along a portion of the length of the immobilizer. These edges 11 are preferably formed with a slight bulge so that their thickness transverse to the length is somewhat greater nearer the edge than it is further from the edge.

Clipped onto the parallel edges 11 is an infusion guard 12 in the form of a rigid arch. The parallel edges of the guard 12 are formed with a pair of parallel extensions 13 that define a groove therebetween complementary to the edge 11 on the immobilizer. The material forming the extensions 13 is slightly elastic so as to snap over the slight bulge in the edges 11 and firmly lock the guard to the immobilizer with sufficient force to prevent accidental dislodging. The guard is temporarily fastened to the immobilizer, however, so as to be installed or removed as desired for starting or stopping an infusion.

The immobilizer further comprises an extension 14 at each end having a shape substantially conforming to the shape of the bight of the U-shaped channel 10 in the central portion. The shape of the U-shaped channel 10 and extensions 14 is complementary to the shape of an arm 16 (shown in phantom) adjacent an elbow joint so that the immobilizer fits comfortably on the limb. Three or four sizes of immobilizer may be employed as desired for accommodating the various size limbs encountered in the populace.

A wide strap 17 fastens the upper extension 14 to the upper portion of the arm 16 above the elbow joint, which in the illustrated embodiment is employed as an infusion site. A similar strap 18 around the lower extension 14 and forearm 16 serves to hold the arm immobile. The two wide straps l7 and 18 can be any of a variety of suitable materials, however, it is preferred that they be formed of a hook-and-eye type material such as is commercially available under the mark Velcro. An end portion of Velcro material can be employed on a fabric strap. The Velcro hook-and-eye material comprises two mating portions, one portion of which has a large number of tiny filament eyelets extending from a base sheet of fabric. The second portion has a large number of small elastic hooklike projections adapted to engage the eyelets of the other portion. Such Velcro material is commercially available from the Velcro Corporation, 681 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y.

When Velcro hook-and-eye material is employed for the straps, one portion, for example, the hook portion, is secured on the underside of each of the extensions 14 and the other portion, for example, the eyelet part, is employed for the straps l7 and 18. In such an embodiment, one end of each of the straps is secured to the portion of Velcro on the immobilizer, then wrapped around the arm 16 to the desired tightness, and the eyelets are engaged with the hooks on the other side to secure the strap in place. Such an arrangement has been found to be extremely rapid and safe and readily adaptable to any size immobilizer. The materials are also readily sterilized with the balance of the immobilizer and guard. If desired, elastic straps or other fastening means can be employed in lieu of or in combination with the preferred Velcro hook and eye material.

The infusion guard 12 is in the form ofa substantially rigid or slightly elastic arch connected between the upstanding parallel side edges 11 of the immobilizer and standing sufficiently high above the bottom of the immobilizer to accommodate a patients arm 16 and leave a sufficient gap to accommodate an intravenous infusion needle and tube. Along the upper portion of the guard 12 is a tubing clamp 19. The tubing clamp 19 comprises a pair of opposed strips 21 each having a C- shaped cross section with the open sides of the Cs opposed to form a substantially cylindrical channel therebetween. The upper portion of the channel is open as a slit 22 between the strips 21 with a width less than the diameter of the cylindrical channel. The channel has a diameter the same as the diameter of a conventional intravenous tube and the width of the open slit along the top of the tubing clamp 19 is smaller than the diameter of an intravenous tubing.

In order to clamp an intravenous tube 23 in the tubing clamp 19, it is pressed through the slit 22 in the top of the clamp and fits along the length of the cylindrical channel between the C-shaped strips 21. The elasticity of the intravenous tube 23 permits the tubing to be readily inserted or removed through the slit with reasonable force, the required force being greater than that typically encountered in any accidental pulling or bumping on the intravenous tubing.

The guard 12 also includes a pair of shields 24 which are preferably extensions of the main body of the guard along the length of the immobilizer and differ from the main body only in being separated from each other by a slot 26 extending along the length of the guard and aligned with the tubing clamp 19. Preferably a flared opening 27 is provided at the entrance to the slot 26. In use, the intravenous tubing 23 extends along the length of the tubing clamp 19 and then passes downwardly through the slot 26 so that it makes a loop 30 in the region guarded by the shields 24 and finally terminates in a needle 28 which is injected in the infusion site. If desired, a tape 29 over the tubing 23 can be employed for maintaining the needle 28 immovable relative to the infusion site. Similarly, a conventional butterfly needle can be held in position on the arm.

The combined immobilizer and infusion guard serve to protect the needle from moving relative to the infusion site under a variety of adverse conditions. Thus, for example, if the tubing 23 is tugged or otherwise accidentally pulled due to motion of the tubing or of the entire arm, the tubing clamp 19 prevents the force or motion from being transmitted to the needle 28. Similarly, the guard 12, particularly the extensions 24 thereof, shield a loop 30 of tubing between the clamp 19 and the needle 28 from being struck. This is a particularly critical portion of the tubing since it is nearest to the needle and is also most subject to impact due to bed clothes being thrown over the infusion site or a patient rolling onto the infusion tubing. The shields 24 extend over the loop of tubing which is permitted to be beneath the guard 12 by the slot 26 and thereby prevent any motion of the needle 28 due to accidental impact on the loop. The straps of Velcro hook-and-eye material hold the limb in a substantially fixed position in the immobilizer so that motion of the limb does not dislodge the needle or otherwise cause infiltration. The needle is, however, free of the guard and is connected thereto only by the flexible loop of tubing so that slight motions of the limb relative to the immobilizer do not cause infiltration since the needle can readily follow these small motions.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, the U- shaped portion 10 of the immobilizer to which the guard 12 is secured is of a length to span the infusion site typically employed for intravenous infusions into the antecubital veins. This site is commonly employed for intravenous infusion when it is anticipated that only a limited number of such infusions are to be required. It will be apparent that if desired the U-shaped portion to which the infusion guard is clamped can be extended for a substantial distance along the length of the immobilizer so that the guard can be affixed thereto over an infusion site anywhere along the volar forearm so that infusions can be made in these veins.

Both the elbow immobilizer and guard illustrated in FIG. 1 are readily made by extrusion of conventional plastic materials followed by cutting away of the portions not required for the articles. Thus, for example, the immobilizer may be extruded with the excess portions cut away to leave the extensions 14 at either end of the U-shaped central portion. Similarly, the guard 12 may be extruded and the strips 21 cut away in the same operation that forms the slot 26. If desired, the immobilizer may also be fabricated by vacuum forming of plastic or closed mold die casting. Other suitable and economical techniques will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

It is preferred that the arch forming the infusion guard be made of transparent material so that the needle and infusion site can be inspected without removing the guard from the region. A variety of transparent plastic materials are, of course, suitable, and if one is chosen that is not susceptible to steam sterilization, there is little lost since the guard itself is quite inexpensive and can be disposed of after each use along with the intravenous tubing and other expendable materials.

FIG. 2 illustrates in perspective a somewhat different 1 style of immobilizer constructed according to principles of this invention and particularly useful for intravenous infusions in the veins on the dorsum of the hand and forearm. As illustrated in this embodiment, the immobilizer has a forearm portion 31 having a curved inner surface 32 substantially complementary to the volar forearm for comfortably accommodating the forearm. Forwardly thereof is another concave U- shaped portion 33 somewhat raised above the forearm portion 32. During use, the raised portion 33 is complementary to a slightly flexed wrist of a patient.

Still further forward on the immobilizer is a hand grip portion 34 about which the patients fingers may pass. A lateral opening 36 is provided at one side between the wrist portion 33 and hand grip portion 34 for accommodating the patients thumb. The hand grip portion 34 is slightly twisted laterally relative to the forearm portion to conform to the typical twist of the hand relative to the forearm. In addition, the hand grip portion 34 is tilted downwardly relative to the forearm portion so that when the hand is held in position on the hand grip 34, the dorsal portion is slightly stretched for better exposing the veins in the dorsum of the hand.'lt will be apparent, of course, that the immobilizer illustrated in FIG. 2 is for a patients left arm and an allochiral immobilizer would be employed for the right arm. Four orfive sizes of immobilizers suitable for use in practice of this invention may be required for accommodating the various sizes of individuals on which such an immobilizer may be employed.

In a manner analogous to the immobilizer illustrated in FIG. 1, a portion of Velcro hook-and-eye material (not shown) is provided on the underside of the immobilizer for connection to a strap passing over at least the upper and lower ends of the immobilizer for securing a patients forearm and hand thereto. One strap should pass over a portion of the hand or the first knuckles for immobilizing the wrist.

In the embodiment illustrated, a pair of parallel tracks 37 are secured to opposite sides of the immobilizer along the forearm portion by a plurality of screws 38. Each of the tracks 37 includes a tongue 39 extending along its length for receiving the groove of an infusion guard (not shown) substantially identical to the infusion guard 12 illustrated in FIG. 1. By providing a pair of-parallel tongues along the length of the immobilizer, the guard may be positioned at any desired location over a selected infusion site. A similar track 41 with tongue 42 is secured to the immobilizer along the side of the hand grip portion 34. A parallel track (hidden) is mounted on the opposite side of the hand grip 34 including a portion mounted on an extension 43 across a portion of the thumb opening 36. An infusion guard substantially identical to that illustrated in FIG. 1 can be positioned on the tongues of these parallel tracks 41 for infusion in the veins on the dorsum of the hand.

The immobilizer illustrated in FIG. 2 is readily fabricated by injection molding or by vacuum forming of the principal portions followed by solvent welding, adhesive bonding, or mechanical fastening of tracks along the edge. This arrangement may be more expensive than integral forming of the tongues on the immobilizer and is illustrated herein to demonstrate the flexibility of fabrication techniques possible for the immobilizer. It will also be clear that, if desired, a groove can be used on the immobilizer to accommodate an edge or tongue on the infusion guard.

FIG. 3 illustrates in perspective another style of immobilizer constructed according to principles of this invention and particularly suitable for pediatric use. In pediatric practice, intravenous infusions are often made on the dorsum of the foot since the veins in this site are relatively large and accessible. The immobilizer illustrated in FIG. 3 comprises a foreleg portion 46 having a concave inner surface 47 approximately complementary to the foreleg. At the opposite end, the immobilizer has a foot portion 48 having a concave inner surface 49 approximately complementary to the bottom of a foot. Intermediate these concave surfaces 47 and 49 is a recessed heel cup 50 within which a patients heel is accommodated when the immobilizer is used. The'foot portion 48 is arranged relative to the foreleg portion 46 so that a foot held in the immobilizer is slightly more flexed than its rest position, with the dorsum of the foot being approximately an extension of the foreleg. This position tends to best expose the dorsal veins and is preferred for infusions.

Formed integral with the foot portion 48 are a pair of parallel tongues 51 to which may be connected an infusion guard (not shown) substantially identical to the guard 12 illustrated in FIG. I. It will be apparent, of course, that if desired a groove can be employed on an immobilizer and a tongue provided on the infusion guard so that the parts are held together in use. One of the mating portions of Velcro hook-and-eye material 53 is secured to each of the convex portions of the foreleg portion 46 and the foot portion 48 of the immobilizer so that a strap having the other portion of hookand-eye material can be employed for securing the immobilizer to a patients extremity. Another strip of Velcro hook-and-eye material is fastened to the immobilizer just below the heel cup 50 for augmenting the end strap of Velcro when the infusion guard is positioned near the lower end of the immobilizer.

A bar 52 is secured to the convex foot portion of the immobilizer so as to extend transverse to the principal extent thereof and the bar is sufficiently long that it inhibits a patient from turning the foot while the immobilizer is in use. This inhibition can be provided merely by the length of the bar or, if desired, the bar 52 can be taped down or otherwise fastened to the bed for preventing the patient from moving his foot. The bar 52 can be permanently attached to the immobilizer or preferably can be temporarily secured thereto by conventional means (not shown) as may be required in particular circumstances. It will be apparent, of course,

that similar arrangements can be employed for fixing an immobilizer such as illustrated in FIGS. 1 or 2, in position to prevent the patient from moving the entire immobilizer.

Two or three sizes of foot immobilizer in both right and left models are sufficient for accommodating pediatric patients. If it is desired to employ the immobilizer on larger patients, an additional one or two sizes may be required.

FIG. 4 illustrates in perspective another embodiment of infusion guard constructed according to principles of this invention. As illustrated in this embodiment, the infusion guard comprises a U-shaped arch 55 having a pair of parallel flanges 56 extending laterally from the arch along each edge. The laterally extending flanges can be engaged with corresponding inwardly faced facing grooves on an immobilizer (not shown) for use in a manner similar to that hereinabove described and illustrated. In such an arrangement, the slight elasticity of the arch 55 permits the flanges to be deflected towards each other for snapping into position in an immobilizer.

The infusion guard illustrated in FIG.- 4 is more generally employed for intravenous infusions where the guard is fastened directly to the patient. This is particularly useful in intravenous infusions of infants where the infusions are often conducted in veins immediately below the scalp. In order to employ the infusion guard illustrated in FIG. 4, it is taped directly to the scalp by means of a small piece of tape over the flanges 56.

The infusion guard illustrated in FIG. 4 further comprises a pair of opposed C-shaped strips 57 extending along the length of the arch 55 preferably symmetrically located between the two side edges. The two C- shaped strips 57 define a substantially cylindrical channel therebetween open at the top in the form ofa slit 58 having a width slightly less than the diameter of a conventional intravenous tube. The diameter of the cylindrical channel between the strips 57 is the same as the diameter of a conventional intravenous tube. A longitudinally extending slot 59 extends beyond the tubing clamp formed by the strips 57 and is slightly wider than the diameter of an intravenous tube.

In order to use the infusion guard illustrated in FIG. 4, a conventional butterfly type needle (not shown) is inserted in a vein beneath the scalp and either the needle or immediately adjacent tubing is taped to the scalp. The infusion guard is then placed in position over the infusion site with the tubing clamping strips 57 lying substantially over the needle. The flanges 56 are then taped to the scalp and the tubing passed through the slot 59 and snapped through the slit 58 into the cylindrical channel between the strips 57. This attachment technique is quickly and easily performed and the intravenous infusion can be started promptly. The guard serves to protect the small loop of tubing between the needle and the tubing clamp on the guard from impact. The tubing clamp serves to protect the needle from an inadvertent tug on the tubing or motion of the patient since such a tug is applied to the infusion guard via the tubing clamp, and hence to the tape on the flanges 56 rather than directly on the small piece of tape adjacent the needle. Such an arrangement greatly minimizes the possibility of such an infusion infiltrating.

FIG. 5' illustrates in transverse cross section an embodiment of immobilizer and infusion guard having a slightly different mode of interconnection. As illustrated in this embodiment, there is provided a substantially U-shaped immobilizer 61 such as, for example, may be employed for immobilizing an elbow. The parallel side edges 62 of the immobilizer are turned outwardly to form very short flanges extending along the length of the immobilizer. Foam rubber padding 65 is provided within the concave immobilizer for cushioning an immobilized limb. Velcro straps (not shown) are used to fasten the immobilizer to a limb in the same manner hereinabove described.

Mounted on the immobilizer 61 is an infusion guard 63 in the general shape of a U-shaped arch extending from one side of the immobilizer to the other. The guard 63 has along its side edges a pair of opposed inwardly facing grooves 64 which mate with the parallel edge flanges 62 on the immobilizer. In order to install the guard 63 on the immobilizer, it is elastically sprung outwardly a small amount to permit the grooves to engage the edges, Such an attaching arrangement pro vides a firm attachment to the immobilizer and permits the elastic deformation of the guard to be spread over a considerably larger distance than is involved when the groove has a slight undercut to fit over a slightly bulged tongue such as was illustrated in FIG. 1.

The guard 63 illustrated in FIG. 5 also comprises a pair of elongated strips 66 defining a tubing clamp in the same manner hereinabove described and illustrated and further comprises a longitudinally extending slot 67 which permits tubing from the tubing clamp to pass beneath the infusion guard in a loop that is protected by the guard from accidental impact.

Another means (not illustrated) for clamping the infusion tubing and permitting the tubing to pass from the exposed portion of the infusion guard to the protected region beneath the guard comprises three or more slots provided in the arch of the guard with at least a pair of the slots converging toward each other. The tubing can then be simply inserted from the outer portion of the arch to the inner portion through one of the converging slits and back out again through the other converging slot with a relatively tight loop therebetween but not so tight as to constrict the inside of the tubing significantly. The tubing is then passed through the third slot to the protected region beneath the arch where it loops to the infusion site. Withdrawal of the tubing from the three slots due to an accidental tugging in any direction is effectively provided. Other similar tube clamping arrangements will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

Limited embodiments of joint immobilizer and infusion guard constructed according to principles of this invention have been described and illustrated herein. Many additional modifications and variations will be apparent to one skilled in the art. Thus, for example, instead of providing a single tubing clamp on the guard, a pair of such clamps may be provided for situations where more than one infusion is to be conducted at the same time. With such an arrangement, a pair of longitudinally extending slots for accommodating a tubing loop between the clamp and the fusion site would be provided. It will also be apparent that in lieu of a slot for the tubing to pass beneath the guard, a hole could be provided. However, this is less advantageous because a slot permits the tubing to be inserted through the guard at any point along its length rather than only at its end. It will also be apparent that other arrangements can be provided for clamping the tubing to the infusion guard, however, the illustrated arrangement is preferred because of the ease of manufacture by extrusion. Many other modifications and variations will be apparent to one skilled in the art and it is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. An infusion guard comprising:

a substantially rigid arch having substantially parallel side edges comprising a U-shaped structure having a convex outer face and a concave inner face;

means for temporarily attaching the arch to a joint immobilizer along the side edges thereof;

means on the outside of the arch for temporarily clamping a flexible intravenous tube thereto; and

means on the arch and spaced from said means for clamping for passing a clamped flexible intravenous tube between the means for clamping and an infusion needle beneath the arch, said arch having sufficient length in the direction of its side edges for shielding most of the tube between the means for clamping and the needle.

2. An infusion guard as defined in claim 1 wherein the means for clamping intravenous tubing comprises a parallel pair of spaced apart elongated strips on top of the arch having a generally C-shaped transverse cross section defining an open sided substantially cylindrical channel therebetween, the diameter of the channel being substantially the same as the diameter of an intravenous tube and the width of the open side of the channel being less than the diameter of an intravenous tube and wherein the means for shielding comprises an extension of the arch beyond the end of the strips.

3. An infusion guard comprising:

a substantially rigid arch having substantially parallel side edges and a U-shape therebetween;

means on the side edges of the arch for temporarily attaching the arch to a joint immobilizer;

a parallel pair of spaced apart elongated strips on top of the arch having a generally C-shaped transverse cross section defining an open sided substantially cylindrical channel therebetween, the diameter of the channel being substantially the same as the diameter of an intravenous tube and the width of the open side of the channel being less than the diameter of an intravenous tube for temporarily clamping a flexible intravenous tube thereto; and

an open ended slot through the arch and having a closed end adjacent the end of the strips for passing a clamped flexible intravenous tube between the strips and an infusion needle beneath the arch.

4. An infusion guard comprising:

a substantially rigid arch having parallel side edges and a U-shape therebetween, said arch extending a substantial distance in a direction parallel to its side edges;

means on the outside of the arch for temporarily connecting a flexible intravenous tube thereto;

means on the arch between said side edges and longitudinally spaced from said means for connecting for passing the flexible intravenous tubing between the means for connecting on the outside of the arch and an infusion needle beneath the arch;

a substantially rigid extension on the arch for shielding a principal portion of flexible intravenous tubing between the means for connecting and an infusion needle beneath the arch; and

a half of a complementary connector along each parallel side edge of the arch for engagement with another complementary half of connector on a rigid member temporarily attached to a patient for temporarily attaching the arch to the patient.

5. An infusion guard as defined in claim 4 wherein the arch is formed of transparent material.

6. An infusion guard comprising:

a substantially rigid arch havingparallel side edges and a U-shape therebetween;

a first arch portion extending along the length of the arch;

a second arch portion extending along the length of the arch, said first and second arch portions cooperating for shielding a portion of flexible intravenous tubing between the means for connecting and an infusion needle beneath the arch; v

a longitudinal slot between the first and second arch portions and having a width greater than the diameter of intravenous tubing;

means on the arch for temporarily connecting a flexible intravenous tube thereto; and

a half of a complementary connector along each parallel side edge of the arch for engagement with another complementary half of connector on a rigid member temporarily attached to a patient for temporarily attaching the arch to the patient.

7. An infusion guard as defined in claim 6 wherein the means for clamping comprises:

an elongated clamping member having an approximately cylindrical passage therethrough and a longitudinally extending opening along one edge of the passage, the width of the opening being less than the diameter of the passage, the diameter of the passage being approximately that of intravenous tubing.

8. A combined immobilizer and infusion guard adapted for use on a limb adjacent an infusion site comprising:

a rigid joint immobilizer having a concave surface conforming to a portion ofa limb spanning ajoint;

means for attaching the joint immobilizer to a portion of a limb on each side of ajoint to be immobilized; and

means for shielding an infusion needle including an infusion guard comprising:

a U-shaped, substantially rigid arch from one side of the joint immobilizer to the other side thereof for straddling and shielding an infusion needle inserted in and supported by the limb;

means on the outside of said arch for clamping a flexible intravenous tube on the arch;

a rigid extension of the arch extending approxi-' mately parallel to the joint immobilizer over a principal portion of flexible intravenous tube between the means for clamping and the infusion needle;

means on the extension for passing the intravenous tube through the extension between the means for clamping and the needle; and

coupling means on the arch and joint immobilizer temporarily attaching the arch to the joint im mobilizer in a position over the infusion needle. 9. A combination as defined in claim 8 wherein the rigid member comprises a first portion having a surface complementary to a fore limb and a second portion approximately complementary to an extremity and wherein the second portion is angulated relative to the first portion sufficiently to expose veins on the dorsum of an extremity.

10. A combined immobilizer and infusion guard adapted for use on a limb adjacent an infusion site comprising:

a rigid joint immobilizer having a surface conforming to a portion of a limb spanning ajoint;

means for attaching the rigid joint immobilizer to a portion of a limb spanning ajoint;

a substantially rigid arch having a U-shape between its side edges from one side of the rigid joint immobilizer to the other side thereof;

means for clamping an intravenous tube on the arch;

a pair of parallel tracks along at least a portion of the length of the rigid joint immobilizer on opposite sides of the portion conforming to a limb;

connector means complementary to the tracks along side edges of the arch for temporarily attaching the arch to the rigid joint immobilizer in a position over the infusion site;

a rigid extension of the arch over a principal portion of intravenous tube between the means for clamping and the infusion site comprising:

a first arch portion extending along the length of the arch;

a second arch portion extending along the length of the arch; and

a longitudinal slot between the first and second arch portions and having a width greater than the diameter of intravenous tubing. 11. A joint immobilizer and guard for an infusion needle comprising:

means for temporarily attaching side edges of the arch to the immobilizer after an infusion needle is inserted, in a position covering the infusion needle;

means on the outside of the arch for temporarily clamping a flexible intravenous tube thereto;

means on the arch and spaced from said means for clamping for passing the flexible intravenous tube between the means for clamping and the infusion needle beneath the arch, said arch including a shielding portion extending along its length a sufficient distance for shielding a principal portion of the tube between the means for clamping and the needle; and

coupling means on the arch and joint immobilizer for temporarily attaching the joint immobilizer to a fore limb and to an extremity for immobilizing the joint therebetween. 4

oint immobilizer as defined in claim 11 wherein the first portion has a surface complementary to a forearm and the second portion has a hand grip.

13. A joint immobilizer as defined in claim 11 wherein the first portion has a surface substantially complementary to a foreleg and the second portion has a surface substantially complementary to a foot.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/877, 604/174, 128/888, 128/DIG.260, 128/DIG.600
International ClassificationA61M5/52
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/26, Y10S128/06, A61M2025/0213, A61M2025/028, A61M2025/0246, A61M25/02, A61M5/52
European ClassificationA61M5/52, A61M25/02