Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3724074 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1973
Filing dateFeb 22, 1971
Priority dateFeb 22, 1971
Publication numberUS 3724074 A, US 3724074A, US-A-3724074, US3724074 A, US3724074A
InventorsWallshein M
Original AssigneeWallshein M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brackets for supporting arch wires, and adapted to function in orthodontic procedures in systems for tilting, uprighting and turning teeth
US 3724074 A
Abstract
The brackets are made of resilient strip material bent in sinuous, convolute or tortious formations to include bight-joined flights one in front of another offering a plurality of V-clamp structures with transverse channels for arch wires of various sizes and cross-sections; the rear flight being fixed onto a band which is for tight fit onto a tooth. The channels may have fulcrum teeth or teats to grip an arch wire against movement therealong and may be made to serve to aid a slight tilting movement of a tooth. A fulcrum may be provided by having a narrow intermediate flight. For appreciable tilting and uprighting of a tooth, the channel is flared from a central region to have the form of the longitudinal half of an hour-glass shape, thus providing a fulcrum and clearance for arch wire movement in a vertical plane. The bracket is also adaptable to move a tooth a part turn about its longitudinal axis. The V-clamps function cumulatively, offering high clamping action. The flights may have transverse dents for tie wires.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Wallshein 51 Apr. 3, 1973 [54] BRACKETS FOR SUPPORTING ARCH WIRES, AND ADAPTED TO FUNCTION IN ORTHODONTIC PROCEDURES IN SYSTEMS FOR TILTING, UPRIGIITING AND TURNING TEETH [76] Inventor: Melvin Wallshein, 8645 Bay Parkway, Brooklyn, NY.

[22] Filed: Feb. 22, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 117,556

[52] US. Cl. ..32/14 A [51] Int. Cl ..A6lc 7/00 [58] Field of Search ..32/l4 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,052,028 9/1962 Wallshein ..32/l4 A Primary Examiner-Robert Peshock AtlorneyM. D. Nissenbaum [57] ABSTRACT The brackets are made of resilient strip material bent in sinuous, convolute or tortious formations, to include bight-joined flights one in front of another offering a plurality of V-clamp structures with transverse channels for arch wires of various sizes and cross-sections; the rear flight being fixed onto a band which is for tight fit onto a tooth. The channels may have fulcrum teeth or teats to grip an arch wire against movement therealong and may be made to serve to aid a slight tilting movement of a tooth. A fulcrum may be provided by having a narrow intermediate flight. For appreciable tilting and uprighting of a tooth, the channel is flared from a central region to have the form of the longitudinal half of an hour-glass shape, thus providing a fulcrum and clearance for arch wire movement in a vertical plane. The bracket is also adaptable to move a tooth a part turn about its longitudinal axis. The V- clamps function cumulatively, offering high clamping action. The flights may have transverse dents for tie wires.

14 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures FIG.5

PATENTEDAPRB ms 3,724; 074

FIG.6 F IG.?

INVENTOR,

MELVIN WALLSHEIN 01 W v v ATTORNEY.

BRACKETS FOR SUPPORTING ARCH WIRES, AND ADAPTED TO FUNCTION IN ORTHODONTIC PROCEDURES IN SYSTEMS FOR TILTING, UPRIGIITING AND TURNING TEETII The present invention relates to brackets to be carried on teeth in the mouth, for association with an arch wire in systems for the practice of orthodontic procedures.

A bracket being confined usually within the face area of one tooth, must of necessity be of a relatively small dimension, so clamping force attainable by a V-clamp is rather limited, because the strip material forming the clamp, must be quite thin. To increase the clamping grip, thicker material was tried, but increase in thickness merely, in such items of small size, stunts flexibility and the capability to clamp is practically nullified. Hence, in brackets heretofore utilizing the V- form, a high clamping grip was unattainable.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide novel and improved orthodontic brackets for mounting arch wire structure therein by V-clamp action which is stronger in intensity than was heretofore attainable in such items, adjustable when need be to allow some relative longitudinal movement, or compete looseness.

Another object thereof is to provide an orthodontic bracket of the character described, for mounting a plurality of arch wires of different cross sections, holding them by clamping actions which are individually adjustable.

A further object thereof is to provide in said orthodontic brackets, means to allow the bracket to swing on its associated arch wire, which action affords arrangement for procedures to tilt and upright teeth.

A further object of this invention is to provide novel and improved orthodontic brackets for supporting an arch wire by clamping action, and without any further appurtenances, is capable of use for turning a tooth about its longitudinal axis.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide novel and improved orthodontic brackets of the kind set forth, having the mentioned attributes, and which are simple in construction, reasonable in cost to manufacture, easy to manipulate, having new modes of operation, and which are effective and efficient in carrying out the purposes for which they are designed.

Other. objects and advantages will become apparent as this disclosure proceeds.

For one practice of this invention, the bracket is of resilient metal strip bent in convolute formation comprised of three generally upright flights one in front of another, with the rear flight secured on a band for tight mounting onto a tooth. The intermediate flight has a plurality of transverse channels for different arch wires. The flights have transverse dents for tie wires. Small sharp fulcrums are struck in channel walls to extend inwardly at center region, one opposite another, for engagement with top and bottom of an arch wire positioned through the channel. In another embodiment, the channel is flared from fulcrum region so the channel wall is like a longitudinal half of an hour glass peripheral wall form; the central intersection serving as the fulcrum. In still another embodiment, the fulcrums are offered by having one flight which is relatively narrow, and bent to have the channels. Brackets are also made without fulcrum means. A bracket is also made of an endless strip to increase the number of bights included in the structure to attain higher gripping action. All shown brackets present a plurality of V-clamp formations.

In the accompanying drawing forming part of this specification, similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side view of a patients upper teeth about which is an orthodontic arch wire shown mounted on brackets embodying teachings of this invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view showing one of the brackets carried on a metal band which is for tight mounting onto a tooth.

All of the following figures are further magnified.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the bracket included in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a rear perspective view of FIG. 3, showing an arch wire associated therewith and includes the use of a tie wire.

FIG. 5 is an end view of FIG. 3, showing two arch wires associated therewith.

FIGS. 6 and 7 are end view of modified bracket constructions.

FIG. 8 shows the bracket of FIG. 3 bent open, in perspective.

FIGS. 9 and 10 are perspective views of modified bracket constructions, shown bent open.

All bent-open views are presented, in order to expose their internal structure.

FIG. 1 1 is a fragmentary top plan view of the bracket of FIG. 3, shown mounted on a band carried tightly on a tooth; said bracket holding the arch wire therein, and in such association whereby the said tooth will be given a part turn about its longitudinal axis.

FIG. 12 is an elevational view of upper teeth in a mouthin an arrangement using the bracket of FIG. 10

in conjunction with means to impose a force which is diamatically shown, to effect the tilting of a tooth.

In the drawing, the numeral 15 designates generally an orthodontic bracket made of resilient metal strip bent in convolute form so it comprises three substantially upright flights, one in front of the other as indicated respectively by the numerals 16, 17 and 18; the rear flight 16 being joined with the intermediate flight 17, by a bight 19, while the front and rear flights are joined by the bight 20. The middle flight 17 is sinuously bent to have the transverse channels 21, 22, 23 for the reception of arch wires as 24, 25 and 26 therethrough respectively. All the flights are provided with transverse dents 27-31 which are for tie wires as shown at 31', if same are needed. The rear flight 16 may have welded thereto a mounting strap 32, which in turn is welded to the periphery of a metal band 33, adapted to be tightly fitted onto a tooth as shown on the teeth 34 36, for carrying the arch wire 37 of an orthodontic system for correction by well known procedures. The channels 21 and 23 are for supporting arch wires 24 and 26, which are of round cross-section. The channel 22 is for an arch wire 25, of rectangular cross section. The number of arch wires used and their cross-sectional shape, is determined by the procedure to be applied for effecting tooth corrections. The flights are in close proximity with one another so when an arch wire is mounted, it will be clamped and the bights will be stressed. The bracket 15, it is to be noted, presents one V-clamp structure comprising the front and rear flights which are connected by the bight 20, and a second V- clamp structure comprising the middle and rear flights joined by the bight 19, and that there is also a clamping action between the intermediate flight l7 and the front flight 18. The cross-section of an arch wire used through any duct formed by adjacent flights, is greater than the duct size in empty condition, hence on mounting an arch wire, both bights will become effected and thereby stressed.

Other suggested bracket constructions to accomplish cumulative bight stressing upon the inserion of an arch wire, are shown in the FIGS. 6 and 7, where the bracket 38 is made of an endless strip bent into a tortious form having four flights, following the general scheme of structure taught herein, and includes the bights 39,40,41 and 42', while the bracket designated generally as 42, is a sinuous form which includes the bights 43,44 and 45. The use of tie wires around one or more pairs of ducts on two different flights, may be resorted to, to further increase clamping action, or by straddling the arch wire tightly by a tie wire arranged as 31, in dents on the same flight. The use of the channel shown at 46, for the attachment of various appurtenances used in conjunction with the arch wire in various known procedures, is well known in orthodontia, and is included merely to show the versatility of the bracket.

To provide that the bracket shall be held against longitudinal movement along the arch wire, the channel holding such wire has struck up therefrom at central region, the opposite tiny sharp teeth 47, 47 to engage the top and bottom of the arch wire. Such hold, and in fact any clamping action on any arch wire, can be adjusted by opening or closing the bight it controls. Making these teeth of greater height, makes them serve as fulcrums to allow the bracket to swing in the vertical plane, which motion, orthodontists know how to utilize to tilt a tooth by the application of a force as shown at F in FIG. 12, to the bracket body, for which reference may be also had to my US. Pat. No. 3,218,712 ofNov. 23, 1965.

The bracket structure 48, shown in FIG. 9, is like the bracket 15, but the fulcrum means is provided by the intermediate flight 49, which is made narrow, but follows the clamping scheme of this invention. A very practical bracket for tilting a tooth is shown in FIG. 10, where the bracket indicated generally by the numeral 50, has the channels 51 and 52 flared from center region, to give an arch wire therethrough considerable ability for swing in relation to the bracket. In fact, it is the bracket that does the swinging. Each of said channels have the configuration of the longitudinal half of what may be called an hour-glass form; the junction lines 53 and 54, serving as the fulcrums.

Besides supporting an arch wire, these brackets as shown in the FIGS. 11 and 12, are adapted for tooth correction functions. The tooth 55 needs to be modes at part turn in clockwise direction. Equipped with any bracket illustrated, but shown in FIG. 11 to be the bracket 38 having the arch wire 37 clamped therein, the closing of the stressed bracket will cause it to slide to the left along the arch wire, thereby effecting such needed correction, at least in part. With several changes increasing the size of the arch wire, the turning movement is made to progress until full correction is accomplished. In the condition shown in FIG. 12, the tooth 56, equipped with the bracket 50, is shown moved to a tilted position, by utilizing means imposing a force F on the bracket, for instance by a compression spring anchored on the arch wire, as shown in my said patent.

This invention is capable of numerous forms and various applications without departing from the essential features herein disclosed. It is therefore intended and desired that the embodiments thereof herein shall be deemed merely illustrative and not restrictive, and that the patent shall cover all patentable novelty herein set forth; reference being had to the following claims rather than to the specific showing and description herein, to indicate the scope of this invention.

I claim 1. In an orthodontic bracket to support one or more arch wires, said bracket comprising an element adapted to be rigidly attached onto a tooth in a mouth, a unitary member of resilient strip material in convolute formation secured to said element, said unitary member including at least first, second and third generally upright portions in close proximity with one another lying in separate general planes in non-intersecting relation with the tooth when said element is attached to the tooth, said first upright portion being secured to said element, said second upright portion being disposed between and movable relative to said first and third upright portions, at least one of said second and third upright portions being provided with a predetermined number of transverse channels adapted to hold an arch wire therethrough with said second and third upright portions coacting to retain the arch wire within its associated channel, first resilient bight means connecting said second upright portion of said first upright portion, and second resilient bight means connecting said third upright portion to said first upright portion, whereby said second and third upright portions are moved out of their respective general planes when the arch wire is disposed therebetween to effectively stress said first and second resilient bight means so that said stressed first and second resilient bight means tend to return said second and third upright .portions to their respective general planes and thereby retain the arch wire within its associated channel.

2. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 1, wherein at least two of said upright portions are provided with transverse grooves for holding tie wires.

3. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 1, wherein at least one channel is provided with opposite internally extending protuberances positioned to contact top and bottom portions of an arch wire positioned through said at least one channel, said protuberances serving as fulcrums for the latter-mentioned arch wire to have swinging movement in a vertical plane.

4. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 3, wherein each of said protuberances is a sharp tooth.

5. An orthodontic bracket according to claim I, wherein at least one channel is flared outwardly from an intermediate region in both directions to define two flared channel portions with a juncture serving as a fulcrum for an arch wire positioned through said at least one channel for enabling the latter-mentioned arch wire to swing in a vertical plane.

6. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 1, wherein said second upright portion is comparatively of narrow width and provided with at least one channel, said second upright portion being centrally positioned in relation to said first and third upright portions to serve as a fulcrum for an arch wire positioned in said at least one channel for enabling the latter-mentioned arch wire to swing in a vertical plane.

7. In an orthodontic bracket to support one or more arch wires, said bracket comprising an element adapted to be rigidly attached onto a tooth in a mouth, a unitary member of resilient strip material in convolute formation secured to said element, said unitary member including at least first, second and third generally upright portions in close proximity with one another lying in separate general planes in non-intersecting relation with the tooth when said element is attached to the tooth, said first upright portion being secured to said element, said second upright portion being disposed between and movable relative to said first and third upright portions, at least one of said second and third upright portions being provided with a predetermined number of transverse channels adapted to hold an arch wire therethrough with said second and third upright portions coacting to retain the arch wire within its associated channel, first resilient bight means connecting said second upright portion to said first upright portion, and second resilient bight means connecting said third upright portion to said second upright portion, whereby said second and third upright portions are moved out of their respective general planes when the arch wire is disposed therebetween to effectively stress said first and second resilient bight means so that said stressed first and second resilient bight means tend to return said second and third upright portions to their respective general planes and thereby retain the arch wire within its associated channel.

8. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 7, wherein third resilient bight means connect a fourth generally upright portion to said third upright portion.

9. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 8, wherein fourth resilient bight means connect said fourth upright portion to said first upright portion to define an endless unitary member.

10. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 7, wherein at least two of said upright portions are provided with transverse grooves for holding tie wires.

11. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 7, wherein at least one channel is provided with opposite internally extending protuberances positioned to contact top and bottom portions of an arch wire positioned through said at least one channel, said protuberances serving as fulcrums for the latter-mentioned arch wire to have swinging movement in a vertical plane.

12. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 11, wherein each of said protuberances is a sharp tooth.

13. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 7, wherein at least one channel is flared outwardly from an intermediate region in both directions to define two flared channel portions with a juncture serving as a fulcrum for an arch wire positioned through said at least one channel for enabling the latter-mentioned arch wire to swing in a vertical plane.

14. An orthodontic bracket according to claim 7, wherein said second upright portion is comparatively of narrow width and rovided with at least one channel said second uprigh portion being centrally positioned in relation to said first and third upright portions to serve as a fulcrum for an arch wire positioned in said at least one channel for enabling the latter-mentioned arch wire to swing in a vertical plane.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3052028 *Sep 27, 1960Sep 4, 1962Wallshein MelvinOrthodontic brackets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4799883 *Mar 25, 1987Jan 24, 1989Stoller Arnold EOrthodontic mirror image brackets to removably receive the end portions of lingual arch wires
US6302688Sep 27, 1999Oct 16, 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyOrthodontic appliance with self-releasing latch
US6582226May 3, 2001Jun 24, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyOrthodontic appliance with self-releasing latch
US6607383Feb 15, 2001Aug 19, 2003Norbert AbelsOrthodontic bracket
US6616445Sep 12, 2001Sep 9, 2003Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets having a spring element interconnecting the base and ligation cover
US6655957Sep 12, 2001Dec 2, 2003Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets formed from multiple plastic materials
US6655958Sep 12, 2001Dec 2, 2003Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets that include a film hinge
US6659766Sep 12, 2001Dec 9, 2003Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets having a safety locking feature for ligation cover
US6659767Sep 12, 2001Dec 9, 2003Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets that include a deformable ligation cover to facilitate locking and unlocking
US6682345Jun 21, 2002Jan 27, 2004Tp Orthodontics, Inc.Orthodontic bracket
US6733286Sep 12, 2001May 11, 2004Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets that have multiple initially open arch wire slots ligatable with a single cover
US6932597Feb 6, 2004Aug 23, 2005Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets including a metal ligation cover hingedly connected to a bracket base
US6960080Mar 4, 2003Nov 1, 2005Norbert AbelsOrthodontic brackets with elongate film hinge
US6960081Jun 18, 2003Nov 1, 2005Norbert AbelsOrthodontic brackets with elongate film hinge
US6964565Feb 19, 2004Nov 15, 2005Norbert AbelsTwo-part orthodontic bracket
US6984127Mar 20, 2003Jan 10, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanyOrthodontic brace with self-releasing appliances
US7014460Nov 4, 2002Mar 21, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanyOrthodontic appliance with fatigue-resistant archwire retaining latch
US7140876Oct 31, 2003Nov 28, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanyOrthodontic appliance with latch for retaining an archwire
US7210927Apr 6, 2005May 1, 2007Norbert AbelsSelf-ligating orthodontic brackets including a metal ligation cover hingedly connected to a bracket base
US7217125Dec 23, 2005May 15, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanySelf-ligating orthodontic appliance with clip
US7377777Dec 23, 2005May 27, 20083M Innovative Properties CompanyOrthodontic appliance with archwire-engaging clip
US20120301838 *Aug 7, 2012Nov 29, 2012Robert KabbaniTooth Top Part
DE3720640A1 *Jun 23, 1987Jan 7, 1988Tp Orthodontics IncIncisor appliance for free tilting of a crown and for uprighting the root to a predetermined extent
DE3720640C2 *Jun 23, 1987Aug 13, 1998Tp Orthodontics IncZahnspange
WO2002007637A1 *Jul 23, 2001Jan 31, 2002Norbert AbelsOrthodontic bracket
Classifications
U.S. Classification433/11
International ClassificationA61C7/00, A61C7/30
Cooperative ClassificationA61C7/30
European ClassificationA61C7/30