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Publication numberUS3724456 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1973
Filing dateMay 5, 1971
Priority dateMay 5, 1971
Publication numberUS 3724456 A, US 3724456A, US-A-3724456, US3724456 A, US3724456A
InventorsR Waxman
Original AssigneeR Waxman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Extremity support attachment for intravenous feeding
US 3724456 A
Abstract
A device to support a human extremity, such as a hand or foot and to be secured thereto, having among other uses intravenous (i.v.) feeding and blood transfusion, the device including a member of a rigid material contoured to hold comfortably and in an anatomically correct position one of such extremities when the member is laid upon a horizontal surface. A disposable liner of sterilized resilient cellular material is placed directly upon the contoured area of the member and is folded over the extremity after the i.v. needle has been properly inserted in the patient's vein and the extremity is disposed therein. Straps having prickly inner surfaces are provided to be wrapped over the exposed area of the thus-folded cellular liner to secure the extremity to the contoured device and the i.v. needle to the patient's extremity. Locking means may also be employed to prevent a patient from attempting to remove the straps.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Waxman 1 Apr. 3, 1973 [76] Inventor: Rudy Waxman, 17132 Killion St.,

Encino, Calif. 91316 [22] Filed: May 5, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 140,458

[52] U.S. Cl. ..l28/133, 128/DIG. 6, 128/214 R [51] Int. Cl. ..A6lm 05/00 [58] Field of Search..128/133, 214 R, 157,165, 155, 128/87-90, DIG. 6

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,763,264 9/1956 Mclnnemy ..l28/l33 3,295,518 1/1967 Hazelwood et al. ..l28/133 3,297,026 1/1967 Van Pelt ..l28/133 2,658,510 11/1953 Hilton ..l28/165 X 3,059,636 10/1962 Schwartz ..128/l33 3,256,880 6/1966 Caypinar... ..l28/l33 3,640,273 2/1972 Ray ..l28/l33 X Primary Examiner-Dalton L. Truluck Attorney-Smyth, Roston & Pavitt [57] ABSTRACT A device to support a human extremity, such as a hand or foot and to be secured thereto, having. among other uses intravenous (i.v.) feeding and blood transfusion, the device including a member of a rigid material contoured to hold comfortably and in an anatomically correct position one of such extremities when the member is laid upon a horizontal surface. A disposable liner of sterilized resilient cellular material is placed directly upon the contoured area of the member and is folded over the extremity after the i.v. needle has been properly inserted in the patients vein and the extremity is disposed therein. Straps having prickly inner surfaces are provided to be wrapped over the exposed area of the thus-folded cellular liner to secure the extremity to the contoured device and the i.v. needle to the patients extremity. Locking means may also be employed to prevent a patient from attempting to remove the straps.

10 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEUAPRIB ms 3,724,456 SHEET 2 0F 2 [KA/eeJ/e EXTREMITY SUPPORT ATTACHMENT FOR INTRAVENOUS FEEDING RELATED APPLICATION The invention of this application attains certain objectives which are sought to be attained by the invention described and claimed in my co-pending application, Ser. No. 882,831, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1 Field of the Invention This invention has its primary application in the medical field in that its principal presently contemplated use is for improving intravenous feeding and blood transfusion processes.

2. Description of the Prior Art Intravenous feeding and transfusions are among the most frequently accomplished and essential treatments of seriously injured or ill patients in hospitals. Such treatments have been provided for a number of decades. Although some i.v. feeding may be done through veins in or about the patients elbow or leg joints, most of i.v. feeding today is accomplished through insertion of a needle in the patients hand or wrist. Sometimes it may also be done through veins in the foot or ankle. After inserting the needle into the patients vein, its retention at the proper angle (usually parallel) relative to the patients hand is absolutely essential in order that the fluid to be injected may pass into the vein properly and continuously over prolonged periods. The needle employed is sharply cut at an angle at its point. While this facilitates insertion into the vein, the sharp point is quite capable of puncturing the other side of the vein wall if the needle should be improperly moved after it has been inserted into the vein. Further, movement of the needle in the opposite direction from that of the insertion could result in the needle being inadvertently withdrawn from the vein with the result of the vein collapsing.

I.v. feeding, moreover, is an extremely slow and time-consuming process (e.g., 24 to 72 hours is usual), even when the patients circulation is relatively normal. However, when a patients hand must be kept in one position for the prolonged period required for i.v. feeding, the blood circulation rate is substantially decreased, with the result that i.v. feeding process may become a continuous process over a period of 2 or 3 weeks. The discomfort to a patient-through such prolonged continuous i.v. feeding process, with the patients arm being kept immobilized, is almost impossible for one who has not been subjected to it, to imagine.

Although the foregoing facts, as well as others, relating to i.v. feeding and blood transfusion processes have been well known by the medical profession and those persons employed by, or associated with hospitals, such processes have been accomplished until recentlyprincipally by inserting the tube-connected needle into the hand or wrist vein, adhesively taping the needle and tube end to the patients hand or wrist, and further taping a wooden splint or armboard to the patients arm with the thus-taped needle and hand, and hoping that the patient does not move his or her thus-taped hand so as to disrupt the position of the needle. Should it become necessary for anyone to check the needle insertion, all taping must be cut and pulled off the patients hand and arm and then the needle, hand, arm and splint carefully retaped to continue the i.v. feeding. Unless the hand or arm were previously shaved, ripping adhesive tape from a patients skin is, of course, quite painful.

Recently, there has been offered as a substitute for the taped wooden splint or armboard, an elbow immobilizer which is comprised of a pair of flat elongate metal elements which are disposed one on each side of the patients arm with a wide strap extending centrally between the elements and to be tightened over the patients elbow; and a strap extending between each pair of ends of the elements and over the opposite side of the patients arm. With this immobilizer" the needle and tube end are still taped on the patients forearm for i.v. feedings. This immobilizer, however, has no use on the hand and wrist for i. v. feedings, but is designed only for i.v. feeding through the clavicle vein inside a patients elbow. Moreover, the immobilizer appears not to have been considered satisfactory because of difficulty in setting and adjusting it properly. Unless perfectly adjusted, the patients arm can be moved with danger of vein puncture by a needle withdrawal. Thus,

the arrnboard does not prevent disorientation of the needle with possible puncturing of the vein wall or inadvertent removal and collapsing of the vein wall, should the patient move his arm during the prolonged i.v. feeding or transfusion process. While the. armretaining cradle disclosed and claimed in my co-pending application Ser. No. 882,831, offers many advantages over the cradle and arrnboard where i.v. feeding is to be accomplished in the vicinity of the elbow, it is not the best solution for i.v. feeding through a hand or wrist, since it does not retain the hand in its unusual horizontal at rest position and is better employed where the needle is inserted at some acute angle relative to the arm instead of parallel to it where it can be taped or otherwise secured to the arm or hand.

Moreover, it has not been practicable to sterilize the conventional armboard or splint so that it must either be discarded after use on any one patient or covered with a type of sterilized paper liner. Such a paper liner, however, performs no function of retaining the needle in its set position but only to insulate the patients skin from the board.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a comfortable readily removable device which maintains the patients hand, wrist and part of his forearm in an anatomically correct position, for use in effecting the i.v. feeding and transfusion processes through a patients extremity, and particularly his or her hand or wrist. A molded plastic member contoured comfortably to receive either the right or left hand, wrist and part of the forearm, with the patients fingers supported but free to move, serves as the base of the device. A special liner with functional flaps is laid first in the contoured area before the hand and wrist are placed thereon. Means are provided to prevent the liner from slipping when it is laid in the contoured area. The needle is then inserted properly in the vein and is secured to the hand or wrist by first wrapping the liner flaps about the hand and wrist and over the needle and by then securing the thus wrapped hand and wrist to the contoured base by straps.

Preferably these straps pass through slotting along the upper edges of the contoured member and include a prickly surface which contacts the cellular flaps and retains them against lateral movement relative thereto. With this assembly, the patient may move his or her arm and fingers, thereby improving the circulation of blood in the arm with the result that the desired rate of i.v. feeding or transfusion can be maintained, in contrast to the rate in a hand which is completely immobilized for prolonged periods. Additionally, the comfort to the patient is immeasurably improved.

It may be seen that with the device of the present invention, once the needle has been properly inserted, securing the needle to hand and wrist in the device, as well as their removal, can be accomplished with a minimum expenditure of time and effort. Additionally, cognizant hospital personnel may readily check the needle insertion and feeding through the venipuncture by simply unwrapping the device without the discomfort to the patient attendant upon the cutting and ripping away of adhesive tape.

Since the feeding needle and patients hand and wrist are well secured in relation to each other, the patient may move his or her arm even to the point of sitting up or walking around, without danger of the needle being moved or displaced and puncturing the vein wall, or inadvertently being withdrawn from the vein. By his ability to move his arm, the patient may improve its circulation and hence maintain the predetermined i.v. feeding or transfusion rate.

Although the contoured plastic base or receptacle may be placed in an autoclave for sterilization, this is not necessary since the disposable cellular liners are intended to be sterilized and are thrown away after any use, and these liners are so made and inserted in the receptacle that no part of the patients hand or wrist ever contacts the receptacle itself.

Lastly, it should be pointed out that because of the simplicity of the several components of the present invention, they may be made and offered to the medical community at a relatively low cost. Since, in use, the device effects a great saving of the time of highlyskilled nursing and doctor personnel, the present invention can effect a significant reduction in the hospital care costs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view taken from above, of the contoured member which receives the patients hand, wrist and part of his forearm.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the liner.

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the contoured member.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of the contoured member.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged detail of the hinged strap end retainer.

FIG. 6 illustrates the contoured member with the liner placed on it to receive the patients hand, etc.

FIG. 7 illustrates the placement of the hand on the liner member and the insertion of the needle.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a patients hand with the inserted i.v. needle, and his wrist and part of his forearm secured in the device.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 4 of the drawings, a member 10 preferably molded of a composite of ABS plastic plus 20 percent glass, in two parts 10a and 10b, is formed slightly arched in the contour shown to provide two side recesses 12a and 12b, each of which comfortably accomodates the base of a persons thumb and the thumb itself and represents a continuance of recessed contouring 12 adapted to receive a part of the forearm and wrist of the patient, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. Intermediate the side recesses 12a, 12b is a slight plateau 14 which terminates in a shoulder 16, itself contoured to provide four recesses 16a, 16b, 16c and 16d to receive and support comfortably a persons fingers of either his left or right hand. Because of the side recesses 12a, 12b and the layout of the plateau 14 and shoulder 16, the member 10 may be employed ambidextrously to receive either the right or left hand of a patient.

The upper part or shell 10a constituting the top half of the member 10 may be slotted at two places 18a, 18b inside the edge at the top of each side wall 20 to permit a strap 22 to pass through the slotting. As best seen in FIGS. 3 and 6, each slot 18a, 18b on one side of the top of the shell 10a may be offset by at least the width of the strap from the slot 18a, 18b on the other side of the shell 10a. Each strap 22 preferably passes through the slottings 18a or 18b in the shell 10a, so that its ends extend approximately equidistantly out of the slotting in the manner'shown in FIGS. 1, 6 and 7. Optionally, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 hinged clamps 24 may be provided on each side of the shell 10b to receive the free end of each strap 22 after it has been wrapped around the patients hand or wrist in the manner hereinafter explained, and to clamp such end to the underside of the shell 10b. The underside of the shell 10b which forms the bottom of the member 10 preferably is provided with loop strips 26a, 26b as shown in FIG. 3, the function of which strips will be hereinafter explained.

The inside of each strap 22 is provided with a prickly surface 28 to provide an interlock such as that obtained by a product known as VELCRO, made by the Velcro Corporation, 681 Fifth Avenue, in the city of New York. The prickly surface 28, however, differs from that employed to secure the usual VELCRO interlock in a manner hereinafter explained. Strips 26c and 26d on the underside of shell 10b include a similar prickly surface 28.

The upper and lower shells 10a, 10b may be secured together by an interlocking edge arrangement (not shown), or simply by fastening devices such as screws or rivets (also not shown).

FIG. 2 shows the pattern of a liner 30 specially designed for use with the member 10. This liner 30 includes a central body portion 30a which may be generally oblong in configuration, an earlike projection 30b extending from one side 300 of the body portion 30a, the base 30b of which projection is preferably located from the upper edge 30a of the central body portion 30a by a distance equal to the average distance between the tip of a person s middle finger and the base of his thumb. Extending from the side 30d of the body portion 30a opposite the earlike projection 30b is a first oblong flap 30e. A second oblong flap 30f extends laterally just below and on the same side as the earlike projection 30b. The entire liner 30 is preferably made of a non-allergenic, cellular, spongelike material.

The prickly surface 28 on the straps should be such that the fine prickles project normally outwardly from the strap and do not include hook type tips which are found in the usual VELCRO materials intended to interlock each other. The straight projections will be found adequately to engage the cellular spongelike material of the liner 30 as well as the loop material of the straps 26a, 26b, to prevent lateral disengagement while permitting disengagement by pulling the prickled surface perpendicularly away from the cellular or loop material which it engages.

In use, the member is first laid on a horizontal prime surface and then covered with a liner 30, as shown in FIG. 6. The end 30a of the liner 30 is passed over the shoulder 16 and pressed into contact with the strip 260. Similarly, the end 30g is pulled around the lower extremity 10c of the member 10 and pressed against the strip 26d. Thereby, the liner is secured against slippage relative to the member 10. The I. V. needle 32 is properly inserted in the patients hand vein and the patients hand, wrist and forearm and then placed on the thus-lined contoured surface in the manner shown in FIG. 7. At this point the flap 302 is carefully brought over the patients hand to cover the same and the inserted needle. Flap 30c is then secured in that position by bringing the left-hand strap 22a over the flap 30c and pressing it down gently onto the cellular material of that flap. This results in an engagement of the prickled inner surface 28 of the strap 22a with the cellular material of the flap. Strap 22b is then also brought over and into engagement with the cellular material of the flap. The ends of each strap 22a, 22b are brought around and pressed against the strips 26a, 26b. In like manner the flap 30f is brought over the patients wrist and secured by straps 22c and 22d. However, the ends of the straps 22c, 22d are inserted in recessed 24a and hinged clamps 24 are closed against the straps and recesses. The end result of thus securing the hand and needle appears as shown in FIG. 8.

It will be readily appreciated by those in the hospital field who are concerned with i.v. feeding that the device of the present invention offers many advantages over the present taped splint arrangement. In the first place, it may quickly be placed on the patients hand by the cognizant hospital personnel and secured by light fingertip contact without any constricting tourniquet effect. Secondly, the straps and liner flaps may readily be removed and replaced should it prove necessary to check the needle insertion and feeding flow therethrough. Further, since the liner may be autoclaved whereas adhesive tape may not, the present invention offers a sterile covering over the point of needle insertion and thereby minimizes possible infection at that point. In addition, since the member 10 is contoured to receive the-patients hand and the fingers are free to be moved over the shoulder 16, the patients hand, wrist and forearm are maintained in an anatomically correct position thereby affording great comfort to the patient, as compared with prior devices. Moreover, the device is light to the point where even an ill person may lift and even carry it. This may enable the physician to prescribe desired bodily movement including walking to and from the bathroom, or to have the patient sit up or walk while the i. v. feeding continues. This may improve circulation and hasten the patients recovery in some situations. Lastly, the device may be made and sold at a relatively inexpensive cost once the initial mold cost is amortized.

While the device has been specifically designed for i.v. feeding through a patients hand, the present teaching may be readily adapted to providing a similar device for securing an i.v. needle to a patients foot or ankle. Also, the device of the present invention could be readily adapted by those skilled in the art of giving blood transfusions through the hand or wrist vein.

More importantly, however, the device of the present invention may be employed to provide support for a fractured hand, wrist and/or lower forearm in lieu of a splint or cast.

Iclaim:

1. A device for maintaining a patients hand or wrist in an anatomically correct position, said device having among other uses, removably and comfortably securing an i.v. feeding needle inserted into a vein of a patients hand or wrist substantially parallel to the patients wrist, said device comprising:

A. A slightly arched member contoured to receive the patients wrist and at least part of his forearm, said member being provided with a contoured recess for a thumb on at least one side of the member, and an adjacent contoured plateau to support the palm of the hand, said plateau terminating at its forward end witha transverse shoulder, said shoulder having four contoured recesses comfortably to receive four fingers of either a right or left hand in movably dependent positions, said member being provided with at least one means to hold a strap means adaptedto wrap around said member and the patients hand when disposed on said member;

B. A removable liner, said liner i. being shaped with a central body adapted to cover that portion of the contoured area of the member in which the patients hand and wrist are received; 7

. having at least one flap extending laterally of the central body substantially normally to the patients wrist when placed on the said member, said flap being adapted to be wrapped around the patient s wrist; and

iii. being of resilient cellular composition, non-allergenic and autoclavable; and

iv. said liner being disposed in its open position upon the upper face of said member prior to the patients hand and wrist being placed on said member;

C. Strap means, said strap means i. being passed through said means to hold a strap means in said contoured member;

ii. providing at least one segment which extends around and over the top of said member from the side opposite the side of said flap; and

iii. including on the inner side of said segment a substantially fine prickly area which, which placed in contact with the top of said cellular liner flap, adheres thereto along the area of engagement to prevent lateral disengagement, but not disengagement by a pulling in a direction perpendicular to the area of engagement; whereby after an i.v. needle is inserted properly in the patients wrist vein and the flap is brought over the needle and wrist, the flap may be secured in that position by bringing said strap segment up and over said flap from the opposite side of the member and pressing its prickly surface against the cellular material of the flap, thereby securing the patients hand, wrist and forearm to the member and the needle to the wrist in the thus-properly inserted position, and enabling the hand, wrist and forearm to be maintained in an anatomically correct position.

2. A device for maintaining a patients hand or wrist in an anatomically correct position, said device having among other uses, removably and comfortably securing an i.v. feeding needle inserted into a vein of a patients hand or wrist substantially parallel to the patients wrist, said device comprising:

A. a slightly arched member contoured to receive the patients wrist and the butt of either the left or right hand, together with the patients wrist and at least part of his forearm, said member being provided with a contoured recess for a thumb on each side of the member, and a contoured plateau disposed between said recesses to support the palm of the hand, said plateau terminating at its forward end with a transverse shoulder, said shoulder having four contoured recesses comfortably to receive four fingers of either a right or left hand in movably dependant positions, said member being provided with at least one means to hold a strap means adapted to wrap around said member and the patients hand when disposed on said member;

B. a removable liner, said liner i. being shaped with a central body adaptedto cover that portion of the contoured area of the member in which the patients hand and wrist are received;

. having at least one flap extending laterally of the central body substantially normally to the patients wrist when placed on the said member, said flap being adapted to be wrapped around the patients wrist; and

iii. being of resilient cellular composition, non-allergic and autoclavable; and

iv. said liner being disposed in its open position upon the upper face of said member prior to the patients hand and wrist being placed on said member;

C. Strap means, said strap means i. being passed through said means to hold a strap means in said contoured member;

ii. providing at least one segment which extends around and over the top of said member from the side opposite the side of said flap; and

iii. including on the inner side of said segment a substantially fine prickly area which, when placed in contact with the top of said cellular liner flap, adheres thereto along the area of engagement to prevent lateral disengagement, but not disengagement by a pulling in a direction perpendicular to the area of engagement;

Whereby after an i.v. needle is inserted properly in the patients wrist vein and the flap is brought over the needle and wrist, the flap may be secured in that position by bringing said strap segment up and over said flap from the opposite side of the member and pressing its prickly surface against the hand, wrist and forearmto the member and the needle to the wrist in the thus-properly inserted position.

3. The device as described in claim 1, wherein the contoured member is molded as a pair of mating hollow plastic shells joined together.

4. The device as described in claim 3, wherein the lower portion of the member includes a hinged clamp to receive and secure the free end of each strap means to the underside of the member, said clamp being located in and as a part of the side wall of the member, to clamp over the strap end.

5. The device as described in claim 3, wherein the lower portion of the member includes a hinged clamp to receive and secure the free end of each strap means, and the clamp includes a movable bottom wall section.

6. The device as described in claim 3 wherein the underside of the member is provided with similar prickly straps at each end to secure the liner from movement relative to the member.

7. The device as described in claim 3 wherein the underside of the member is provided with VELCRO type loop material to receive and grip the ends of the straps.

8. A reversible removable and disposable liner for use in a device as described in claim 1 to maintain in an anatomically correct position either a left or right hand of a patient, said liner comprising a sheet of non-allergenic autoclavable, resilient cellular material cut in a pattern to include v A. a generally oblong body portion having a length extending from at least a portion of a patients forearm to the tip of his fingers;

B. An earlike projection extending laterally from a first side of the body at a point from one end thereof located approximately the distance between the fingertip of the middle finger and the base of the thumb;

C. A first oblong flap laterally extending from the second side of the body directly opposite the earlike projection for a distance sufficient to cover a patients hand when laid on the body with the thumb disposed on said projection, said first flap being of a width approximately equal to'the length of the thumb;

D. A second oblong flap laterally extending from the first side of the body adjacent the base of the carlike projection, said second flap being generally similar in length and width of the first flap.

9. A device for maintaining a patients limb in an anatomically correct position, said device having among other uses, removably and comfortably securing an i.v. feeding needle inserted into a vein of such limb said device comprising:

A. A member contoured to receive the patients limb and to hold it comfortably and to dispose and retain said limb in an anatomically correct position, said member being provided with at least one means to hold a strap means adapted to wrap around said member and the patients limb when the latter is disposed on said member;

B. A removable liner, said liner i. being shaped with a central body adapted to cover that portion of the contoured area of the member in which the patients limb is to be received;

ii. having at least one flap extending laterally of the central body substantially normally to the patients limb when placed on the said member, said flap being adapted to be wrapped around the patients said limb;

iii. being of resilient cellular composition, non-allergenic and autoclavable; and

iv. said liner being disposed in its open position upon the upper face of said member prior to the patients limb being placed on said member;

C. Strap means, said strap means i. being passed through said means to hold a strap means in said contoured member;

ii. providing at least one segment which extends around and over the top of said member from the side opposite the side of said flap; and

iii. including on the inner side of said segment a substantially fine prickly area which, when placed in contact with the top of said cellular liner flap, adheres thereto along the area of engagement to prevent lateral disengagement, but

not disengagement by a pulling in a direction perpendicular to the area of engagement;

whereby after an iv. needle is inserted properly in the patients limb vein and the flap is brought over the needle and limb, the flap may be secured in that position by bringing said strap segment up and over said flap from the opposite side of the member and pressing its prickly surface against the cellular material of the flap, thereby securing the patients limb to the member and the needle to the limb in the thus-properly inserted position, and enabling the limb to be maintained in an anatomically correct position.

10. A device for maintaining a patients hand or wrist in an anatomically correct position, said device having among other uses, removably and comfortably securing an iv. feeding needle inserted into a vein of a patients hand or wrist substantially parallel to the patients wrist, said device comprising:

A. a slightly arched member contoured to receive in its upper contoured face the patients wrist and the butt of either the left or right hand, together with the patients wrist and at least part of his forearm, said member being provided with a contoured recess for a thumb on each side of the member, and a contoured plateau disposed between said recesses to support the palm of the hand, said plateau terminating at its forward end with a transverse shoulder, said shoulder having four contoured recesses comfortably to receive four fingers of either a right or left hand in movably dependent positions, said member being provided with at least one means for holding a strap means adapted to wrap around said member and the patients hand when disposed on said member;

B. a removable liner, said liner i. being of resilient cellular composition, non-allergenic and autoclavable; ii. being shaped in a pattern to include:

a. a generally oblong body portion having a length extending from at least a portion of a patientfs forearm to the tip of his fingers; b. an earlike pro ection extending laterally from a first side of the body at a point from one end thereof located approximately the distance between the fingertip of the middle finger and the base of the thumb;

c. a first oblong flap laterally extending from the second side of the body directly opposite the earlike projection for a distance sufficient to cover a patients hand when laid on the body with the thumb disposed on said projection, said first flap being of a width approximately equal to the length of the thumb;

d. a second oblong flap laterally extending from the first side of the body adjacent the base of the earlike projection, said second flap being generally similar in length and width of the first flap;

iii. being disposed with its oblong body portion laid on the upper contoured face of the arched member so that the first and second flap may be wrapped around the patients hand, wrist and lower arm;

C. Strap means, said strap means,

i. being passed through said means to hold a strap means in said contoured member;

ii. providing at least one segment which extends around and over the top of said member from the side opposite the side of each said flap; and

iii. including on the inner side of said segment a substantially fine prickly area which, when placed in contact with the top of each said cellular liner flap, adheres thereto along the area of engagement to prevent lateral disengagement, but not disengagement by a pulling in a direction perpendicular to the area of engagement.

Whereby after an iv needle is inserted properly in the patients wrist vein and the flap, and the first oblong flap is brought over the needle and wrist, the second oblong flap is brought over the patients wrist and forearm, and both flaps may be secured in their respective positions by bringing a strap segment up and over each said flap from the opposite side of the member and pressing its prickly surface against the cellular material of the flap, thereby securing the patients hand, wrist and forearm to the member and the needle to the wrist in the thus-properly inserted position.

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Referenced by
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CN100502969CSep 19, 2007Jun 24, 2009陈长英;陈长华;田中一;李正莲Transfusion fixator for children's foot
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/877, 128/DIG.600, D24/191
International ClassificationA61M5/52
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/06, A61M5/52
European ClassificationA61M5/52