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Publication numberUS3724763 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1973
Filing dateApr 5, 1971
Priority dateApr 5, 1971
Publication numberUS 3724763 A, US 3724763A, US-A-3724763, US3724763 A, US3724763A
InventorsBraun A
Original AssigneeBraun A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray device
US 3724763 A
Abstract
A spray head for discharging a spray pattern in which the entire inner portion of the pattern has liquid atomized therein. A plurality of orifice channels receive fluid radially from a relatively large central supply channel.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Braun 1 Apr. 3, 1973 |54l SPRAY DEVICE [76] Inventor: Arthur R. Bruun, 209 East Mildred,

Cary, Ill. 60013 22 Filed: Apr.5, 1971 21 Appl.No.: 130,919

[52] U.S. Cl. ..239/490, 239/553.5, 239/497, 239/565 [51] Int. Cl. ..B05b 1/34 [58] Field of Search...239/548, 565, 553.5, 497, 490, 239/552 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,458,876 1/1949 Rehn ..239/548 X 2,651,547 9/1953 Calhoun ..239/490 3,504,862 4/1970 Lowry ..239/553.5 X

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 519,254 12/1955 Canada ..239/548 Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, .Ir. Assistant Examiner-John J Love Attorney-Gr'eist, Lockwood, Greenawalt & Dewey [57] ABSTRACT A spray head for discharging a spray pattern in which the entire inner portion of the pattern has liquid atomized therein. A plurality of orifice channels receive fluid radially from a relatively large central supply channel.

Preferred embodiments are disclosed in which the spray head is a unitary molded component having no moving parts. Other preferred embodiments are disclosed in which the spray head includes an adjustment feature whereby a two-part molded head provides a desirable cone-shaped spray pattern at either relatively high or relatively low through-puts, thereby eliminating dribble" at relatively low through-puts.

3 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENIEDAPR3 I975 3.724.763

' sum 1 OF 2 INVENTOR ARTHUR R. BRAU N ATT 'YS.

PATENTEDAPRE r975 3,724,763

INVENTOR ARTHUR R. BRAUN SPRAY DEVICE This invention relates to themanufacture of molded spray heads generally, and includes embodiments which are especially adapted for use in connection with aerosol dispensers, and the like. Nonetheless, spray heads of this invention are readily adapted for use in bathroom showers, equipment-cleaning sprays, horticultural spray equipment, insecticide spray equipment, carburetion equipment and the like.

It is an object of this invention to provide spray heads which can be integrally molded from corrosion-free plastic materials, and to provide spray heads which can be manufactured by relatively inexpensive molding operations. It is a further object of this invention to provide spray heads which, though of apparently simple construction, provide highly efficient break-up of a stream of fluid, such as water, to provide an even spray pattern. It is a further object of this invention to provide an adjustable spray head which, even at extremely low fluid flow rates, produces a highly desirable spray pattern. It is another object of this invention to provide a spray head in which the spray pattern includes atomized fluid passing through the entire interior regions of the cone.

The invention is described in general, and in connection with particular preferred embodiments thereof with the aid of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a spray head of this invention adapted for use as a shower spray;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1,

' FIG. 3is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the line 3--3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration showing the open interior region of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 and suggesting the construction of coring elements which are used in the molding of the spray head of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment adapted for use as a shower head;

' FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the line 77 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8A is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the line 88 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 8B is a view of the elements shown in FIG. 8A in which. the parts have been moved with respect to the position shown in FIG. 8A;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective 'view showing an aerosol dispenser with a mechanical break-up button;

FIG. l0is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the line 10 10 of one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 11A is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the line 11-11 of an embodiment which is an alternative to the embodiment shown in FIG. 10;

FIG. 1 1B is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the line 11--11 of the same embodiment shown in FIG. 11A except that some of the parts have been movedrelative to the position shown in FIG. 11a.

In FIG. 1, a shower assembly is generally indicated at 20. It includes a shower head generally indicated at 22, and supply pipe 24. It is to be understood, of course, that auxiliary valving equipment (not shown because conventional) is to be used with this shower head.

Shower head 22 includes a plurality of orifices 26 which are supplied through respective orifice channels 28. It is noted that the plurality of orifices 26 are evenly spaced apart on end face 30 of spray head 22. It is also FIGS. 3 and 4 it is apparent that the central supply channel 32 is substantially triangular in cross section and that respective passageways 34 connecting central supply channel 32 with respective orifices 26 occur at the apex of adjacent sides 36 of central supply channel 32 with the opening 34 constituting an opening at the.

axial end 38 of channel 32 along one wall which is adjacent the respective discharge orifice 28. Thus the other wall is substantially a tangent, in the disclosed preferred embodiment, to the circular wall of the respective discharge orifice 28. This relationship is perhaps more clearly appreciated from a consideration of FIG. 5 in which the exterior of the shower head 22 is shown in broken lines, and the extent of the hollow interior passageways is shown in solid lines.

In the manufacture of the spray head 22 illustrated in FIGS. 1-5 two sets of axially extending core elements are utilized in cooperation with a conventional mold (not shown) in the injection molding manufacture of spray head 22. A first core element, corresponding to conduit 25 and central supply channel 38, is inserted axially into a conventional mold and a second set of core elements corresponding to conduit channels 28 are extended axially from the opposite direction into the mold cavity as suggested in FIG. 5. It is noted that end portions of the rounded coreelements 28', corresponding to discharge orifice channels 28, have a flat lateral end portion 34 which butts against a face 36' of the central supply channel core element. This shut-off abutment results in the formation of passageways 34.

A first alternative embodiment of this invention is shown in FIG. 6 in which a two-piece molded shower head assembly is generally indicated at 44. Assembly 44 includes a stationary member 46 which is fitted with socket 48 for sealingly engaging a conventional plumbing pipe, and the like. Socket 48 extends axially into central supply channel 50 which extends into coaxial supply region 51. Rotatable orifice-containing face member 52 is rotatably retained on stationary member 46 by mating lip 54, 56 on members 46, 52, respectively. Assembly 44 utilizes four discharge orifices 60 which are positioned, in the illustrated embodiment, coaxially with axial bosses 62 which assist in gripping rotatable member 52 for manual rotation thereof. Each respective orifice 60 is supplied by its respective orifice discharge channel 64. Channels 64 dead-end in axially inward extreme 66, as in the previously described embodiment, and entry to discharge orifice channel 64 is gained through axially extending slits 6 8. Vanes 70 extend radially outwardly from axially inward central supply region 51.

FIG. 8A, it is apparent that interior central supply region 51 is connected with each discharge orifice 64 through a passageway 72 between adjacent vanes. It is further noted that the general path of passageways 72 are somewhat spiraled, i.e., non-linear, from central supply region 51 and that the relatively shorter edges 74 of the passageways are positioned to form a substantially tangential line with substantially circular discharge orifice 64. Moreover, it is appreciated from a consideration of FIG. 8A that fluid flowing substantially radially outwardly through passageways 72 will be ejected from passageways 72 into the discharge orifice channel 64 in a path which is off-center with respect to the central axis of discharge orifice channel 64, when the relative positions shown in FIG. 8A prevails.

In FIG. 8B the relative positions of stationary member 46 and rotatable member 52 are changed. It is noted, however, that, although relative rotation is illustrated, internal elements 46 appear to have been pivoted whereas, in fact, outer element 52 is the movable member.

In the position shown in FIG. 8B passageways 72 have been moved with respect to discharge orifices 64 so that a relatively narrow gap 75 remains between the outer extreme of longer edge 76 and the opposing edge 78 of external member 52. However, it is also appreciated from a consideration of FIG. 8B that fluid flowing generally radially outwardly through channel 72 tends to be ejected into discharge orifice channel 64 in a direction which is off-center with respect to the axial center of discharge orifice 64. The sweeping curve of elongated passageway side 76 is substantially tangential to the wall of discharge orifice 64 as indicated in FIG. 8B when wall 76 approaches the opposing corner 78 of the movable member.

The capability of reducing gap 75 by manually rotating rotatable member 52 around stationary member 46 is important in the operation of the spray head of this invention at relatively low flow rates. Thus, at high flow rates, the operation of the spray head with the configuration shown in FIG. 8A is eminently satisfactory since the entryway 68 to discharge orifice channel 64 is completely unobstructed. Thus with high flow rates liquid is discharged into discharge orifice 64 in a radial direction thus imparting a helical or swirling motion to the liquid as it moves generally axially outwardly in discharge orifice 64. At relatively low flow rates, however, if fluid were to pass at low velocity through radially outwardly directed channels 72, very little circular, helical, or swirling component is imparted to the motion of the liquid moving axially outwardly through discharge orifice channel 64. At low flows, shower heads, generally, tend to dribble. However, at low flows, adjustment of the gap 75, as shown in FIG. 88 requires that, even at such low flow, the fluid passing through gaps 75 move at relatively high velocity into the orifice discharge channel 64. This relatively high velocity assures a helical pattern as liquid moves generally axially outwardly in discharge orifice channel 64.

Thus, in accordance with this preferred adjustable embodiment of this invention illustrated in FIGS. 6, 7, 8A and 83 a highly desirable gentle atomized centerfilled spray pattern is achieved at very low flow through-puts. Further rotation of rotatable member 52 stops the flow of fluid into discharge orifice channel 64.

FIG. 9 illustrates an aerosol dispenser can 80 equipped with conventional valve elements enclosed within collar 82. Fluid is discharged at will from can 80 through hollow valve stem 84 which is sealingly joined to mechanical break-up button assembly generally indicated at 86. Finger pressure in a downward axial direction at top 88 of button 86 causes axially downward movement of valve stem 84 which results in a fluid-release configuration within the valve assembly 82 (not shown because conventional). Fluid passes upwardly through valve stem 84 into central region of break-up button 86. In FIG. 9 button assembly 86 is equipped with a break-up insert 90. It should be emphasized that two embodiments of insert 90 are shown. A first embodiment shown in FIG. 10 is a onepiece embodiment which is analogous to the one-piece embodiment of FIGS. 1-5. The second embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 11A and 11B is analogous to the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 6, 7, 8A and 8B in which the stationary port provides stationary elements. However, in the embodiment of FIGS. 11A, and 11B, a complete shut-off feature is provided by providing one vane on the stationary element and an opposing vane on the rotatable element to define the side walls of the conduit through which fluid is channeled to the discharge orifice channel 94.

Insert 90 is retained in socket 106 in main body portion 98 of button assembly 86 by the mating of radially outwardly extending projection 108 as it mates with undercut detent in socket 106.

In a simplified version of the insert button which is illustrated in FIG. 10 a view taken approximately along the line 11-11 in FIG. 10 shows the configuration presented in FIG. 11A, inasmuch as central supply region 100 connects with discharge orifice channels, 94 through passageways 104 between vanes 102. In the embodiment of FIG. 10, all vanes are molded into a one-piece button. However, in a preferred alternative, as illustrated in FIG. 11A, vanes 102 forming opposing sides of channels 104 are provided, in part, by insert button vanes l 16 which are rotatable with insert button 90 and stationary vanes 118 which are stationary projections from wall 120 around channel 98 into central supply region 100. Thus, in the adjustable embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 11A and 11B button 90 corresponds to button 90, except that in the adjustable embodiment half of the vanes defining passageway 104 are provided by the stationary wall 120 of main body portion 98. As rotatable button 90' is rotated to bring opposing side walls of vanes 116, 118 on opposite sides of channels 104 into abutment as indicated in FIG. 118 it will be appreciated that the passageway connecting discharge orifice with central supply region is effectively sealed. Thus, the invention is particularly useful in embodiments in which it is desirable to seal the interior of break-up button assembly 86 between uses in order to prevent hardening, e.g., solids formation induced by slow evaporation of a solvent, of potentially clog-forming materials within the interior of mechanical breakup button assembly 86.

In the preferred embodiment, as illustrated in FIGS. 11A and 118 wall 120 is provided with indent region which is positioned to lay at the inner extreme of passageway 104 adjacent stationary vanes 118. It will beappreciated by comparing FIGS. 11A and 118 that recess 125 extends under the axial end 127 of discharge orifice channel 94 when the vanes are in the position indicated in FIG. 11A. However, when the button insert 90 is rotated to provide the configuration of 1 18 at which opposing walls of vanes 116, and 118 which dcfine channel 104 have approached each other, and finally abut to seal off the channel, the rotation will have carried discharge orifice channel 94 beyond and away from super-imposition over recess 125. Thus, any fluid trapped in recess 125, as a result of the operation of the mechanical'break-up spray button of this invention, is also sealed off when the rotatable insert 90 is rotated to the seal position indicated in FIG. 11B. Should mechanical break-up button assembly 86 be axially depressed while insert button 90 is in the closed or seal configuration of 1 18, substantially nothing happens which will be apparent to the consumer. However rotation of rotatable button 90 to the open configuration of 11A carries the axially inward end of discharge orifice 94 to register with recess 125. Thus, should liquid retained in discharge orifice channels 94 become dried out the generation of pressure against the mass within discharge orifice channel 94 in an axial direction through boss 124, which now serves as a conduit, assists in the axial ejection of solidified material in discharge orifice channel 94. Thus any liquid retained between uses in recess 125 is sealed and consequently recess 125 serves as a hydraulic conduit to develop pressure exerted in an axial direction against the axially inward extreme portions of any solidified materials remaining in discharge orifice channel 94.

In all the preferred embodiments disclosed herein, the supply channel is greater in cross section than the total cross-sectional area of the discharge orifice channels. The spray head of this invention permits efficient break up through a plurality of orifices with a compact, streamlined component.

Although the invention is particularly applicable to molded plastic spray heads, it is also applicable to metal spray heads used in burner nozzles, and the like.

I claim:

I. A one-piece spray head comprising a centrally positioned supply chamber having a plurality of planar side walls meeting at axially extending side wall junctions; a plurality of axially extending circular cross-sectional discharge orifice channels extending partially laterally with respect to said supply chamber, said discharge orifice channels each being continuous with said central supply channel along a respective wall at a respective junction between a respective first and second wall, wherein a passageway between said central supply chamber and said discharge orifice extends axially in said first wall, and wherein said second wall is tangential with respect to said discharge orifice.

2. A one-piece spray head of claim 1 having three of said discharge orafice channels, and three of said walls.

3. A one-piece spray head comprising: a centrally positioned supply chamber having a plurality of axially extending side walls; a plurality of axially extending circular cross-sectional discharge orificechannels extending partially laterally with respect to said supply chamber, said discharge orifice channels each being continuous with said central supply chamber between a respective first and second wall thereof, wherein a passageway between said central supply chamber and said discharge orifice extendsaxially in said first wall and wherein said second wall 18 tangential with respec to said discharge orifice, wherein each of said passageways is positioned to discharge fluid into said discharge orifice channel generally transversely to said axis, and off-center with respect to the axial center of said discharge orifice channel.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2458876 *Jan 16, 1946Jan 11, 1949Anna RehnEye spray
US2651547 *Feb 27, 1950Sep 8, 1953Calhoun Rollin SNozzle head
US3504862 *Jan 5, 1968Apr 7, 1970Gillette CoDispensing device
CA519254A *Dec 6, 1955N.V. Philips GloeilampenfabriekenBurner device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4316580 *Jul 13, 1979Feb 23, 1982Sontek Industries, Inc.Apparatus for fragmenting fluid fuel to enhance exothermic reactions
US4347983 *Jan 9, 1980Sep 7, 1982Sontek Industries, Inc.Hyperbolic frequency modulation related to aero/hydrodynamic flow systems
US5064122 *Aug 10, 1990Nov 12, 1991Toko Yakuhin Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaDisposable nozzle adapter for intranasal spray containers
US5340570 *Mar 4, 1993Aug 23, 1994Shiseido Co., Ltd.Dispensing system for sprayable gel-type hair conditioner
US5878964 *May 2, 1997Mar 9, 1999Hansen; Dennis R.Spray nozzle with two or more equally sized orifices
US6009868 *Jul 4, 1996Jan 4, 2000Astra AbArrangement in a spray tube mouthpiece
US6817493 *Aug 22, 2003Nov 16, 2004S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Spray nozzle
US7299552 *Sep 8, 2003Nov 27, 2007Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Methods for creating channels
US8196847 *Jul 27, 2004Jun 12, 2012Valois SasSpray head for liquid product
US8893815 *Dec 23, 2008Nov 25, 2014Utc Fire & Security CorporationFire extinguisher and discharge nozzle assembly
US9555953 *Aug 31, 2012Jan 31, 2017L'orealSpray head and container thus equipped, method and use
US20050051518 *Sep 8, 2003Mar 10, 2005Christopher VitelloMethods for creating channels
US20060249598 *Jul 27, 2004Nov 9, 2006Valois S.A.SSpray head for liquid product
US20070125879 *Nov 21, 2005Jun 7, 2007Babek KhamenianAdjustable spray nozzle
US20110214885 *Dec 23, 2008Sep 8, 2011Mauney Ronald CFire extinguisher and discharge nozzle assembly
US20150122833 *Aug 31, 2012May 7, 2015L'orealSpray head and container thus equipped, method and use
EP0486660A1 *Jun 4, 1991May 27, 1992Contico Int IncFluid discharge apparatus.
EP0486660A4 *Jun 4, 1991Nov 4, 1992Contico International, Inc.Fluid discharge apparatus
EP2367600A1 *Dec 23, 2008Sep 28, 2011UTC Fire & Security CorporationFire extinguisher and discharge nozzle assembly
EP2367600A4 *Dec 23, 2008Oct 29, 2014Utc Fire & Security CorpFire extinguisher and discharge nozzle assembly
WO1994014404A1 *Dec 21, 1992Jul 7, 1994Shiseido Co., Ltd.Sprayable gel-type hair conditioner
WO2010074684A1Dec 23, 2008Jul 1, 2010Utc Fire & Security CorporationFire extinguisher and discharge nozzle assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/490, 239/497, 239/565, 239/553.5
International ClassificationB05B1/34, B65D83/16
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/3436, B05B1/3426, B65D83/20
European ClassificationB65D83/20, B05B1/34A3B2, B05B1/34A3B4B