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Publication numberUS3724800 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 3, 1973
Filing dateOct 8, 1971
Priority dateOct 8, 1971
Publication numberUS 3724800 A, US 3724800A, US-A-3724800, US3724800 A, US3724800A
InventorsJimenez I, Rubin I
Original AssigneeJimenez I, Rubin I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescopic sight mounting
US 3724800 A
Abstract
A telescopic sight mounting formed of a mounting bar for fastening upon the side of a rifle, and a pair of ring-type scope holding clamps fastened upon the upper edge of the bar, with the forward clamp being pivotable about a vertical axis, and a rear clamp being arcuately movable in a horizontal plane for horizontally adjusting the angle of the scope relative to the rifle, and with the means for holding and moving the rear clamp being normally concealed by the clamp itself.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Rubin et a1.

[54] TELESCOPIC SIGHT MOUNTING [76] Inventors: Irving N. Rubin, 21781 Straford, Oak Park, Mich. 48237; lvan Jimenez, 1780 Ouster Lane Drive,

Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197 [22] Filed: Oct. 8, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 187,628

[52] US. Cl. ..248/205 R, 33/50 R [51] Int. Cl ..F4lg 1/38 [58] Field of Search ..248/205 R, 229, 226 R, 186; 33/50 R, 50 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,436,948 3/1948 Williams ..33/50 R 2,854,748 10/1958 Williams 2,072,877 3/1937 Green 3,463,430 8/1969 Rubin v ..248/205 R Y [111 3,724,800 51 Apr. 3, 1973 2,456,214 12/1948 Roe ..33/50 A X 2,951,292 9/1960 Buehler ..33/50 R 3,226,868 1/1966 Mahoney .....33/50 R X 3,187,435 6/1965 Miller ..33/50 R Primary Examiner-J. Franklin Foss Attorney-Cullen, Settle, Sloman & Cantor [57] ABSTRACT A telescopic sight mounting formed of a mounting bar for fastening upon the side of a rifle, and a pair of ring-type scope holding clamps fastened upon the upper edge of the bar, with the forward clamp being pivotable about a vertical axis, and a rear clamp being arcuately movable in a horizontal plane for horizontally adjusting the angle of the scope relative to the rifle, and with the means for holding and moving the rear clamp being normally concealed by the clamp itself.

5 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPRB I975 724,

INVENTORS IRVING N. RUBIN BY IVAN JIMINEZ.

CULLEN, SETTLE, SLOMAN 8 CAN'IDR ATT'YS.

1 TELESCOPIC SIGHT MOUNTING BACKGROUND OF INVENTION The invention herein relates to a telescopic sight mounting which is an improvement of the types shown, for example, in our prior US. Pat. No. 3,463,430 granted Aug. 26, 1969 and in the prior patent to Williams No. 2,854,748 granted Oct. 7, I958.

The device disclosed in our own earlier patent above, includes a bar fastened across the top of the receiver portion of a bolt action rifle, with ring-type clamps secured to the bar for holding a scope above and in parallel alignment with the rifle barrel. For certain types of rifles, as for example the so called Winchester Model No. 94," it is not practical to arrange the mounting bar above the barrel or receiver because of the nature of the rifle construction. Here, it is desirable to mount the bar upon the side of the receiver of the rifle.

Thus, the Williams patent mentioned above shows a mounting bar, upon which the clamps are secured, fastened to the side receiver cover plate of the rifle. This prior construction, however, has the disadvantage of requiring the gunsmith to drill and tap accurately formed holes in the side receiver plate, requiring considerable labor and expense.

Additionally, with these types of rifle telescopic sight mounts, it is desirable to provide some means for adjusting the mounted telescopic sight in a horizontal plane, parallel to the bore of the rifle, for accurate alignment between the scope axis and the barrel axis. This type of alignment is required only rarely, but is desirable to have available when needed.

In the foregoing types of sight mounts, as .for example, in the above Williams patent disclosure, a means is provided for moving the scope relative to the rifle. However, it has been conventional to leave such andthe scope only when desired, eliminating inadvertent adjustments.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent upon reading the following description, of which the attached drawings form a part.

mounting adjustment means exposed with the result SUMMARY OF INVENTION The invention herein contemplates a telescopic sight mount having a bar arranged for side mounting upon the conventional receiver side cover plate, utilizing the existing screw holes in the plate, to eliminate the need for drilling additional accurate holes, and with a forward ring-type clamp vertically pivotally secured to the forward end of the bar by meansof a vertical screw and the rear ring-type clamp secured to the rear of the bar by means of a screw extending through an offset hole in a rotatable bushing, so that rotation of the bushing arcuately moves the scope in a horizontal plane, and wherein the bushing and screw are, concealed by the base of the rear clamp.

The construction herein makes it possible for the average rifle owner to install the scope mount by himself, without the necessity of using the services of a skilled gunsmith and makes it possible for him to adjust the horizontal alignment between the rifle'bore axis DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the telescopic sight mounting herein securing a conventional scope to a' rifle.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing a portion of the rifle and the scope mounting parts disassembled.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the side mounting bar.

FIG. 4 shows a ring-type clamp, with its two parts disassembled.

FIG. 5 is an end view of the ring-type clamp.

FIG. 6 is a perspective, cross sectional view of the adjustment bushing, and

FIG. 7 is an enlarged top or plan view of the bushing within the side mounting bar.

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional view taken in the direction of arrows 8-8 of FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION FIG. 1 illustrates a rifle 10 such as of the so called Winchester 94" type model which is lever operated and has a side receiver cover. Secured to the rifle is a conventional telescopic sight 11 by means of the mounting generally designated as 12.

The mounting includes an elongated, narrow bar 14,

arranged on edge, and having a forward screw mounting hole 15 and rear screw mounting holes 16 for horizontal alignment with the corresponding forward screw hole 17 and rear screw holes 18 formed through the side receiver cover plate 19 of the rifle. In this type of rifle, the plate is secured to the side of the rifle by suitable screws extending through holes 17 and 18.

I-Iere, those screws are removed and the same holes are used for fastening both the receiver plate and the bar to the side of the rifle by means of suitable matching screws 20 and 21.

The forward, rifle engaging face of the bar may be suitably relieved at 22 to fit around the contours of the side or receiver area of the rifle.

The mounting also includes a forward .and a rear ring-shaped clamp 24 and 25, respectively, each identical in construction.

As illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, the clamps comprise two parts, namely, a base part 26 having a half ring portion 27 and a lower base portion 28, and a cover part 29 having a half ring portion 30. The two parts are engaged together as shown in FIG. 5, and secured by means of screw holes 31 in the upper and lower areas of the cover part aligned with screw holes 32 in the upper and lower areas of the base partthrough which small screws 33 are inserted.

The base forming portions 28 are arranged to rest upon the upper edge surface of the side mounting bar 14 and are provided with vertically axised screw holes 35 (see FIG. 5).

The forward clamp is secured to the bar 14 by means of a vertical long screw 36 extending through a vertical hole 37 in the forward end of the bar, with the screw engaging into the hole 35 in the clamp. Thus, the forward clamp may be pivoted about the vertical axis of the screw 36.

The rear clamp is mounted for movement in an arcuate, horizontal direction. For this purpose, a hole 39 is drilled through the rear portion of the bar (see FIG. 8), with the hole having an upper and a lower countersink portion 40 and 41, respectively. Centered within the hole is a circular bushing 42 whose head 43 snuggly and rotatively fits within the upper countersink 41, with its shank 44 fitting within the hole 39. A screw receiving hole 45 is drilled through the bushing, but this hole is offset relative to the central axis of the bushing.

A screw 46 extends upwardly through the offset hole 45, with the head 47 of the screw fitted within the lower countersink 41, which is of a considerably greater diameter than the screw head 47.

Thus, rotation of the bushing 42 moves the screw hole 45, with the screw 46, in an arcuate horizontal path so that the screw may be either aligned with the center line of the bar 14 or moved to one side or the other of that centerline, as the case may be.

To more positively lock the bushing against inadvertent movement, arcuate notches 48 are formed in its head 43 and the head 49 of a set screw 50 engages one of these notches. Thus, the bushing may be rotated into a number of positions, determined by the number of arcuate notches formed in it. The movement of the bushing moves the screw 46 as indicated by the double arrow 51 in FIG. 3.

The screw 46 is engaged into the threaded hole 35 in the rear clamp and by tightening the screw, the clamp is fixed in position. This covers the bushing and the set screw so that neither of these may be tampered with while the clamp is in place. For further adjustment, the clamp is removed and the bushing adjusted and then the clamp is replaced again. Since this type of adjustment is not necessary often, the fact that the bushing adjustment is not readily accessible is not a difficult problem.

The telescopic sight is arranged through the ring clamps as shown in FIG. 1, by removing the cover parts 29, inserting the sight into the base parts 26 and then replacing the cover parts.

This construction completely eliminates the necessity of drilling accurately located screw mounting holes, which was required in the past, for attaching scope mounts to the rifle and, moreover, eliminates inadvertent loosening or shifting or misalignment of the scope relative to the rifle barrel.

Having fully described an operative embodiment of this invention, we now claim:

1. A telescopic sight mounting comprising:

a horizontally elongated, narrow, thin bar arranged on one long edge and adapted for fastening in face to face contact with the side face of a rifle in its receiver area;

a pair of ring-shaped clamps, each having a base portion arranged upon the upper long edge of the bar, with one clamp near the forward, relative to the rifle, end of the base and the other being near the rear end of the bar, with the two clamps being axially aligned for clamping a telescopic sight extending therethrough in substantially parallel alignment with the bar length and thus the rifle barrel;

each base portion having a vertical, downwardly opening, threaded screw receiving opening formed therein;

and a vertical opening extending through the bar near each end thereof and aligned with said base openings;

and a vertically arranged threaded screw extending upwards through each of the bar openings and being threadedly engaged into the respective base portion openings for thereby screw fastening said clamps directly upon the upper long edge of said bar;

and one of said bar openings being of a considerably greater diameter than its screw and being circular in cross section, and a circular bushing rotatably fitted within said one opening, and being substantially covered by its respective clamp base portion, with the bushing having a vertical hole extending therethrough and of a diameter to closely receive its screw, with the hole being parallel to but offset relative to the axis of said one opening, so that rotating said bushing within its opening offsets the screw extending through the bushing relative to the center line of said one opening,

wherein the vertical axis of the screw extending through the bushing, and also the clamp threadedly engaged therewith may be adjusted in a horizontal arcuate path, by rotating the bushing into varying positions when its clamp is disconnected from its screw to uncover the bushing, and re-engagement of its clamp and its screw thereby locks its clamp to the bar in such prearranged position and conceals the bushing.

2. A construction as defined in claim 1, and said screws having heads counter-sunk into the lower edge of the bar, wherein the entire means for fastening the clamps to the bar are concealed by the clamp bases on the upper edge of the bar and the counter-sinking of the screw heads on the lower edge of the bar.

3. A construction as defined in claim 1, and including a number of vertically arranged notches formed in the upper edge of said bushing, and a small set screw threadably fastened into the upper edge of the bar and partially engaging one of said notches for locking the bushing against rotation, the set screw being beneath and thus concealed by the base portion of its respective clamp.

4. A construction as defined in claim 1, and including means for fastening the bar to the rifle, comprising screw holes horizontally extending through the bar and arranged in horizontal alignment with pre-existing screw holes used for screw fastening the rifle side receiver cover plate to the rifle, and screws of a length for extending through said aligned screw holes for consequently fastening both the bar and cover together to the rifle.

5. In a rifle having a side receiver cover plate formed with a number of horizontally axised screw receiving holes through which screws are inserted for fastening the plate to its adjacent rifle structure, and a telescopic sight mounting comprising a horizontally elongated, narrow, thin bar arranged on one long edge and adapted for fastening in face to face contact with the side receiver cover plate of a rifle; and a pair of ringshaped clamps each having a base arranged upon the number of the receiver plate screw holes, and includlng screws of sufficient length for extending through said aligned screw holes in the bar and plate, replacing the original screws used for originally fastening the plate to the rifle structure, for consequently fastening both the bar and the cover plate together as a unit to the adjacent rifle structure.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2072877 *Jan 25, 1935Mar 9, 1937Green Samuel GMount
US2436948 *Jul 14, 1945Mar 2, 1948Williams Harvey AMount for gun sights
US2456214 *Mar 28, 1947Dec 14, 1948Bryce PoePeep sight for firearms
US2854748 *Oct 13, 1954Oct 7, 1958Williams Harvey AMount for gun sight
US2951292 *Apr 28, 1958Sep 6, 1960Buehler Maynard PAdjustable telescope sight mount
US3187435 *Nov 16, 1962Jun 8, 1965Miller Jr George VTelescope mounts for rifles
US3226868 *Oct 22, 1962Jan 4, 1966Mahoney Woodrow LPivotable telescope sight mount
US3463430 *Nov 24, 1967Aug 26, 1969Rubin IrvingMounting means for rifle telescopic sights
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3986285 *May 16, 1975Oct 19, 1976Krisay Robert JDetachable top side mount
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/205.1, 42/125, D22/110
International ClassificationF41G1/387, F41G11/00, F41G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G11/001
European ClassificationF41G11/00B