Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3726193 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 10, 1973
Filing dateFeb 4, 1970
Priority dateFeb 10, 1969
Publication numberUS 3726193 A, US 3726193A, US-A-3726193, US3726193 A, US3726193A
InventorsIshii K
Original AssigneeShashin Shokujiki Kenkyusho Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for photo-typesetting
US 3726193 A
Abstract
A photo-typesetting apparatus operates at speeds of more than 500 characters per minute. The apparatus includes an optical system for selecting devised characters from a large number of character groups arranged on the character disc and focussed the sleected characters at the same position on a focussing plane. If necessary, ruby characters and address figures are added to the character thus selected in accordance with a selected typesetting type either for horizontal typesetting or vertical typesetting and the desired characters are arranged and photographed one after another in accordance with either the horizontal typesetting technique or vertical typesetting.
Images(12)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Elite States atent [191 lshii [s41 APPARATUS FOR PHOTO- TYPESIETTING [75] Inventor: Kiyoshi Ishii, Tokyo, Japan [73] Assignee: Shashin Sholtujiki Kenkyusho Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan [22] Filed: Feb. 4, 1970 [21] App1.No.: 8,619

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Feb. 10, 1969 Japan ..44/9296 Aug. 9, 1969 Japan. ..44/62753 Feb. 10, 1969 Japan 44/9298 [52] US. Cl. .95/4.5 R [51] Int. Cl. ...B41b 15/18 [58] Field of Search ..95/4.5 R

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,887,935 5/1959 Scott et a]. ..95/4.5 3,191,157 6/1965 Parker et a1. .95/4.5 UX 2,720,586 10/1955 Mork ..95/4.5 X

[4 1 Apr. M1, 1973 2,950,800 8/1960 Caldwell ..95/4.5 UX 2,944,471 7/1960 Drillick 1 ..95/4.5 2.905,068 9/1959 Friedman ..95/4.5

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 205,731 5/1955 Australia 95/45 Primary ExaminerRobert P. Greiner Attorney-Robert E. Burns and Emmanuel J. Lobato [57] ABSTRACT A photo-typesetting apparatus operates at speeds of more than 500 characters per minute. The apparatus includes an optical system for selecting devised characters from a large number of character groups arranged on the character disc and focussed the sleected characters at the same position on a focussing plane. If necessary, ruby characters and address figures are added to the character thus selected in accordance with a selected typesetting type either for horizontal typesetting or vertical typesetting and the desired characters are arranged and photographed one after another in accordance with either the horizontal typesetting technique or vertical typesetting.

5 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures PATENTED APR 1 0 i373 SHEET 02 0F 12 PATENIED-APR 1 0 ms SHEET 03M 12 PATENTED APRI 01573 SHEET nu 0F 12 PATENTED APR 1 01975 SHEET us 0F 12 PATENTED APR 1 0 I975 SHEET us [1F 12 PATENTED APR 1 0 i975 SHEET GSUF 12 PATENTEU APR 1 0 1913 SHEET 10 0F 12 w: E 5 $9 5 wm PATENTEU R 1 0 5315 sum llUF 12 SELECTOR PLATE NO CHARACTER POSITION APPARATUS FOR PHOTO-TYPESETTING The present invention relates to a photo-typesetting apparatus and more particularly to a photo-typesetting apparatus which selects any character from a large number of characters arranged in the character disc and composes these characters by way of an optical channel.

A special feature of Japanese characters is that the kind, variety and number of Japanese characters is of a very large quantity. That is, the kinds of letters that exist are Chinese" characters, hirakana characters, katakana characters, Roman letters etc., and the kinds of figures are Japanese figures, Roman figures and Arabic figures. With regard to the number of characters, the European characters consist of about 30 characters. However, the Japanese characters alone consist of 1,850 characters of Chinese origin for common use. Another feature of Japanese characters is that the two methods exist in composing sentences, that is, vertical writing and horizontal writing. These features of Japanese characters cause various difficulties in the art of printing, particularly in photo-typesetting.

Further, another feature of Japanese characters relates to the problem of ruby, that is, to add kana to Chinese characters, in some cases, along with the foreign characters. Also, sometimes the address figures, which indicate the position of the figure in the space, are added along with the various characters. Further, in addtion to the rubies in the foreign characters, there exists accent, index," subindex; umlant in German characters; accent aigu, accent grave," accent circonflexe or cedille in French characters etc. (hereafter called ruby). In the Japanese photo-typesetting apparatus, it is required that these various rubies, along with the other characters, are used rapidly and accurately.

The characters, figures, symbols etc. used as rubies are hereinafter generally called ruby characters;" the characters, figures, symbols etc. which utilize the ruby characters are hereinafter generally called basic characters; the whole character, which is composed of the ruby characters and the basic characters are hereinafter called composed characters.

As mentioned above, in the Japanese phototypesetting apparatus, the following problems exist.

I. A long time is required for selecting the desired character.

2. The mechanism of the typesetting apparatus becomes complex, and consequently, its operation also becomes complex.

b 3. It is susceptible for causing dispersion in the exactness of the photo-typesetting characters and as a result, the rapidness of the Japanese phototypesetting apparatus can be operated, at most, at 300 characters per minute. However, the rapidness of the European photo-typesetting apparatus can be operated at more than 500 characters per minute.

The object of the present invention is to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional Japanese phototypesetting apparatus.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus which enables the typesetting speed to be more than 500 characters per minute while obtaining exactness of the images of the photo-typesetting characters.

Other objects and features of the invention will more fully appear from the following description and the accompanying drawings and will be particularly pointed out in the claims.

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram showing examples of vertical typesetting and horizontal typesetting of Japanese characters,

FIG. 2 is examples of foreign characters and chemical symbols,

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram explaining the position of the ruby character,

FIG. 4 is a diagram explaining one-way characters and two-way characters,

FIG. 5 is a diagram explaining one example of typesetting,

FIG. 6 is a diagram explaining one example of an optical system of the photo-typesetting apparatus of the present invention,

FIG. 7 is a diagram showing one example of the character disc in a partial plan view,

FIG. $A and 8B are diagrams illustrating one example of the perforated tape,

FIG. 9 is a diagram showing partial development of the character disc,

FIG. It) is a diagram showing one example of an arrangement of the character disc,

FIG. 11 is a diagram showing the function of the optical tunnel system of the present invention,

FIG. I2 is a diagram showing a vertical-sectional view of the optical tunnel,

FIG. 13 is a schematic diagram showing a light beam mask of the present invention,

FIG. I4 is a schematic diagram showing one example of a mask plate of the light beam mask,

FIG. 15 is a schematic diagram explaining the typesetting of the composed character,

FIG. I6 is a diagram showing the relation between position of the light beam windows of the selector plate,

FIG. 17 and FIG. I8 are diagrams showing one example of the Iight beam selector,

FIG. 39 is a diagram showing one example of the position of the light beam window of the selector plate,

FIG. 20 is a schematic diagram explaining the operation of the photo-typesetting of the present invention.

Referring to FIG. I, the Japanese characters which comprise the basic characters, ruby characters and address figures are composed by horizontal writing (a) or vertical writing (b). FIG. 2 shows some examples of the foreign characters which comprise the umlaut, accent aigu, accent grave and some chemical symbols.

FIG. 3(a) shows the examples of arranging the address figures. An imaginary body 5 of the basic figure shows the whole area required for typesetting the basic character, and the figures of address numbers are arranged in the marginal space. In the horizontal typesetting, the figure of the address number is arranged in the position 4, and in the vertical typesetting, arranged in the position 2. FIG. 3(b) shows the position which is given for the ruby characters, and positions I and 3 show a case of horizontal typesetting and vertical type-setting, respectively. Referring to FIG. 3(a) and FIG. 3(b), the ruby characters of vertical typesetting and horizontal type-setting are simultaneously arranged in the marginal spaces of the same imaginary area of the same character. The plural ruby characters of the same basic character of horizontal typesetting and vertical typesetting arranged simultaneously in the plural position are hereinafter called the composed ruby characters. FIG. 3(c) shows the example of the composed ruby character of the present invention simultaneously arranged with the ruby characters and the address figure of vertical and horizontal typesetting. However, in the conventional method, it is required to separately provide in the character disc, the four kinds of composed characters shown in FIG. 3(d), (e), (f), (g). As a result of this, by using the method shown in FIG. 3(a) and (b), the number of composed characters that can be provided in the character disc becomes double the conventional method, and by using the method shown in FIG. 3(c), thenumber of composed the number becomes four times the conventional method.

FIG. 4 shows an example of one-way characters and two-way characters. Referring to FIG. 4, rows A show the characters used in vertical writing, rows B show the characters used in horizontal writing, group 6 shows the one-wya characters, and group 7 shows the twoway characters. Usual characters included in group 7 can be used two ways, that is, in the case of vertical typesetting and horizontal typesetting. Accordingly, it is sufficient to provide only one character, which is used in two ways, by a rotation of an element such as a prism corresponding to vertical or horizontal typesetting. On the other hand, the characters included in group 6 are not able to be used in two ways. Accordingly, it is required to provide two kinds of characters corresponding to vertical or horizontal typesetting. The characters that can not be treated only by a rotation of an element such as a prism hereinafter are called one-way characters. Thus, the code showing the one-way characters or the two-way characters is provided in the suitable position of the character disc, and selected by the order of the perforated tape. Further, the characters and symbols shown in FIG. 4 are only examples and there exists many other characters and symbols. In FIG. 4, the square frames surrounding each character are the same as imaginary body in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 shows one example of the. typesetting using the above-mentioned characters. In this case, the characters in vertical typesetting 8 can be also used in the case of horizontal typesetting 9 by the rotation of the element such as the prism. However the position of the Japanese character tsu" in the horizontal writing 9 is shifted from the regular position when the two-way Japanese character tsu is used ln this case, the normal type-setting can be performed by using the one way Japanese character tsu, as shown in horizontal writing 10 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram illustrating the optical photo-typesetting system of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 6, the light beam emitted from the light source 11 is advanced along the optical axis 13 and illuminates a character group in a part of an illuminating position C of the character disc B through a condenserlens l2 and an optical wedge A. A light beam containing an image of a desired character is selected from the light beam group corresponding to a character group of a part of illuminating position C by using the light beam selector D, and arrives at the first image plane 15, through a main lens 14 and an optical tunnel E, wherein an image of the desired character is focussed. Further, the composed characters made up of the basic characters and ruby characters are selected by a light beam mask F provided atthe first image plane. The image of the character thus obtained arrives, through a collimator lens 16, at a prism G wherein the image of the character rotates at any angle desired. Then the image of the character arrives, through a light traveller H, at a photo-sensitizer 21 of the photo-sensitive apparatus J wherein the final image is focussed and the photo-typesetting is carried out.

Further, the explanation connected to each element arranged in the optical system is briefly given below. A light source 11 is provided for taking photographs of the image of the characters, and the number of the light sources 1 1 is one or a plurality of lights sources per one optical system. An optical wedge A is provided for equalin'ng the intensity of light passing through each character on the character disc thereby equalizing the density of the images of the characters which are taken in a photograph. A light beam selector D is provided for selecting a light beam corresponding to the desired character from the group of light beams passing through the characters of the character disc, thereby passing the desired light beam and cutting off the other light beams. An optical tunnel E is provided for transforming the light beam passing through the light beam selector D to the image of the character which is orientated in the first image plane 15. An image rotator G is provided for rotating the image of the character on the first image plane 15 to any angle desired. A light beam traveller H is provided for transforming, to any desired angle, the light beam passing through the image rotator G, feeding the light beam for typesetting and projecting the above-mentioned light beam to the photo-sensitizer 21. A photo-sensitive apparatus J is provided for exposing the image of the character on the photo-sensitizer 21 by the light beam which is projected to the apparatus J.

FIG. 7 is an example of the character disc shown in a partial plan view. Referring to FIG. 7, a lighting slit 23 is provided in the peripheral part of the character disc B. An analogue-digital code 24, which codes the positions of the various characters, is provided in the inner part of the character disc B. Character rows 25 are provided in the middle part of the disc B. The characters, figures, symbols, codes and other marks (hereinafter called simply characters) are arranged in the character rows 25 on the character disc. Further, in FIG. 7, five rows are employed for explaining the character rows,

but, it is not limited to the five rows, and some portions of the character rows are shown by dotted lines, but actually the characters are arranged in'this dotted-line portion. Rotation of the character disc is possible around the center axis 26.

FIG. 8 partially shows a perforated tape 27 wherein for example, 12 bits code are used. Referring to FIG. 8A, the four units 28 surrounded by the dotted-lines are provided for selecting the position of the radial direction on the character disc, and the other units 29 are provided for selecting the position of the circumference. That is, the four units for the radial position can command the sixteen positions, that is, the sixteen of 6 bits and the code for selecting the circumferential I position of the first Japanese character hon 30 comprises an array of perforations. In the character disc, an analogue-digital code, which is coin-cidental with the code of the first Japanese character hon 30, is included in row 45 in the character disc as shown in FIG. 9. The characters included in row 45 of the disc are ro, yaku," ri, shima, hon, and iro. And then the Japanese character hon is selected from the characters included in row 45 by using the light beam selector D shown in FIG. 6. As mentioned above, a

light beam selector D is provided for selecting a light beam corresponding to the desired character from the group of the light beams passing through the characters of the character disc, that is, in this case, only the light beam corresponding to Japanese character hon 30 is selected.

As a result of this, by the order of the perforated tape, the contents of the perforated tape correspond with the analogue digital codes 24 of the character disc B. At the same time, a part of the order of the perforated tape is transmitted to the control circuit of the light beam selector D and when the above-mentioned orders of the perforated tape correspond with the analogue-digital codes, the light source 11 is lit up and the desired characters are photographed on the photosensitizer 21. Similarly, the Japanese characters honhatsumei dewa basuketto 1 no teibu ni kaku 30 44 are photographed. In FIG. 9, the group of characters are arranged, by way of example, in the vertical direction and of course, they canbe arranged in the horizontal direction.

Next the selecting method of the one-way characters or the two-way characters is explained as follows. Referring to FIG. 9, the characters having the analogue-digital codes 46 are the one-way characters for vertical writing and the characters having the analogue-digital code 47 are the one-way characters for horizontal writing. The discrimination code 48 has the similar function as the analogue-digital code and is attached only to the vertical (or horizontal) one-way characters thereby discriminating the vertical (or horizontal) one-way characters. The discrimination of the discrimination code 48 is performed, in a similar manner as the discrimination of the analoguedigital codes, by the reading element which is provided at the position corresponding to the discrimination code 48 on the character disc B. Referring to FIG. 9, snce the characters arranged on the character disc are already explained, as an example, in the case of vertical writing, it is sufficient to discriminate only the horizontal one way characters from the other characters.

FIG. 10 shows one example of the relation between the arrangement of the character row 25 on the character disc and the positions of the photographing. Referring to FIG. 10, the character row 25 has sixteen rows, and each row is represented by 25-1, 25-2, 25 3, 2546. The optical axis point 13 is an intersecting point of the character disc B and the optical axis 13. Four imaginary lines 52-52, 53-53, 54-54 and 5555 (hereinafter called lines 52, 53, 54 and 55) are provided with a 45 angle at the optical axis point 13 and four characters are selected on each of the imaginary lines 52, 53, 54 and 55, and then the 16 characters thus selected 113' and, 56 -70, are treated as the character group with-regard to the optical axis point 13. One example of a selecting method for the character group is explained below.

The intersecting points 56, 57, 13 and 58 which are respectively, the intersecting points between the imaginary line 52 and the character rows 25-7, 258, 259 and 2510 are selected as having the following relations; that is,

With regard to the intersecting points 59, 60, 61 and 62 which are, respectively, the intersecting points between the imaginary line 53 and the character rows 25l, 254, 25-14 and 2546 are selected such as;

Similarly, with regard to the imaginary line 54, the intersecting points 63, 64, 65 and 66 with the character rows 252, 25-5, 25-12 and 2545 are selected as the positions of the photographing points, and with regard to the imaginary line 55, the intersecting points 67, 68, 69 and 70 with the character rows 25-3, 256, 25-11 and 2543 are selected as the positions of the photographing points. In the same manner, with regard to the imaginary lines 52 and 53, the intersecting points 56, 57, 58, 13, 59, 60, 61 and 62 are selected as the positions of the photographing points. As a result of this, the characters selected, one from each character row, form the character group in connection with the optical axis point 13'. In the above-mentioned method which selects the character group, when each imaginary line select four points excepting the optical axis point 13, 17 characters, including the optical axis point 13, can be selected. However, in the case of FIG. 10, the character group having 16 points are formed by using the axis point l3 instead of the symmetrical point for the intersecting points 57. Of course, 17 characters can be used as the positions of the photographing points. In the above-mentioned explanation, the explanation concerning the present invention was given, as an example, in the case of the character row having the sixteen characters, but it is not limited to this value.

FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram for showing the function of the optical tunnel system.

The optical tunnel system is comprised of the main lens 14 and the optical tunnel E. Referring to FIG. 11, considering in the first place, that the characters 71, 72, 73 and 74 are arranged on the character disc B. Now, the position of the characters 71, 72 and 73, 74 are selected so as to be arranged in a symmetrical position with regard to the optical axis 13 and the distance between the character '71 and the optical axis 13 is selected as twice the distance between the character 72 and the optical axis 113. The optical tunnel comprises a pair of reflecting mirrors 75 and 76 arranged parallel and opposite to each other at an equal distance from the optical axis 13. The v characters 71 74 have a direction shown by the arrow. The light beam passing through the characters 71 74 passes through the main lens to the optical tunnel. When the distance between the main lens 14 and the first image plane is assumed L, the light beam passing through the character 71 is reflected two times, that is, at the position L/4 and 3L/4 in the mirrors 75 and 76 as shown in FIG. 11, and focussed on the first image plane 15. The character 72 is reflected at the position L/2 in the mirror 76 and focussed also on the first image plane 15. If the distance of the reflecting mirror is adjusted so, the images of the character 71 and 72 are on the same position on the same plane, all the characters 71 74 are focussed on the same position on the same plane. As a result of this, the direction of the character on the character disc are determined so that the image focussed on the image plane are arranged in the same directon considering the reflection times in the optical tunnel.

FIG. 12 is a vertical sectional view of the optical tunnel. The reflecting mirrors are arranged parallel to the optical axis 13 of the positions, 57, 64, 60, 68, 58, 65, 61 and 69 which are inside positions to the optical axis 13 on the imaginary lines. Further, as mentioned above, the distance between the positions 56, 63, 59, 67, 66, 62, 70 and the optical axis 13 are respectively selected as twice the distance between the positions 57, 64, 60, 68, 58, 65, 61, 69 and the optical axis 13. As a result of this, the character group composed of 16 characters is selected from the character row 25 composed of l6 rows, and the 16 light beams corresponding to the above-mentioned character group can be focussed on the same plane by using the optical tunnel E. No. movement mechanism is neceaaary for the optical tunnel E, and the precision of the character which is photographed does not vary, so the rapidity of the photography can be performed with high precision and accuracy..

FIG. 13 shows a schematic diagram of the light beam mask F which takes a photograph of only the composed character having the necessary ruby characters from the composed ruby characters. The light beam mask F is generally provided on the image plane of the optical tunnel E and is composed of the mask plane and the control means for the position of the mask plane. A vertical typesetting window 18 and a horizontal typesetting window 82 are provided in the mask paate 83, and these windows are shifted to the desired position, for example, as shown in FIG. 13, by the electromagnets 79 and 80. When the mask plate 83 is pulled by the magnet 79, the horizontal typesetting window 82 is positioned on the optical axis 13, and, on the contrary, when the mask plate is pulled by the magnet 80, the vertical typesetting window 81 is positioned on the optical axis 13. Further, other means for pulling the mask plate, for example, means using oil pressure, air pressure or other mechanical means, can be used in this case.

FIG. 14 shows one example of a schematic diagram of the mask plate 83 wherein a vertical typesetting win- 1 dow 81 and horizontal typesetting window 82 are prohatching portions 86, 87, 88 and 89 show, respectively, the imaginary bodies for ruby characters to the vertical typesetting, for address figures to the vertical typesetting, for ruby characters to the horizontal typesetting and for address figures to the horizontal typesetting. The portion ofthe windows provided on the mask plate should be selected as being larger than the portion of the basic character and ruby character.

Next, the method of typesetting the composed character is explained according to FIG. 15. The operation of typesetting is actually performed either in the vertical typesetting or the horizontal typesetting. However, in FIG. 15, for convenience, the explanation is given simultaneously for the operation of both kinds of above typesetting.

a. In the first place, when the address figure 20 90 is exposed to light by the light beam window 81 as shown in FIG. 15(A), the address figure 20 90 is focussed to the right and upward out of the imaginal body 84 and the address figures for use in the horizontal typesetting are shut out by the light mask plate 83. On the other hand, when the address figure 20" 91 is exposed to light by the light beam window 82, the address figure 20" 91 is focussed left out of the imaginary body 85 and the address figures for use in the vertivided. Two hatching portions 84 and 85 show, respectively, the imaginary bodies for the basic figure, and

cal typesetting are shut out by the light mask plate 83.

b. Next, the desired basic Japanese character shiyou" is exposed to light, as shown in FIG. 15(8), and this Japanese character shiyou is photographed in the imaginary bodies 84 or 85.

c. Further, an explanation in the case where the ruby Hiragana characters shiyou to the basic Japanese character shiyou are divided in two parts is illustrated, that is Hiragana characters shiyo and Hiragana character u. When the ruby Hiragana character shiyo 93 is exposed to the light by the light beam window 86, as shown in FIG. 15(C), the ruby characters Hiragana character shiyo 93 is photographed to the right and upward out of the imaginary body, and the ruby characters for use in the horizontal typesetting are shut out by the light beam mask 83. In the same manner, the ruby character Hiragana character shiyo" 94 is only photographed to the left and upward out of the imaginary body by using the light beam window 82.

d. Further, the character is shifted in the distance of the ruby characters which are photographed, as shown in FIG. 15(D), and the ruby Hiragana character u is photographed in the same manner.

e. In the above-mentioned operations (a) to (d), the composed Japanese character shiyou added to the ruby Hiragana characters shiyou and the address figure 20 is obtained as shown in FIG. 15(E). In this case, when the ruby Hiragana character shiyou, of

the basic Japanese character shiyou is used without being divided into two parts, the operation ((1) can be eliminated, however, it is necessary to use the light beam window as shown in FIG. 14(B).

The mask plate is preferably provided in the position corresponding to the image plane of the optical tunnel. One reason for this is that by providing the mask plate in the image plane, the flare light produced on the optical system, such as a main lens or optical tunnel, can be eliminated and distinct images can be obtained. Another reason for this is that the displacement distance of the mask can be selected minimumly and consequently, the operation speed controlling the position of the mask can be at maximum because the light beam corresponding to each character is focussed in the mask plate.

With regard to the connection with the above-mentioned parts, the beam selector D is elTectively arranged in the apparatus of the present invention. Concerning the beam selector D, explanation is given briefly for one example of the beam selector. As mentioned-above, the light beam selector selects only one beam corresponding to the desired character from the character group, as'shown in FIG. 10. The light beam selector is operated by the instructions of the binary code. As shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17, the light beam selector comprises a base plate 95, four selector plates 96, 97, 98 and 99, four solenoids 100, 101, 102 and 103 and if necessary, a selector mask 104. A light beam window 105 is provided in the central part of the base plate 95, and has a sufficient area for passing through the whole beam illuminating the character group. Both sides of the light beam window 105, the upper position plate 106 and the lower position plate 107, are provided on the base plate 95 and control the position of the above-mentioned selector plate. Selector guides 108 and 109 are provided on the base plate so as to determine the direction of movement of the selector plates. A guide gutter 110 is provided on the selector guides 108 and 109. At the upper part of the upper position plate 106, a pin 111 is fixed to the base plate 95. Springs 112, 113, 114 and 115 are fixed to the pin 111, and are connected to the selector plates 96 99, thereby contacting the upper part of the selector to the lower surface of the upper position plate 106, that is, the normal position of the selector. Solenoids 104) 103 are provided for the base plate 95 by the holding plate 116, and each magnetic core 117, 118, 119 and 120 of the solenoids 100 103 are coupled to the lower ends of the selecter plates 96 99. By exciting each solenoid 100 103, the selector plates 96 99 corresponding to each solenoid 100 103 are pulled downwardly thereby contacting the lower part of the selector to the upper surface of the lower position plate 7 107, that is, the displacement position of the selector.

By cutting of the exciting current for each solenoid, the I selector plates return to their original positions, that is, their normal positions.

As a result of this, the selector plates go and return between the normal position and the displacementposition. Consequently, the movement of the selector plates can be commanded by the binary coded signal. FIG. 18 and FIG. 19 are diagrams explaining the position of the light beam window of the selector plates. FIG. 19(1), (2), (3) and (4) show, respectively, the

relationship between the light beam Windows provided for the selector plates 96, 97, 98, 99. The positions indicated by FIGS. 13 and 56 correspond to the position of the character group of the character disc B. The FIGS. 121 to 136 indicate the position of the light beam window of the selector plates, in the normal position, corresponding to each character of the character group, and the FIGS. 121' 136 indicate the position of the light beam window, in the displacement position, corresponding to each character of the character group. The relation between the light beam window of the selector plates is shown in FIG. 18. For example, as shown in FIGS. 18 and 19, the light beam No. 1 passes through the light beam selector when the selector plate 96 is in the displacement position and the selector plates 97, 98 and 99 are in the normal position.

Next, an explanation of the method of the phototypesetting of the present invention is given below by the drawings in FIG. 9 and FIG. 20. The codes recorded in the perforated TAPE 27 are decoded by the TAPE READER 142, and are stored in MEMORY 143. DECODER 144 decodes the contents stored in MEMORY 143 and transmits the functional codes to FUNCTION 145 and the codes relating to the characters, to the CHARACTER 146. The contents of F UNC- TION 145 are transmitted to HORIZONTAL COM- MAND 147, VERTICAL COMMAND 148 and FUNCTION 149 and further stored in HORIZONTAL MEMORY 150 or VERTICAL MEMORY 151 in accordance with the horizontal writing or vertical writing. The output of the FUNCTION 149 is transmitted to DRIVING MECHANISM 170 for performing as the functional code. The contents stored in HORIZON- TAL MEMORY 150 or VERTICAL MEMORY 151 are held until the next command and sends the signals to AND gates 152, 153, 157 and DRIVING MEANS 154. That is, when the signal indicating the horizontal writing is stored in the HORIZONTAL MEMORY 150, the signal indicating the horizontal writing is held until the receiving of the signal indicating the transformation to the vertical writing. By receiving this signal, MEMORY 150 or 151 sends this signal to a DRIVING MEANS 154 and drive the prism G shown in FIG. 6 so as to occupy the position corresponding to the vertical writing or the horizontal writing. The above-mentioned explanation relates to the case where the form as to whether the vertical writing or horizontal writing is determined by the rotation of the prism G shown in FIG. 6, and further, the order of whether the horizontal writing 147 or vertical writing 148 is commanded by codes stored in the perforated TAPE 27. In this case it is determined Whether the horizontal writing or vertical writing can also be decided by the HORIZONTAL SWITCH 155 or VERTICAL SWITCH 156 provided on the front panel of the apparatus.

The character signals decoded inthe DECODER 144 are divided into two parts by CHARACTER 146,

a that is CHARACTER 158 and RULE OF PUNCTUA- TION 159. The ordinary character signals (the twoway character signal) are transmitted to AND gates 152 and 153, and the signals of RULE OF PUNCTUA- TION 159 are transmitted to AND gates 152 and 157. v

Discrimination mark 48 provided on the character disc B is detected by the MARK DETECTER 160, for deciding on the horizontal code or vertical code. The output of HORIZONTAL CODE 161 is further transmitted to AND gate 157, and the output of VERTICAL CODE 162 is further transmitted to AND gate 152 and 153. A-D DETECTOR 163 detects the analogue-digital code 24 on the character disc B. The output detecting signal of A-D DETECTOR 163 and the tape signal 164 of MEMORY 143 are transmitted to COINCIDENTAL CIRCUIT 165 which emits the coincidental signal when the above two signals are coincidental. The coincidental signals emitted by COINCIDENTAL CIR- CUIT 165 are transmitted to-AND gate 166. The outputs of AND gates 152, 153 and 157 are transmitted to OR gate 167, and the output of OR gate 167 is transmitted to the above-mentioned AND gate'166. When the signal from COINCIDENTAL CIRCUIT 165 and the signal from OR gate 167 are coincidental in AND gate 166, AND gate 166 emits a coincidental signal whereby the light source 11 is lighted. The above explanation is given only as one example of the apparatus of the present invention and other modifications can be realized. For example, the output signal 164 can be taken out from DECODER 144, or MARK DETEC- TOR 160 and the A-D DETECTOR 163 can be united as one element.

In the next place, the operation of the vertical typesetting is given below. First, the tape, as shown in FIG. 8, is applied to the photo-typesetting of the present invention, and the contents of the tape 27 are read by TAPE READER 142 and stored in MEMORY 143. The contents of the MEMORY 143 are decoded by DECODER 144 and the output of DECODER 144 is transmitted to FUNCTION 145 and CHARACTER 146. When the codes of the instruction of vertical typesetting are included in tape 27, the codes of the instruction of vertical typesetting are transmitted from FUNCTION 145 to VERTICAL COMMAND 148, and stored in VERTICAL MEMORY 151. VERTICAL MEMORY 151 is composed of, for example, a group of flip-flop circuits etc., and 'is converted by the input signal and holds its condition until the next input signal is applied. The output signal of VERTICAL MEMORY 151 is transmitted to DRIVING MEANS 154 and sets the prism G to the state for vertical typesetting. Further the output signal of VERTICAL MEMORY 151 is transmitted to AND gate 152. With this, the preparation of vertical typesetting is finished. Next, the DECODER 144 decodes the contents stored in MEMORY 143. Referring to FIG. 8B, the first character on the tape 27 Japanese character hon 30 and is first read out by DECODER 144. In this case, the

signal of the codes 168 corresponding to the part 28 in FIG. 8A is transmitted to the light beamselector D shown in FIG. 6. The signal 168 is taken out independently to the CHARACTER and FUNCTION and operates the light beam selector D so as to pass the light beam corresponding to the 14th row. That is, in FIG. 9, the Japaenese character hon 30 is positioned in rows 25-l4, the signal 168 is provided so as to perform the passing of the light beam corresponding to rows 25-14.

DECODER 144 reads the code of Japanese character hon" 30 and the output of DECODER 144 is transmitted to CHARACTER 146 and further, to CHARACTER 158. The output of CHARACTER 158 is transmitted to AND gates I52 and 153 which are held in closed states. On the other hand, the discrimination mark 48 is detected by MARK DETECTOR 160 and the negative pulse code thus obtained is transmitted to AND gates 152, 153 through VERTICAL CODE 162. Consequently, AND gate 152 receives the output signals of VERTICAL MEMORY 151, CHARACTER 158 and VERTICAL CODE I62 and the output signal of AND gate 152 is transmitted to OR gate 167. As a result of this, the output signal of OR gate 167 is sent to AND gate 166. On the other hand, A-D DETECTOR 163 reads out the analogue-digital code recorded on the character disc B and the output of A-D DETECTOR 163 is continuously transmitted to COINCIDENTAL CIRCUIT 165. When the tape signal 164 from MEMORY 143 and the analogue-digital code 45 corresponding to the Japanese character hon" 30 are coincidental in COINCIDENTAL CIRCUIT 165, the output of COINCIDENTAL CIRCUIT 165 is transmitted to AND gate 166 wherein the output signal of OR gate 167 is applied. The light source 11 is lit up by the output of AND gate 166 and illuminates the character disc B by way of the condenser lens 12. The characters with the range of illumination wherein the Japanese character hon 30 is included are all lit up by the light source 1 l and transmitted to the light beam selector D. As the light beam selector D is already selected to pass only the rows 25 14 by the signal 168, only the light beam corresponding to the Japanese character hon 30 is passed through the light beam selector D and arrives at the first image plane 15 via main lens 14 and optical tunnel E. The image focussed on the first image plane 15 is photographed on the photo sensitizer 21 via the prism G which it is controlled by the DRIVING MEANS 154 and lens 17. As a result of this, the photography of the first Japanese character hon 30 is finished, and DECODER 144 reads out the next signal. If the next signal relates to the instruction of the character shift, the signal drives DRIVING MECHANISM 170 of the apparatus via FUNCTION 145 and 149. The Japanese characters hatsumei wa ni kaku" are treated in a similar manner. When the Japanese character kaku 44 is photographed, DECODER 144 detects the code of a beginning new line; and shifts one line by the operation of the driving mechanism, and the position of the typesetting is returned to the head of the line. As a result of this, the operation of the typesetting is continued until DECODER 144 detects the code of the finished procedure.

Next, the explanation concerning the horizontal typesetting is given below. The signal code is transmitted from DECODER 144 to FUNCTION 145, HORIZONTAL COMMAND 147, and HORIZON- TAL MEMORY as a similar manner in the case of the vertical typesetting. The output signal of HORIZONTAL MEMORY 150 is transmitted to DRIVING MEANS 154 whereby the prism G shown in FIG. 6 is orientated to the horizontal typesetting position and the output signal of HORIZONTAL MEMORY 150 is transmitted to AND gates 153 and 157. The characters are transmitted to AND gates .153 and 157 via CHARACTERS 146 and 158. On the other hand, the negative pulse signal detected by the discrimination mark 48 on the character disc B is transmittd to the above-mentioned AND gates 152 and 153 via VERTICAL CODE 162 and the output signals detecting the analogue-digital signal 24 are transmitted to COINCIDENTAL CIRCUIT 165. AND gate 152 receiving the output signals of the CHARACTER 158 and VERTICAL CODE 162 is held in the cut-off state, and the output of AND gate 153 receiving the output signals of HORIZONTAL MEMORY 150, CHARACTER 158 and VERTICAL CODE 162 is transmitted to OR gate 167 and further, to AND gate 166. COINCIDENTAL CIRCUIT receiving the output signal 164 of MEMORY 143 similar to th vertical typesetting, generates a coincidental signal to AND gate 166 so as to give an instruction to source 11, and the characters are photographed on the photo-sensitizier 21. In this case, the horizontal typesetting is carried out by using VERTICAL CODE 162, because the characters arranged on the character disc B are provided for vertical typesetting use, which is used for horizontal typesetting by the rotation of prism G. Next, the explanation is given as an example for taking a photograph of the horizontal one way katakana character tsu 37. The output signal of DECODER 144 is transmitted passing through CHARACTER I46 and RULE OF PUNCTUATION 159 to AND gates 152 and 157, The positive pulse detected in MARK DETECTOR 160 is transmitted to AND gate 157 via HORIZONTAL CODE 161. Then AND gate 157 receives the output signals of HORIZONTAL MEMORY 150, RULE OF PUNCIUATION 159 and HORIZONTAL CODE 16] and the output of AND gate 157 is transmitted to OR gate 167 and the light source 1 l is lit up.

Modifications of the herein disclosed circuits will occur to those skilled in the art and various combinations of the circuits will be capable of use together for achieving the desired results of the invention. The scope of the invention is to be interpreted accordingly as defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for photo-typesetting comprising: means for establishing four imaginary lines provided with a 45 angle at an intersecting point of a light axis and a character disc whereon character rows are arranged, means for determining intersecting points of each of said four imaginary lines and each different said character row as photographing points, said character rows at each of said intersecting points with said imaginary lines being arranged symmetrically at said intersecting point of said light axis and said character disc, pairs of parallel mirrors for each said imaginary line disposed at the base of said light axis, said pair of parallel mirrors being arranged in parallel with said light axis, said mirror reflecting one time said photographing points of inner intersecting points of said imaginary light the light lines and each different said character :row and reflect- I ing two times said photographing points of outside intersecting points of said imaginary lines and each different said character row, means for focussing said photographing points at the same focussing position on a focussing plane, means for adding ruby characters and address figures to said character in case of need, and means for arranging and typesetting said characters one after another on a predetermined typesetting type from horizontal typesetting and vertical typesetting.

2. Apparatus for photo-typesetting according to claim 1, wherein said means for adding said ruby characters is further characterized in that compound character disc having arranged 14 ruby characters arranged with plural ruby characters at plural positions out of an imaginary body of basic characters are arranged on said character disc, a movable mask plate provided at said focussing plane having means therein defining more than two light beam windows for said compound characters of vertical typesetting and horizontal typesetting, said light beam windows for said compound characters are composed of said light beam windows for said basic characters and for said ruby characters and said address characters which are arranged at a predetermined position for said basic characters, and means for controlling the position of said mask plate in accordance with the horizontal typesetting or vertical typesetting so that the center of one of said light beam windows for said basic character is arranged coincidentally with said light axis.

3. Apparatus for photo-typesetting according to claim 2, wherein said means for arranging said characters on a predetermined typesetting type is further characterized by providing a discrimination mark on said character disc whereon one-way characters and two-way characters are arranged, means for discriminating said predetermined typesetting type of said characters means for selecting and typesetting desired characters by using a detecting signal of said discrimination mark, a detecting signal of an analoguedigital signal determining a position of said character, a commanding signal commanding said predetermined typesetting type, a detecting signal detecting one-way characters and two-way characters and a commanding signal of a tape.

4. In an apparatus for photo-typesetting: a rotatable thereon a plurality of characters; means coacting with said character disc for sequentially forming optical images of individual ones of said characters and focussing same at an image plane; means for selectively adding a ruby character image and an address figure image to a character image focussed at said image plane thereby forming a sequence of composite character images; and means receptive of said composite character images for sequentially transmitting same to a plane of use while angularly orientating said composite character images to a preselected angular position to enable both horizontal and vertical photo-typesetting to be carreid out.

5. An apparatus according to claim 4, wherein said means for selectively adding ruby character and address figure images includes a movably mounted mask plate having means therein defining a series of light beam windows, and means for effecting movement of said mask plate in accordance with the type of photo typesetting desired to enable appropriate ruby character and address figure images to be transmitted through said light beam 7 windows onto said image plane.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2720586 *Oct 25, 1951Oct 11, 1955Internat Busines Machines CorpCounting circuit for photographic recorder
US2887935 *Feb 11, 1954May 26, 1959Perkin Elmer CorpOptical image director
US2905068 *Apr 30, 1958Sep 22, 1959Friedman AllanShutter mechanisms for photocomposing apparatus
US2944471 *Apr 22, 1953Jul 12, 1960Phototypograph CorpComposing apparatus
US2950800 *Oct 24, 1956Aug 30, 1960Graphic Arts Res Foundation InIdeographic type composing machine
US3191157 *Jan 21, 1960Jun 22, 1965Rca CorpOptical memory
AU205731A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3938099 *Mar 15, 1974Feb 10, 1976Alephtran Systems Ltd.Electronic digital system and method for reproducing languages using the Arabic-Farsi script
US3988746 *Nov 15, 1974Oct 26, 1976Alphatype CorporationPhotocomposing machine
US4122533 *Jun 2, 1977Oct 24, 1978Addressograph-Multigraph CorporationMultiple language character generating system
US4148571 *Feb 23, 1977Apr 10, 1979Moyroud Louis MPhotocomposing device and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification396/555, 396/556
International ClassificationB41B17/00, B41B17/10, B41B27/00, B41B21/16, B41B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41B21/16, B41B17/10, B41B27/00
European ClassificationB41B17/10, B41B27/00, B41B21/16