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Publication numberUS3726287 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 10, 1973
Filing dateJul 16, 1970
Priority dateJul 16, 1970
Publication numberUS 3726287 A, US 3726287A, US-A-3726287, US3726287 A, US3726287A
InventorsS Wikler
Original AssigneeS Wikler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe construction with foot-stabilizing appliance
US 3726287 A
Abstract
To stabilize the foot against movement within the foot-receiving cavity of the shoe, and particularly fore and aft movement, abutments are located at the outer and inner sides thereof, extending upwardly from the region of the insole to engage the foot. One abutment is located at the outer side with its rearward foot-engaging extremity positioned in front of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal and its forward foot-engaging extremity positioned behind the fifth metatarsal phalangeal joint. A second abutment is located so as to engage the foot at the region of the inner arch, with the forward foot-engaging extremity of this abutment located behind the first metatarsal phalangeal joint and the rearward foot-engaging extremity located at the scaphoid. A third abutment is located to engage the back and inside of the heel of the foot, with the rearward foot-engaging extremity of this abutment located at the middle of the back of the heel and the forward foot-engaging extremity located in the talus-scaphoid joint region.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

limited States ?atettt Wikler [76] Inventor: Simon J. Wikler, 423 N. Federal Highway, Hollywood, Fla. 33020 [22] Filed: July 16, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 55,405

[52] 11.8. C1 ..128/6l7, 128/581 [51] llnt. Cl. ..A6lf 5/14 [58] Field of Search ..l28/6l7, 581, 607, 128/610, 614, 615, 619

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,156,086 4/1939 Hack et a1. ..128/62l X 2,790,254 4/1957 Burns ..128/619 859,291 7/1907 Grossman ...l28/607 X 2,607,132 8/1952 Wikler ..128/581 3,081,774 3/1963 Lelyveld 128/615 3,543,765 12/1970 Alzner ..l28/6l5 X 3,421,518 l/l969 Wikler ..l28/614 [451 Apr. 10, 1973 Primary Examiner-William E. Kamm Assistant Examiner.l. Yasko Attorney.lay L. Chaskin ABSTRACT To stabilize the foot against movement within the foot-receiving cavity of the shoe, and particularly fore and aft movement, abutments are located at the outer and inner sides thereof, extending upwardly from the region of the insole to engage the foot. One abutment is located at the outer side with its rearward foot-engaging extremity positioned in front of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal and its forward foot-engaging extremity positioned behind the fifth metatarsal phalangeal joint. A second abutment is located so as to engage the foot at the region of the inner arch, with the forward foot-engaging extremity of this abutment located behind the first metatarsal phalangeal joint and the rearward foot-engaging extremity located at the scaphoid. A third abutment is located to engage the back and inside of the heel of the foot, with the rearward foot-engaging extremity of this abutment located at the middle of the back of the heel and the forward foot-engaging extremity located in the talusscaphoid joint region.

13 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR1 @1915 3,726.28?

sum 1 OF 2 lm ll INVENTOR SIMON J. WIKLER BY 5/mpir0 and Shapiro ATTORNEYS PATENTEDAPRWIW 3,726,287

SHEET 2 BF 2 mvm'ron SIMON J. WIKLER m 550 170 (Inc/5, 70,000

ATTORNEYS SHOE CONSTRUCTION WITH FOOT- STABILIZING APPLIANCE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to footwear, and more particularly to foot-stabilizing appliances.

A serious shortcoming of conventional footwear, especially shoes for children and athletic use, is that in sudden stops the foot tends to crowd against the shoe upper and into non-accommodating spaces within the shoe, and particularly to slide forward in the toe area of the shoe. Resultant friction can cause blisters and abrasions of the skin, jamming of the toes against the front of the shoe, permanent injury to the soft malleable bones of children, reduction of the effective use of the toes, and abnormal postural changes.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION It is accordingly a principaLobject of the present invention to provide an improved shoe construction or an improved appliance for use in shoes to prevent or significantly reduce the foregoing and other shortcomings of conventional footwear.

Briefly stated, in accordance with a preferred form of the invention, three abutments or grippers are employed to stabilize the foot within the shoe cavity. The abutments extend upwardly within the shoe cavity from the region of the insole. A first abutment is located so that its rearward foot-engaging extremity is in front of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal and its forward foot-engaging extremity is behind the fifth metatarsal phalangeal joint, so that this abutment engages the foot in the area of the fifth metatarsal shaft. A second abutment is located in the inner arch region, having its rearward foot-engaging extremity in the area of the scaphoid bone and its forward foot-engaging extremity behind the first metatarsal phalangeal joint. A third abutment extends from the middle of the back of the heel forwardly to a point behind the talus-scaphoid joint. These abutments cooperate in stabilizing the foot within the shoe and particularly in preventing fore and aft movement therein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be further described in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate preferred and exemplary forms of the invention, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a human foot illustrating the position of a vertical fore and aft plane in which the elevation of the foot is greatest;

FIG. 2 is a plan view ofa conventional shoe last;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of an improved shoe last;

/ FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing a skeletonized foot fitted against an insole constructed, in accordance with the invention and supported by a conventional outsole;

FIG. 5 is a transverse sectional view of a shoe construction in accordance with the invention, the section being taken approximately at the position 55 of FIG.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of an insole appliance constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a shoe construction in accordance with the invention, with the upper being cut and pulled back to expose the foot (the skeleton being shown as by X-ray) and individual abutments which normally would be constrained to more upright positions by the upper;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a shoe construction in ac cordance with the invention, with the upper shown completely removed to expose abutment extensions of the insole which normally would be constrained to more upright positions by the upper;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a shoe last in accordance with the invention as seen generally from below; and

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view of a shoe construction in accordance with the invention,

the section being taken approximately at the position 10-10 of FIG. 8.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to the drawings, and initially to FIG. 4 thereof, a skeletonized foot 10 is shown fitted with an insole 12 supported by a conventional outsole 14. The insole is of a type shown more fully in FIG. 6 and comprises a generally planar major portion 16 from which cars 18, 20 and 22 project outwardly and upwardly. These ears constitute the abutments of the invention and may be formed integrally with the insole from resilient substances like rubber or leather, or in some instances from nonresilient material such as plastic or metal. In the form shown in FIG. 6, the cars 18, 20 and 22 project laterally beyond the periphery of the major portion 16 of the insole and will be constrained to assume positions more upright and within the lateral confines of the major portion of the insole under pressure exerted on the ears by the shoe upper. FIG. 5 shows the operative relationship of the outsole 1,4, the upper 24, the insole 12 with its abutments 1s and 20 22 not shown) and the foot 10, the phalangeal shafts of the foot being shown in cross-section. In order to avoid confusion, it should be noted that the insole appliance of the invention shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 is for the left foot, while that of FIG. 6 is for the right foot.

In accordance with the purposes of the invention, the abutments must be critically located in order to perform their intended functions. The abutment 20 is located, as shown in FIG. 4, so as to engage the foot in the region of the fifth metatarsal shaft 26. The rearward foot-engaging extremity of the abutment 20 is located in front of the tuberosity 28 of the fifth metatarsal, and the forward foot-engaging extremity of the abutment 20 is located behind the fifth metatarsal phalangeal joint 30. As shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, the abutment 18 is located to engage the foot in the region of the inner arch. This internal arch abutment or gripper has its forward foot-engaging extremity behind the first metatarsal phalangeal joint 32 and has its rearward foot-engagmetatarsal joint. In shoes such as those constructed in accordance with the applicants prior U.S. Pat, No. 2,607,132, granted Aug. 19, 1952, No. 3,421,518, granted Jan. 14, 1969, and British Patent No. 1,143,420, the precise positioning of abutment 20 is a simple matter, because the shoe has a distinct projection at the site of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal. Such a projection of the sole and upper is indicated at 39 in FIG. 7. In a conventional shoe, as for example a mans size ten shoe, the apex of the abutment 20 will be about one inch behind the position of the fifth metatarsal phalangeal joint when the foot is properly fitted within the shoe. The position for shoes of different size will vary proportionally.

The maximum height and thickness of the fifth metatarsal abutment 20 should be located at about the longitudinal center of the abutment, and the height and thickness should gradually diminish forwardly and rearwardly, so that at the forward and rearward extremities the abutment blends with the adjacent areas of the insole and upper proper upon which the abutment is superimposed. The first metatarsal abutment 18 is constructed similarly, but the longer, narrower abutment 22 has its thickness diminishing only at the longitudinal extremities. To assist in defining the thickness of the abutments imaginary horizontal planes may be drawn through the most convex part of the non-weight-bearing sides of an average foot of a given size at the regions of the fifth metatarsal, first metatarsal, and inner border of the heel, as shown at and 17 in FIG. 5 and at 21 in FIG. 10. Below these horizontal planes to a point where the bottom of the foot tends to curve up to become non-weight-bearing, as indicated at 11 and 13 in FIG. 5 and at 23 in FIG. 10, the thickness of the corresponding abutments(as seen in a transverse vertical plane is greatest. Above these horizontal planes the abutments diminish in thickness until they become a feathery edge at the termination of the top part of the aforesaid convex sides of the foot. Abutment 18 will be the highest because of the greater height of the first metatarsal segment. Abutment 20 will thus be lower, and abutment 22 will have the least height, because the associated convex side of the heel rapidly curves into a more vertical plane above the convexity, and less height of the abutment 22 is required to blend into that vertical plane. The height and thicknessof the abutments will vary with the size of the shoe, the proportions of the abutments illustrated being typical. As can be seen from FIG. 5 and 10, each of the abutments 18, 20 and 22 has an inner arcuate concave surface which approximates the convex part of the non-weight bearing sides of an average foot.

In the form shown in FIG. 6, the appliance of the invention is a removable partial insole, but the insole may extend throughout the length of the insole area of the shoe as in FIG. 8. The insole with abutments may be fixed to the sole by sewing and/or adhesives, and, if desired, the abutments 18-22 may be secured by sewing and/or adhesive to the adjacent surfaces of the upper. The embodiment of FIG. 7 is illustrative of a form of the invention in which individual abutments are secured, as by adhesive, to the insole of the shoe, rather than being formed integrally therewith as in FIG. 6. The abutments may be secured directly to the outsole, or directly to the upper of the shoe, or may be formed integrally with either. Flexible rubber-like material may be either molded or stamped out and skived on one side only or skived on both sides.

With the upper 24 cut and pulled open as shown in FIG. 7, the resilience of the abutments forces them to assume positions beyond the usual confines of the insole, as is the case in FIG. 8 where the upper is removed completely and in FIG. 6 where the insole is shown separately from the shoe. It is, of course, possible to employ abutments which remain within the confines of the insole, as in FIG. 5, even in the absence of pressures exerted thereon by the upper, such as abutments molded from soft materials or firmer materials such as plastics and metals.

It should be clearly noted, in any event, that the abutments per se of the invention are not supports for the plantar surfaces of the foot and are not lifts. The abutments engage the lateral or rear surfaces of the foot and exert pressure thereon. The critical positioning of the abutments, and especially of abutment 20, is essential to the proper functioning of the invention. Thus, abutment 20, which fits just in front of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal, is positively engaged by this tuberosity if the foot tends to slip forwardly in the shoe and deters such forward movement. Abutment 18 fills the concavity of the inner arch and thus inhibits fore and aft movements in the shoe. The novel cooperation of abutments 18 and 20, which engage opposite lateral surfaces of the foot therebetween, serves to enhance the foot-stabilizing effect of both abutments. This cooperative action is further enchanced by abutment 22, which assists abutment 18 in opposition to abutment 20. Since abutment 20 is forward of abutment 22, the engagement of abutment 22 with the back of the foot is also beneficial in stabilizing the foot between the abutments. Also side-to-side movements of the foot within the shoe are inhibited by virtue of the gripping action of the precisely fitted abutments on either side of the shoe.

An additional useful function or advantage of the invention resides in the capability of the abutments to serve as weight-bearing members for the sides of the foot during abnormal or emergency foot postures. With normal foot postures the abutments are not weightbearing. However, when the foot is twisted so that the weight is put on the sides of the foot, the normally nonweight-bearing abutments can provide auxiliary weight-bearing surfaces. The abutments conform to the structure of the foot and reduce the possibility of injury to the foot when the sides of the foot are called upon to assume weight-bearing functions. In conventional shoes, in which the weight-bearing surfaces abruptly terminate at the margins of the sole, transfer of weight to the sides of the foot and the shoe, above the aforesaid convex areas of the sides of the foot, is unrestrained and actually encouraged, with resultant tearing of ligaments, sprains, and fractures.

Although the abutments of the present invention are distinctly intended to engage the lateral surfaces of the foot, and not to serve as supports for the bottom of the foot, it will be recognized that, if desired, the abutments may be used in conjunction with foot-elevating members, as taught, for example in the applicant's aforesaid prior U.S. Pat. No. 3,421,518. Thus, as shown in FIG. 9, a shoe last 40 may be provided with a recess 42 for receiving material which will constitute a weightbearing support for the fourth and fifth toes, as taught in that patent. The last is similarly excavated at regions 443% and 48 to receive material for constituting the abutments of the invention. In injection molded, canvas, rubber, or other shoes formed substantially entirely of flexible material, it is preferred to utilize a suitably excavated last to prevent bulging of the shoe at the regions of the abutments. If desired, weight bearing supports may be provided at all of the regions S1, S2, S3 shown in FIG. 8, as taught in the last-mentioned patent.

In conventional shoes formed on lasts such as last 50 depicted in FIG. 2, forward movement of the foot within the shoe cavity is deterred somewhat by pressures exerted on the toes at the narrowing front of the shoe. Such pressures can be injurious, as noted previously. As taught in the aforesaid prior U.S. Pat. No. 2,607,132, a flared-toe shoe, constructed on a last as shown at 52 in FIG. 3, for example, avoids confinement of the toes. Such a shoe preferably has a counter portion which is narrow and shaped to securely engage the foot from a point behind the calcaneo cuboid articulation on the outer side to a point behind the first metatarsal phalangeal articulation on the inner side, both the sole and upper being flared outwardly and forwardly at both the inner and outer sides to provide space for the abducting of the toes, and an outwardly extending curvature being provided to receive the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal. A shoe which is widened at the toe region does not have the forward movement restricting effect provided by the narrow conventional toe region, but fore and aft movement of the foot can be restricted in accordance with the present invention while maintaining all the desirable features of the invention of U.S. Pat. No. 2,607,132. The last illustrated in FIG. 9 incorporates the features of the present invention in the flared-toe shoe of that patent, as well as the foot-supporting elevations taught in U.S. Pat. No. 3,421,5I8.

The present invention may also be effectively employed in a shoe constructed for better conformity with the human anatomy as taught by the aforesaid British Patent No. 1,143,420. As shown in FIG. 1, line 54 represents the location of a vertical fore and aft plane containing the highest elevations of the foot. It will be noted that this plane is located closer to the inner side of the foot than to the outer side. This may be contrasted with the construction of a shoe formed on a conventional last 50 (FIG. 2 wherein the plane just referred to is located at line 56 substantially along the middle of the shoe. If, on the other hand, the shoe is formed on a last 52 as shown in FIG. 3, in which the said plane is located at line 58, corresponding to the location of the line 54 of FIG. 1, and if the upper fits snugly with the top of the foot, the foot-stabilizing action of the present invention is further enhanced.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes can be made in these embodiments without departing from the principles and spirit of the invention, the scope of which is defined in the appended claims.

The invention claimed is:

1. A shoe in combination with an insole, said shoe having a foot receiving cavity, the insole having a plantar portion extending between a forward and rearward end within the cavity, abutment means located within the cavity of the shoe at the outer side thereof adjacent the forward end of the insole and extending upwardly from a marginal region of the insole and projecting laterally beyond the periphery of the insole plantar portion, said abutment means being adapted to be nonsupportive of the plantar surface of the foot, said abutment means having forward and rearward foot-engaging extremities located along the insole marginal region and between the forward and rearward ends of the insole, the rearward foot-engaging extremity positioned to be immediately in front of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal, and the forward foot-engaging extremity being positioned to be behind the fifth metatarsal phalangeal joint, the abutment means having an arcuate inner surface which is concave with respect to the plantar portion of the insole and adapted to engage only the outer convex side of the foot, said abutment means having a maximum height and thickness located at about the longitudinal center of the abutment, the maximum thickness being in that part of the abutment projecting laterally from the periphery of the insole, the thickness diminishing at the extremities to blend with the insole and the height diminishing to a tapered edge, the peripheral edge of the abutment means between the maximum height and the extremities being a descending curve so as to blend with the insole, whereby engagement of said abutment with the outer convex side of the foot deters forward and backward movement of the foot within the shoe cavity.

2. A shoe construction as set forth in claim 1, said foot-receiving cavity of the shoe having a fore and aft vertical plane of greatest elevation at a position substantially closer to the inner side of the shoe than to the outer side of the shoe, so that with the shoe upper snugly fitting the foot, forward movement of the foot in the shoe cavity is further deterred.

3. A shoe construction as set forth in claim 1, said shoe having an upper including a counter portion and a toe portion, said counter portion being narrow and adapted to securely engage the foot from a point behind the calcaneo-cuboid articulation on the outer side thereof to a joint on the inner side thereof behind the first metatarsal phalangeal articulation, the toe portion of the sole and upper being flared outwardly and forwardly at both the inner and outer edges and positioned to be adjacent to the region of the great and small toes to allow space between the great toe and the inner side and between the small toe and the outer side of the upper of the shoe to permit the abducting of said toes, and wherein said shoe construction additionally includes an outwardly extending curved portion at the outer side thereof positioned to be adjacent to the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal.

4. A shoe construction as set forth in claim I, there being elevations means positioned to be bone-supporting under the cuboid,tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal, posterior portions and shafts of the fourth and fifth metatarsals, internal part of the heel, and the fourth and fifth toes.

5. A shoe construction according to claim 1, a second abutment means located within the cavity at the inner side thereof and generally opposite to the first abutment means and extending upwardly from the insole marginal region and projecting laterally beyond the periphery of the insole plantar portion, said second abutment means having forward and rearward foot-engaging extremities located along the insole marginal region and between the forward and rearward ends of the insole, and forward foot-engaging extremity of said second abutment means being positioned to be behind the first metatarsal phalangeal joint and the rearward foot-engaging extremity of the second abutment means being positioned to be located at the scaphoid, the second abutment means having an arcuate inner surface which is concave with respect to the plantar portion of the insole and adapted to engage only the convex region of the inner arch of the foot, said second abutment means having a maximum height and thickness located at about the longitudinal center of the second abutment means, the maximum thickness being in that part of the second abutment means projecting laterally from the periphery of the insole, the thickness diminishing at the extremities of the second abutment means to blend with the insole and the height diminishing to a tapered edge, the maximum height of the second abutment means being greater than the maximum height of the first abutment means, the peripheral edge of the second abutment means between its maximum height and the forward and rearward footengaging extremities having a descending curve shape so as to blend with the insole, said second abutment means being adapted to be non-supportive of the plantar surface of the foot and cooperating with said first abutment means to stabilize movement within the shoe.

6. A shoe construction according to claim 5, a third abutment means located within the cavity and rearward of the second abutment and extending upwardly from the inner side of the insole marginal region and projecting laterally beyond the periphery of the insole plantar portion, said third abutment means having foward and rearward foot-engaging extremities located along the insole marginal region, the rearward foot-engaging extremity of the third abutment means located adjacent to the rearward end of the insole and positioned to be at the middle of the back of the heel and the forward foot-engaging extremity of said third abutment means being located rearwardly of the second abutment rearward foot-engaging extremity and positioned to be in the talus-scaphoid region of the foot, said third abutment means having a maximum thickness located at about the longitudinal center the maximum thickness being in that part of the third abutment means projecting laterally from the periphery of the insole, the thickness diminishing at the longitudinal extremities to blend with the insole, the maximum height of the third abutment means being less than the maximum height of the first abutment means, the length of the third abutment means being greater than the length of either of the first or second abutment means, said third abutment means being adapted to be non-supportive of the plantar surface of the foot and assisting said first and second abutment means in stabilizing the foot within the shoe.

7. A shoe construction as set forth in claim 6, said abutments being fixed to or part of the insole of the shoe.

8. A shoe construction as set forth in claim 6, said abutments being fixed to or part of the outsole of the shoe.

9. A shoe construction as set forth in claim 6, said abutments being fixed to or part of the upper of the shoe.

10. A shoe construction as set forth in claim 6, said abutments being fixed to or part of an appliance separable from the shoe.

11. An insole for a shoe, said insole having a plantar portion extending between a foward and rearward end of the insole, said insole having abutment means extending upwardly from an outer margin thereof adjacent the forward end of the insole and projecting laterally beyond the periphery of the insole plantar portion, said abutment means being adapted to be nonsupportive and non-weight-bearing of the planar surface of the foot, said abutment means having first and second foot-engaging limits, the first foot-engaging limit being located along the insole margin and positioned to be behind the fifth metatarsal joint, said second foot-engaging limit being located along the insole margin and rearward of the first limit and positioned to be immediately in front of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal, said abutment means having an arcuate inner surface which is concave with respect to the plantar portion of the insole and adapted to engage only the outer convex side of the foot, said abutment means having a maximum height and thickness located at about the longitudinal center of the abutment, the maximum thickness being in that part of the abutment projecting laterally from the periphery of the insole, the thickness diminishing at the extremities to blend with the insole and the height diminishing to a tapered edge, the peripheral edge of the abutment means between the maximum height and the extremities being a descending curve so as to blend with the insole.

12. An insole according to claim 11 further comprising a second abutment means extending upwardly from an inner margin of the insole and generally opposite to the first abutment means and projecting laterally beyond the periphery of the insole plantar portion, said second abutment means being adapted to be nonweight-bearing and non-supportive of the planar surface of the foot, said second abutment means being disposed along the insole inner margin and extending from between having limits on the inner insole margin positioned to be behind the first metatarsal phalangeal joint to the scaphoid, the second abutment means having an arcuate inner surface which is concave with respect to the plantar portion of the insole and adapted to engage only the convex region of the inner arch of the foot, said second abutment means having a maximum height and thickness located at about the longitudinal center of the second abutment means, the maximum thickness being in that part of the second abutment means projecting laterally'from the periphery of the insole, the thickness diminishing at the limits of the second abutment means to blend with the insole and the height diminishing to a tapered edge, the maximum height of the second abutment means being greater than the maximum height of the first abutment means, the peripheral edge of the second abutment means between its maximum height and the limits being a descending curve so as to blend with the insole.

13. An insole according to claim 12 further comprising a thirs abutment means extending upwardly from the inner margin and located between the scaphoid limit of the second abutment means and the rearward end of the insole, said third abutment means being adapted to be non-weight-bearing and non-supportive of the plantar surface of the foot, said third abutment means being disposed along the inner margin and having limits extending from between the middle of the rearward end of the insole positioned at the back of the heel to the talus-scaphoid joint,said third abutment means projecting laterally beyond the periphery of the

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US859291 *Aug 9, 1905Jul 9, 1907Julius GrossmanBoot, shoe, and other footwear.
US2156086 *Mar 30, 1935Apr 25, 1939Hack Shoe CoOrthopedic shoe
US2607132 *Mar 10, 1950Aug 19, 1952Joseph Wikler SimonShoe construction for preventing deformation of the foot
US2790254 *Dec 6, 1955Apr 30, 1957William C BurnsRemovable shoe pad construction
US3081774 *May 19, 1960Mar 19, 1963Lelyveld JosephArch support with metatarsal support bar
US3421518 *Aug 10, 1965Jan 14, 1969Simon J WiklerShoe construction having a sole provided with a shank stiffener and selective elevated bone supporting areas
US3543765 *Oct 20, 1965Dec 1, 1970Alznner National Arch SupportsArch supports
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6671981 *Aug 3, 2001Jan 6, 2004Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc.Footwear
US7028419Dec 8, 2003Apr 18, 2006Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc.Footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/176
International ClassificationA61F5/14, A43B7/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/22, A43B7/142, A43B7/1415, A43B7/144, A61F5/14
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20H, A43B7/14A20, A43B7/14A20A, A61F5/14, A43B7/22