Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3726431 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 10, 1973
Filing dateAug 24, 1970
Priority dateAug 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3726431 A, US 3726431A, US-A-3726431, US3726431 A, US3726431A
InventorsBotkin L
Original AssigneeFruehauf Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Containerized tank system
US 3726431 A
Abstract
The tank is constructed in the usual manner to withstand pressure and bending moments and is supported within a frame structure which simulates a container in dimensions and corner castings. The frame structure is capable of being stacked six-high when fully loaded which is made possible by the use of end frames of heavy tubular construction which are disposed in aligned relation when the frame structures are stacked. The frame structures are 20 or 40 feet long following the dimensions of the containers so that they can be transported, stacked and stored in the same manner as the containers.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Botkin [451 Apr. 10, 1973 CONTAINERIZED TANK SYSTEM [7 5] Inventor: Lawrence A. Botkin, Omaha, Nebr.

[73] Assignee: m'eiiatif (fai -65am, 9 a Detroit Mich.

T22 Fi ledz Aug. 21 1970 [21] App1.No.: 66,505

[52] U.S. Cl. ..220/12, 206/46 M, 220/97 R [51] Int. Cl. ..B65d 57/00 [58] Field of Search ..220/1.5, 12, 69, 220/97 R, 71, A, 1 B; 248/146, 138; 206/46 M [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,868,368 1/1959 Beach ..220/5 A X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 952,576 5/ 1949 France ..220/7l 1,535,681 7/1968 France l ,406,47 1 6/ 1965 France 1,925,405 l/ 1970 Germany ..220/ 12 Primary Examiner-Leonard Summer Assistant Examiner-James R. Garrett Attorney-Harness, Dickey & Pierce ABSTRACT The tank is constructed in the usual manner to withstand pressure and bending moments and is supported within a frame structure which simulates a container in dimensions and corner castings. The frame structure is capable of being stacked six-high when fully loaded which is made possible by the use of end frames of heavy tubular construction which are disposed in aligned relation when the frame structures are stacked. The frame structures are or feet long following the dimensions of the containers so that they can be transported, stacked and stored in the same manner as the containers.

9 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR 1 01913 SHEET 1 OF 4 PATENTEU 3,726,431 SHEET 3 or 4 INVENTOR'.

PATENTED RI 0 I973 sumunr;

fir-L CONTAINERIZ ED TANK SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION US. Pat. Nos. 2,056,179 and 2,166,139 disclose tanks supported in frame structures for transportation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention pertains to a containerized tank system in which the tank and frame unit are constructed separately to resist bending moments and stresses to which each is subjected. Thus, the frame structure withstands the outside load, bending moments and stresses to which it is subjected while the tank within the frame structure withstands the stresses and bending moments required to safely contain a product. This permits the tank to be mounted with the usual cradle design so that the stress analysis may be completed in the normal acceptable manner thereon. Production problems are simplified since the tank and frame structure are separately constructed which is important as each of the units require different manufacturing techniques to meet the respective code requirements. This results in the attachment of the frame structure about the tank in a manner to give the best balance of stress between the tank and the frame unit so as to withstand the bending moments. This provides an economical unit with the tank taking an acceptable portion of the bending moment with the frame unit withstanding the balance thereof.

The tank is manufactured in the normal manner and the frame structure may be made in sections and joined together about the tank or the frame structure can be assembled and dropped downwardly over the tank and joined to the tank and bottom frame members. Walkways are preferably employed on the top of the frame structure leading to ladders supported on the end frame sections. The end sections of the frame structure are made of heavy upright pillars at the sides which have the comer castings welded thereto with cross members at the top and bottom and diagonal crossed members joining the corners. Each of the end sections are extremely strong in tension and in compression so that the entire frame structure and contained tank when loaded may be handled in the same manner as a container.

The frame structure is secured by the bottom castings to a trailer, railroad car, boat and the like and may be swung by the top corner casting onto a platform or deck. The frame structures are stackable one above the other and the top and bottom castings may be interlocked with each other. The heavy end sections are joined by a central frame unit which, when made of aluminum, reduces the overall weight of the frame structure. Tunnels may be secured to the side frame rails which permits the frame structure and tank to be raised and transported by a forklift truck.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view of a containerized tank system embodying features of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a view in elevation of the containerized tank system illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an end view of a containerized tank system illustrated in FIG. 2, as viewed from the right hand end thereof;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged broken view of the lower right hand portion of the structure illustrated in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 2, taken on the line 6-6 thereof;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged broken end view of the end frame section illustrated within the circle 7 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a view of the structure illustrated n FIG. 7, as viewed from line 8-8 thereof;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 4, taken on the line 9-9 thereof;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 5, taken on the line 10-10 thereof;

FIG. 11 is a view in elevation of the central frame unit the ends of which are attachable to the end frame sections;

FIG. 12 is a plan view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is an end view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 1 1;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 2, taken on the line 14-14 thereof, and

FIG. 15 is a sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 4, taken on the line 15-15 thereof.

DESCRIPTION OFTHE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The containerized tank system 11 embodies like heavy end frame sections 12 and 13 and a lighter central frame unit 14 to which the end frame sections 12 and 13 are secured. The end frame sections are constructed from heavy upright tubular pillars 15 to the ends of which four dissimilar corner castings l6, 17, 18 and 19 are secured preferably by welding. The comer castings are the same as those employed on the corners of container bodies, having apertures in the bottom, the

end and side faces. The containerized tank system can be secured to a carrier, to each other and to astorage area in the same manner as the container bodies now used in the trade. The bottom castings l6 and 17 are interconnected by a cross member 2lof rectangular section, as illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 10. The top corner castings l8 and 19 are interconnected by a channel elethem 22, as illustrated more specifically in FIGS. 3, 7 and 8.

A flanged corner panel 23 is secured to the pillar l5, cross member 21 and the casting 16 for reinforcing the comer. A step plate 24 for a ladder reinforces the opposite corner when secured to the opposite pillar 15, the cross member 21 and the casting 17. A pair of bars 25 are disposed in X-relation and are welded thereat and to the panel 23 and plate 24 at the bottom and to the cross member 22 and gussets 26 at the top which are joined to the castings l8 and 19. The plate 24 has a cutout portion 27 to permit the cross member 21 to function as a step while a flange 28 on the top of the plate 24 forms a step thereabove. The ends of a ladder 29- has the side angle members 31 riveted to the plate 24 at the bottom and to one of the gussets 26 and cross member 22 at the top. The side angle members 31 are inner-connected by cross bars 32 which form the rungs of the ladder, the metal of which is preferably aluminum. The end frame sections are capable of withstanding maximum loads in tension and compression and will take a load in compression for a plurality of the containerized tank systems which are stacked six hi h.

Ihe two end frame sections 12 and 13 are interconnected by the central frame unit 14, illustrated more specifically in FIGS. 11 to 14, which is preferably made of aluminum. Top angle rails 33 are spaced apart at the top by a pair of angle members 34 which are supported on vertical angle members 35. The bottom of the angle members 35 are joined to bottom rails 36 of offset construction each rail having spaced vertical flanges 37 and 38 joined by a horizontal web 39. A pair of diagonal angle members 41 are disposed in crossed relation and joined to the top and bottom rails 33 and 36 between the vertical angle members 35. A pair of diagonally disposed angle members 42 are joined to the bottom rails 36 outwardly of the vertical angle members 35. It will be noted that cutout sections 43 are provided in the flange 38 of the rails 36 at the point where the angle members 35, 41 and 42 are joined to the flange 37 of the bottom rails. The angle members 35, 41 and 42 not only form the sides of the frame unit when connected between the rails 33 and 36 but also provide maximum strength in the area of the cutout sections 43 which are provided for a purpose which will be explained hereinafter.

In FIG. 14,.it will be noted that the outer angle member 41 has a cutout section 44 in one of the flanges to receive the inner angle member 41 and permit the abutted flanges to be welded at the crossing point. Diagonally disposed cross braces 45 are secured to the top angle members 34 and the vertical angle members 35 to brace the corners. The cross braces 45 are so located as to be in spaced relation with the contained tank.

As illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, the inner face of the pillars and the corner castings l8 and 19 have an angle plate 46 extending therefrom with the ends of the top flange 47 provided with a plurality of apertures 48 to which the top flange of the top rails 33 are secured by rivets. The side flanges 49 of the angle plates 46 have a set of apertures 51 to which the side flanges of the top rails 33 are secured by rivets. The side flanges 49 also have a set of apertures 52 with which theapertures in the end of the angle members 42 are aligned and are secured together by rivets. As illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5, 6 and 15, the inner faces of the bottom end of the pillars l5 and the castings 16 and 17 have an angle plate 53 of stainless steel secured thereto. The adjacent edge of the upright portion 54 and the right angle portion 55 of the angle plate 53 is welded to the face of the pillars 15, the castings 16 and 17 and the cross member 21.

A bolster 56 of stainless steel is formed from a pair of members having an arcuate portion 57 at the top which engages a .stainless steel pressure pad 58 which is welded to the tank. The side edges 59 of the bolster 56 are welded to the upright portions 54 of the angle plates 53. A bottom flange 61 on the bolster 56 rests upon the angle portions 55 of the angle plates 53 to which his welded. A pair of substantially triangular stainlessisteel gusset plates 62 and 63 are welded to each side of the bolster 56 and to the upright portion 54 of the angle plate 53 with the inner ends welded to the pressure pad 58 and pads 64 extending therefrom which contains a drain opening 65. The pillars 15 are each constructed from two channel elements and a plate 66 is welded within the inner channel element to reinforce the pillars at the top of the angle members 53 which is further strengthened by a stainless steel plate 68.

The upright portions 54 of the angle member 53 have a stainless steel channel member 69 welded to its outer face with one end welded to the face of the pillars 15. The outer web of the channel member 69 is provided with a plurality of apertures which align with the plurality of apertures 71 in the flanges 37 of the bottom rails 36. Rivets 72 extend through the apertures and secure the flanges 37 of the rails 36 to the webs of the channel members 69. The lower ends of the upright portions 54 of the angle members 53 are provided with a plurality of apertures which align with apertures in the vertical flange sections 38 of the bottom rails 36. Rivets 72 in the apertures secure the flange sections 38 to the upright portions 54. In this manner, the ends of the upper rails 33, the lower rails 36 and the diagonal braces 42 are secured to the end frame sections 12 and 13 by rivets. This is desirable since the central frame section is herein illustrated as being made of aluminum .while the end frames 12 and 13 are made of steel. At

the point of juncture between the steel and aluminum at which the riveting takes place, a film of material, such as a section of polyvinyl tape, is used to prevent paint failure at the riveted joints. A small hole 101, as illustrated in FIG. 8, is provided through the top of the bottom castings l6 and 17 near the center thereof and also through the bottom cross member 21 so that the inner surface of the pillars 15 and the cross members 21 can be undercoated after all of the elements of the frame sections 12 and 13 have been welded together.

The tank is separately constructed, as pointed out hereinabove, and when so constructed will meet all the present tests required thereof. The tank is constructed as a cylindrical shell 75 with spaced external reinforcing rings 76 and heads 77 of spherical section at the ends. The pressure pads 58 are applied-at the bottom sides near the ends along with the inwardly extending pads 64 to which the bolster 56 and gusset plates 62 and 63 are welded. When the tank is made of stainless steel, all of the parts joined thereto are of stainless steel.

After the tank has been constructed, the .central frame unit can be dropped downwardly thereover and be joined to the two end sections 12 and 13 by rivets as pointed out hereinabove. While any type of rivet may be used, the ones herein illustrated are of the Huck pin and collar type readily procurable in the trade. The end sections can be applied to the bolsters of the tank and the two side frame sections and the two cross members 34 secured thereto and to each other to complete the assembly. The assemblied system provides assurance that the tank will withstand all required tests and that the frame likewise will withstand the tests and bending moment to which it is subjected.

Various elements may be applied to the tank. A manhole and cover 78 of conventional form is illustrated as being provided in the top center of the tank as well as a safety rupture disc 79. A warming channel 81 may be applied to the tank along the bottom central portion thereof beneath the rings 76 having a conduit d2 extending from one end for a heating medium such as steam, electricity and the like. A delivery pipe $3 is provided at the bottom of one of the heads 77, herein illustrated as being connected to a valve M. A manual and automatic operating device 95 for the valve is illus- .trated, described and claimed in an application for Letters Patent of L. A. Botkin, Ser. No. 760,025, filed Sept. 16, i968 for Valve Actuator" and assigned to the assignee of the present invention. The operating device 85 is enclosed in a cabinet d6 supported on the cross member 21 which prevents unauthorized operation of the valve. The device may be operated manually at the cabinet or remotely at the opposite end of the frame structure and automatically in the presence of a tire.

Catwalks 87 extend from the ends of the cross members 22 at each side of the manhole and cover 78 joined together thereabout by catwalk sections 88. The ends of the catwalks 87 at the cross members 22 are aligned with the ladders 29 on the end frame sections l2 and 13. The catwalks are constructed from spaced aluminum angle members 89 between which strips 93 of expanded aluminum are secured. It is to be understood that the frame structure can be slightly modified to support other types of tanks but in each instance, the

' overall result will be the same. That is to say, the tank and frame structure are separately constructed so as to meet the various standards now set for the respective units. This eliminates the necessity for acquiring a new set of test analyses for the containerized tank system.

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 5, it will be noted that blade receiving tunnels 92 extend between the bottom rails 36 to rest against the flange 39 when secured in position by a plurality of rivets 93. The tunnels are disposed within the cutout sections 43 of the rails 36 at the point where the angle members 35, 41 and 42 are welded to the flanges 37 thereof. The frame structure and loaded tank may be raised and transported by a forklift truck when the blades thereof extend within the tunnel 92. As illustrated in FIGS. 2, 4 and 5, a flange 94 of the tunnels 92 has a stainless steel plate 95 welded thereto at the bottom center of the'tank which is overlapped and welded to a flange 96 of an angle member 97. The flanges 98 of. the angle members-97 abut the central tank rings 76 to which they are welded. This provides reinforcement for the tunnels from the tank which is supported solely on the end frame sections 12 and 13.

At each side and at each end of the frame structure, a Dial-A sign 99 is provided which is turnable to expose one of the four sides thereof. The sides have different wording such as flammable, inflammable, loaded, unloaded and the like to meet the requirements for transportable tank structures.

When the tank is subjected to extremes of heat, especially when carrying a hot product, the bolsters may be placed at the center of the tankwith the ends free so they can expand and contract under abnormal heat conditions. This is especially true in a 40 foot containerized tank system where the expansion under extreme temperature changes would be substantial. By having the end frame sections made of heavy steel, the system can withstand substantial loads in compression and tension and by having the central frame section made of aluminum, the overall weight is substantially reduced and the payload increased to the maximum allowable load.

l claim:

It. in a containerized tank, a horizontal tank having a cylindrical body of circular transverse cross section and with heads enclosing the ends thereof, a heavy substantially square frame disposed adjacent each end of the cylindrical body of said tank with its plane perpendicular to the principal axis of the tank and in surrounding relation to said cylindrical body vertically disposed plate means under each end of the cylindrical tank body, each plate means being disposed with its plane in the plane of one of said frames, means securing said plate means to the lower side of the cylindrical body and to the bottom portion of said frames, said spaced frames forming substantially the sole support for said tank, and means at the top of said frames by which said frames and tank are lifted as a unit.

2. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 1, wherein each said frame has upright pillars at the sides joined at the ends to apertured castings, and top and bottom cross members secured to the pillars and castings.

3. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 2, wherein the pillars and bottom cross members are of tubular construction and wherein said bottom castings have an aperture in the top communicating with the interior of the pillars and said bottom cross member has an aperture in the underside thereof, said apertures providing passageways through which an undercoat material is introduced.

4. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 2, wherein a central unit inverted U-shaped frame having a top and two side sections is constructed of aluminum frame elements and joined to said end frames to surround said cylindrical body.

5. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 4, wherein said pillars have inwardly extending steel elements at the top and bottom welded thereto and provided with apertures, and wherein the ends of the central aluminum unit are provided with apertures which align with the apertures in said elements, and rivets in said aligned apertures for joining said ends to the elements.

6. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 2, wherein inwardly extending plates on the pillars engage the ends of said vertically disposed plate means to which they are welded, and gusset plate means welded to said vertically disposed plate means and said inwardly extending plates to provide reinforcements therefor.

7. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 6, wherein said pillars are of tubular construction embodying facing channel sections welded together along the mating edges, and a reinforcing plate welded within a channel in the area of said inwardly extending plates.

8. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 6, wherein a transverse plate is secured to each of the pillars and the upper end of said inwardly extending plates to further reinforce the same.

9. in a containerized tank as recited in claim 6, wherein said inwardly extending plates have a bottom section extending at right angles inwardly toward each other to which the bottom ends of the vertically disposed plate means are welded.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US965455 *Aug 7, 1909Jul 26, 1910Owen K HarryTank and support.
US2267417 *Aug 5, 1938Dec 23, 1941Smith Corp A OSupport for cylindrical vessels
US2332410 *Dec 9, 1940Oct 19, 1943Smith Corp A ODouble deck tank structure
US2808176 *Apr 19, 1955Oct 1, 1957Pfaudler Co IncContainer supporting means
US2868368 *Sep 7, 1955Jan 13, 1959John M BeachContainer
US2887251 *Oct 24, 1956May 19, 1959Technical Waxes LtdMeans for the transporting of thermoplastic materials in bulk
US3024942 *May 14, 1958Mar 13, 1962Smith Corp A OReinforced tank structure
US3115982 *Mar 18, 1960Dec 31, 1963Liquefreeze Company IncInsulated freight car
US3128897 *Mar 9, 1962Apr 14, 1964 Cargo container construction
US3386600 *Sep 26, 1966Jun 4, 1968Christopher H. BetjemannDemountable shipping gondolas
DE1925405A1 *May 19, 1969Jan 29, 1970Jean VaillantWaermeisolierter Transportbehaelter,insbesondere fuer verderbliche Fluessigkeiten
FR952576A * Title not available
FR1406471A * Title not available
FR1535681A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4098426 *Oct 20, 1976Jul 4, 1978Westerwalder Eisenwerk Gerhard GmbhDouble-walled transport container for flowable media
US4307812 *Jun 28, 1979Dec 29, 1981Westerwalder Eisenwerk Gerhard GmbhFreight container for flowable substances
US4395052 *Apr 3, 1980Jul 26, 1983Proco, Inc.Uranium slurry hauling system
US4416384 *Mar 9, 1981Nov 22, 1983Dynatrans AbTank container with mounting means
US4421243 *May 4, 1982Dec 20, 1983B S L (Bignier Schmid-Laurent)Container, particularly for materials in particles
US4745952 *Jan 20, 1987May 24, 1988Dempster Systems Inc.Structure and method for handling hazardous waste materials
US4901855 *Nov 30, 1988Feb 20, 1990Shigenobu FurukawaRoll cargo transportation container and apparatus for preventing roll cargo from divergence of roll core
US5064091 *Aug 14, 1990Nov 12, 1991Westerwaelder Eisenwerk Gerhard GmbhSwap tank
US5353967 *Apr 20, 1993Oct 11, 1994Northbrook Rail CorporationDry bulk pressure differential container
US5390827 *Nov 19, 1993Feb 21, 1995Northbrook Rail CorporationDry bulk pressure differential container with external frame support
US5529222 *Feb 17, 1995Jun 25, 1996Earl L. FreemanDry bulk pressure differential container with external frame support
US5647514 *Apr 18, 1996Jul 15, 1997Aluminum Company Of AmericaDry bulk pressure differential container with external frame support
US5688086 *Feb 16, 1996Nov 18, 1997Aluminum Company Of AmericaStandard corner fittings for aluminum container frames
US5911337 *Apr 8, 1997Jun 15, 1999Bedeker; James E.Vessel for a shipping container
US5960974 *Oct 3, 1996Oct 5, 1999Advance Engineered Products Ltd.Intermodal bulk container
US6012598 *Jun 9, 1997Jan 11, 2000The Columbiana Boiler CompanyFreight container
US6382446Jul 29, 1997May 7, 2002Alcoa Inc.Container module for intermodal transportation and storage of dry flowable product
US6527134Oct 19, 2001Mar 4, 2003Alcoa Inc.Container module for intermodal transportation and storage of dry flowable product
US7104425 *Oct 18, 2002Sep 12, 2006Le Roy Curtis WIntermodal bulk dry particulate cargo container and method
US7337926Nov 30, 2004Mar 4, 2008Leroy CurtisIntermodal powder/bulk freight container
US7591190 *Feb 27, 2006Sep 22, 2009American Fabricating, LlcTest stand
US8297459 *Dec 21, 2006Oct 30, 2012Wew Westerwalder Eisenwerk GmbhTank container
US8474892Jun 13, 2012Jul 2, 2013Pinnacle Companies, Inc.Lifting apparatus and method
US8534480Jun 13, 2012Sep 17, 2013Pinnacle Companies, Inc.Tank segment connection apparatus
US8801041Jul 30, 2012Aug 12, 2014Pinnacle Companies, Inc.Fluid storage container and method
US9283883 *Jun 13, 2014Mar 15, 2016Dast Tanks, LLCStorage tank
US20040074918 *Oct 18, 2002Apr 22, 2004Le Roy Curtis W.Intermodal bulk dry particulate cargo container and method
US20050121459 *Nov 30, 2004Jun 9, 2005Leroy CurtisIntermodal powder/bulk freight container
US20070199387 *Feb 27, 2006Aug 30, 2007Asher Michael JTest Stand
US20080223878 *Jan 24, 2008Sep 18, 2008Leroy CurtisIntermodal powder/bulk freight container
US20100025407 *Aug 4, 2008Feb 4, 2010Lynn BensonMethod Of Converting Shipping Containers To Fluid Tanks
US20100193077 *Feb 3, 2009Aug 5, 2010Peak Innovations, Inc.Containerized silo
US20110049165 *Dec 21, 2006Mar 3, 2011Wew Westerwalder Eisenwerk GmbhTank container
US20140367953 *Jun 13, 2014Dec 18, 2014Dast Tanks, LLCStorage tank
US20150368035 *Jun 19, 2015Dec 24, 2015Innovative Trailer Design Technologies Inc.Intermodal shipping container box
WO1981002561A1 *Mar 9, 1981Sep 17, 1981Dynatrans AbTank container
WO1998045139A1 *Mar 17, 1998Oct 15, 1998Bedeker James EA vessel for a shipping container
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/1.5, 206/446, 220/647, 206/599
International ClassificationB65D88/00, B65D88/12
Cooperative ClassificationB65D88/128
European ClassificationB65D88/12D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 27, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: FRUEHAUF CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:LMC ACQUISITION CORPORATION, A MI CORP.;FRUEHAUF CORPORATION, A MI CORP.;LMC ACQUISITION CORPORAITON;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:005132/0001
Effective date: 19870330
Apr 27, 1989AS03Merger
Owner name: FRUEHAUF CORPORATION
Owner name: FRUEHAUF CORPORATION, A MI CORP.
Owner name: LMC
Owner name: LMC ACQUISITION CORPORATION, A MI CORP.
Effective date: 19870330