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Publication numberUS3727245 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1973
Filing dateJul 19, 1971
Priority dateJul 19, 1971
Also published asCA985855A, CA985855A1, CA999103A, CA999103A1
Publication numberUS 3727245 A, US 3727245A, US-A-3727245, US3727245 A, US3727245A
InventorsGerth W
Original AssigneeGerth W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring-up furniture and the like
US 3727245 A
Abstract
A rollable downwardly collapsible bed is accommodated beneath a combination chesterfield-bed. Straight-line rolling of the former at right angles to the length of the latter to and from its housing is achieved by (i) a set of barrel-shaped castors off-set from swivelling axes thereof so that even if grossly misaligned, an inch or so of horizontal movement rotates them all into parallel rolling posture such as to permit the bed to be rolled in a direction at right angles to its length and (ii) a guide bar having rounded leading corners bearable against the housing side portals which line up the bed for entry between said portals. The rolling bed also includes a cover for said housing when it is accommodated therewithin, said cover being secured to a locking bar by means of which the rollable bed is maintained in raised position. The chesterfield-bed includes adjustable cushioned back rest means (i) whereby standard parallel two-faced cushions may be supported at an angle and afterwards removed for bed use, and (ii) which may be retracted so as not to interfere with use of the bed over its entire width.
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United States Patent 1191 Gerth 1451 Apr. 17, 1973 SPRING-UP FURNITURE AND THE [57] ABSTRACT LIKE A rollable downwardly collapsible bed is accom- [76] Inventor: William Valentine Gerth, 13 modated beneath a combination chesterfield-bed. Roosevelt Street, Waterloo, On- Straight-line rolling of the former at right angles to the t i Can d length of the latter to and from its housing is achieved by (i) a set of barrel-shaped castors off-set from [22] Flled: July 1971 swivelling axes thereof so that even if grossly mis- [21] Appl. No.: 163,829 aligned, an inch or so of horizontal movement rotates them all into parallel rolling posture such as to permit the bed to be rolled in a direction at right angles to its [52] US. Cl. ..5/14, 280/36, 312/250 16 ngth and (ii) a guide bar having rounded leading [51] Int. Cl ..A47c 17/06, B62b 1/00, A47b 91/00 come bearable against the housing side portals [58] Field of Search ..5/ 144; 280/36; which line up the bed f entry between Said pol-tals 16/20 45, 46; 312/250 The rolling bed also includes a cover for said housing when it is accommodated therewithin, said cover References Cited being secured to a locking bar by means of which the rollable bed is maintained in raised position. The UNITED STATES PATENTS chesterfield bed includes adjustable cushioned back 1,902,726 3/1933 Schacht ..l6/45 rest means whereby Standard Parallel two-faced 2,370,890 3/1945 Thomas... .....5/53 R cushions may be supported at an angle and afterwards 2,760,2l0 8/1956 Bebry ....5/l4 X removed for bed use, (ii) which may be retracted 2,964,778 12/1960 Frey ..l6/2l so as not to interfere with use of the bed over its entire 3,007,709 1/1961 Munson ..280/36 R widm 3,152,833 10/1964 Creveling et al. ..297/l40 3,l7l,l39 3/1965 Ziegenfuss 5/53 Primary ExaminerPaul R. Gilliam AttorneyCecil C. Kent 5 Claims, 29 Drawing Figures PATENTEUAPRWW 3.727. 245

sum 1 (IF 4 756 58 M /0 as INVENTOR. W V. Geri/2 BY 7 PATENTEU 71973 3,727, 245

I sum 3 or 4 FIG. 24

INVENTOR.

- W. V. Gerf/z SPRING-UP FURNITURE AND THE LIKE The following disclosure contains a correct and full description of the invention and of the best mode known to the inventor of taking advantage of the same. The present invention relates to rollable beds having mattress assemblies which can be moved between raised and lowered positions. Collapsible trundle beds are well-known and it is common to employ barrelshaped castors to assist the rolling movement thereof in a straight-line direction. However, if not all orientated for rolling in the same direction at the same time, much jockeying over the floor is often needed to achieve this before straight line rolling can be commenced and by that time the bed will probably be in the wrong position for such straight-line rolling directly toward a desired location.

The present rolling bed is therefore adapted and designed to achieve virtually automatic and almost instantaneous rotation of any or all of the castor assemblies upon which the same is rollable into universally parallel attitude, such attitude being that in which the yokes of the castor assemblies are acutely angled relative to the floor when the bed is collapsed so that they function to push or pull the castor to which they are connected from well to one side thereof. Thus there is, in addition to the inherent tendency of a barrel-shaped castor to roll in a straight line, the further impediment even more strongly inhibiting deviation from a straight line of the fact that the castors are being pushed or pulled well from'one side thereof and not from a vertical axis.

The result is that if any castor assembly or all castor assemblies are misaligned (by which is meant with the castors directed to roll in different directions) when the rolling bed is in raised position (at which time the swivelling axes of the castor assemblies are vertical) almost the slightest horizontal movement applied to the rolling bed will be enough to snap the misaligned castor assembly (or all of them) into parallelism such that the bed will now roll in a straight line at right angles to its longitudinal horizontal axis.

U.S. Pats. No. 3,152,833 to Creveling, et al. dated Oct. 13, 1964 and Munson U.S. Pat. No. 3,007,709 of Nov. 7, 1961 show a folding table and chair combination and a collapsible utility cart respectively. The latter shows the same to be mounted on four wheels journalled in yokes the swivelling axes of the yokes being vertical in the raised position of the utility cart and inclined in the collapsed position. The shown wheels of Munson however are narrow tired and of substantial diameter. As a result, unlike the condition which obtains with barrel-shaped castors put to the present novel use there is no diminishing diameter from the central transverse axial plane of the wheel to its outer extremities. As a result, if Munsons wheels are misaligned, in many conditions of such misalignment they will stay that way. For example, if only due to their closeness and their flat tires, if one is 180 misaligned it will probably stay that way at least for a considerable distance during horizontal movement and when it rotates it will probably rotate on its side and drag indefinitely a condition which is not believed possible under any conceivable condition of misalignment as between the castor assemblies of the present invention.

A further object of the invention is to provide, in a castor-mounted rolling bed two spaced and parallel pairs of scissorwise pivotally connected legs by means of which the bed may be moved between raised and lowered positions and locked in the latter position with the assistance of a horizontally extending, elongated, U-shaped locking bar pivotally connected to one of the corresponding legs of each of said pairs, the said locking bar being operatively engageable with locking means on the bar and on the other of the corresponding legs of each of the said pairs, such locking bar having also connected thereto an elongated relatively narrow vertically disposed panel operating as the cover for a housing to close the front of a housing in an associated chesterfield-bed forming part of the present inventive combination, when the rolling bed is accommodated within said housing.

A further object of the present invention is to provide, in association with the aforesaid pivotally connected legs horizontal, non-dust collecting and substantially enclosed, inconspicuous, safety-designed and simple spring counter-balancing raising and lowering means with the aid of which, when the weight of a mattress is added to the mattress assembly, upon actuation of the aforesaid locking bar, the said mattress assembly may be collapsed downwardly by little more than the pressure of a finger, and held in its downwardly collapsed position. 1

A further object of the present invention is to provide a spring mattress frame for the invented rollable bed which is of triangular cross-section to impart not only improved appearance but more importantly considerably greater strength and resistance to bending or curving, particularly on the long sides, in a horizontal plane convexly inwards under the tension of the mattress spring, such cross-sectional configuration when the hypotenuse web is uppermost and inclined downwardly inwards providing (i) an improved means for anchoring the ends of the spring, and (ii) a flanged tray formation assisting in keeping the mattress centered. A further object of the present invention is to provide a rolling bed which includes in combination therewith a convertible chesterfield-bed characterized by being adapted and designed to include, below a fixed mattress unit, an open-fronted housing for accommodating said rolling bed when in its lowered position, the ends of the housing being bounded by a pair of opposite end-supporting structures, the rolling bed including a mattress rail and guide bar, such mattress rail and guide bar extending along at least three sides of the mattress supported on the mattress assembly of the rolling bed partially to enclose the mattress, the opposite comers of the bar being rounded so as to help guide the rolling bed into the housing below the chesterfield-bed mattress unit should it be misaligned slightly with respect thereto and to save it from hanging into one or other of the said end-supporting structures.

Describing first the rolling bed component of the present invention, the same comprises a mattress assembly, elevating means for supporting and moving said mattress assembly between raised and lowered positions, and at least two castor assemblies secured to said elevating means for engagement with a supporting surface, each said castor assembly comprising a wheel of generally elongated bulbous or barreLshaped cylindrical member having a longitudinal axis and being journalled for rotation about said longitudinal axis in a yoke for translational movement of said structure over said supporting surface, each said yoke having a stub shaft and being thus secured to said elevating means for rotation about a yoke axis (the stub shaft) which is disposed substantially perpendicularly to said longitudinal axis of the respective generally cylindrical member and preferably offset therefrom, substantially perpendicular to said supporting surface when said supporting means is disposed in its raised position and acutely angularly with respect to the floor when said mattress assembly is disposed in its lowered position, whereby the longitudinal axes of said generally cylindrical members of said castor assemblies are urged into mutually parallel orientation when said mattress assembly is in its lowered position.

The mattress-supporting frame in which the elevating means for supporting and moving the mattress-supporting frame between its raised and lowered positions preferably comprises longitudinally spaced apart first and second pairs of legs, the legs of each of the first and second pairs being pivotally secured together at pivot points intermediate their upper and lower ends whereby the mattress-supporting frame is moved between its raised and lowered positions on relative pivoting movement of each of the first and second pairs of legs, and in which each of the legs is secured at its lower end to one of the castor assemblies in such a manner that the longitudinal axes of all of the generally cylindrical members of the castor assemblies are urged into mutually parallel orientation when the mattresssupporting frame is disposed in its lowered position.

The rolling bed component is additionally provided with a releasable locking means for releasably maintaining the mattress-supporting frame in its raised position. This comprises a first transversely extending arm pivotally secured to a first leg of the first pair of legs and adapted releasably to engage a second leg of the first pair of legs releasably to restrict relative pivoting movement of the legs of the first pair of legs when the mattress-supporting frame is disposed in its raised position, a second transversely extending arm pivotally secured to a first leg of the second pair of legs and adapted releasably to engage a second leg of the second pair of legs releasably to restrict relative pivoting movement of the legs of the second pair of legs when the mattress-supporting frame is disposed in its raised posi tion, and a longitudinally extending member interconnecting the first and second transversely extending arms for effecting manual pivoting movement of both the aforesaid arms between their leg-releasing and legrestraining positions.

The manual effort required to move the mattresssupporting frame of a rolling bed according to the invention can be significantly reduced by the provision of a spring means connected between the legs of at least one of the aforementioned first and second pairs of legs to urge such legs to undergo relative pivoting movement against the action of the weight of a mattress supported by the mattress-supporting frame.

With the foregoing in view, and such other or further purposes, advantages or novel features as may become apparent from consideration of this disclosure and specification, the present invention consists of the inventive concept which is comprised, embodied, embraced, or included in the method, process, construction, composition, arrangement or combination of parts, or new use of any of the foregoing, herein exemplified in one or more specific embodiments of such concept, reference being had to the accompanying Figures in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a mattress-supporting structure or rolling bed in accordance with the present invention a part of the spring mattress being shown broken the better to depict the disposition of the scissor leg pairs and lock actuating bar assembly.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view through the rolling bed of FIG. 1 taken along the line 2-2 of that Figure, showing the bed in its raised position and with a portion cut away to reveal its structure in greater detail, a sectional view corresponding to this Figure if taken an equal distance from the opposite end being a mirror image.

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view similar to that of FIG. 2 but showing the bed in its lowered position.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary view taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2, a sectional view corresponding to this Figure taken an equal distance from the opposite end thereof being a mirror image.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, front elevation of one of the castor assemblies of the bed of FIGS. 1 to 4 showing the disposition of the castor yoke when the bed is disposed in its raised position.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged end elevation of the castor assemblies of FIG. 5 showing the disposition of the yoke of that assembly when the bed is disposed in its lowered position.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a corner of the novel triangular form of frame member preferably employed in association with the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a vertical cross-sectional representation of the frame member shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view from below of the bed shown in the preceding Figures, showing two of the castor assemblies of that bed and illustrating the straight-rolling orientation of such castor assemblies with the bed being in its raised position.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary horizontal view from below of the right side castor assembly of FIG. 9 with the bedunit now in lowered position, and depicting said castor assembly rotated from the said straight-rolling orientation of both castor assemblies illustrated in FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary side elevation of the castor assembly of FIG. 10.

FIGS. 12 through 21 are fragmentary horizontal view from below similar to that of FIG. 10 illustrating several sequential stages in the automatic rotation which takes place consequent upon the short-distance spreading movement of bar members 36 and 44 in the castor assembly 16 from the unstable orientation of FIGS. 10 and 11 to the stable orientation of FIG. 3 and in which latter Figure the longitudinal axes of the barrel-shaped castors of all four castor assemblies of the bed unit are in parallel orientation, with the flanges 54 of one pair of yokes 58 on one side of the unit spread in opposition away from the opposite pair so that the lowered bed unit is obliged to roll transversely straight when pushed under an adjacent bed.

FIGS. 22 and 23 are fragmentary side elevations similar to that of FIGS. 10 and 11 corresponding respectively to the orientation of the opposite side castor pair of FIG. 3, and 180 reversed relative to said FIGS. and 11.

FIG. 24 is a perspective representation of the presently inventedcombination of rolling bed and enclosing chesterfield-bed.

FIG. 25 is a fragmentary perspective representation of the adjustable cushion-supporting means employed in association with the aforesaid Chesterfield-bed in cushion-supporting position.

FIG. 26 is a fragmentary perspective representation of the cushion-supporting means in vertical retracted position.

FIG. 27 is a side elevation of the Chesterfield-bed cushion-supporting means showing the same in cushion-supporting position FIG. 28 is a fragmented plan view illustrating a modified form of mattress retaining rail and guide which is combined with a mattress frame. FIG. 29 is a section on the line 29--29 of FIG. 28 and illus-trates a fragment of the mattress.

In the drawings like characters of reference designate similar parts in the several Figures.

The rolling bed indicated generally at 10 in FIGS. 1 to 3 of the accompanying drawings comprises a mattress-supporting frame indicated generally at 12 and an elevating or support means indicated generally at 14 for moving the mattress-supporting frame 12 between the raised position shown in FIG. 2 and the lowered position shown in FIG. 3. Castor assemblies generally designated 16 are further essential components of the rolling bed 10.

The mattress-supporting frame 12 may have any appropriate structure. It may, for example, comprise a simple frame of an appropriate pripheral configuration, for example, a rectangular configuration, which is adapted to support a mattress having a built-in rigid frame such as a box-spring mattress. Generally however, the mattress-supporting frame 12 will be formed as shown with longitudinal side members 18 and transverse end members 20 with transversely extending springs 22 and interwoven longitudinally extending springs 24 for the purpose of supporting a conventional mattress (not shown) and for providing the required resilient support for such a mattress.

Numerous variations are possible in the manner in which the springs 22 and 24 are disposed and secured to the frame 12 and many such variations will occur to those cognizant with the construction of sprung mattress-supporting frames. From FIGS. 2 and 3, it will be noted that in the particular embodiment illustrated, the longitudinal side members 18 are in the form of angle members having generally horizontal flanges 28 and upstanding side flanges 26.

In the rolling bed 10 shown in the drawings, the elevating means 14 or actuating bar assembly comprises a pair of generally U-shaped members indicated at 30 and 32 and which are pivotally interconnected in a manner to be described in greater detail hereinafter to provide a scissor-type mechanism for moving the member 36. It is to be noted that the legs 34 are nonlinearly formed at their lower ends with sections 38 which are disposed substantially parallel to a supporting surface 40 on which the bed 10 is resting, when the mattress-supporting frame 12 is disposed in its raised position as shown in FIG. 2.

In a similar manner, the U-shaped member 32 has longitudinally spaced apart legs 42 which are interconnected at their lower ends by an integrally formed, longitudinally extending member 44. As is the case of the legs 34, the legs 42 are non-linearly formed at their lower ends with sections 46 which are disposed substantially parallel to the supporting surface 40 when the mattress-supporting frame 12 is in its raised position.

Each leg 34 is pivotally secured to the corresponding leg 42 by a pivot pin 48 for pivotting movement of the legs and consequent generally vertical movement of the mattress-supporting frame 12 between the positions shown in FIGS. 2 and 3.

Each castor assembly 16 comprises a castor 50 which, for the bed 10 illustrated, has a barrel-shaped external configuration as is best seen by reference to FIGS. 2 and 5. Each castor 50 is journalled on a longitudinal axle pin 52 which in turn is carried by downwardly extending flanges 54 and 56 of a yoke 58, the flanges 54 and 56 being interconnected by an intermediate web 60. In the particular construction illustrated, the axle pin 52 is rotatably mounted in the flanges 54 and 56 but it will'be appreciated that it would be equally suitable to have the castor 50 rotatably receiving the axle pin 52.

The yoke 58 of each castor assembly 16 has an up standing yoke pivot pin or kingpin 62 which is freely rotatably received through the respective longitudinally extending member 36 or 44 in proximity to the longitudinal ends thereof for rotation about such pivot pin 62 as is conventional with castors. In the actual construction illustrated the stub shaft 62 is provided, below the member 36 (or 44), with an annular flange 64 for engaging the undersurface of such member 36 (or 44). It should perhaps be explained that the longitudinal axis of each stub shaft 62 is the yoke axis referred to hereinbefore and in the appended claims. Also, it should be stressed that each such yoke axis is disposed substantially perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the respective castor 50, i.e., the longitudinal axis of the axle pin 52, and that these axes of each castor assembly 16 preferably (though not necessarily) are offset from each other, in other words are non-intersecting.

A further important feature which should be noted with reference to the structure of each of the castor assemblies 16 is that the yoke axis thereof, i.e., the longitudinal axis of the yoke stub shaft 62, is adapted to be disposed substantially perpendicularly to the support ing surface 40 when the mattress-supporting frame 12 is in the its raised position as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 5 while acutely angularly to such surface 40 when the mattress-supporting frame 12 is disposed in its lowered position as shown in FIGS. 3 and 6.

It will further be appreciated that, in order to permit the required relative pivoting movement of the legs 34 and 42 of each pair of such legs, the upper ends of these legs must be capable of undergoing transverse movement towards and away from each other. Additionally,

these upper ends must be pivotally secured to the mattress-supporting frame 12. In the specific embodiment illustrated in the accompanying drawings, each leg 34 is pivotally connected between a pair of downwardly projecting flanges 66 of a respective transversely extending channel or mounting member 68 secured rigidly to the side members 18 of the mattress-supporting frame 12. To this end, a pivot pin 70 extends through each of the flanges 66 and through an appropriate opening in the upper end of the respective leg 34, the pins 70 being maintained in position by upsets 72.

Similarly, each leg 42 is pivotally secured to a respective pivot pin 74 having upsets 76. Each pin 74 is, however, received within transversely extending slots 78 formed in the respective flanges 66 to permit the required transverse movement of the upper ends of the legs 42 on the relative pivoting movement of the legs 34 and 42.

Preferably, the pivot pins 70 and 74 at the upper ends of each pair of legs 34 and 42 are interconnected by spring means adapted to urge the legs to undergo relative pivoting movement against the action of the weight of a mattress supported on the mattress-supporting frame 12. In the embodiment illustrated, each such spring means comprises a helical tension spring 80, one end of which engages the respective pivot pin 74 and the other end of which engages a clevis 82 secured to the respective pivot pin 70.

The rolling bed 10 shown in the drawings is completed by a releasable, generally U-shaped locking means (or lock actuating bar generally designated 83) having transversely extending arms 84 and a longitudinally extending section 86. At its free end, each arm 84 is pivotally secured as by pivot pin 88 to the respective leg 34. On its undersurface, each arm 84 is provided with a downwardly extending dog 90 adapted to engage a pin or other projection 92 suitably provided in proximity to the lower end of the respective leg 42. It will be noted that each dog 90 is provided with a first surface 94 generally perpendicular to the arm 84 for engagement with the respective pin 92 when the mattress-supporting frame 12 is in its raised position (FIG. 2) and outwardly thereof with a sloping undersurface 96 for sliding movement over the respective pin 92 as the mattress-supporting frame 12 is moved from its lowered position to its raised position.

OPERATION When the mattress-supporting frame 12 is disposed in its raised position as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 5, each pin 92 is held in abutting engagement with the surface 94 of the respective dog 90 by the weight of the mattress supported by the frame 12 against the action of the springs 80.

With the frame 12 in its raised position as shown in FIG. 2, the leg sections 38 and 46 are disposed substantially parallel to the supporting surface 40 and the yoke stub shaft 62 are consequently disposed substantially perpendicularly to the supporting surface 40, i.e., these yoke stub shafts 62 are disposed generally vertically (FIG. Since rotation of the castor assemblies 16 about their yoke axes, i.e., about stub shaft 62, with the frame 12 in its raised position, involves no raising or lowering of any part of the bed structure 10, these castor assemblies 16 are free to rotate about such stub shafts 62 to permit the bed 10 to undergo any required rotational and/or translational movement over the surface 40.

When it is desired to lower the mattress-supporting frame 12 from its raised position shown in FIG. 2 to its lowered position shown in FIG. 3, it is necessary merely to elevate the dogs 90 so that the pins 92 are no longer engaged by the surfaces 94 of such dogs 90. To this end, the longitudinally extending section 86 may be finger tip manually elevated to pivot the arms 84 about the pivot pins 88. Since the helical tension springs act to urge the mattress-supporting frame 12 upwardly against the action of the weight of the mattress supported thereon, the engaging force between the pins 92 and the respective surfaces 94 is very slight hence little physical effort is required to release such engagement.

As soon as the dogs are disengaged from the pins 92, the mattress-supporting frame 12 moves downwardly wholly or virtually wholly under the weight of the upholstered mattress and bed-clothes thereon against the action of the springs 80 to the lowered position shown in FIG. 3. During such movement, the pivot pins 74 move transversely outwardly in the respective pairs of slots 78 and the castor assemblies 16 are urged into the dispositions shown in FIGS. 3 and 6 in which their yoke stub shafts 62 are disposed angularly, i.e., non-perpendicularly, with respect to the supporting surface 40. It will be appreciated that with the yoke stub shafts 62 so angularly disposed, rotation of the castor assemblies 16 about such stub shafts 62 will lead to vertical movement of the bed 10 with respect to the supporting surface 40. Consequently, the yokes of the castor assemblies 16 will all be urged to move into the positions of minimum potential energy, i.e., the positions in which the bed 10 is disposed as near as possible to the supporting surface 40. In such a minimum potential energy disposition, the longitudinal axes of the axle pins 52 of all the castor assemblies 16 will be disposed in mutually parallel orientation which, with the construction illustrated, will restrict movement of the bed 10 over the surface 40 to translational movement in the transverse directions, i.e., in the directions of the arrows A and A of FIG. 3.

Such restriction of the movement of the bed 10 with respect to the surface is particularly important and valuable when the bed 10 is to be stowed in a restricted space such as will hereafter be described. In such a circumstance the bed 10 is first moved with its mattresssupporting frame 12 in raised position so that it is disposed alongside the novel chesterfield-bed collectively designated 114. During such movement, the bed 10 may be moved across the surface 40 and may be rotated on its castor assemblies 16 to whatever extent is required. When the bed 10 is in correct alignment with the bed 114 the locking means is released in the manner already described and the mattress-supporting frame 12 is moved to its lowered position to o rient the castor assemblies 16 and consequently to restrict further movement of the bed 10 to translational movement in the directions A and A. The bed 10 is then easily pushed into the housing 116 beneath bed 114 without undesired rotational movement occurring.

Similarly, when it is desired to remove the bed 10 from its position in housing 116 the aforementioned parallel orientation of the castor assemblies 16 ensures that the bed 10 is pulled out therefrom in the desired direction.

Having removed the bed 111 from such as the just noted location the mattress-supporting frame 12 is first moved to its raised position. Such movement is again greatly facilitated by the action of the springs 81) which act in opposition to the weight of the frame 12 and to the action of the weight of any mattress disposed on the frame 12. The result is that as little efiort for all practical purposes is required to raise the mattress as is required to lower it. With the frame 12 in its raised position, the dogs 91) firmly engage the pins 92 and the bed is then readily movable to its required location by any combination of rotational and translational movement.

The manner in which the barrel-shaped castors 50 facilitate automatic movement of the castor assemblies 16 into positions in which the axle pins 52 of all these assemblies are disposed in mutually parallel orientation as aforesaid will now be explained with reference to FIGS. 9 to 23 of the accompanying drawings. It will be I assumed for convenience that the bed 111 is in its raised position as illustrated in FIG. 9 and that the bed has been moved over the supporting surface 46 so that the two castor assemblies 16 shown in FIG. 9 are disposed as actually illustrated in that Figure. In particular it will be noted that of the castor assemblies 16 mounted on the longitudinally extending members 36 and 441 one or more of their yoke pivot pins 62 may be disposed inwardly of axle pin 52. Consequently any thus disorientated" castor assembly will have a tendency to move automatically into the position shown in FIG. 3 as the bed 10 is moved into its lowered position due to the spreading apart (as indicated by arrows 116 and 112 of FIG. 3) of the longitudinal members 36 and Ml and on a smooth, uncarpeted surface at least will do so at that time.

The longitudinally extending member MI is shown in FIG. 9 as having its axle pin 52 disposed inwardly of its yoke pivot pin 62. Consequently, for this particular castor assembly to be disposed as shown in FIGS. 3 and 6 when the bed 11) is moved into its lowered position, it is necessary for the yoke 56 to rotate during such lowering of the bed through 180, i.e. between the positions shown in FIGS. 10 and 11, on the one hand, and those shown in FIGS. 22 and 23 on the other hand. Such rotation is greatly facilitated in a manner now to be explained by the provision of the aforementioned barrel-shaped configuration of the castor 51). Assuming that the castor assembly 16 is in the position shown in FIGS. 10 and 1 1 and that the lowered bed 10 is moved even a very small distance over a carpeted (or uncarpeted) supporting surface 46, a relatively minute disturbance in that surface or a very small rotational movement of the bed 10 relative to that surface will be sufficient to cause the castor assembly 16 to start rotating about its yoke pivot pin 62.

As will be seen from progress FIGS. 12 through 21, as soon as any such rotation about the yoke pivot pin 62 is initiated or commences, the point of contact in dicated in these Figures by the small cross 10% will be offset along the axle pin 52 with respect to the yoke pin 62. Consequently, a turning couple is exerted by reaction of the supporting surface 411 to cause further and increasingly easy rotation about the yoke pin 62 with FIGS. 20 and 21 indicating that position assumed by the castor 50 just before it reaches outwardly orientated centrality or equilibrium as indicated at FIGS. 22 and 23 (also of course FIG. 3).

It will be appreciated however that under rather unfavorable, rare conditions, the castor assembly pair on one side of the said unit can remain for instance in the position of FIG. 9 when collapsed to the FIG. 3 position. For so long as that situation obtains the mattress plane must obviously remain slightly inclined. Again, occasionally just one, or the two castor pairs as actually depicted in FIG. 9 may get lodged in the shown position. Again, one or a diagonal pair may remain orientated to the FIG. 9 position (or else be skewed anywhere between that and 180 degrees swivelled from it). Whatever the disorientated position of one or more castor assemblies in the up-sprung position however, they will all quickly turn then snap into the FIG. 3 position after horizontal transverse rolling effort is applied to the bed unit and it has been shifted seldom more than about the distance of one inch before this occurs, the final snap" part of the swivelling action starting to occur of course after the position of FIGS. 16 or 17 has been reached.

The manner in which the barrel-shaped castor 50 facilitates movement into the specified orientation shouldnow be understood. In less technical terminology it can be stated that such a barrel-shaped configuration so to speak causes a castor assembly first to twist and then to jump from the position shown in FIGS.

111 and 11 to that shown in FIGS. 22 and 23 on very slight linear movement of the bed unit 10 with respect to the supporting surface at).

The novel triangular form of frame 98 shown in the accompanying FIGS. '7 and 8 has a base flange 100, a vertical flange 102, and an inclined connecting flange 104. It may be very economically formed from tube stock in a roller or the like press. Disposed as shown it very well accommodates a mattress resting on the springs 1116. The springs 106 are easily anchored in the apertures (not shown) provided in the connecting flange 1114.

Frame members such as 108 are much to be preferred over angle stock such as indicated at 12 in FIG. 3 because the necessary strength against buckling, especially under the tension of the springs 106 or the seating load, or both, bearing downwardly upon the flanges 11M) and 1112, is also distributed into the connecting flange 1114 which spans the said flanges 100 and 1112 thus providing both a vertical and a horizontal stiffening component thereto. 1

In conclusion relative to the rolling bed per se the lower end sections 46 are obtusely angled as best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 relative to the main portion of the lengths of the associated legs for the following reasons: (i) to prevent the legs, on collapse, from lying co-planar with the springs which of course would provide an undesirable dead-center lock, (ii) to permit the legs to be more steeply angled than would be the case if they extended straight from points 76 to points 14i (see FIG. 2) and at the same time provide a suitably low mattress height and sufficiently stable or spreadapart base, while at the same time permitting, in virtue of the aforesaid steepness, more stiffness and greater strength in the legs than would be the case if they were lying at a shallower angle to the horizontal in the raised position of the bed, and (iii) to provide desirably for the needed angling with requisite lowness, of the castor assemblies and the associated legs when the bed is collapsed.

The invention has now been described in the broad sense of its comprising a rolling bed. It will now be described in the more restricted sense of its comprising, in combination, said rolling bed, a novel chesterfieldbed characterized by having a sub-seat housing wherein the rolling bed may be accommodated, a housing cover on the rolling bed, means for guiding the rolling bed into the housing and for helping to retain the rolling bed mattress in place, and a two-position supporting means on the chesterfield-bed for supporting conventional cushions at an angle whereby'they may function as removable back rests for the chesterfield-bed, and whereby, after removal of said cushions, the full width of the chesterfield-bed may be made available for sleeping.

The chesterfield-bed 114 is novel due to being adapted and designed to provide the capacious housing 116 below a mattress unit 118 such mattress unit consisting of a suitable supporting means for a mattress 120 (or set of cushions serving the same purpose), and said mattress or set of cushions. The mattress unit is positioned between and secured to end supporting structures 122 including arm rests and the novelty of the chesterfield-bed 114 as described up to this point resides in its being characterized by being adapted and designed for fixity of the relationship between the said end supporting structures and the mattress unit by the provision of said housing. By fixity of the relationship is meant to convey the novel simplicity of providing a capacious open-fronted housing under a chesterfield-bed wherein the said end supporting structures and the said mattress unit are all fixed, i.e. immovable, and this in contrast to the great variety of convertible chesterfield-beds wherein the arts are ingeniously counterbalanced to swing and glide so that the article of furniture assumes a substantially different appearance when used as a bed to its appearance used as a chesterfield.

The rolling bed has secured to the locking bar 83 a relatively narrow horizontally elongated vertically disposed panel 126 by means such as the pair of projecting brackets 128, such panel constituting a cover or closure for the entrance to housing 116, which entrance lies substantially on the vertical plane of the front edge 130 of the mattress unit 118 when the rolling bed 10 has been accommodated within said housing. Thus it will be understood that the user can actuate the raising and lowering of bed 10 by manipulation of the cover 126 instead of the locking bar as plainly depicted in FIGS. 2, 3 and 24.

A combination mattress-rail and roller bed guide means collectively designated 132 takes the form of a length of tubing two ends of which are secured as by welding to the interior angle of the mattress frame member 134 (FIGS. 1, 2, and 24). The member 132 then makes a 90 curve at 136 (FIGS. 1 and 24) to enclose mattress 138 via the portions 140 of the member 132 rising at a slight incline toward the near end of the mattress where it again angles curvilinearly as at 142 to protect the front edge of the mattress against misalignment, the front portion being designated 144 (FIG. 9).

In this way, not only is the mattress preserved against sliding off the mattress assembly on which it is resting but, in virtue of the curvatures 136, guide means are provided to facilitate leading the rolling bed 10 into housing 116 with greater ease should it be the case that it was somewhat misaligned therewith. The curvatures 136 in such case will come up against the near corners of the end-supporting structures 124. Thus, in order to enter the housing 116 either the chesterfield-bed will be slightly moved one way or the other or else the rolling bed will yield perhaps aided by the person who is rolling it into the said housing.

The adjustable means for supporting at least one removable cushion having substantially parallel front and back supporting surfaces at a sub-vertical inclination for reclining against when seated upon the mattress unit, collectively designated 146 in FIGS. 25-27 consists in combination of an angulated vertically disposed mounting bracket 148 of generally angular configuration. The adjustable means 146 are suitably secured to two corners of the chesterfield-bed via 148 or an extension such as 150 thereof.

The adjustable means essentially embody, in'combination, upper and lower downwardly U-shaped bars 152 and 154 respectively against which the upper and lower rear parts 156 and 158 of cushions 160 are supported respectively, wherein the front and back supporting surfaces are designated 162 and 164 respectively.

The lower bar 154 is pivotally connected at its ends 166 to the chesterfield-bed, by which is meant mounting bracket 148 or some convenient extension thereof since 148 could in fact be a bed leg.

Upper bar 154 is pivotally connected at its lower ends 168 to the legs 170 of lower U-shaped bar 154. Tie links 172 are pivotally connected to the chesterfield-bed (generally and more specifically the mounting bracket 148 thereof). And to upper U-bar 152 (specifically upon the legs 174 thereof) above the lower U-bar 154. The points of pivotal connection of the tie links 172 are at 176 and 178.

The lower U-bar 154 projects further over the lower edge surface area 180 of mattress 118 than does the upper U-bar 152 in the advanced position of the adjustable means. The cushion 160 or set of same rests against the adjustable means specifically via the connecting bar portions 182 and 184 of the U-bars 152 and 154 respectively. The links or tie bars 172 are each provided with the inwardly projecting lug 186 and with the crowfoot extension 188.

OPERATION In the retracted position of FIG. 26 and in phantom lines FIG. 27, essentially all parts will be seen to be vertical so that no structure is overhanging the area 180 and hence the full width of the mattress 120 may be utilized for sleeping after the cushions 160 have been removed. In such position the adjustable means (also hereinafter called adjustable unit) is essentially locked in such position. Any attempt to open it by grasping the bar 182 of the upper U-bar 152 and pulling leftwardly with respect to FIG. 27 will be frustrated due to the existence of a bound linkage system and the right angulated surfaces 190 and 192 of mounting bracket 148. Nor can the bar 182 be rotated clockwise with respect to FIG. 27 for the same reason in addition to the fact that lug 186 will rotate clockwise to butt against the upper edge 194 of 192 (see FIG. 27).

The only way to move the adjustable unit 146 between the position of FIGS. 26 and 27 (phantom lines of the latter) and the open position of FIG. 25 or the full line position of FIG. 27 is by grasping the bar 184 of the lower U-bar unit 154 and pushing it rotatably clockwise or counter clockwise with respect to FIG. 27. When that is done it moves easily between the two positions and it will not open further than is shown in FIGS. 25 and 27 (full lines of the latter) due to the crowfeet of the tie bars 172 coming up against the plates 192 of mounting brackets 148. Persons may now lean their full weight upon the inclined cushions 126 without any possibility of the unit moving into vertical attitude because such weight will necessarily be clearly above the plane of bar 184.

As aresult, a simple-to-operate and inexpensive means has been provided for simulating the appearance of wedge-shaped cushions or structural sloping backs of a chesterfield by the use of ordinary cushions and with, in general an equal amount of comfort.

Reverting to the supporting mattress-retaining and rolling-bed guide means which have been described, reference is lastly made to the novel, simplified, multipurpose structure so referred to, illustrated in FIGS. 28 and 29.

In this modification of these Figures the round-tubular mattress frame 196 also functions as a mattress retainer and as a guide. These functions are accomplished by anchoring the supporting spring system 98 in apertures 200 on the underside of the tubing soas to provide a shallow cavity for the mattress 202.

Next, the corners 204 are rounded so as to glide past the salients (or end-supporting structure 124) at opposite ends of the chesterfield-bed. Lastly however, with regard to the tubular frame in its function as such (i.e. anchoring the spring system spanning it), such a novel frame, especially when anchoring the spring system in the manner described, importantly contributes to resistance against the common tendency of spring mattress frames to twist or buckle diagonally (i.e. as between diagonal comers thereof) out of a true plane so that they are no longer on their feet at said corners, and therefore can be see-sawed if lying on a flat floor as between two diagonal corners.

Various modifications can be made within the scope of the inventive concept which is disclosed and/or claimed. Accordingly, it is intended that what is set forth herein should be regarded as illustrative of such concept and not for the purpose of limiting protection to any particular embodiment thereof, and that only such limitations should be placed upon the scope of protection to which the inventor is entitled, as justice dictates.

What is claimed is:

1. A collapsible rolling bed having an elongated rectangular configuration with opposite sides and opposite ends, said bed comprising a mattress assembly, collapsible support means for sustaining and moving said mattress assembly between a raised and a collapsed position, said support means including a pair of mounting members provided at the underside of the mattress assembly and extending transversely thereof in planes spaced longitudinally of the bed, two pairs of legs connected to the respective mounting members, the legs in each pair being mutually crossed and pivoted together at their point of crossing, the upper end of one leg in each pair being pivoted to the associated mounting member at a point adjacent one side of the bed and the upper end of the other leg being horizontally slidably connected to the mounting member adjacent the other side of the bed, resilient means biasing the upper ends of the legs in each pair toward each other and thereby urging the mattress assembly to its raised position, said support meansbeing characterized in that said legs have angulated lower end portions which extend substantially horizontally outwardly in the direction of the opposite sides of the bed when the mattress assembly is in its raised position, a castor provided at the lower end of each leg, each castor comprising an inverted substantially U-shaped yoke, a barrel-shaped roller rotatably mounted in said yoke, and a kingpin on the yoke pivotally connecting the same to said lower end portion of the associated leg, the axis of rotation of said roller being offset horizontally from said kingpin and the kingpin being substantially vertical when the lower end portion of the leg is horizontal in the raised position of the mattress assembly, said support means being further charac terized in that when the mattress assembly is collapsed, said legs are in very close relationship to a supporting surface on which said castor rollers rest and the angulated end portions of the legs slant upwardly and outwardly in the direction of the opposite sides of the bed and said kingpins of the castors slant upwardly and inwardly to a degree which would not be possible if the angulated lower leg portions were not provided, thereby enhancing the ability of the castors to assume an optimum position for travel in a direction transverse of the bed and reducing the bed in its collapsed position to an optimum low height.

2. The rolling bed according to claim 1 which includes in combination therewith a convertible chesterfield-bed characterized by being adapted and designed for fixity of the relationship between a pair of opposite end-supporting structures thereof and a mattress unit extending between said end-supporting structures and by the provision of an open fronted housing below said mattress unit bounded by the underside of said mattress unit and the inner sides of said end-supportingstructures for accommodating said rolling bed when in lowered position, said rolling bed being further characterized by including locking means for locking said mattress assembly in raised position, said locking means comprising a locking bar extending along one side of said rolling bed, and a relatively narrow horizontally elongated vertically disposed panel so secured to said locking bar as to constitute a cover for the en-,

said end-supporting structures, said rolling bed being further characterized by including a combination mattress-rail and roller bed guide means for retaining a mattress against misalignment on said mattress assembly and facilitating the passage of said roller bed into said housing when urged towards same, in the form of a bar at least partially encircling said mattress assembly and being rounded in a substantially horizontal plane at two opposite corners on the long side of said mattress assembly.

4. The rolling bed according to claim 2 in which said chesterfield-bed is also characterized by including adjustable means for supporting at least one removable cushion having substantially parallel front and back supporting surfaces at a sub-vertical inclination for reclining against when seated upon said mattress unit, said adjustable means being movable between an advanced and angulated cushion-supporting position projecting over the rear edge surface area of said mattress unit, and an essentially vertical retracting position in which latter position the maximum width of said mattress unit is available to the user and said rear edge surface area is unobstructed, said means essentially embodying, in combination, upper and lower downwardly U-shaped bars against which the upper and lower rear parts of said cushion are supported respectively, said lower bar being pivotally connected at its ends to said chesterfieldbed, said upper bar being pivotally connected at its lower ends to the legs of said lower U- shaped bar, tie links pivotally connected to said chesterfield-bed and said upper U-bar above said lower U-bar, said lower U-bar projecting further over said rear edge surface area than said upper U-bar in said advanced position, and means for efiectively locking said means in said advanced and retracted positions.

5. The rolling bed according to claim 3 in which said Chesterfield-bed is also characterized by including adjustable means for supporting at least one removable cushion having substantially parallel front and back supporting surfaces at a sub-vertical inclination for reclining against when seated upon said mattress unit, said adjustable means being movable between an advanced and angulated cushion-supporting position projecting over the rear edge surface area of said mattress unit, and an essentially vertical retracting position in which latter position the maximum width of said mattress unit is available to the user and said rear edge surface area is unobstructed, said means essentially embodying, in combination, upper and lower downwardly U-shaped bars against which the upper and lower rear parts of said cushion are supported respectively, said lower bar'being pivotally connected at its ends to said chesterfieldbed, said upper bar being pivotally connected at its lower ends to the legs of said lower U- shaped bar, tie links pivotally connected to said chesterfield-bed and said upper U-bar above said lower U-bar, said lower U-bar projecting further over said rear edge surface area than said upper U-bar in said advanced position, and means for effectively locking said means in said advanced and retracted positions.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6244417Jul 30, 1998Jun 12, 2001Fmc CorporationMaterial handling unit with multidirectional helical roller assemblies
US6264219 *Aug 6, 1999Jul 24, 2001Dave W. SmithUtility cart
EP0359307A1 *Sep 1, 1989Mar 21, 1990FLOU S.p.A.Support structure for sofa beds, with pull-out, raisable auxiliary bed
EP0811341A2 *May 28, 1997Dec 10, 1997PRO-CORD s.r.l.Sofa convertible into a bed
WO2000006474A1 *Apr 8, 1999Feb 10, 2000Fmc CorpMaterial handling unit with multidirectional helical roller assemblies
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/14, 280/641
International ClassificationB60B33/00, A47C17/13, A47C17/32
Cooperative ClassificationB60B33/00, A47C17/134, A47C17/32
European ClassificationA47C17/32, A47C17/13B2, B60B33/00