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Publication numberUS3727753 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1973
Filing dateOct 26, 1971
Priority dateOct 26, 1971
Also published asCA937377A1, DE2252006A1
Publication numberUS 3727753 A, US 3727753A, US-A-3727753, US3727753 A, US3727753A
InventorsStarr R, Swetlitz M
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building subsystem and packaging arrangement
US 3727753 A
Abstract
An essentially self-contained building subsystem, such as a kitchen, is factory constructed in one example of currently preferred form of the unitary assembly including a planar side wall upon which the appurtenances such as kitchen cabinets and appliances are cantilever mounted, the unitary assembly including opposite end walls of greater depth than the appurtenances. Facing wall means of an area essentially coextensive with the planar side wall is secured to abut the edges of the end walls to form a shipping package enclosed on the four vertically extending sides and preferably devoid of a floor, the securing means being of a character permitting relatively ready lateral separation of the unitary assembly from the facing wall means for properly placing the parts of the unit in the building in which the parts are to be installed. Electrical wiring connections and other functional connections, to the extent they are to extend between the opposite parts of the unit, are provided with sufficient slack length to accommodate the full lateral separation of the parts. In one common type of installation in which the opposite structural frames are essentially U-shaped and mirror images of each other, and the ceiling for the core unit is included in the shipping package, the movable central part of the ceiling is carried in overlapping relation to the fixed sides of the ceiling in the shipping package, and is dropped into place in the center when the core unit is expanded.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ 1 Apr. 17, 1973 United States Patent n91 Starr et al.

[ ABSTRACT An essentially self-contained building subsystem, such BUILDING SUBSYSTEM AND PACKAGING ARRANGEMENT Starr, Allison Park;

Inventors: Richard A. as a kitchen, is factory constructed in one example of currently preferred form of the unitary assembly including a planar side wall upon which the appur- Myron Swetlitz, Monroeville, both of Pa.

Assignee: Westinghouse Electric Corporation,

tenances such as kitchen cabinets and appliances are cantilever mounted, the unitary assembly including opposite end walls of greater depth than the appur- Pittsburgh, Pa.

[22] Filed: Oct. 26, 1971 tenances. Facing wall means of an area essentially [211 pp 192 520 coextensive with the planar side wall is secured to abut the edges of the end walls to form a shipping package enclosed on the four vertically extending sides and preferably devoid of a floor, the securing [52] US. R, 52/34, 52/79,

206/46 1-1 means being of a character permitting relatively ready .B65d 9/00, B65d 85/62, B65d 71/00 lateral separation of the unitary assembly from the facing wall means for properly placing the parts of the unit in the building in which the parts are to be In- [58] Field of Search.................206/65 R, 65 K, 65 B,

206/46 H, 46 R, 46 M; 217/36; 52/34, 79,

' 64; 135/4 R; 312/198 stalled. Electrical wiring connections and other functional connections, to the extent they are to extend [56] References Cited between the opposite parts of the unit, are provided with sufficient slack length to accommodate the full UNITED STATES PATENTS lateral separation of the parts. In one common type of 206/46 H installation in which the opposite structural frames are 35/4 R essentially U-shaped and mirror images of each other, ....52/34 and the ceiling for the core unit is included in the 206/46 M shipping package, the movable central part of the ceil- -2O6/46 H ing is carried in overlapping relation to the fixed sides '52/69 of the ceiling in the shipping package, and is dropped into place in the center when the core unit is expanded.

1,951,825 3/1934 Ferris 2,485,914 10/1949 Owens.....

2,712,164 7/1955 Shefield.. 2,791,323 5/1957 Schreckengost et al. 3,173,436 3/1965 Peters....,..... 3,629,982 12/1971 Primary Examiner-William T. Dixson, Jr. AttorneyF. I-I. Henson l0 Claim, 23 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR 1 H913 SHEET 2 OF 5 PATENTEU 1 7 I973 sum n []F 6 FIG.6

PAIENTEUAPR 1 71915 I SHEET 5 n; 6

PATENTEUAPR 1 11915 3; 727. 753

SHEET 6 BF 6 6 J FIG-.23

BUILDING SUBSYSTEM AND PACKAGING ARRANGEMENT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention pertains to the art of pre-fabricated building subsystems of the character adapted for use in industrialized building construction.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART Building subsystems, and sub-assemblies of similar character, are well known in the building art. Examples of U.S. Patents generally relating to the subject, and of which we are aware and may be considered to have some pertinency to our invention, include US. Pat. Nos. 3,230,549; 3,182,424; 3,110,907; 2,904,850; 2,419,319; 2,037,895. Our invention is considered to provide a residential subsystem having advantages over each of the arrangements taught in the listed patents.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Our invention considered in its broader aspects is essentially a building subsystem and packaging arrangement thereof for shipping and installation into a building system at the site of the building, where the building system is of the character providing all of the vertical support for the subsystem. In accordance with the invention, it comprises at least one unitary assembly which includes residential appurtenances and vertical support means, of non-load bearing character from the building system standpoint, for supporting the appurtenances in substantially their final locational relationship in accordance with the predetermined building design, facing wall means generally coextensive in area with the unitary assembly and disposed in facing relation to the appurtenances presented by the unitary assembly, with end means at each of the opposite ends of the unitary assembly and the facing wall means for obtaining a spacing therebetween sufficient that the front faces of the appurtenances are spaced from the facing structure to avoid interference therebetween during shipping. The unitary assembly, facing wall means and end means are assembled together to form a compact shipping package smaller in area than the area bounded by lines encompassing the parts of the package as they are installed in the building system after the parts packaged are separated and finally located in the build ing system in accordance with the predetermined building design. Interconnecting means at at least two of the interfaces between the parts in their form of the shipping package prevent relative vertical movement and lateral separation in at least one direction, while permitting relatively ready lateral separation in the other lateral direction. Securing means extend around the parts in the shipping package to hold the parts in that form for purposes of movement to and into the building system, with the securing means being relatively readily releasable to permit the separation of the parts in the building system and their subsequent movement to their final respective locations in accordance with the predetermined building design.

In one currently preferred form of the invention, the appurtenances are cantilever supported in the shipping package so that a floor as such may be omitted from the package. For one of the more common types of subsystems which the invention is now contemplated to take, i.e., a galley-type kitchen, the unitary assembly and facing wall means are essentially mirror images of each other from the standpoint of the walls upon which the appurtenances are mounted, and the end means comprise short end walls so that as viewed in plan the walls are of shallow U-shape. The package is formed by moving the opposite halves together so that the vertical edges of the four end walls abut with the interconnecting means therebetween. A central ceiling portion for the galley-type kitchen is carried in the package in overlapping relation to fixed side ceiling portions, and may be dropped into place upon separation of the opposite parts of the subsystem. The subsystem is fully wired and plumbed with respect to individual living unit service, and such connections extending from the respective appurtenances to localized areas for connection to the central utility system of the building as a whole.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric view of one side of a galleytype kitchen subsystem;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the opposite side of the galley-type kitchen subsystem;

FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the shipping package formed by the opposite sides of the kitchen subsystem of FIGS. 1 and 2; a

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view corresponding to one taken along the line 4--4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an isometric view of the galley kitchen formed by laterally separating the subsystem parts of FIGS. 1 and 2, but with the central ceiling portion shown in a position elevated to an exaggerated height from its final position;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view corresponding to one taken along the line66 of FIG. 5 and showing the one example of a ceiling arrangement in a finished galley-type kitchen subsystem;

FIG. 7 is a view in the nature of the vertical section i1- lustrating the manner in which a refrigerator, for example, is cantilever supported from the side wall during shipping;

FIG. 8 is an isometric view of part of the framing structure of a galley-type kitchen subsystem and'illustrating an electrical wiring arrangement therefor;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of a part of the floor of one kind of multi-story building of the type in which a galleytype kitchen subsystem may be installed to illustrate how at least part of the exterior walls of the subsystem in its shipping package form may constitute interior partition walls-in the installed position of the kitchen;

The even numbered FIGS. 10-22 are diagrammatic plan views of various arrangements of shipping packages that different kitchen subsystem may take; and

The odd numbered FIGS. 11-23 are diagrammatic plan views of the various forms the subsystems may take as installed, each Figure corresponding to the successively lower numbered figure with respect to the initial shipping package.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS A galley-type kitchen subsystem will be described as a prime example of carrying out the invention.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, each of the opposite sides 1 and 2 of the galley-type kitchen subsystem constitutes unitary assemblies froma structural standpoint. Each has a planar side wall 3 and 4 and opposite end walls 5-8. While these structural walls may be made of various materials, in the example of the drawings they. are of the usual wood sill-stud-plate construction and with panel sheets 9 of either finished or unfinished surface character, depending upon whether the sheet is exposed to view, secured to the inside faces of the walls.

Each of the opposite sides of the kitchen subsystem includes selected wall and base kitchen cabinets 10 and 11 as well as basic kitchen appliances such as a refrigerator l2, stove l3, and dishwasher 14. It will be appreciated that any of these applicances may be omitted according to the particular building plan, as well as other appliances such as trash mashers, garbage grinders, water heaters and the like may be added or substituted. The cabinets, appliances, as well as light fixtures, outlets, wiring, air flow, ducts, and plumbing connections, to the extent necessary for the particular items to satisfactorily operate and for the unit to be considered essentially self-contained, are considered to be comprehended by the term appurtenances. In that connection, while the description of the invention will proceed in connection with kitchen subsystems, the invention is also considered to be applicable to bathroom subsystems in which items such as bathtubs, toilets, and lavatories are considered to be comprehended within the terms of appurtenances.

The end walls 5-8 are each securely fastened by bolting one vertical end of each to the respective comer post formed at the opposite ends of each of the planar side walls 3 and 4. Thus in plan view, the structural framing of each of the halves of the kitchen module appears as a shallow U-shape. Each of the opposite end walls illustrated preferably has a length, (that is, a horizontal dimension) in excess of the depth of the appurtenances so that the unsecured vertical edges of the end walls lie in a plane which is parallel to the side wall and spaced from the side wall sufficiently that the exposed front faces of the appurtenances do not extend beyond the plane. In some building system designs the plan will be such that the opposite end walls will be omitted entirely (as will be described later in connection with FIG, 22 and 23), or the end walls may be of insufficient length to project beyond the front face of all of the appliances. In such a case, the appliances will be arranged relative to their face-to-face disposition in the shipping package that their faces do not contact.

The unsecured vertical edges of the end walls are identified by the end wall numeral plus the suffix a." The end stud forming each of the vertical end edges 5a through 8a has a horizontal hole 15 drilled edgewise into it (FIG. 4) with the hole in the facing vertical edges being located so they are aligned to receive a shear pin 16 in the registering holes when the opposite sides are moved together to interface and form the shipping package as in FIG. 3. The shear pins are relatively loosely received in the holes so that they serve as interconnecting means at the interfaces of the sides in the sense of preventing relative vertical movement and lateral separation of the halves in one sideways direction while permitting relatively ready lateral separation in the other sideways direction.

Each of the unit halves includes a fixed ceiling portion which extends for less than the full lateral depth of the half. The ceiling may conveniently be of the suspended system type arranged as shown in FIGS. 1-2, 5-6 in which angle-shaped wall moldings 17 extend along the end walls and support a T-shaped main runner 18. The permanent ceiling boards 19 have one edge resting on a front top edge of the wall cabinets 10 and their opposite edges supported by the main runner 18. Additional support for the main runner 18 is provided by support boards 20 which have one end secured on top of the rear edge of the wall cabinets (FIG. 6) to the respective planar side walls and their opposite ends attached to the stem portion of the T's 18. In this way the fixed portions of the ceiling are sufficiently strong that cross Ts 21 will be adequately supported at their ends by the main runners 18 to support the weight of the center ceiling boards 22, some of which carry light fixtures 23.

It is currently preferred that the center ceiling portion be comprised of a series of individual ceiling boards 22 as distinguished from a center ceiling portion comprising a single piece. The ends of the ceiling boards 22 are supported by the main runners 18, while the lengthwise edges of the ceiling board are supported by the cross T's 21. The length of the center ceiling boards 22 is determined so that when the opposite halves of the galley-type unit are separated from each other and moved to their proper position in accordance with the predetermined building design, the ends of the ceiling boards will be received by the corners of the main runners 18. When the opposite halves of the unit are moved together to form a shipping package as in FIG. 3, the center portion of the ceiling is elevated sufficiently that the opposite end portions of the ceiling boards overlap the permanent side portions of the ceiling. While this ceiling arrangement is not applicable to all of the units comprehended by the invention it is well suited to the galley-type subsystem as well as an in-line type subsystem of the character depicted in FIG. 10 and 11. It is only necessary that when the subsystem halves are separated and placed in their final locations according to the building system plan, the span between the main runners 18 not exceed the distance between the opposite planar walls 2 and 3 when the opposite halves are formed into the shipping package.

While the cabinets l0 and 11 are permanently fixed to the planar side walls, some of the applicances such as the refrigerator, range and dishwasher should be adapted to be moved away from the side walls after the unit is installed to permit access for servicing. However, during shipping the applicances are preferably cantilever mounted from the planar side walls so that usually no permanently load-bearing floor will be present in the shipping package. Referring now to FIG. 7, the manner in which an appliance such as a refrigerator 12 with a wire and tube static condenser is mounted for shipping is illustrated. A pair of upper brackets 25 and a pair of lower brackets 26 are securely fastened to the planar side wall 9 in horizontally spaced relation to each other of less than the width of the appliance 12. The upper brackets 25 are located vertically in a position to bear against a portion of the rear wall of the refrigerator 12 which has sufficient flexural strength that the rear wall will not be unduly deformed during shipping. The lower brackets 26 are also spaced apart and include a toe portion 27 located in a position to provide the main vertical support for the refrigerator during shipping. A series of vertically spaced bands 28 of plastic or other soft, non-abrading character extend horizontally and through holes in the sheet panel 9 behind the refrigerator and around one or more studs of the planar side wall to hold the refrigerator tightly to the planar side wall to prevent any shifting during the shipping of the package. Essentially the same basic arrangement may be used for supporting the other appliances such as the stove 13 and the dishwasher l4.

After the opposite halves of the unit are separated and moved to their final locations according to the building plans, the bands 28 are removed and the appliances are moved to a rest position on the supporting floor of the building system.

The unit is fully wired in the sense that only the main supply cable need be connected to the electrical load center located in the unit. One example of the wiring which may be used and its general location is diagrammatically illustrated in FIG. 8 in which the opposite halves of the unit have been expanded beyond the normal expansion for the purpose of clarity of the drawing. The load center 30 may be conveniently located in the rear portion of the cabinet above the sink. A connection box 31 is mounted on the permanent part of the ceiling and is connected by a series of cables collectively identified by the numeral 32 so that the circuit breakers in the load center control the circuits emanating from the connection box. The connection box contains terminal blocks for the on-site connections to incoming service such as air conditioning, a furnace, and the house circuits for rooms other than the kitchen subsystem. A junction box 33 is also provided in the false ceiling space of the unit half 1. The cables for the circuits in the unit half I extend from the junction box through the false ceiling space and then down between the studs to wall-light fixture and outlets, as indicated by the cables identified by numerals 34, while the cable 35 indicates those circuits which are connected directly to the load center. a

The electrical wiring also extends from the unit half 1 to the unit half 2 through the false ceiling area and another junction box 36 located in the false ceiling space of the unit half 2. A range cable 37 also extends over to unit half 2 directly from the load center and terminates in an outlet on the wall behind the space for the range. It will be appreciated thatall of the electrical wiring for the unit, as well as the wiring which can be extended to other parts of the apartment, is brought to the localized area of the load center 30 from which the connection may be made with the main supply cable 38 to the building service. The length of the wires which extend from one half to the other half of the unit is sufficient to reach between halves when they are in their properly installed locations, and, in the shipping package form, the extra wire is simply looped about the false ceiling space (only a short length of which is shown). The flexible exhaust duct for the range hood is also looped about the ceiling space and has sufficient length to reach the service chase of the building.

The unit is also fully plumbed so that the connection to the plumbing service of the building may be made from a localized area. In the usual arrangement according to the invention, the plumbing 39 (FIG. 5) below the sink and to the dishwasher and garbage grinder is conventional, and an opening 40 is provided in the planar side wall 3 below the sink to make the plumbing connection to the building service. In case the living unit is to have its own hot water heater, the hot water heater will be located in the same unit half as the sink and lateral connections will be made back and forth from the hot water heater location and the sink location. Conveniently the pipes for such an arrangement may be run in the space between the rear ends of the drawers of a drawer-type base cabinet and the planar side wall.

It is now contemplated that in nearly all, if not all, cases, the electrical load center and the sink with undercounter plumbing will be provided in the same unit half or unitary assembly for purposes of simplifying connections to the building system service.

After the subsystem has been factory fabricated, with all of the components including appurtenances, wiring, plumbing, etc., the opposite halves are moved together, with the shear pins 16 in place to form a compact shipping package as in FIG. 3. While not shown, a weather covering such as plastic film will be provided for at least the top of the package. Depending upon the mode of shipping and the type of on-site storage, the sides of the package may also be protected against weather, and under some circumstances may have a heavier covering provided to prevent tree branches from rubbing against and damaging any part of the package. However, in all such cases, it will be understood that such coverings are of a protective character, since the halves themselves form their basic shipping package from the structural standpoint. The package is then banded with horizontal bands 41 (FIG. 3) which serve as the means to secure the subsystem in shipping package form. These bands are relatively readily releasable, by simply cutting them, so that the parts can be separated laterally after the subsystem has been located generally in the building system.

While it is contemplated that ordinarily no floor whatsoever will be provided under the applicances and base cabinets, there may be instances where the building system plan makes it desirable to provide a floor under those components. For example, if the other rooms in the building system will have a finished floor such as parquet blocks, and it is desirable that the floor in the subsystem part be at the same level, a sheet of equal thickness plywood or the like may be used to underlie the base cabinets and appliances. While such a sheet may be adequate to provide much of the support for applicances and base cabinets during shipping, the basic support for these components will be the floor of the building system when the subsystem is installed.

While the units according to the invention are applicable to use in various types of building, it is currently expected that most such units will be employed in multi-story apartment buildings, particularly of the type using advanced industrialized building techniques. In such buildings, the unit in its shipping package form may be typically moved into place with a crane which either lowers the package to its approximate location before the floor of the next succeeding story is placed, or it may be moved into the particular apartment through an open exterior side wall before the wall panel is put in place. In either case, the unit is then generally located as is shown in FIG. 9, adjacent a service chase 41 which provides main utility service for all of the building, and then the unit halves are separated and located in their permanently installed locations. As may be seen in FIG. 9, except for the planar side wall 3 which abuts the service chase wall, the other walls of the unit serve as interior partition walls. Since only the interior of the unit is in finished form, the exterior bare stud walls may be finished with any appropriate covering such as plaster, paneling, or the like. It is currently contemplated that for the most part the vertical edges Sa-Sa of the respective end walls will be in unfinished form and that after the halves are properly located and the exterior of the unit halves finished, the usual jambs and casing may be applied to form the doorways at the opposite ends of the kitchen.

It is also contemplated that the invention is applicable to other forms of subsystems than those which ultimately become galley-type kitchens used as the prime example of the application of the invention. Thus, in FIG. 10, a shipping package is formed of a half 1 of a galley-type kitchen, and a planar wall 43 which closes the finished side of the kitchen. In this Figure, as well as each of the even numbered FIGS. l222, the location of the shear pins 16 at the interfaces is indicated. The planar wall 43 is simply moved away from the unit portion including the appurtenances and as shown in FIG. 11, forms a partition wall if desired.

In FIG. 12, the same character of shipping package is formed as shown in FIG. 3, but upon separating the halves, the half 2 is swung around to form an L-shaped kitchen as shown in FIG. 13. With this arrangement, the corner identified as 44 may be boxed in to form a closet for example, or may be left as is and finished as part of another room.

In FIG. 14, the unit half 1 is used with an opposite half 46 which is designed so that the portion 48 abuts the end wall 6 of the unit half 1 as installed and, as shown in FIG. 15, so that the lengths of the L-shaped kitchen are unequal.

In FIG. 16, two unit halves l and 2 are butted together in facing relation, and a third unit 50 is moved into facing relation with the exterior planar side wall 3 of unit half 1 with the three parts then being banded to form the shipping package. After the package has been generally located on the floor of the building in which the parts are to be installed, they are opened out to form the U-shaped kitchen as illustrated in FIG. 17 with the corners 44 being treated as explained in connection with FIG. 13.

In FIG. 18, a unit half I and an unequal length unit 52 are butted together at one end and an additional unit 54 of a length which, added to the length of the unit parts 52, equals the length of the unit part I is provided. The section 54 may be located as shown in FIG. 19 and revised to be used as a closet if desired, or may be discarded at the site.

In FIG. 20, a shipping package is shown in which only the one end of the unit parts 56 and 58 are butted together in the shipping package. The opposite ends of the unit parts have a facing miter form and a wall and spacer section 60 is provided to complete the package. 6

In the building system, the parts 56 and 58 are arranged in the L as shown in FIG. 21 and the wall section 60 may be located as shown or elsewhere according to the building system design.

In FIG. 22, the two unit parts carrying the appurtenances and designated 62 and 64 do not have end walls attached thereto as integral parts of the unitary assemblies, and the end means take the form of planar walls 66 to 68. The package is formed as shown in FIG. 22 and upon separating the parts the walls 66 and 68 may be moved out as shown in FIG. 23 to form partition walls if that is in accordance with the building plan,

or may be placed in other locations according to the 7 building plan to form interior partition walls. The arrangement of FIG. 23 may be particularly applicable if the building system plan provides a load bearing structural wall arrangement in which end walls for the unitary assemblies are a part of the basic building system.

It will be appreciated that with respect to the L- shaped kitchen designs, the particular ceiling arrangement shown for the galley-type kitchen is not directly applicable. However, the ceiling components may still be shipped in the false ceiling space of the shipping package, fully wired, and then installed subsequently by providing wall support for the parts of the ceiling not supported by the unit parts.

The description of the invention has proceeded in terms of a residential building subsystem. By this it is meant that the subsystem is used in a building which people occupy as a living unit, and it is intended that this comprehends temporary living units such as motels and hotels, as well as what is normally considered a residence.

The description has also used as an example a subsystem in which the walls are of the conventional sill-stud-plate construction, which is the currently preferred type of wall. However, it is to be understood that other forms of walls may be used in accordance with the invention, their principal function being to provide support for the appurtenances, to permit the provision of a substantially, if not wholly, finished interior for the subsystem, and being adapted to being formed into a shipping package according to the invention. In all cases, however, the walls are to be of a character that they are not load-bearing with respect to providing structural support for the building system itself.

We claim:

1. A residential building subsystem for installation in a building structure having a floor to support said unit, comprising:

a unitary assembly including a planar side wall structure having residential appurtenances mounted on one face thereof in cantilever fashion, at least one planar end wall permanently secured to the end of said side wall, said end wall having a length in excess of the depth of said appurtenances so that the unsecured vertical edge of said end wall lies in a plane parallel to said side wall and spaced from said side wall sufficiently that the exposed front faces of said appurtenances are spaced toward said side wall from said plane;

facing wall means generally coextensive in area with the area of said planar side wall; and

means for securing said facing wall means to said unitary assembly to form a shipping package closed on the four vertically extending sides and devoid of a floor, said securing means being of a character permitting relatively ready lateral separation of said unitary assembly from said facing wall means so that said unitary assembly and said facing wall means may be moved apart from each other to their proper locations in said building structure.

2. A subsystem according to claim 1 including:

a planar end wall permanently secured to both of the opposite ends of said planar side wall.

3. A subsystem according to claim 2 wherein:

said facing wall means comprises a unitary assembly including a planar side wall and opposite end walls, said walls forming a mirror image in plan view of the walls of the opposite unitary assembly.

4. A subsystem according to claim 1 wherein:

said appurtenances include those of the character requiring water for operation mounted on said planar side wall;

said subsystem including supply and drain plumbing extending from said water using appurtenances to a localized area of said planar side wall, said planar side wall having a cut-out therein to permit connections to a main supply and drain plumbing network in said building.

5. A subsystem according to claim 1 wherein:

said appurtenances include appliances of the character requiring electricity for operation, and said subsystem includes electrical wiring extending from said appliances to an electrical load center carried by said planar wall.

6. A subsystem according to claim 5 wherein:

said subsystem includes means for forming a ceiling after said unitary assembly has been separated from said facing wall means, said ceiling means including lighting fixtures carried thereby, and electrical wiring extending from said lighting fixtures to said electrical load center with sufficient length therein to accommodate proper placement of said ceiling means and fixtures after separation of said unitary assembly and facing wall means.

7. A residential building subsystem and shipping package for on-site installation in a building structure having a floor to support said subsystem, comprising:

a pair of unitary assemblies, each including a planar side wall and opposite end walls arranged to form a shallow U-shape as viewed in plan;

residential appurtenances mounted on each of said planar side walls in cantilever fashion;

said assemblies being arranged to form a rectangular shipping package substantially closed on all four ides by placing said assemblies in mirror image relation with respect to the form of said walls, and with the vertical edges of the end walls of one assembly abutting the vertical edges of the end walls of the other assembly;

the depth of the appurtenances facing each other in the two assemblies being less than the distance between the inner faces of the two opposing planar side walls when said assemblies are in the form of said shipping package; and

means for securing said assemblies together for 6 each of said unitary assemblies includes a fixed ceiling portion extending for the length of the planar side walls, and extending away from said planar side walls for a distance less than the length of said end walls; and

central ceiling means having a dimension in one direction corresponding generally to the length of said planar side walls, and a dimension in the other direction less than the distance between said opposite planar side walls when said assemblies are in the form of a shipping package, said central ceiling means overlying and being supported by said fixed ceiling means when said assemblies are in the form of said shipping package.

9. A residential building subsystem and shipping package arrangement thereof for installation in a building system at the site of the building, the building system being of the character providing all of the vertical support for said subsystem, comprising:

at least one unitary assembly including residential appurtenances and vertical support means, of nonload bearing character from a building system standpoint, for supporting said appurtenances in substantially their final location relationship in accordance with the predetermined building design; facing wall means disposed in facing relation to the appurtenances presented by said unitary assembly; end means at each of the opposite ends of said unitary assembly and said facing wall means for obtain ing a spacing therebetween sufficient that the front faces of said appurtenances are spaced from facing structure to avoid interference therebetween; said unitary assembly, facing wall means and end means being assembled together to form a compact shipping package having a peripheral boundary encompassing an area less in extent than the area bounded by lines encompassing said parts as I installed in said building system after the parts of the package are separated and finally located in said building system in accordance with said predetermined building design:

means at at least two of the interfaces between said parts in the form of said shipping package to prevent relative vertical movement and lateral separation in one sideways direction, while permitting relatively ready lateral separation in the other sideways direction; and

securing means extending around said parts in said shipping package form to hold said parts in said form for purposes of movement to and into said building system, said securing means being relatively readily releasable to permit the separation of said parts in said building system and their subsequent movement to their final respective locations in accordance with said predetermined building design.

10. A subsystem and packaging arrangement according to claim 9 wherein:

said facing wall means comprises a second unitary assembly including appurtenances;

both said one and said second unitary assemblies include appurtenances of an electrically powered character;

said one unitary assembly includes an electrical load center adapted to be connected to an electrical distribution system of said building system; and

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3984953 *Nov 22, 1974Oct 12, 1976Ernest Joseph KumpTransport configuration for a modular environmental space module
US4171596 *Sep 29, 1977Oct 23, 1979Fonderia Elettrica Allumino e Leghe F.E.A.L. S.p.A.Prefabricated room structure for facilities in general such as toilets, baths, kitchens and the like
US4332681 *Apr 28, 1980Jun 1, 1982Jambry Jean FrancoisJunction and connection terminal for the service of fixed or mobile premises in particular for the supply of a sanitary unit which may be itself attached to a caravan or a camping-car
US4364206 *Dec 5, 1979Dec 21, 1982Jacques WybauwPrefabricated building units for constructing building, and buildings whose fabric comprises assembled units of this kind
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/321, 52/79.5, 206/223, 52/79.7, 52/34
International ClassificationE04G21/14, E03C1/01, E04B1/348, E03C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/01, E04G21/14, E04B1/34869
European ClassificationE04B1/348D, E03C1/01, E04G21/14