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Publication numberUS3727796 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1973
Filing dateMar 17, 1972
Priority dateAug 18, 1969
Publication numberUS 3727796 A, US 3727796A, US-A-3727796, US3727796 A, US3727796A
InventorsE Young
Original AssigneeSun Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motor fuel dispensing apparatus
US 3727796 A
Abstract
An apparatus for dispensing a selected grade of motor fuel (each grade having a different octane rating) has an array of operating pushbuttons a selected one of which may be actuated (the selection being made according to the grade of fuel desired) to start the dispensing operation. Upon the actuation of a pushbutton, certain instrumentalities in the apparatus are energized or released to (among other things) select gearing in the apparatus appropriate to the grade selected, reset the counter or register to zero, set a control valve to a predetermined position, and start up the pump to cause the dispensing of fuel to begin. All of these functions are performed automatically, i.e., without any further human intervention, once the pushbutton has been actuated. Upon the termination of the actual dispensing, electrical instrumentalities are automatically activated to carry out certain resetting operations, prior to the next dispensing operation. The dispensing apparatus is particularly suitable for a self-service type of operation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Young Apr. 17, 1973 [5 1 MOTOR FUEL DISPENSING APPARATUS [75] Inventor: Einar T. Young, Newtown Square,

[73] Assignee: Sun Oil Company of Pennsylvania,

Philadelphia, Pa.

221 Filed: Mar. 17,1972

[21] Appl. No.: 235,702

Related us. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No. 85,612, Oct. 30, 1970, Pat. No'. 3,705,596, which is a division of Ser. No. 850,901, Aug. I8, 1969, Pat. No. 3,587,337.

52] US. Cl. ..222/26 [51] Int. Cl. .1. ..G01f 1/04 [58] Field of Search ..222/20, 17, 14, 25, 222/26, 135, 144.5

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 4/1963 Bliss et a1 ..222/17 X Primary Examiner-Stanley l-l. Tollberg Attorney-George L. Church et al.

[57] ABSTRACT An apparatus for dispensing a selected grade of motor fuel (each grade having a different octane rating) has an array of operating pushbuttons a selected one of which may be actuated (the selection being made according to the grade of fuel desired) to start the dispensing operation. Upon the actuation of a pushbutton, certain instrumentalities in the apparatus are energized or released to (among other things) select gearing in the apparatus appropriate to the grade selected, reset the counter or register to zero, set a control valve to a predetermined position, and start up the pump to cause the dispensing of fuel to begin. All of these functions are performed automatically, i.e., without any further human intervention, once the pushbutton has been actuated. Upon the termination of the actual dispensing, electrical instrumentalities are automatically activated to carry out certain resetting operations, prior to the next dispensing operation. The dispensing apparatus is particularl suitable for a self-service type of operation.

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SHEET 3 [1F 8 FIGS.

PAIENTEDAPRI 7191a SHEET S [If 8 FIG] I PATENTED APR 1 7 I971 SHEET 7 [IF 8 FIGQ.

4 IIIIIIIIIIII.

' PATENTEDAPRHIHH 3.727. 796

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MOTOR FUEL DISPENSING APPARATUS This application is a division of application Ser. No. 85,612, filed Oct. 30, 1970, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,705,596, which is in turn a division of US. Pat. No. 3,587,337, filed Aug. 18, 1969 as Ser. No. 850,901.

This application relates to motor fuel dispensing apparatus, and more particularly to dispensing apparatus of the so-called multigrade type, wherein a plurality of different grades of fuel (each having a different octane rating) are selectively dispensed by a single apparatus. These various grades are provided by various blends of two fuel components of different octane ratings, and in addition by solely one component and solely the other component. Thus, the number of grades usually is two greater than the number of blends."

A typical example of a multigrade motor fuel dispensing apparatus according to the prior art is described in my US. Pat. No. 2,880,908, referred to hereinafter as the 908 patent. Dispensing apparatus built according to the teachings of the 908 patent is now being used to a considerable extent in gasoline marketing operations, in service stations. However, such apparatus, while easily manipulatable for the dispensing of motor fuel by a trained service station attendant, is too complicated for a self-service or unattended type of dispensing operation, that is, for an operation wherein the customer operates the dispensing apparatus himself, for his own motor vehicle. To particularize, in the prior dispensing apparatus all of the control operations, such as fuel grade selection, resetting of the counter or register to zero, and turning the pump motor or motors on and off, must be performed manually through the actuation of various knobs or handles, some of which require considerable physical force to actuate. For fuel grade selection, one handle must be actuated and held in this actuated position while a separate knob is rotated, all while watching an indicator. A separate control lever must be actuated to effect a resetting of the counter or register, while still another handle, which calls for considerable physical force to actuate, must be rotated in one direction to turn the pump motor or motors on and in the opposite direction to turn the pump motor or motors off. In addition, the prior dispensing apparatus includes a manually-operated nozzle valve which must be opened in order to begin the actual dispensing.

The rather complicated control operations which are required for the prior dispensing apparatus render it unsuitable for a self-service type of operation. Therefore, a fuel dispensing apparatus which is much simpler to operate would be very desirable, since there is now a trend toward self-service in the industry. In addition to its use for self-service, such a simplified apparatus would be highly beneficial even for attended operation.

An object of this invention is to provide a novel motor fuel dispensing apparatus.

Another object is to provide a novel motor fuel dispensing apparatus of the multigrade" type.

A further object is to provide a multigrade motor fuel dispensing apparatus which is simple and convenient to manipulate.

A still further object is to provide a multigrade" motor fuel dispensing apparatus wherein an electric motor is employed to carry out certain resetting and adjustment actions required for each dispensing operation, thereby reducing to a substantial extent the manual, physical manipulative force utilized as compared to that utilized with prior apparatus.

Still another object is to provide an automated multigrade motor fuel dispensing apparatus which operates to carry out the dispensing completely automatically, once a single (combined) grade selection and start" manipulation has been performed.

The objects of this invention are accomplished, briefly, in the following manner: An array of pushbuttons is provided on each side of the housing of a mul tigrade motor fuel dispensing apparatus, one pushbutton for each grade to be dispensed. These pushbuttons carry individual gearing for mechanically positioning a shaft, and also actuating means which causes closure of a pair of electrical contacts when any one of the pushbuttons is actuated. If the dispensing nozzle has been properly positioned in the fillpipe of the motor vehicle fuel tank, the closure of the contacts results in the energization of a reset motor and also of a solenoid which are included in the dispensing apparatus. These two electrical instrumentalities, when energized, effect an adjustment of selective gearing in the apparatus appropriate to the grade of motor fuel selected for dispensing, in accordance with the position of the pushbutton-operated shaft, as well as an adjustment of a blend control valve in the apparatus to an appropriate position, and cause the pushbutton which has been actuated to be mechanically locked in, and reset the counter or register to zero. After the adjustments and resetting have been completed, the motor brings about energization of a relay which energizes the pump motor and starts the dispensing of the selected grade of motor fuel, and then shuts itself off.

When the dispensing operation is finished, the pump motor relay is almost immediately deenergized (terminating the dispensing), and the reset motor is automatically reenergized and the solenoid is deenergized, thereby to operate the blend control valve to an OFF" position, and then to reset the various mechanically-adjustable items to their initial positions.

A detailed description of the invention follows, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating the liquid and mechanical connection involved in a preferred form of dispensing apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation, partly in section and with certain parts broken away, of the dispensing apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a sectional plan view of the apparatus, as viewed along line 33 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3, but taken along line 44 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating electrical circuitry employed in the apparatus;

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic illustration of the operation of certain cam-operated switches;

FIG. 7 is a horizontal section, somewhat schematic, through the blend control portion of the apparatus;

FIG. 8 is a cross-section through a portion 'of the dispensing apparatus, taken along line 8 -8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a bottom view of the blend control portion of the apparatus, as viewed along line 9-9 of FIG. 2;

FIG. is a vertical section of the apparatus, taken along line 1010 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 11 is a side elevation, partly in section, of the lower portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2, but illustrating another position of the mechanism;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view taken along line 12'l2 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a vertical section taken on line 13-l3 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary section, showing certain of the parts of FIG. 13 in a different position;

FIG. is a view similar to FIG. 14, but illustrating still another position;

FIG. 16 is a section of a portion of the apparatus taken on line 1616 of FIG. 10, and drawn on an enlarged scale; and

FIG. 17 is a diagram illustrating remote circuitry which can be used with the apparatus of the invention.

A brief description of the overall operation of the dispensing apparatus will first be-given, referring to FIG. 1. In this figure, liquid connections between various elements are indicated by double lines (as pipes), mechanical connections utilized during the resetting and adjustment cycles are indicated by single dotted lines, while mechanical connection utilized during the actual dispensing operation are indicated by single solid lines. In this connection, it is noted that throughout the present description, the various resetting and adjustment operations that take place immediately prior to an actual dispensing operation will be referred to as constituting an ON" cycle, while those resetting operations that take place after the conclusion of a dispensing operation (and prior'to the start of a following ON cycle) will be referred to as constituting an OFF cycle.

In FIG. 1, the apparatus housing indicated as 1 may be more or less conventional, locked against unauthorized access, and provided with windows and various operating devices (such as pushbuttons) accessible from the outside of the housing, as will hereafter appear. Where an apparatus generally is referred to hereinafter, it will be understood that it is this housing and the parts contained therein and associated therewith, though in' some cases (as will hereinafter appear) there may be a remote unit associated with the apparatus. Included in the dispensing apparatus is a lo gasoline pump 2 driven during dispensing by a pump motor 3 (for example, by means of a belt drive) and provided with an inlet connection 4 from a supply (storage) tank containing a lo 01' relatively low-octane gasoline (fuel) component. As usual, a bypass 5 is provided containing a relief valve 6 to bypass the pump in the event that a blend control valve is closed. The lo gasoline to be dispensed flows through connection 7 and a conventional lo" meter 8 and thence through the pipe connection incorporating a check valve 10.

A pump 1'] for the hi gasoline draws its supply of hi gasoline (a high-octane fuel or gasoline component) from a storage tank through pipe connection 12. This pump 11 may be'of the same type as the lo pump 2 and is preferably driven by the same motor 3. Associated with it is a bypass l3 incorporating a relief valve 14.

The hi" gasoline pump 1 1 delivers the hi gasoline through line 15 to the hi meter 16 which may be of the type serving to meter the lo gasoline. Delivery from the meter 16 takes place through piping 17 which includes the check valve 18.

The lo and hi gasolines delivered, respectively, through lines 9 and 17, are respectively controlled by the 10 and hi" sections of a blend control valve 19, to be further described hereinafter. The 10 and hi gasolines, as controlled by the 10 and hi sections of the valve 19, are delivered through conduits 20 and 21, which are connected to passages through a hose to a nozzle, such as the nozzle disclosed in FIGS. 7 and 8 of my US. Pat. No. 3,590,890, referred to hereinafter as the 890 patent. The hose passages are maintained separate, communicating with each other closely adjacent to the nozzle itself, so that admixture of the two components cannot taken place to any substantial degree so as to markedly change the composition dispensed. As disclosed inmy 890 patent, if, but only if, the nozzle is properly inserted into the fillpipe of a motor vehicle fuel tank, electrical continuity is provided by the fillpipe between a pair of spaced electrodes mounted on the nozzle, thus completing a conducting path between such electrodes, one of which is grounded. This conducting path will be further referred to hereinafter.

As disclosed in my '890 patent, a triple-conduit hose combination connects housing 1 to the nozzle mentioned. The third conduit 22 of this combination (being in addition to the conduits 20 and 21) is utilized, during dispensing, for abstracting air and vapor from the fuel tank into which the nozzle is inserted. The housing end of the vapor conduit or hose 22 is connected to a vacuum pump 23 by way of a tee fitting 24. The vacuum pump 23 is driven (as by way of a belt drive) during the actual dispensing by the pump motor 3, along with pumps 2 and 11. A vacuum switch 25 is also connected to the tee 24, so asto be responsive to the pressure in conduit 22. This vacuum switch, as disclosed in my 890 patent, includes a pair of electrical contacts which are opened in response to a full condition of the motor vehicle fuel tank. These contacts will be further referred to subsequently. These contacts are mechanically held closed during a portion of the ON" resetting and adjustment cycle, until the actual dispensing gets well under way, by means of a cam arrangement schematically indicated at 26 and described in detail hereinafter. This cam arrangement is also referred to in my 890 patent. It has been stated previously that the vacuum pump 23 is used to abstract air and vapor from the fuel tank. (This pump also in a sense forms a portion of the automatic shutoff for a full" fuel tank, since it establishes the pressure in conduit 22, to which vacuum switch 25 is responsive.) The air and vapor (which together may be thought of as tank vapors) discharged from vacuum pump 23 is preferably conducted (by means of one or more pipes, not shown) back to the underground storage tanks (from which tanks connections are made at 4 and 12, respectively, to pumps 2 and 11).

The lo meter 8 provides one input 27 to adifferential 28, the other input to which is provided at.29 from the hi" meter 16. The output of the summingtype differential 28 at 30 represents the sum of the two quantities delivered by the two meters 8 and'16, and operates the total gallons portion of the gallons and cost counter or register 31. This said portion of the counter 31 is arranged to indicate the total gallons dispensed during anoperation, through a suitable window arrangement in the apparatus housing 1.

A second output from the differential 28, also corresponding to total gallons, is delivered at 32 to a variator 33 in which is set the price per gallon ascribed to the lo gasoline. The setting of this variator may be changed by a manual operation from time to time, whenever the price of the lo gasoline changes; this setting is changed only by an authorized person, upon proper access to the interior of housing 1. This price setting is automatically exhibited through a window in the housing 1. The output 34 of variator 33 represents the total gallons of both lo and hi gasolines multiplied by the price of the gasoline.

A third output from the differential 28, also corresponding to total gallons, is provided at 35 to a price increment unit (termed selective gearing in my 908 patent) indicted at 36, from which there is provided an output 37. The price increment unit 36 just mentioned is reset (i.e., adjusted) during each ON resetting and adjustment cycle concurrently with, and in dependence upon, the adjustment for control of the grade of fuel to be dispensed. The mechanical arrangement whereby this resetting is effected is indicated schematically at 38, and will be further referred to hereinafter. As described in detail in my 908 patent, the price increment unit 36 effects the multiplication of the total gallons dispensed (at 35) by an amount according to the excess (or increment) of the price per gallon of a grade being dispensed over the price per gallon ascribed to the lo gasoline. The output from the price increment unit delivered at 37 provides an input to a summingtype differential 39, the other input to which is 34, the differential providing its output at 40 to the total cost portion of the gallons and cost register 31. This portion of the register 31 is arraNged to exhibit through a window in the apparatus housing 1 the total cost of the gasoline dispensed.

Another output at 41 from the lo meter 8 provides an input to a 10" gear box 42, while a corresponding output at 43 from the hi meter 16 provides an input to a hi gear box 44. The gear boxes 42 and 44 are reset (i.e., adjusted) during each ON resetting and adjustment cycle to adjust the control of the grade of fuel to be dispensed. The mechanical arrangement whereby the lo gear box 42 is adjusted is indicated schematically at 45, while the mechanical arrangement whereby the hi gear box 44 is adjusted is indicated schematically at 46. The 10 and hi gear boxes may together be thought of as comprising a blend control unit.

The outputs of the lo and hi" gear boxes at 47 and 48 drive a subtractive differential 49, the output of which at 50 controls concurrently the relative positions of the 10 and hi sections of the blend control valve 19. For example, this control may be effected by means of a pair of shafts which are operated simultaneously to control valve shoes in the 10 and hi sections of valve 19, as will be described hereinafter. In brief, with particular settings of the 10 gear box 42 and the hi" gear box 44, if the meters 8 and 16 indicate a proper ratio of deliveries of lo and hi gasolines, the output at 50 is zero and does not affect the settings of the valve shoes in the two portions of valve 19. On the other hand, if this correspondence does not exist, an output at 50 adjusts the valve shoes to control the composition of the delivered blend. At this juncture, it is desired to be pointed out that for the dispensing of solely the lo gasoline or solely the hi" gasoline, the gear boxes 42 and 44 and the differential 49 are in effect rendered inoperative and thus out of the picture. For the dispensing of the lo or hi" components separately, the blend control valve 19 is mechanically placed in a predetermined corresponding position and is positively maintained in such position during the dispensing operation. This will all be described in somewhat more detail hereinafter.

Also operating on the shoes of valve 19 are two mechanical arrangements indicated schematically at 51 and 52. The arrangement 51 is operated by a solenoid 53 and functions to bring the valve 19 to an open position at the beginning of a dispensing cycle and to bring this valve to a closed position at the end of the actual dispensing operation; this arrangement will be described more in detail hereinafter. The arrangement 52 is controlled by a reset motor 54 during the ON and OFF resetting cycles and functions to bring the valve 19 to certain predetermined positions; this arrangement will also be described in detail hereinafter.

The reset motor 54 also controls the mechanical arrangements 26, 38, 45, and 46 previously referred to, and also operates to reset the number wheels of the register 31 to zero during the ON resetting cycle, through a mechanical arrangementindicated schematically at 55. In addition, the motor 54 operates a group of cam-operated switches 56 through a mechanical arrangement indicated schematically at 57. All of these mechanical arrangements will be described in detail hereinafter.

Refer now to FIGS. 2-4. A vertically-extending array or column of operating or grade selecting pushbuttons 58-65, which for convenience may be termed start buttons, is provided at one side of the apparatus housing, in the upper portion thereof, these buttons extending through respective holes in a suitable escutcheon plate (not shown) and thus being accessible for operation from the exterior of the housing. A duplicate array of pushbuttons 58'-65 is provided at the opposite side of the housing, so that the dispensing apparatus may be operated or started from either side. The last-mentioned pushbuttons are located directly opposite (across the housing) to the respective start buttons 58-65. The apparatus housing is generally frustopyramidal in configuration, so the arrays of pushbuttons 58-65 and 58'-65, viewed from the side thereof as in FIG. 2, slope inwardly from bottom to top, as shown.

The start buttons 58-65 and 58-65', being arranged for grade selection, each correspond in number to the number of grades of motor fuel which the dispensing apparatus is capable of dispensing, there being one button (on each side of the housing) for each respective grade of fuel. Assume, for purposes of illustration, that the dispensing apparatus is capable of dispensing any one of eight grades of motor fuel; thus, there are eight start" buttons 58-65 on one side of the hosing, and eight start buttons 58'-65' on the opposite side of the housing. Each of these buttons carries, on its outer end, individual indicia (such as an arbitrarily-assigned number) corresponding to a respective grade of motor fuel. By way of example only, these numbers may be respectively as follows, beginning with button 58 and proceeding in order to button 65: 190, 200, 210, 220, 230, 240, 250, and 260. Button 58 may correspond to solely lo gasoline, and button 65 to solely hi" gasoline, the remaining buttons corresponding to blends oflo and hi gasolines.

Each of the start buttons 58-65 is mounted for individual sliding movement in a direction inwardly and outwardly of the apparatus housing, by means of an individual shank such as 66 (FIG. 3) secured to each respective pushbutton. The inner end of each shank is slidably mounted in a respective aperture provided in the base of a channel-shaped support 67 secured to the apparatus housing and extending somewhat vertically, parallel to the array of pushbuttons. Each start button is biased outwardly by a separate coiled spring such as 79 which surrounds the respective shank 66, one end of the spring bearing against the base of support 67 and the other end thereof bearing against the inner end of the respective pushbutton.

The shank of each of the pushbuttons 58-65 carries linear or rack-like gear teeth such as illustrated at 68 (FIG. 3). Each of these pushbutton shanks has a different number of teeth, as follows: pushbutton 58, eight teeth; pushbutton 59, seven teeth; pushbutton 60, six teeth; pushbutton 61, five teeth; pushbutton 62, four teeth; pushbutton 63, three teeth; pushbutton 64, two teeth; pushbutton 65, one tooth.

It is again pointed out that all of. the structure so far described (at one side of the housing) is duplicated at the opposite side of the housing. There is a pushbutton (in the array 58'65' at the opposite side of the housing) exactly cor'responding to each respective one of the pushbuttons 58-65, and the former carry rack-like teeth corresponding to those carried by the latter, the least number of teeth being carried by the upper most pushbutton 65 and the greatest number of teeth being carried by the lowermost pushbutton 58. The duplicated structure at theopposite side of the housing is denoted by the housing same reference numerals but carrying prime designations.

A shaft 69, the axis of which extends more or less vertically and parallel to the support 67, is journaled for rotation in a pair of fixedbearings 70 secured to the base of support 67. Fixedly secured to shaft 69 are eight sector gears 71 (one for each of thepushbuttons 58-65) which are all exactly alike (they may each have ten teeth, for example) and which are adapted to mesh with the rack-like gear teeth carried by the respective pushbuttons. Each of the sector gears 71 is so located as to mesh with a corresponding one of the pushbuttoncarried rack gears, when such pushbutton is pushed inwardly. To make this possible, the axis of shaft 69 is laterally offset from the centerlin'es of the pushbutton shanks (see FIG. 3) Since the number of teeth carried by each of the pushbuttons is different, when a certain one of the buttons 58-65 is depressed, the shaft 69 will be gear-driventhrough an angle depending upon and uniquely determined by which one of these buttons is so depressed or actuated.

A similar shaft 69 is journaled for rotation at the opposite side of the housing, in bearings 70. This latter shaft carries eight sector gears 71' which are exactly like gears 71 and which are adapted to mesh with the rack-like gear teeth carried by the respective pushbuttons 58'65' at this opposite side of the housing. When a certain one of the start buttons 58'-65' is depressed, the shaft 69 will be gear-driven through an angle depending upon and uniquely determined by which one of these latter buttons is so depressed or actuated. The gear ratios between the shaft 69 and the array of start pushbuttons 58'-65 at the corresponding side of the housing are exactly similar to those between the shaft 69 and the array of start" buttons 58-65. Thus, when a particular one of the start buttons 58'65' is depressed, the shaft 69' will be rotated through a certain angle which is exactly the same as the angle through which shaft 69 is rotated when the matching pushbutton on the first-mentioned side of the housing is depressed.

In order :to lock the shafts 69 and 69' together, a crank plate 72 (see FIG. 4) is pinned at one endto the upper end of shaft 69', and a crank plate 73 is pinned centrally to the upper end of shaft 69;. A rigid link member 74 is pivotally secured at one end to the other end of crank 72, and is pivotally secured at its other end to one of the ends of crank 73. It may be seen that the link and crank arrangement just described positively locks the two shafts 69 and 6' together. A coiled spring 75, one end of which is attached to link 74 and the other end of which is attached to crank 73, tends to return the crank 73 to the OFF position illustrated in FIG. 4.

The end of crank 73 opposite to link 74 has therein a plurality of holes 76 equal in number to the number of grades of motor fuel to be dispensed (in accordance with what has been previously stated, eight holes are illustrated), these holes being equally spaced along the circumference of a circle centered on the axis of shaft 69. A thin locking plate 77, slightly flexible in the direction of its thickness, which carries an upstanding pin 78 at one end thereof, is secured at its opposite end to the side of support 67 in such'a position that the pin 78 can enter any one of the holes 76. Plate 77 is positioned below crank 73 and is arranged so that in its released position the pin 78 will enter one of the holes 76 (if such hole has been rotated into vertical alignment with this pin). Plate 77 is normally (which is to say, in the OFF" position, between dispensing operations) held downwardly (in such a position that the crank 73 can rotate freely thereabove, without interference by pin 78) by a downwardly-depending pin attached to one end extension 80 of a somewhat T- shaped pivoted arm 81 which will be further referred to hereinafter. Arm 81 is rotatably mounted on a fixed pivot pin 224.

As previously described, when one of the start buttons 58-65 is actuated, the shaft 69 (and also, incidentally, the shaft 69, through link 74) will be rotated to an angular position which depends on the particular button actuated. Of course, if one of the buttons 58'-65' is actuated, shaft 69 is caused to rotate through the operation of shaft 69 and link 74. As shaft 69 rotates, the crank 73 pinned thereto also rotates (in the counterclockwise direction in FIG. 4), bringing one of the holes 76 into vertical alignment with pin 78. The particular hole 76 which is brought into alignment with pin 78 will depend on the amount of angular rotation of shaft 69. When the pushbutton being actuated has reached the limit of its travel (bringing shaft 69 to the appropriate angular position), the solenoid 53 (see FIG. 2) is energized, as will be subsequently described. Solenoid 53 is mounted above the apparatus housing 1 in a suitable manner, and the plunger of this solenoid is pivotally attached to the upper end of a rigid link member 225 which extends through an aperture into the housing, the lower end of link 225 being pivotally attached at 226 to the end of arm 81 adjacent extension 80. When solenoid 53 is energized, link member 225 moves vertically upwardly from the position shown. This causes the end extension 80 of arm 81 to move upwardly, away from plate 77. This action releases plate 77 so that its pin 78 enters the particular one of holes 76 which is then vertically aligned therewith. Since the plate 77 is rigid in the direction of its length, this provides a locking effect, which mechanically locks the shaft 69 in its rotated or adjusted (ON) angular posi-- tion. Therefore, that one of the sector gears 71 (or 71) which is then in mesh with the rack teeth of the actuated pushbutton holds such pushbutton in the depressed or actuated position during the dispensing operation, even though this pushbutton has been manually released after being manually actuated. This arrangement provides a mechanical lock, which locks in" the particular pushbutton which has been actuated, during the dispensing operation which occurs upon its actuation.

At the conclusion of the dispensing operation, as will be described, solenoid 53 is deenergized, which allows the end extension 80 of arm 81 to be pulled downwardly by a spring (hereafter described), along with the link 225, causing plate 77 to be pushed downwardly and its pin 78 to be pushed out of the hole 76 into which it had previously entered. Crank 73 and shafts 69 and 69' then return to the OFF" position illustrated in FIG. 4 under the urging of spring 75, and the actuated pushbutton is released for return to its outward or unactuated position, under the urging of its respective spring 79.

A stop plate 82, seen in face view in FIG. 3, is fixedly secured to the lower end of shaft 69, so as to rotate therewith. Plate 82 has a plurality of stepped projections 83 on its outer periphery, equal in number to the number of grades of motor fuel to be dispensed (in our example, this would be eight), providing eight abutments on the periphery of this plate which are located at different radial distances from the axis of shaft 69, these radial distances constituting a stepped or orderly progression (in a clockwise direction in FIG. 3) from the minimum radial distance (corresponding to start" button 65) to the maximum radial distance (corresponding to start" button 58). In this connection, it may be noted that buttons 65 and 65 stand for solely the hi gasoline, buttons 58 and 58' stand for solely the gasoline, while the intermediate buttons stand for different blends of the lo and hi gasolines or gasoline components. The array of pushbuttons is orderly, with buttons 64 and 64 denoting the highest-octane one of the six blends, and buttons 59 and 59' the the lowest-octane one of the six blends. Since buttons 58 and 58' carry eight teeth, while buttons 65 and 65' carry one tooth, it may be noted that the actuation of one of the former causes a maximum angular rotation of shaft 69 and of stop plate 82, from the position illustrated in FIG. 3, while the actuation of one of the latter causes a minimum angular rotation of stop plate 82, from this same position. The rotation of shaft 69 (or shaft 69') to an angular position determined by the particular pushbutton which is depressed, brings stop plate 82 to a corresponding angular position, such that a particular one of the projections 83 is brought to a position wherein it can control or govern the amount of angular rotation of a cooperating member 114 which will be described hereinafter.

A resilient, U-shaped contact member 84, insulated from ground" or the metallic elements such as support 67, and a similar insulated contact member 84' are each insulatingly mounted within a respective one of the channel-shaped supports 67 and 67, as by means of a bolt 85 which extends through the member 84, through a washer 86 of electrical insulating material, through an enlarged hole in the support, and through another washer 87 of electrical insulating material on the outside of the support. A common electrical connection is made to the bolts 85, the two bolts 85 being directly connected together. The contact member 84, and the duplicate contact member 84' on the opposite side of the housing, are positioned within the respective supports 67 and 67 as illustrated in FIG. 3, and are arranged to be engaged respectively by grounded U- shaped bars 88 or 88'. Each of these bars extends for most of the length of supports 67 and 67, so that they will cooperate with all pushbuttons in the respective supports. That is to say, when any one of the pushbuttons is depressed the grounded bar on that side is caused to come into contact with the insulated contact member on the same side of the housing. This will result in the grounding of the corresponding insulated contact member. Each foot 89 and 89' of the U-shaped bar 88 or 88 is flexibly attached as by a bolted hingelike strap to the respective support such as 67 As the pushbutton is depressed or actuated, its base comes into engagement with the bar 88 or 88' and-swings this bar inwardly to bring it into contact with the appropriate insulated contact member 84 or 84', thus grounding this insulated contact. The arrangement is such that the contact between members 88 or 88' and 84 or 84 is made subsequently to the actuation of shaft 69 or 69' by the actuated pushbutton, and just prior to the reaching of the extreme limit of travel (inwardly) by the pushbutton. Thus, each time a pushbutton is actuated, one or the other of the two insulated contacts 84 or 84' (one of which contacts is at each respective side of the-apparatus housing) is grounded.

Refer now to the circuit diagram of FIG. 5. A lowvoltage alternating current (25 volts, for example), is supplied to a pair of buses 91 and 92 by means of a stepdown transformer 93 whose primary is connected to the a.c. supply terminals 94 and 94 (these terminals comprising one 1 l5-volt side of a three-wire a.c. supply, terminal 94 being one line" terminal, terminal 94' being a neutral terminal, and terminal 94" being the other line terminal) through a cam-operated switch 95 which is closed prior to the start of each dispensing operation, and is so illustrated. It may be noted here that the cam operator for switch 95 is driven mechanically by the reset motor 54.

The nozzle associated with the dispensing apparatus (and to which the hose or conduits -22, FIG. 1, are connected) carries a pair of spaced electrodes 96 and 97, as disclosed in my 890 patent. As described in my 890 patent, one of these electrodes is insulated from ground; this electrode 96 is connected to bus 91. The other electrode 97 is grounded, and when the nozzle is properly inserted into the fillpipe of a motor vehicle fuel tank, the metal fillpipe schematically illustrated at 98 forms a conducting path between the electrodes 96 and 97, all as described in my '890 patent. It will be assumed that the nozzle has been properly positioned in the fillpipe prior to the actuation of one of the start buttons, so that electrode 96 is connected electrically to the grounded electrode 97.

The contact 99 represents bar 88 on one side of the apparatus housing, while the contact 100 represents bar 88' on the opposite side of the housing. As previously described, when any one of the buttons is actuated, either the insulated contact 84 or the insulated contact 84' is grounded. These insulated contacts (by way of bolts 85) are connected together as at 188 and through the closed contacts of a pair of emergency stop switches (panic buttons) 101 and 102 (pushbutton, spring-biased, normally closed, push to open, these two switches being on respective opposite sides of the apparatus housing and being accessible from the outside of the housing) to one contact 103 of a vacuum-operated single-pole, single-throw switch 25. This latter switch may be constructed, for example, as disclosed in my 890 patent, and is mechanically caused to close by a cam (as will be described subsequently) prior to the beginning of each dispensing operation. It is therefore shown as closed in FIG. 5. It may be noted here that the cam just mentioned is driven mechanically by the reset motor 54.

The other contact 105 of switch is connected through a pair of resistors 106 and 107 and then through the operating winding of a relay 108 to the bus 92.

When one of the start buttons is actuated, it may be seen that a circuit is completed between buses 91 and 92 through the winding of relay 108 (provided, of course, that the dispensing nozzle has been properly positioned in the fillpipe). This energizes relay 108. The ac. supply terminal 94 is connected directly to the reset motor 54. When relay 108 is energized, a pair of relay contacts 109 are closed to connect the ac. terminal 94 to one of the movable contacts 110 of a single-pole, double-throw cam-operated switch 111. The cam operator for switch 111 is also driven mechanically by the reset motor 54, and the movable arm of this switch is closed on contact 110, as illustrated, prior to the beginning of each dispensing operation. Thus, when relay 108 is energized (in response to actuation of one of the start" buttons), a circuit is completed from the ac. supply terminals 94 and 94' to reset motor 54, energizing this motor.

The reset motor 54 is one of the electrical instrumentalities employed to bring about the ON resetting and adjustment cycle of the dispensing apparatus. Refer now to FIG. 6, which diagrammatically illustrates the mode of operation of various cam-operated switches (some in the group 56, FIG. 1) operated by the reset motor 54. The cams which operate these switches are mounted on a shaft driven by motor 54 through suitable gearing indicated at 57 in FIG. 1. The various arcs illustrated in FIG. 6, with respect to the center 112, represent the angles through which the cams actuate the switches, referred to the vertical line extending upwardly from center 112, which line represents the beginning of the ON resetting and adjustment cycle. This line is denoted by OFF, since it represents conditions at the end of the OFF cycle, as well as at the very beginning of the ON cycle. The entire figure represents one complete or 360 rotation of the shaft on which the cams are mounted.

The are indicated by A represents the operation of the switch 111. This switch is closed on its contact 110 (by a previous rotation of the camshaft) slightly prior to the reaching of the OFF position or upwardly-extending vertical line, and remains closed on this contact for about 25 more of the camshaft rotation; throughout the remainder of the 360 of camshaft rotation this switch is closed on its other contact 113. Thus, after about 25 of camshaft rotation from OFF (during the ON cycle) the contact 110 is opened and the motor energization circuit previously described is opened.

However, the motor 54 is maintained energized for substantially 180 of camshaft rotation (from OFF by means of a cam-operated switch 104 whose singlepole, single-throw contacts are connected directly in a series circuit with motor 54 across the a.c. supply terminals 94 and 94'. The are indicated by B represents the operation of switch 104. Switch 104 is closed by its cam-at about 8 after the beginning of the ON cycle (the ON cycle beginning at the upwardly-extending vertical line in FIG. 6, and proceeding in the direction of the clockwise arrow denoted by G), and remains closed throughout substantially all of the remainder of the 180 of the ON cycle, that is, substantially until the downwardly-extending vertical line designated ON in FIG. 6 is reached. This last-mentioned line represents the completion of the ON cycle, which coincides in'camshaft position, butnot in time, with the beginning of the following OFF cycle. Thus, the reset motor 54 is maintained energized (by switch 104) until the substantial completion of the ON cycle, even though the original energization circuit for this motor (through contact 110) is opened at about 25 of camshaft rotation following the beginning of the ON cycle. It may be mentioned here, in passing, that the arc B indicates that switch 104 is also closed throughout substantially all of the following OFF cycle; this will be further referred to later.

The arc denoted by D represents the operation of switch 95. Switch is closed by its cam (by a previous rotation of the camshaft)slightly prior to the reaching of the OFF position, and remains closed throughout the ON cycle, and also for a few degrees of rotation in the following OFF cycle.

The are denoted by E represents the operation of the cam which mechanically causes the contacts 103 and of vacuum switch 25 to close. The contacts of this vacuum switch are mechanically caused to close (by a previous rotation of the camshaft) slightly prior to the reaching of the OFF position, and are mechanically released just prior to the termination of the ON" cycle. The operation of other cam-operated switches depicted in FIG. 6 will be described hereinafter.

From the above, it may be seen that the reset motor 54, upon energization thereof in response to actuation of one of the start buttons 58-65 or 58'65' is maintained energized until it has caused rotation of the camshaft through substantially 180, then it is shut off or deenergized by the opening of switch 104 (see are B in FIG. 6). This motor is provided with a brake which causes its output shaft to stop rotating immediately upon deenergization of the motor. Thus, the motor is made to stop exactly when the camshaft has reached the position represented by the downwardly-extending vertical line designated ON in FIG. 6. This line denotes the completion of the ON cycle.

A positioning and adjusting member 114, which is somewhat disc-shaped when seen in end view as in FIG. 2, is pinned to the outer end of a shaft 115 which is suitably journaled for rotation in a fixed supporting plate 116 (FIG. 8). Along a portion of the edge thereof, and extending over say 80 of its circumference, member 114 has a plurality of stepped projections 117, equal in number to the number of grades of motor fuel to be dispensed (in the example, this would be eight), providing eight abutments along the periphery of member 114 which are located at different axial distances (measured parallel to the axis of shaft 115) from a reference plane transverse to the axis of shaft 115. That is to say, this portion of the edge of member 114 may be thought of as forming a stepped cylindrical wall. If it be assumed that the reference plane previously mentioned coincides with the extreme outer end of member 114 in FIG. 3, the axial distances of the stepped projections 117 from this reference plane constitute an orderly progression from the minimum axial distance (corresponding to solely the 10 gasoline component) to the maximum axial distance (corresponding to solely the hi gasoline component).

The axes of shafts 115 and 69 lie at substantially 90 to each other, and the projections 117 provided on member 114 are arranged to cooperate with the projections on stop plate 82 in such a manner that, when member 114 is free to rotate in the counterclockwise or ON" direction in FIG. 2, it will rotate to an angular position uniquely determined by the angular position to which stop plate 82 has been rotated by shaft 69. That is to say, member 114, when it is free to rotate in the counterclockwise direction in FIG. 2, will be caused to stop at a selected one of eight angular positions, the selection being made in dependence upon the particular one of the "start" buttons 58-65 or 58'-65 which has been actuated (and the consequent angular position of stop plate 82). A coiled tension spring 118, which is rather strong, provides the motive force for driving member 114 in the counterclockwise or ON" direction in FIG. 2. One end of this Spring is attached to an outstanding eccentric pin 119 secured to member 114, and the other end is attached to a pin 120 which also secures one end of a diag0nally-extending brace 121 to the support 67. The other end of brace 121 is secured to support 67. A similar diagonally-extending brace 121a is secured at its ends respectively to supports 67 and 67'. The braces 121 and 1210 together form an X-shaped configuration. Spring 118 acts to urge the member 114 to rotate in the counterclockwise or ON direction in FIG. 2, to move the projections 117 toward the stop plate 82.

Refer now to FIGS. 7-9, which illustrate the 10 and hi gear boxes 42 and 44, respectively, together with mechanical connections such as 45 and 46 for resetting the same, that is, for adjusting the same to various selected positions. These gear boxes constitute an essential part of the blend control unit or portion of the dispensing apparatus. The shaft coupling 41 (FIGS. 1 and 8) is driven through suitable gearing from the output of lo meter 8 and corresponds to gallons of 10" gasoline. A shaft 122, which may be integral with the shaft coupling 41, has secured thereto a cone gear 123. Similarly, the shaft coupling 43 (FIG. 1) is driven through suitable gearing from the output of hi meter 16 and corresponds to gallons of hi gasoline. A shaft 124 (FIG. 7), which may be integral with the shaft coupling 43, has secured thereto a cone gear 125. Since the lo" gear box 42 and the hi" gear box 44 are essentially similar, only the lo gear box will be described in detail, in connection with FIG. 8, reference being made to elements of the hi" gear box, when necessary, to complete the disclosure.

Each of the cone gears 123 and 125 comprises six spur gears arranged each in a separate level, for a total of six levels. The two cone gears 123 and 125 are identical, but they are disposed oppositely, that is, they are disposed in parallel but inverted relation with respect to each other. They are so disposed that the levels of the two gears are respectively aligned with each other, reference being made here to a horizontal alignment. By way of example, the numbers of teeth in the various levels of gear 123 are, reading from top to bottom in FIG. 8, as follows: eight teeth, 16 teeth, 24 teeth, 32 teeth, 40 teeth, and 48 teeth.

The shafts 122 and 124 are journaled for rotation by bearings provided in the supporting plate 116 and in a lower supporting plate 126. A rocker shaft 127 is journaled forrotation at its upper and lower ends, respectively, in plates 1 16 and 126. Rotatably carried by shaft 127 are six vertically-arranged pairs of mounting plates 128 (one pair of plates for each of the levels of cone 'gear 123), of more or less triangular shape seen in plan as in FIG. 7, these plates being carried by shaft 127 adjacent one of the three vertices of the triangle. Each pair of plates 128 carries, adjacent another of its three vertices, a respective idler gear 129, one such gear for each of the levels of cone gear 123. Each of the idler gears is journaled for rotation in suitable bearings provided in the two individual plates of its respective pair of plates 128. All of the idler gears 129 are identical, and each is adapted to be swung into and out of mesh with its corresponding spur gear (or level) of cone gear 123.

A separate banjo-shaped member 130 is positioned between each respective pair of plates 128, the large end of each of these members 130 being pinned to shaft 127. A fixed pin 131, whose two ends are fixed in the respective plates 128, is mounted between each respective pair of plates 128, in such a location as tobe en-. gaged by one side of the straight or neck portion of the respective banjo member 130. A wishbone-shaped spring 132 is positioned between each respective pair of plates 128, one end portion of this spring engaging the neck" of the banjo member 130, on the opposite side thereof from pin 131, and the other end portion of this spring being wrapped around a respective fixed pin 133 (similar to pin 131) whose two ends are fixed in the respective plates 128. Pin 131 is located near one side of its (somewhat triangular) respective plates 128, while pin 133 is located near another side of its respective plates 128.

In the hi gear box, the elements 127133 previously described are duplicated, being denoted in this latter gear box by the same reference numerals but carrying prime designations. Each of the idler gears 129' in the hi gear box is adapted to mesh with a corresponding spur gear (or level) of cone gear 125.

The elements 127-128 and 130-133 together comprise a gear throw-out, by operation of which the idler gears 129 may be brought into and out of mesh with cone gear 123 and pinion gear 134. Elements 127-128 and 130'133' comprise a similar gear throw-out for the hi gear box, by operation of which the idler gears 129' may be brought into and out of mesh with cone gear 125 and pinion gear 134. For convenience of illustration only, in FIG. 7 a lo idler gear 129 is shown out of mesh with cone gear 123 and pinion gear 134, while a hi" idler gear129 is shown in mesh with cone gear 125 and pinion gear 134'; it is desired to be pointed out, however, that these conditions will never occur in actual practice during dispensing, which is to say that in actual practice, either both, or neither, of (a selected one of) the idler gears 129 and 129' will be in mesh with the respective cone and pinion gears, during dispensing.

Each idler gear 129 in the lo" gear box, in addition to meshing with its corresponding one of the individual gears in cone gear 123, is adapted to mesh with an elongated pinion gear 134 (having a vertical length about equal to the combined vertical lengths of the six levels of cone gear 123) which is pinned to a shaft 135 journaled for rotation in plates 116 and 126. Each idler gear 129 in the hi gear box, in addition to meshing with its corresponding one of the individual gears in cone gear 125, is adapted to mesh with a similar pinion gear 134' which is pinned to a shaft 135'.

The shafts 135 and 135 constitute the mechanical connections 47 and 48, respectively (FIG. 1), which couple the outputs of gear boxes 42 and 44, respectively, to the subtractive differential 49. This subtractive differential is preferably constructed and arranged as disclosed in my U.S. patent No. 2,977,970, referred to hereinafter as the 970 patent. This subtractive differential will not be described in detail herein, since it is fully and completely disclosed in my '970 patent. The principle of operation, however, may be described as follows. The gear box 42 may be thought of as including cone gear 123, a selected one of the idler gears 129, and pinion 134, while the hi gear box 44 may be thought of as including cone gear 125, a selected one of the idler gears 129', and pinion 134. The settings of the gear boxes 42 and 44 (i.e., the particular levels of the gear cones with which the corresponding idler gears are in mesh) determine the relative flows which would be required to maintain at zero the output 50 of differential 49 to hold the two sections of valve 19 in fixed relative position. If the rate of flow of hi gasoline relative to lo gasoline (assuming that a mixture or blend of liquids is being dispensed) exceeds the predetermined ratio, the differential 49 will have an output of such direction as to move the valve shoe in the hi section of valve 19 toward closed position and the valve shoe in the lo section of valve 19 toward open position. The result is readjustment of the individual flows to a ratio predetermined by the gear box settings and resulting in zero output from differential 49. If the lo flow is in excess, a reverse output from the differential 49 occurs, resulting in correction of the ratio of the flows.

The output 50 of the subtractive differential 49 is provided in an output gear 137 which meshes with a sector gear 138 carried by one end of a rigid lever 138 pivotally mounted at 140 to the frame and having a dog configuration 141 at the other end of the lever. The dog 141, moving back and forth (about pivot 140) as the output of differential 49 varies from zero, effects a mechanical control adjustment of the blend control valve 19, as will appear hereinafter.

It is here noted that all of the foregoing description of the operation of differential 49 has assumed that a mixture of liquids is being dispensed, which means that a selected one of the idler gears 129 is in mesh with a corresponding spur gear (in a particular level) of the cone gear 123, and a selected one of the idler gears 129 is in mesh with a corresponding spur gear (in the same level) of the cone gear 125. For the dispensing of either hi or 10 gasoline, alone, the differential 49 is in effect inoperative, as will hereinafter appear.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 10, reset motor 54 (illustrated schematically in FIG. 10) is mounted on top of the apparatus housing 1. This motor, when energized in the manner previously described, drives, through a small gear 142 pinned to its output shaft, a larger gear 143 which is secured to a camshaft 144 to be later described. Gear 143,'in turn, drives a gear 145 (having the same number of teeth as gear 143) which is located inside the apparatus housing. Gear 145 is pinned to one end of a stub shaft 146 which may be thought of as a motor-driven shaft. The hub end of a crank 147 is pinned to the other end of the motor-driven shaft 146, and a crank pin 148 at the radially-outer or eccentric end of crank 147 is pivotally connected to oneend of a rigid link member 149 which extends in a generally downward direction and whose opposite or lower end is pivotally connected to one outer end of a bifurcated plate 150. At its base, the plate 150 is attached to a stub shaft 151 which is pinned to a counter reset shaft (referred to hereinafter). The stub shaft 151 may be thought of hereinafter as itself comprising the counter reset shaft. Shaft 151 is journaled for rotation in the cross braces 121 and 121a, at the point of intersection or overlap of these two braces. Shaft 146 operates at the same speed as camshaft 144.

One end of a rigid link member 152 is pivotally connected to the other outer end of plate 150, and the other end of this link member ispivotally attached to one end of an L-shaped lever 153 which is rotatably supported at its base by means of a fixed pin 154. Also rotatably supported on pin 154 is a wing plate 155, which carries at one side a sector gear 156 and at its other side (more or less diametrically opposite to gear 156) another sector gear 157. The wind plate has thereon an integral outwardly-extending leg 158 which is adapted to engage the side edge of that leg of lever. 153 to which link 152 is coupled.

During the ON cycle (180 of rotation of shaft 146), the reset motor 54, through the various linkages described, drives the plate 150 in the direction indicated by the ON arrowhead on are 159, and the arrangement is such that during this cycle the center of the lower end of link 152 (that is, the end of this link which is coupled to lever 153) travels through an arc of 90 about the center of pin 154.

The sector gear 156 meshes with a sector gear 160 which is formed integrally on member 114, approximately diametrically opposite the projections 117. Thus, when member 114 rotates in the ON direction (counterclockwise in FIG. 2), it can drive plate 155 (by way of the gearing 156, 160) in the ON direction (clockwise in FIG. 2). As previously stated, member 114 is caused to rotate in the ON direction by the force exerted on it by spring 118. The various elements are illustrated in the OFF" position in FIG. 2.

A rearwardly-extending pin 161 is secured to that end of lever 153 which is opposite to link 152. A crank 162, secured to the outer end of a price increment unit locking shaft 163 and adapted to rotate about the axis of such shaft, has a radially-outwardly extending portion which lies in the path of pin 161, as lever 153 is rotated by the reset motor. A tension spring 164, one end of which is tied to a fixed pin 165 and the other end of which is tied to the previously-mentioned portion of crank 162, tends to maintain the crank 162 in the OFF position illustrated in FIG. 2. When the lever 153 is rotated by the reset motor 154 in the ON direction (which is clockwise in FIG. 2), pin 161 will engage crank 162 and rotate it in the clockwise direction, about its pivot point 163, in opposition to the bias of spring 164.

One end of a rigid link member 166 is pivotally connected to crank 162 at an eccentric location, and the opposite end of this link is pivotally connected to one end of a lever 167 (see FIG. 3) which is pinned at its central point to the upper end of the lo gear box rocker shaft 127 (see also FIG. 8). At its other end, arm 167 carries a pin 168 which fits between the two arms provided by the bifurcated end of an arm 169 pinned to the upper end of the hi" gear box rocker shaft 127'.

The arrangement is such that, during the ON cycle, when pin 161 engages crank 162 and causes it to rotate in the clockwise direction in FIG. 2, the link 166 rotates lever 167 to cause a rotation of shaft 127 in the clockwise direction in FIG. 7, and a rotation of lever 169 (by way of pin 168) to cause a rotation of shaft 127' in the counterclockwise direction in FIG. 7.

The spring 164 ordinarily (which is to say during the interval between successive dispensing operations) maintains the crank 162 in such a position that both of the rocker shafts 127 and 127 are brought to the position exemplified by the shaft 127 in FIG. 7, that is, to a position wherein all of the idler gears 129 and 129 are out of mesh with the respective cone gears 123 and 125 and also out of mesh with the respective pinions 134 and 134'. Also, during the OFF" resetting and adjustment cycle (which takes place following the completion of an actual dispensing operation, as will later become apparent) the spring 164 rotates crank 162 in such a direction as to cause rotation of rocker shaft 127 in the counterclockwise direction in FIG. 7 and to cause rotation of rocker shaft 127' in the clockwise direction in FIG. 7. The ON position for shaft 127 being illustrated in the upper portion of FIG. 7 (wherein the illustrated one of the idler gears 129' is in mesh with cone gear and with pinion 134'), the rotation of rocker shaft 127' in the clockwise direction (during the OFF cycle) causes all of the banjo members 130' to engage their fixed pins 131' to swing all of the mounting plates 128' clockwise from the position illustrated, moving all of the idler gears 129 out of mesh with the cone gear 125 and with the pinion 134'. No net force is exerted at this time by wishbone spring 132, since one of its ends is attached to the pin 133' (attached to and moving with plate 128'), and the other of its ends bears against banjo member 130', which is in firm engagement with the pin 131' (also attached to and moving with plate 128').

Similar action takes place during the OFF cycle for the lo gear box, when rocker shaft 127 is rotated in the counterclockwise direction in FIG. 7. Summarizing the operation so far described of the gear throw-out arrangement for the 10 and hi gear boxes, it may be seen that all of the idler gears 129 and 129' are moved out of mesh with their corresponding cone gears 123 and 125 and pinions 134 and 134 during the OFF cycle, by the force of spring 164 acting through the crank 162 and linkage 166, etc., and are maintained out of mesh, until the next ON cycle, by this same spring. It remains to be explained how a selected one of the gears 129 and a selected one of the gears 129 (or alternatively, none of these gears) are brought into mesh with the cone gears and pinions during the ON" cycle.

Refer again to FIGS. 7 and 8. A vertically-extending supporting shaft is mounted between the fixed supporting plates 116 and 126. Journaled on the shaft 170 are two spaced stirrup members 171 between which is mounted an arcuate plate 172 (for the 10 gear box) provided with six helically-arranged apertures 173, one such aperture for each of the levels of cone gear 123. One of the two individual plates of each pair of mounting plates 128 (it will be remembered that there are a total of six pairs of such plates, each pair carrying an idler gear 129) is provided with a projecting tab 174 which is adapted to enter a corresponding one of the apertures 173, and can enter such aperture if the plate 172 has been rotated to a position wherein the aperture 173 is in alignment with the tab. That is to say, a selected one of the six tabs 174 can enter its aperture 173, the selection depending upon the angular position to which arcuate plate 172 has been rotated.

Also journaled on the shaft 170 are two spaced stirrup members 175 between which is mounted an arcuate plate 176 (for the hi" gear box) similar to plate 172 and also provided with six helically-arranged apertures 177, one such aperture for each of the levels of cone gear 125. One of the two individual plates of each pair of mounting plates 128 (it will be remembered that there are a total of six pairs of such plates, each pair carrying a separate idler gear 129') is provided with a projecting tab 178 which is adapted to enter a corresponding one of the apertures 177 as illustrated in FIG. 7, and will enter such aperture if the arcuate plate 176 has been rotated to a position wherein the aperture 177 is in alignment with the tab. The particular one of the six tabs 178 which enters its aperture depends upon the angular position to which arcuate plate 176 has been rotated. I

When one of the tabs 178 enters its aperture 177 (as illustrated in the upper portion of FIG. 7), the idler gear 129' associated with that particular tab (that is, the idler gear which is carried by that particular plate 128') is brought into mesh with the cone gear 125 and with the pinion 134'. The same is true for one of the tabs such as 174 in the 10 gear box. If, on the other hand, the apertures in arcuate plates 172 and 176 are not in alignment with the tabs (which condition is in effect illustrated in the lower portion of FIG. 7 the idler gears associated with all of these latter tabs are prevented from meshing with the cone gears 123 and 125 and the pinions 134 and 134. For each of the six blends, the arcuate plate 176 will be brought to a position wherein one of its apertures 177 is in alignment with a corresponding tab 178, and the arcuate plate 172 will be brought to a position wherein one of its apertures 173 (generally on the same horizontal level as the aligned aperture in plate 176) is in alignment with a corresponding tab 174; the idler gears 129 and 129' on this particular level will come into mesh with their cone gears 123 and 125 and pinions 134 and 134. All the other idler gears (to wit, five idler gears in the group 129 and five idler gears in the group 129') will be prevented from meshing with the cone gears and pinions. I

For each of the two additional grades of gasoline to be dispensed (to wit, the logasoline component alone and the hi gasoline component alone), no corresponding holes are provided in arcuate plates 172 and 176. This means that for each of these two latter grades, all of the idler gears 129 and 129' will be prevented from meshing with the cone gears and pinion gears (as illustrated in the lower portion of FIG. 7). In each of these cases, the subtractive differential 49 is in effect rendered inoperative to adjust the blend control valve 19, the cone gear 123 rotating idly during the dispensing of solely the 10 gasoline and the cone gear 125 rotating idly during the dispensing of solely the hi'gasoline.

It has been previously stated that during the ON resetting and adjustment cycle, the motor-driven pin 161 engages and rotates crank 162, resulting in a rotation of shaft 127 in the clockwise direction in FIG. 7, from the OFF position illustrated, and also a rotation of shaft 127' in the counterclockwise direction from its OFF" position (not illustrated, but corresponding to the OFF" position illustrated for shaft 127). When shaft 127 rotates in the clockwise direction, each banjo member 130 tends to push against its respective wishbone spring 132, tending to compress the latter somewhat, and whichever one ofthe six tabs 174 is aligned with an aperture 173 in arcuate plate 172 is pushed into such aperture by the respective spring 132, pushing resiliently against the fixed pin 133 in the corresponding mounting plate 128. The spring 132 corresponding to the tab 174 which so moves into its aperture 173 is compressed somewhat, and exerts a force on pin 133 which tends to maintain this tab in its aperture 173 (and the corresponding idler gear 129 in mesh with cone gear 123 and pinion 134) during the rotation of such gears (which rotation takes place during the actual dispensing operation).

Similar action takes place during the ON cycle for the hi gear box, when rocker shaft 127 is rotated in the counterclockwise direction in FIG. 7.

The arcuate plates 172 and 176 are fastened together, so as to be rotated simultaneously, by means of a vertically-extending pin 179 which passes through aligned holes in the two upper stirrup members 171 and .175 (the upper one of stirrup members 171 directly overlying the upper one of stirrup members 175) and also through a hole provided in a bevel gear wheel 180, at an eccentric location on such wheel. Gear wheel 180 is joumaled on shaft 170. A plurality of holes 181, equally spaced on a base circle which is centered on the axis of shaft 170, are provided in the hi stirrup member 175. This provides for an adjustment or variation of the included angle between the longitudinal center lines of arcuate plates 172 and 176 (by insertion of pin 179 through an appropriate one of the holes 181). This possibility of variation of the angular relation between the arcuate plates permits effectuation of a change in the number of grades of gasoline which are capable of being dispensed by the dispensing apparatus of this invention (for example, reduction in the number of grades from eight to some other number). The variation of the angular relation between the plates 172 and 176, from the relation illustrated, will cause the idler gear 129 which is in mesh with the cone gear 123 (during a dispensing operation) to be in a level different from the idler gear 129' which is in mesh with the cone gear 125 during the same operation.

The arcuate plates 172 and 176 are rotated to a selected position (for positioning no holes in alignment with the tabs 174 and 178, or for positioning a pair of holes 173 and 177 in alignment with the appropriate ones of tabs 174 and 178, respectively) by means of a sector bevel gear 182 pinned to shaft and meshing with the bevel gear 180. The latter drives the arcuate plates 172 and 176 by means of pin 179.

Refer again to FIG. 2. As previously indicated, in the OFF position, prior to the beginning'of a'n ON cycle, the spring 164 maintains the idler-gears 129 and 129 thrown out, that is, out of mesh with the cone gears 123 and and pinions 134 and 134', as exemplified in the bottom portion of FIG. 7. In this position, the tabs 174 and 178 are all withdrawn from the holes in the arcuate plates 172 and 176, and these latter are free to rotate.

When the reset motor 54 is energized to begin the ON cycle (as a result of actuation of one of the start pushbuttons 58-65 or 586S'), it causes lever 153 to begin rotating in the clockwise direction. As soon as this lever begins to rotate, lug 158 is freed from engagement with lever 153, so that member 114 can rotate in the ON or counterclockwise direction, being driven in this direction by spring 118. (Prior to this freeing of lug 158, of course, the member 114 is prevented from rotating due to the meshed gearing 156, 160). The member 114 rotates to a final angular position of stop plate 82, the position of the latter being determined by the particular one of the start buttons which has been actuated.

As member 114 rotates, it rotates shaft 115 (to which it is pinned), and the rotation of thisshaft, through 182, 180, etc., causes rotation of arcuate plates 172 and 176 to an angular position determined by the final angular position of member 114 (and appropriate to the particular grade of gasoline selected by the actuated start" button). The arrangement is such that the arcuate plates reach their (selected) angular positions before the motor-driven pin 161 comes into engagement with crank 162 (it will be remembered that the tabs 174 and 178 are free of the plates 172 and 176 during this time, so that the latter are free to rotate). When the pin 161 engages and rotates crank 162, the rocker shafts 127 and 127' are rotated (through link 166, etc.) to throw in or bring into mesh the one selected (as determined by the angular positions of the arcuate plates 172 and 176) idler gear in each group 129 and 129', or, alternatively, to keep all idler gears out of mesh (again as determined by the angular positions of the arcuate plates).

It is pointed out that during the ON cycle, the wing plate 155 rotates in the clockwise direction as member 114 rotates, being driven through the gearing 156, 160 from this latter member.

As wing plate 155 rotates, the sector gear 157 carried thereby meshes with a gear 183 pinned to the camcarrying shaft 184 of a price increment unit denoted generally by the numeral 36. This price increment unit is preferably of the type disclosed in FIGS. 8 et seq. of my 908 patent. In the '908 patent, the price increment unit is termed selective gearing. The diametral relation of gears 183 and 157 is such that the shaft 184 is rotatable in 40 steps, whereas file wing plate 155 and the member 114 rotate in 10 steps (the individual projections 117 on member 114 being in 10 steps). That is to say, the successive possible stop positions of member 114 and of wing plate 155 are separated by l0, whereas the successive possible stop positions of camshaft 184 are separated by 40.

The camshaft 184 corresponds to camshaft 302 of my '908 patent, and operates by means of cams to select gearing (for inclusion between the couplings 35 and 37, FIG. 1) individual to each possible stop in the angular rotation of camshaft 184. The particular gearing selected by the operation of camshaft 184 depends upon the final angular position to which this shaft is brought during the ON cycle, and this in turn depends upon the final angular position of wing plate 155 (the latter being governed, as previously described, by the final angular position of member 114, which in turn depends upon the particular grade of gasoline selected for dispensing by means of the start pushbuttons 58-65 or 58'-65'). For further details regarding this gearing selection, reference should be made to my 908 patent, wherein the same is more fully and completely described. It is here noted that the rotation of camshaft 184 to its final angular position is completed before the motor-driven pin 161 comes into engagement with crank 162.

The price increment unit 36 is provided with a locking arrangement for locking the price selection gears out of mesh, this locking arrangement preferably being similar to that illustrated at 338, 340, 342, etc., in FIG. 11 of my 908 patent. The locking arrangement just referred to includes a rockable lever operated by a locking shaft 163. As previously described, shaft 163 is secured to crank 162. In the OFF position illustrated in FIG. 2, the locking shaft 163 is in its locked" position, wherein the gears are held out of mesh. The spring 164, acting on crank 162, tends to maintain shaft 163 in this locked" position. During the ON cycle, as previously described, the motor-driven pin 161 engages crank 162 and causes this crank to rotate in the clockwise direction. This happens after camshaft 184 has reached its final angular position, and results in the rotation of shaft 163 to its unlocked position, wherein the proper gear is allowed to go into mesh, as urged by the cam and spring. It remains in mesh during the actual dispensing operation, which follows the ON resetting and adjustment cycle.

Refer again to FIG. 5. Relay 108, shown in its unenergized position, has a pair of normally-open contacts 185 which are connected in a series circuit extending from the a.c. supply terminal 94 (the camoperated switch being closed) to the a.c. supply terminal 94', by way of a pair of normally-closed (reed switch) contacts 186 of a reed-switch-actuating relay 187 and the operating winding of the solenoid 53. Thus, when relay 108 is energized as above described (e.g., as a result of the operation of one of the start contacts denoted as 99 and in FIG. 5), its contacts close to energize the winding of solenoid 53. The solenoid 53 is thus energized simultaneously with the energization of reset motor-54, at the beginning of the ON cycle. This solenoid remains energized after the end of the ON" resetting and adjustment cycle, and throughout most if not all of the actual dispensing operation which follows such ON" cycle.

Refer now to FIGS. 2, 10, and 11. The blend control valve 19 is generally somewhat similar in construction to the combined proportioning and shut-off valve 36 described in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,073,484. In the 10" section of this valve, a shaft 227 serves to mount a spring-engaged valve shoe 228, which is provided with a cylindricalsurface engaging the interior wall of a chamber 229 in the valve housing or body 230. The shoe 228 cooperates with an outlet port 231 in the valve body for the control of flow of the lo fuel component, the valve or housing end of the 10" hose 20 being coupled to receive liquid flowing through this outlet port. The valve housing 230 is suitably secured to a fixed support or frame 232 (see FIG. 10) provided inside the apparatus housing]. The lo gasoline enters the chamber 229 by way of the connection or coupling 9. It may be seen that by rotation of shaft 227, the shoe 228 may be made to selectively cover or uncover the outlet port 231, and thus to control the flow oflo gasoline into the hose 20.

The hi section of the valve 19 is sealed off from the lo" section thereof by means of a sealing partition 233. In the hi section of the valve, a shaft 234 serves to mount a spring-engaged valve shoe 235, which is provided with a cylindrical surface engaging the interi or wall of a chamber 236 in the valve housing or body. Preferably, the two chambers 229 and 236 are cylindrical and have a common longitudinal axis which extends horizontally. The shoe 235 cooperates with an outlet port 237 in the valve body for the control of flow of the hi fuel component, the valve or housing end of the hi hose 21 (see FIG. 1) being coupled to receive liquid flowing through this outlet port. The hi gasoline enters the chamber 236 by way of the connection or coupling 17. It may be seen that by rotation of shaft 234, the shoe 235 may be made to selectively cover or

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3087651 *Mar 17, 1959Apr 30, 1963Veeder Root IncPreselector mechanism for liquid dispensing apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4978029 *Jul 3, 1989Dec 18, 1990Gilbarco Inc.Multi-fuel dispenser with one nozzle per fueling position
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/26
International ClassificationB67D7/74
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/741, B67D7/742
European ClassificationB67D7/74B, B67D7/74B2