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Publication numberUS3727889 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1973
Filing dateMar 8, 1971
Priority dateMay 21, 1970
Also published asCA963459A1, DE2124817A1, US3722021, US3881628
Publication numberUS 3727889 A, US 3727889A, US-A-3727889, US3727889 A, US3727889A
InventorsF Nagel
Original AssigneeChapman Chem Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mixing method and apparatus
US 3727889 A
Abstract
A measured amount of diluent fluid is directed in a stream into a container of a chemical substance so as to wash the chemical substance from the container while accomplishing a dilution and mixing of the chemical substance with the diluent fluid.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Nagel 1 MIXING METHOD AND APPARATUS [75] Inventor: Fritz J. Nagel, Memphis, Tenn.

[73] Assignee: Chapman Chemical Company,

Memphis, Tenn.

22 Filed: Mar. 8, 1971 [21] Appl.No.: 122,006

a [52] US. Cl. ..259/l R, 23/267 E, 23/271 [51] Int. Cl. ..B01f 5/00 [58] Field of Search ..259/DIG. 58, DIG. 30, 259/8, 1 R; 23/271, 267, 167; 134/200;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 46 i CONTROL 6/1960 McBride ..99/295 1 Apr. 17, 1973' 2,036,412 4/1936 Henglein et a1 ..23/1 67 X 3,322,507 5/1967 Smith ..23/267 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 604,803 5/1960 Italy ..99/295 Primary Examiner-Leon G. Machlin Attorney-Curtis Ailes [571 ABSTRACT A measured amount of diluent fluid is directed in a stream into a container of a chemical substance so as to wash the chemical substance from the container while accomplishing a dilution and mixing of the chemical substance with the diluent fluid;

20 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR 1 5 3,727, 889

I SHEET 1 OF 3 CONTROL INVENTOR FRITZ J. NAGEL ATTORNEY CONTROL PATENTED APR I H975 RHLU 2 UP 3 CONTROL r 1 \\&\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\X CONTROL PATENTEI] APR 1 H975 SHEET 3 [IF 3 FIG. 5

CONTROL MIXING METHOD AND APPARATUS This invention relates to a method and apparatus for combining a chemical substance with a diluent fluid,

and more particularly, to a combination dispensing and mixing apparatus whereby a quantity of pre-packaged substanceof a predetermined amount is dispensed for mixture with a predetermined amount of diluent.

This invention is useful with those products (chemi cal substances) which come in concentrated form, either solid, paste, or liquid, which must be mixed with a fluid diluent. Usually the diluent is a liquid, but it may be a gas such as steam. Conventionally, the user must accurately measure the amount of water or other liquid diluent to be used and must then manually empty the contents, of the container or package into the liquid. Though the problem of emptying a container is not so great with granular, free-flowing materials, or very thin liquids, it is a problem with powdery materials which tend to glob, and with pasty or slurry-like materials. Further, with powdery materials, and for that matter, even with granular materials, when emptying the package the atmosphere surrounding the user becomes saturated with dust particles from the ingredients. This is a very severe health and safety factor, especially when working with highly toxic materials such as pesticides, herbicides, or other chemicals which may be harmful if inhaled or which may be harmful to the skin.

As with anything that has to be mixed, there is no guarantee that the ultimate consumer or user will accurately follow directions to produce the proper solution. Further, the user will not always take the time to make sure that the container or package is empty. This oftentimes results in the solution not containing the proportion intended by the manufacturer. Not only is the proper solution not obtained, but a substantial amount of wastage results.

In many cases, a concentrated product manufacturer adjusts for the inability of the consumer to completely remove the product from a container manually. He must go to the expense of carefully blending all ingredients ofthe concentrate so that the user, when he mixes the product with a diluent, will receive the use of a properly mixed solution even though a portion of the product remains in the container. Such quest for product uniformity often involves unnecessary manufacturing expense and product wastage.

Additionally, many products specifically require stirring or shaking prior to use. For example, the pigments in paints settle to the bottom of the container and often are so difficult to completely disperse throughout the paint that an improper paint mixture is often used.

It is an objective of this invention to provide a dispensing apparatus which will insure the complete removal of contents from a container in a safe and efficient manner and which will preliminarily mix the contents and diluent.

It is another objective of this invention to provide a dispensing apparatus wherein the contents of a container are dispensed within a substantially enclosed feed receptacle and are, thereby, precluded from entering the atmosphere and affecting the eyes, nose, ears, skin, and lungs of the user.

It is a further objective of this invention to provide means whereby the package, transportation, and storage costs of the product to be mixed are reduced. In

using this invention, it is possible to package the product wherein the ratio of active to inert ingredients is substantially increased thereby reducing the size and weight of the product container. For example, by

removing water from paint the container size is reduced. Of course, when this is done the viscosity of paint is increased to such an extent that the contents of the can are quite difiicult to remove by conventional devices. Some products contain more diluents than necessary merely to secure a minimum level of transferability.

It is another objective of this invention to provide a dispensing apparatus in combination with a mixing apparatus whereby a container is emptied and the contents thereof mixed with a diluent in an enclosed environment.

It is a further objective of this invention to provide an improved method for removing the contents from a container. More particularly, it is an objective of this invention to provide an improved method for dissolving soluble packages and dispensing the contents thereof.

These and other objects of the invention will become more apparent to those skilled in the art by reference to the following detailed description.

The invention may be carried out in one form thereof in a method for combining a concentrated non-gaseous chemical substance with a diluent fluid comprising directing a predetermined measured amount of diluent fluid in at least one stream into a container of said chemical substance containing a predetermined amount of the chemical substance so as to wash the chemical substance from the container while accomplishing a dilution and combination of the chemical substance with the diluent fluid in desired proportions.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side view in elevation, partially in crosssection, showing apparatus for carrying out the invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view showing a modified form of apparatus for carrying out the invention.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a further modified form of the apparatus.

, FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of another modified form of the apparatus.

And FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of still another modified form of the apparatus.

Referring to the drawings, a first embodiment of the apparatus is generally indicated by the numeral 10 in FIG. I, and includes a feed receptacle in the form of a cylindrical tower 12 having upper and lower compartments I4 and 16, respectively. The upper end of the tower is closed by a closure 18 hingedly mounted to the side wall of the tower 12 at 20. The lower end 22 of the tower is in the form of a funnel terminating in a dispensing pipe 24 which has an opening 26 in the lower end thereof. A filter element 28 extends across the passageway 30 defined by the pipe 24.

The upper compartment 14 receives a rupturable container which includes ingredients to be mixed with a suitable liquid diluent. The container may be flexible, composed of a plastic material such as polyethylene. Or itmay be in the form of a can, either metal or cardboard, the end of which is to be punctured to dispense the contents thereof.

The upper and lower compartments are defined by a dished-out baffle or supporting plate 32 which slopes radially inwardly to form an inverted cone, and which has a central opening 34. Adjacent to the central opening is an upstanding fixed cutter element 36 which element is integral with the plate 32 and can be a portion struck therefrom. A container of the type described above is inserted into the upper compartment 14 and pushed downwardly over the cutter element 36 and onto the battle plate 32 whereby the cutter element 36 ruptures or punctures the container. Depending upon the height of the container, this may be accomplished by force applied at the top of the container by the closing of the cover 18.

A fluid conduit 38 extends upwardly through the central opening 34 in the baffle 32 to a point just below the uppermost point of the cutter element 36. The conduit extends from a suitable pump 40, which pumps fluid from a reservoir 42 through the conduit 38. The reservoir contains a suitable liquid diluent to be mixed with the ingredients of the package or container placed in the compartment 14.

The conduit 38 preferably is provided with a nozzle so that the liquid passing through the conduit emanates as a jet and is projected upwardly into the ruptured or punctured container whereby the ingredients of the container are washed therefrom and flow downwardly through the central opening 34. The combined chemical substance from the container, and diluents, flow downwardly through the funnel element 22 and the opening 26, to a downstream mixing chamber or storage container. The screen 28, of course, catches any oversized particles of the product or ingredients or any part of the ruptured package that happens to be entrained in the fluid stream. Any such oversized particles are broken down and mixed or dissolved and carried through the screen by the continuing stream of diluent.

The amount of diluent injected into the dispensing device can be controlled by means of an automatically controlled valve 44, which extends across conduit 38. Suitable automatic control means well known in the art is diagrammatically illustrated at 46. The control means automatically supplies a predetermined amount of diluent to the feed receptacle. A selector dial can be provided whereby the user can easily select the amount of diluent to be used during any one cycle. It is, of course, to be understood that the valve can be controlled manually, if desired.

In the preferred form of this embodiment of the invention, the dispensing pipe 24 is preferably long enough to reach to near the bottom of the separate mixing chamber or storage container (not shown). Furthermore, as illustrated in the drawing, the opening 26 is a constricted opening in the form of a nozzle so that the combined materials are ejected through the nozzle 26 into the storage container with considerable velocity. This creates turbulence in the bottom of the storage container, serving to further mix the ingredients, and to make the combined solution or dispersion more uniform. In the preferred form of this embodiment of the invention, the cover 18 is ap propriately gasketed and is securely held closed, such as with clamps (not shown), so that the entire interior of the container 12 can be maintained under pressure because of the pressure of the diluent liquid entering from the nozzle 38. Thus, the combined materials are ejected through the nozzle 26 with greater velocity because of this pressure.

A modification of the apparatus is shown in FIG. 2. It comprises a funnel-shaped feed receptacle 52 enclosed at its upper end by a pivotally mounted cover 54. The lower end of the receptacle is provided with a throat 56 having extending thereacross a series of cutter elements such as rotary saw blades, or the like 58 mounted for rotary movement on a shaft 60 which is journaled in the side walls of the throat portion 56 of the feed receptacle. The shaft is driven by an electric motor 62 which is supported by a shelf 64 attached to the outer surface of one of the side walls of the throat 56. A removable foraminous tray 66 is slidably positioned within the throat 56 to act as a filter. Disposed axially along the shaft 60, and between the cutter elements 58, are paddles 68, which are twisted axially of their lengths to provide a downdraft during rotation thereof by the high-speed electric motor 62.

The embodiment of FIG. 2 is particularly adaptable for use on packages of paper, plastic, tin plate, or other material which can be easily cut by the blades 58. The filter 66 traps the residual particles of the package. Since the filter tray 66 is easily removable, the particles can be cleaned from it so that they do not obstruct the filter.

A suitable diluent liquid is provided through a conduit and nozzles 67 to the interior of the feed receptacle 52. The diluent liquid is supplied from a reservoir 42 through a pump 40 and valve 44 under control of a control device 46, and in measured quantity as previously described in connection with FIG. 1. The jets are directed upwardly to dilute any of the chemical substance remaining above the cutters 58, and the diluent then flows downwardly through the throat portion 56 to combine with any of the chemical substance which is in the lower portion of the throat.

The receptacle 52 and associated apparatus is attached to the top of a mixing container, generally indicated by the numeral 70. The container 70 is divided into a mixing chamber 72, and a storage chamber 74 by a funnel-shaped baffle 76 which is provided with a centrally disposed, axially extending passageway 78 for communicating the two chambers. The dispensing apparatus within receptacle 52 communicates with the chamber 72 via the throat 56, and is mounted by any suitable means, such as welding, or the like, to a cover 80, which is removably positioned over the upper end of the container 70. A plurality of radially extending rotating paddles 82 are vertically spaced on and fixed to vertically extending shaft 84. A smaller paddle 102 is affixed to the lower end of the shaft. The shaft 84 is coupled to a drive shaft 86 which is driven by an electric motor 90 through a gear reduction assembly 92. The paddles 82 are pitched to create an uplifting movement to the ingredients dispensed into the chamber from the product dispenser 50. A sloping plate 94 is spaced below the paddles 82 and is attached to one side wall of the container and extends downwardly toward the opposite side but terminates in a free edge 96 a predetermined distance from the baffle 76 to define a passageway 98. The material, after being mixed in the chamber 72, passes through the passageway 98 to a subchamber 100 within the chamber 72, whereafter the chamber 156. The feed receptacle is attached to the cover 158 of a mixing container 160 in any suitable manner, whereby the cover and receptaclemay' be 7 removed to permit access to the interior of the mixing container 160. The mixing container 160 defines a chamber 162 therein for the mixing and/or storage of a solution suitably mixed by means of a rotary impeller 164 fixedly mounted on the lower end of a rotary shaft 166. The shaft 166 extends through the cover 158 and is driven by a motor 170 through gear reduction means 172, both of which are mounted on the cover 158.

The container 152 is provided at its lower end with a funnel 174 having a central aperture 176 therein. Extending across the interior of the container 152 is a forarninous supporting plate 178 which supports a solublepackage 180. A liquid diluent conduit 182 extends inwardly of container 152 and across the underside of the plate 178 and is provided with a plurality of upwardly extending jet nozzles 184. As in FIG. 1, the conduit 182 communicates with a suitable liquid diluent source 42 via a pump and valve 44. The valve can be automatically controlled by suitable control means 46, as previously described with respect to the system of FIG. 1, to meter out a predetermined quantity of diluent.

The embodiment of FIG. 3 is designed primarily for use with packages formed of soluble material, or material which disintegrates in the presence of the diluent, whereby, upon the direction of jets of liquid diluent upwardly against the package 180, the package opens, and the contents thereof are washed downwardly through the filter plate 178, the funnel 174, the opening 176, and into the mixing chamber 162.

The embodiment of FIG. 4 is particularly adapted for use in mixing two or more ingredients with a liquid diluent. The apparatus is provided with a feed receptacle 206 having a hinged cover 208. The receptacle, as

inFIGS. 2 and 3, is attached to the cover 204 of the.

container 202. Interiorly of the receptacle 2 06 is a supporting plate 210 which extends across the width of the receptacle and which is provided with at least a pair of apertures 212 which receive the necks of inverted product containers 214. In those instances where the necks of the containers 214 are threaded, it may be desirable to thread the apertures 212 for securely supporting the containers in a secure manner. As in the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 3, a conduit 216 extends across'the underside of the plate 210, and has a pair of upwardly directed jet nozzles 218 which are directed toward the openings in the containers 214. As in FIGS. 1 and 3, the conduit 216 communicates with a suitable source of liquid diluent 42 by a pump 40 and valve 44. Valve 44 may be automatically controlled by control means 46 to provide aprecise quantity of diluent.

In operation of the embodiment of FIG. 4, high pressure liquid diluent jets are directed upwardly into the interior of the containers 214 for completely washing the contents thereof into the chamber 228 of the mixing container 202. The solution entering the chamber 228 is further mixed and agitated by means of impeller 164 which is secured to rotatable shaft 166 driven by electric motor 170 through gear reduction means 172.

FIG. 5 illustrates still another modification of the invention which combines features from the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 4. The embodiment of FIG. 5 is arranged to accommodate two containers, or a double compartment container in an upper chamber 14A. The floor of the compartment 14A is formed by the supporting plate 32A which is provided with two openings 34A and 34B. Adjacent to these openings are the respective upstanding fixed cutter elements 36A and 3613 which are preferably integral with the plate 32A and which may be formed by being struck therefrom. The cutter elements 36A and 36B are positioned so as to engage with the lower surface of two separate rupturable packages of chemical substances to bemixed with diluent. As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the packages may be pushed downwardly and thus impaled upon the cutter elements 36A and 36B, rupturing or puncturing the package. Preferably, the vertical dimension of the compartment 14A is so designed with respect to the vertical dimension of the packages that the force needed to puncture the packages is achieved by simply closing the cover 208 of the compartment 14A. The nozzles 218 extend through the openings 34A and 348 to wash the contents from the containers down into the chamber 228. All of the remaining structure of FIG. Sis substantially the same as the corresponding structure of FIG. 4 and the corresponding components are similarly numbered.

By using the various embodiments of the invention disclosed herein an operator can accurately mix a liquid diluent with a suitable concentrated chemical substance regardless of its consistency, without waste and without having to come into actual contact with the product within the containers which, in most cases, are placed in the feed receptacle while still sealed. Only in the embodiment of FIG. 4 must the user open the container or package prior to inserting the material into the mixing apparatus. Through suitable control means, just the right amount of diluent can be injected to insure a final solution of proper proportions.

The concept of emptying and mixing two containers simultaneously, as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, is a very important aspect of the invention. While only shown in connection with the embodiments of FIGS. 4 and 5, it will be apparent that this concept may also be incorporated in the practice of the method of the invention by means of apparatus such as that shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3. As a matter of fact, the two container concept may be employed with the embodiment of FIG. 3, without substantial modification of the apparatus.

Furthermore, the concept of a pipe such as 24 in FIG. 1 to carry the mixture of diluent and the chemical substance to the bottom of the storage chamber may be applied to the multiple container embodiments of FIGS. 4 and 5, separate pipes being provided for the mixtures from each container.

By use of the multiple container concept, two or more chemical substances which cannot be pre-mixed before dilution, or which are more conveniently mixed at the time of dilution, can be very effectively handled. The two or more constituents which must be kept separate, may be mutually reactive, or may have a substantially reduced shelf life when pre-mixed. It will be understood, of course, that it is within the scope of the present invention to employ a single package container having two or more compartments for the separate constituents which must be separately stored prior to dilution, the package being appropriately shaped so that it must be inserted into the chamber 14A of FIG. 5, for instance, so that both compartments are opened and emptied simultaneously.

The following are several examples of combinations of materials which may be mixed and diluted using water as the diluent, and starting with separate chemical substances in separate containers:

EXAMPLE I.

A solid, melted-in-place, formaldehyde deficient resorcinol-formaldehyde resin is in the first container. Powdered paraformaldehyde plus walnut shell floor are in the second container. After emptying the containers with water diluent, the resulting water solution mixture is ready for use as a cold setting wood g'lue.

EXAMPLE ll.

A solid water-soluble phenol-formaldehyde onestage plywood glue is filled into a first container from an elevated temperature melt. The second container is filled with a phenolic glue catalyst such as sodium hydroxide, or meta phenylene diamine. The diluent used is water, and the resultant mixture is a plywood glue which is ready for use.

The chemical substance, or substances, which are contained within the container which is to be diluted by the diluent in accordance with the method of the present invention may be in any non-gaseous (solid or liquid) form. Thus, for instance, the substance may be in the form of a single solid cast piece, large chunks, powdered solid, or liquid of any viscosity. It is one of the important features of the invention that because of the active way in which the diluent is applied to the chemical substance to be diluted, the substance may be in a highly concentrated form, and depending upon the material, special preparation of the material to promote the formation of a solution or dispersion can often be avoided. When the chemical substance is in the form of a viscous liquid or a solid which is directly dissolved or formed into a low viscosity dispersion by the diluent without forming lumps, the filters may be omitted from the apparatus. However, if the substance is powdered, or for some other reason is likely to form lumps in the course of becoming mixed and diluted with the diluent, then the filters, such as filter 28 in FIG. 1, are desirable. No filter plates have been illustrated in the embodiments of FIGS. 4 and 5. However, it will be obvious that such filter plates may be provided there if needed.

The diluent has been variously referred to in this specification as a fluid, or as a liquid. While liquids will be more commonly used in the invention, gaseous fluids, such as steam, may also be used. The gaseous diluent may also be a gas which gasifies the chemical substance in the container. Various liquid diluents may be employed, water being the most common one. Other single chemicals, such as ethanol, may be employed. Furthermore, the diluent may be a mixture of compatible liquids such as water plus ethanol, or a mixture of incompatible liquids such as water and oil. The liquid may already contain dissolved or suspended solids. Furthermore, while the diluent may often be a true solvent for the chemical substance in the container, it may be simply a dispersing liquid for at least some of the constituents of the chemical substance. While the specification describes the process of the invention in terms of mere mixing, it will be understood that the diluent may be chemically reactive with the chemical substance in the container so that a chemical combination occurs rather than a simple mixing.

The invention has been illustrated and described entirely in terms of arrangements in which the container to be emptied is in an inverted position with the diluent fluid generally directed upwardly into the container so that the container can drain by gravity. The term inverted position" is used here in its broadest sense to indicate the principle that the opening is facing downwardly. Thus, this may include the case of a plastic bottle with a screw cap top which is placed upright in the apparatus, the bottom of the bottle being punctured for emptying. This arrangement is generally preferred. However, it will be understood that other orientations of the container may be employed if desired. It will also be understood that the process may be carried out at elevated or reduced temperatures or pressures.

The practice of the process has been described in terms of providing a predetermined amount of diluent by means ofa control which determines total volume of diluent flow. However, it will be understood that various other methods may be employed for determining the exact amount of diluent. For instance, the storage tank which is filled with the mixture of the diluent and the chemical substance may simply be filled to a level which provides the desired total volume. Furthermore, it is within the scope of this invention to pump liquid from the accumulating storage tank, which stores the mixture, up into the container which is to be emptied of the chemical substance, either as a supplemental source of liquid, or as a substitute source of liquid for emptying the container. Thus, one circulation of the prescribed liquid diluent through the container may not be sufficient to empty the container if the chemical substance has a low solubility.

Other methods of opening the containers, in addition to those illustrated and described above, may be employed. For instance, a frangible container may be employed and a hammer blow by a suitable ram device built into the apparatus may be employed to quickly open the container. Other opening arrangements may be employed such as drills or other rotatable cutters.

Several examples of containers which may be disintegrated by a diluent, and opened in that manner, as described above in connection with FIG. 3, are as follows:

such as sodium tetrachlorophenate. Both bag and the solid dissolve in the diluent which is water.

EXAMPLE IV.

A vinyl acetate bag contains a vinyl latex water dispersion. The diluent is acetone which dissolves the bag and its contents.

EXAMPLE V.

A polystyrene container contains an alkyd resin in mineral spirits solution. The diluent is mineral spirits containing percent acetone to dissolve the polystyrene.

EXAMPLE VI The container may be composed of a paper which readily and quickly disintegrates on contact with water into the short fibers from which the paper was originally made. This container may be employed with any compatible substance for which water is to be the diluent.

The following table gives a few examples of chemical substances and diluents for which the present invention is particularly useful.

Non-Gaseous End Use of and zinc cyanide While this invention has been shown and described in connection with'particular examples, it is apparent that various changes and modifications, in addition to those mentioned above, may be made by those who are skilled in the art without departing from the basic features of the invention. Accordingly, it is the intention of the applicant to protect all variations and modifications within the true spirit and valid scope of this invention.

Iclaim:

1. A method for combining a concentrated non-gaseous chemical substance which may be harmful in concentrated form with a diluent fluid while avoiding any necessity for operator contact with the chemical substance comprising supporting a container containing only a predetermined amount of the chemical substance with at least one container opening facing downwardly and with the container being fully closed except on the downward facing side, directing a predetermined measured amount of diluent fluid in at least one stream upwardly into a container opening so as to wash the chemical substance from the container and thereby emptying the container by gravity through a container opening while accomplishing a dilution and combination of the chemical substance with the diluent fluid in desired proportions.

iii

2. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the diluent fluid is a liquid.

3. A method as claimed in claim ll including the preliminary step of opening the container of the chemical substance by means of an opening device combined with a support for the container.

A. A method as claimed in claim 3 wherein the opening device comprises a fixed cutter having at least one sharp point and the step of opening the container is carried out by impaling the container upon the cutter.

5. A method for combining a concentrated non-gaseous chemical substance with a diluent fluid comprising directing a predetermined measured amount of diluent fluid in at least one stream into a container containing only a predetermined amount of the chemical substance so as to wash the chemical substance from the container and thereby emptying the container while accomplishing a dilution and combination of the chemical substance with the diluent fluid in desired proportions wherein the container is supported in a substantially enclosed receptacle and positioned with a container opening facing downwardly before the diluent fluid is directed into the container, the diluent fluid being directed upwardly into the container to wash the chemical substance therefrom.

6. A method as claimed in claim 1 including the additional step of collecting the combined chemical substance and diluent fluid in a second container.

7. A method as claimed in claim 6 including the additional step of mechanically agitating the combined chemical substance and diluent fluid.

8. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the diluent fluid is directed into a plurality of containers of chemical substances to be combined with the diluent fluid.

9. An apparatus comprising a feed receptacle for receiving a container containing only a concentrated chemical substance which is to be emptied and combined with a diluent fluid, said receptacle having a first opening for receiving said container and a second opening through which the container contents are to be removed, said second opening being a downward facing opening, means within said receptacle for producing an opening only in the downward facing wall of said container, and means for directing a stream of fluid diluent upwardly into said container through said container opening for removing the contents thereof through said container opening and for washing the contents away by gravity through said second receptacle opening.

10. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 wherein said means for producing an opening in said container is a fixed cutter element upon which the container is impaled.

11. Apparatus as defined in claim 10 and including a supporting plate interiorly of said receptacle for supporting said container and having a central opening therein comprising said second opening, and wherein said cutter element is a portion of said plate struck therefrom.

12. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 and including control means for automatically regulating the amount of diluent directed into said container.

13. Apparatus as claimed in claim 9 wherein there is provided a closure for said first opening to prevent the escape of the contents of said container and said fluid diluent.

. wherein said feed receptacle is operable to receive a plurality of containers the contents of which are to be combined with the diluent fluid, said receptacle having means within said receptacle for opening all of said containers and means for directing streams of fluid diluent into all of said containers.

15. Apparatus as claimed in claim 14 wherein said means for opening said containers comprises at least one fixed cutter element for each container upon which said containers are impaled.

16. A mixing apparatus comprising a tank for receiving ingredients to be mixed, agitating means in said tank, a dispensing apparatus mounted on said tank comprising a feed receptacle for receiving a container containing only a concentrated chemical substance which is to be removed and mixed with a diluent in said tank, said receptacle having a downward facing opening connecting the interior of said receptacle with the interior of said tank, means for directing jets of liquid diluent upwardly into an opening in the downward facing wall of said container to wash the entire contents therefrom by gravity through said opening and into said tank for mixing.

17. Apparatus as defined in claim 16 including cutter means in said receptacle for opening said container.

18. Apparatus as defined in claim 16 including control means for automatically regulating the amount of diluent injected into said receptacle.

19. The apparatus of claim 16 including a removable cover for said tank and wherein said dispensing apparatus is attached to said cover.

20. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the diluent fluid is a gas.

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USRE32763 *Aug 27, 1986Oct 11, 1988Ecolab Inc.Cast detergent-containing article and method of making and using
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DE4204489C1 *Feb 14, 1992Apr 29, 1993Ecosan Hygiene Gmbh, 6450 Hanau, DeTitle not available
EP0281935A2 *Mar 3, 1988Sep 14, 1988Tripp, MartinaDevice for the dosed delivery of a detergent to a dish-washing machine
EP0749777A1 *Jun 21, 1996Dec 27, 1996LAWER S.r.l.A device for preparing mixtures, for example, for dissolving dyes in powder form, and the like, in textile plants
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/349, 366/162.1, 366/348, 366/168.1, 422/261
International ClassificationB01F1/00, A47L23/05, B65D83/14, A47L15/44, B01F15/02, B01F3/08
Cooperative ClassificationB01F15/0201, B01F1/0011, B01F15/0206, B65D83/285, A47L15/4436, B01F15/0234, A47L23/05, B01F1/0016, B01F2001/0094, B01F2003/0896, B01F3/0853, B01F15/0254, B01F1/0027, B01F15/0205
European ClassificationB01F15/02B40R, B65D83/28B, B01F15/02B6B, B01F15/02B40F, A47L15/44C, B01F15/02B, B01F1/00D, B01F3/08D, B01F15/02B6, A47L23/05, B01F1/00C, B01F1/00F2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 28, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: KENOGARD AB, A CORP. OF SWEDEN
Owner name: KLOSE, JEROME B., 20 S. CLARK STREET, STE. 2100, C
Effective date: 19850329
Apr 28, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: DIVERSEY WYANDOTTE CORPORATION, 1532 BIDDLE AVENUE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:KLOSE, JEROME B.;REEL/FRAME:004394/0720
Effective date: 19850416
Owner name: KLOSE, JEROME B., 20 S. CLARK STREET, STE. 2100, C
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:KENOGARD AB, A CORP. OF SWEDEN;REEL/FRAME:004394/0728
Effective date: 19850329