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Publication numberUS3727918 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1973
Filing dateMay 24, 1972
Priority dateMay 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3727918 A, US 3727918A, US-A-3727918, US3727918 A, US3727918A
InventorsZawacki W
Original AssigneeTurf Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable golf game
US 3727918 A
Abstract
A portable golf game comprises a) a base including a flat center panel, a rim surrounding the back and sides of the center panel; three rows of depressed pockets in the center panel for receiving a golf ball, and a channel wall joining the rim to the center panel, and b) a synthetic grass strip secured to and overlying the center panel, and having a plurality of openings aligned with the drpressed pockets of the center panel. The grass strip extends past the front of the center panel to provide a longitudinal putting surface. The first, second and third rows of pockets include one, two and three holes, respectively. The pockets in the first and second rows are offset from each other and have equal diameters which are less than the diameters of the pockets in the third row, which latter pockets are offset from the pockets in the second row. The bottom walls of all the depressed pockets are provided with scoring indicia which makes the degree of difficulty of a succeeding shot depend upon the success of the immediately preceeding shot.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Zawacki 1 PORTABLE GOLF GAME [75] Inventor: Walter Zawacki, St. Petersburg, Fla.

[73] Assignee: U.S. Turf Corporation, St. Petersburg, Fla.

22 Filed: May 24, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 256,295

52 us. Cl. ..273/176 FB 51 Int. cu. ..A63b 67/02 58 Field of Search ..273/176, 177, 178, 273/179, 180

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,864,030 6/1932 ROSS ..273/176 F 2,144,439 1/1939 Duffy- ..273/176F 2,384,723 9/1945 Brodzik et al. ..273/178 B X 2,465,418 3/1949 Baker ..273/180 2,539,046 1/1951 Wright ..273/176 F FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 22l,l68- 9/1924 Great Britain ..273/176 FB [4 1 Apr. 17, 1973 Primary ExaminerGeorge J. Marlo Attorney-Finnegan, Henderson & Farabow [57] ABSTRACT A portable golf game comprises a) a base including a flat center panel, a rim surrounding the back and sides of the center panel; three rows of depressed pockets in the center panel for receiving a golf ball, and a channel wall joining the rim to the center panel, and b) a synthetic grass strip secured to and overlying the center panel, and having a plurality of openings aligned with the drpressed pockets of the center panel. The grass strip extends past the front of the center panel to provide a longitudinal putting surface. The first, second and third rows of pockets include one, two and three holes, respectively. The pockets in the first and second rows are offset from each other and have equal diameters which are less than the diameters of the pockets in the third row, which latter pockets are offset from the pockets in the second row.

The bottom walls of all the depressed pockets are pro- 8 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures P-ATENTEDAPR 1 new 7 7, 91

SHEET 1 [1F 2 PORTABLE GOLF GAME This invention relates to a simulated golf game, and more particularly to a portable golf game which can be used by all of the members of a family including young children who have just learned or are learning how to play the game of golf.

The popularity of golf has generated many games which simulate the game of golf to enable people to practice and improve on their golfing skills and to participate in the excitement of a golf game.

It is an object of this invention to provide a new simulated golf game which can be played at home.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a new simulated golf gamewhich is portable and can be easily and conveniently stored in a small area.

Additional objects and advantages of the present invention will be set forth in part in thedescription which follows and in part will be obvious from the description or can be learned by practice of the invention. The objects and advantages are achieved by means of the instrumentalities and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

To achieve the foregoing objects and in accordance with its purpose, this invention provides a portable golf game comprising (a) a base including a flat center panel having a front, back and two opposed sides; a rim surrounding the center panel at its back and sides; a plurality of depressed pockets in the center panel for receiving a golf ball, the pockets comprising a first row of a single pocket, a second row of two pockets between the first row and back of the center panel, and a third row of three pockets between the second row and back of the center panel; and a channel wall joining the rim to the center panel; and (b) a synthetic grass strip secured to and overlying the center panel. The

grass strip has a plurality of openings aligned with the depressed pockets of the center panel and extends past the front of the center panel to provide a longitudinal putting surface.

It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory but are not restrictive of the invention.

The accompanying drawings illustrate-an example of a preferred embodiment of the invention and, together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

Of the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a portable golf game constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the golf game shown in FIG. '1;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the golf game of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a vertical section view taken along lines 4- 4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a vertical section view taken along lines 5- 5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the single pocket in the first row of pockets in the center panel;

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of a pocket in the second row of pockets in the center panel; and

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of a pocket in the third row of pockets in the center panel.

Referring to FIG. 1 and 2, and in accordance with the invention, the golf game includes a base, generally 10, comprised of a flat center panel, generally 12 and a rim generally 14.

Center panel 12 is generally rectangular and has a front 16, a back 18, and two opposed longitudinal sides 20 and 22. Rim 14 extends above and surrounds center panel 12 at its back 18 and sides 20 and 22. Rim 14 includes a transverse back end portion 24 and two opposed longitudinal side portions 26 and 28, generally parallel to sides 20 and 22 of center panel 12. Front 16 of center panel 12 is open and is not bounded by rim 14. As best seen in FIG. 3, a front wall 30 extends downwardly from center panel 12.

Rim 14 comprises a top flat web portion 32 which has an inner edge 34 and an outer edge 36 and a skirt 38 which is joined to outer edge 36 of the rim. Skirt 38 extends downwardly from top web portion 32 which is above center panel 12. Skirt 38 is provided with an outwardly extending flange 40 at its bottom to form a supporting surface which contacts the floor or other surface on which the game is placed. Flange 40 extends around the entire periphery of base 10.

A channel wall, generally 42 joins inner edge 34 of rim 14 to sides 20 and 22 and back 18 of center panel 12. Channel wall 42 is concave in shape and forms a continuous groove between rim 14 and center panel 12 for receiving golf balls that have rolled past the boundaries of the center panel.

In accordance with the invention, center panel 12 is provided with a plurality of depressed pockets. As best shown in F IGS. 1 and 2, center panel 12 has a first row consisting of a single pocket 44, a second row of two pockets 46 and 48, and a third row of three pockets 50, 52 and 54. Pocket 44 of the first row is midway between the sides 20 and 22 of center panel 12. Pockets 46 and 48 of the second row are between the first row and back of center panel 12. Each pocket 46 and 48 of the second row is offset on opposite sides of pocket 44 so that they are closer to the sides of center panel 12 than pocket 44. The pockets 50, 52 and 54 of the third row are between the second row and back 18 of center panel 12. The two outer pockets 50 and 54 of the third row are offset outwardly of the pockets of the second row so that they are closer to the sides 20 and 22 of center panel 12 than pockets 46 and 48. The middle pocket 52 of the third row is aligned with pocket 44 of the first row. The pockets of the third row are 2 i inches in diameter, which is larger than the 2 inch diameter of the pockets of the first and second rows. Each pocket is generally cylindrical in shape and has a bottom wall 56 provided with a set of indicating markers to indicate the score obtained when a player has stroked a golf ball into the pocket. The different rows of pockets each have different markings in accordance with the degree of difficulty in landing a ball in that row. The pocket 44 is the most difficult pocket for a player to hit the golf ball into, and accordingly he is rewarded with the best score if he lands in this pocket. As best seen in FIG. 6, pocket 44 has three markings, an outer marking 58 indicating a drive shot of 300 yards, a middle marking 60 indicating an approach shot of 15 feet from the pin, and a center marking 62 indicating that the hole was putted out in one stroke.

The pockets 46 and 48 of the second row are the next most difficult pockets for a player to land his golf ball. The bottom wall of these pockets as seen in FIG. 7 has an outer marking of 250 yards for a drive shot, a middle marking of 10 feet for an approach shot, and a center marking of 2 strokes for putting out the hole. The outer marking of pocket 46 is further marked to indicate that the drive shot is in the left rough and the outer marking of pocket 48 is further marked to indicate that the drive shot is in the right rough.

The pockets 50, 52 and 54 of the third row are the easiest pockets for a player to land has golf ball because these pockets are larger in diameter than those of the first and second rows and there are more pockets for the ball to land. The bottom wall of these pockets as seen in FIG. 8 has an outer marking of 200 yards for a drive shot, a middle marking of feet for an approach shot, and a center marking of 3 strokes for putting out a hole. The outer marking of pocket 50 is further marked to indicate that the drive shot is hooked and the outer marking of pocket 54 is further marked to indicate that the drive shot is sliced.

The markings of each pocket are preferably color coded with the outer marking always being in red to indicate a score for a drive shot, the middle marking always being in blue to indicate a score for an approach shot, and the center marking always being in white to indicate the number of strokes for putting out a hole.

In accordance with the invention, a synthetic grass strip, generally 64, is secured to and overlies center panel 12. As best seen in FIG. 5, grass strip 64 has a plurality of openings 66 vertically aligned with the depressed pockets of center panel 12. Grass strip 64 extends past front 16 of center panel 12 to provide a longitudinal putting surface of a length sufficient to provide a player with challenging golf strokes. Preferably, grass strip 64 is about 80 inches long, and the portion that overlies center panel 12 is about 18 inches in length. Grass strip 64 is approximately one foot wide, and is rectangular in shape.

As seen in FIG. 1, grass strip 64 has a playing portion 68 and an intermediate portion 70 which joins playing portion 68 to the portion of the strip that overlies center panel 12. Playing portion 68 is generally laid flat on the floor surface supporting the game. Intermediate portion 70, however, has a gradual upward slope from the floor surface because center panel 12 is raised above the floor. Preferably, a board 72 made of a suitable material such as wood or a composition board, for example fiberboard, is placed beneath intermediate portion 70 of the grass strip to provide support for it and a smooth transition to center panel 12. Board 72 has one end resting on the floor and its other end resting in a groove on front wall 30 of base [0.

Grass strip 64 can be made of any suitable synthetic material, and as best seen in FIG. 4 comprises a pile layer 74 and a backing layer 76. Pile layer 74 preferably is made of nylon fiber having a pile height of three-eighths inch, a 250 denier nylon ribbon, and a face fiber per square yard of 24 ounces. Backing layer 76 preferably comprises a primary backing layer of woven polypropylene which is tufted with the nylon fiber and a secondary backing of an all-weather, nonslipping material such as a synthetic rubber secured to the primary backing. Grass strip 64 preferably is an allweather surface strip which retains its lush green color all year around, is fade resistant, and will not mildew, rot or shed. Grass strip 64 does not require any maintenance, and it can be easily cleaned by hosing it down, or by sweeping it with either a broom or vacuum cleaner. It is stain resistant, non-flammable, and dries quickly. The grass strip does not harm wood or tile floors, and can be used on the surfaces of patios, pool areas, apartment balconies, cottage decks and docks, and family rooms. A synthetic grass strip having the above properties is ideally suited for the portable golf game of this invention because it enables the game to be set up on any available surface.

The playing portion 68 of grass strip 64 is provided with a plurality of indicating markers designating the areas where the different golf shots are to be taken by the player. An identical set of markers is placed on each side of the grass strip and aligned with each other. A tee area 78 is provided at the front of grass strip 64 and a first marker 80 is placed a short distance from the front edge 81 of the strip to define the tee area. All tee shots must be taken from the tee area 78.

A second marker 82 is placed approximately one foot from marker 80. Marker 82 indicates the position that the ball is to be placed for the next shot if the previous shot landed in the third row of pockets 50, 52 and 54. Marker 82 is marked to read 200 yards and 15 feet from the pin. A marker 82 is placed on each side of grass strip 64. The marker on the right side of grass strip 64 corresponds to a golf ball being hit in pocket 54 so that the next shot must be taken at the right side of grass strip 64. Similarly, the marker on the left side of grass strip 64 corresponds to a golf ball being hit in pocket 50 so that the next shot must be taken at the left side of the grass strip. When a golf ball lands in pocket 52, the next shot is taken at the center of grass strip 64 between the markers 82.

A third marker 84 is placed approximately one foot from marker 82 and indicates the position that the ball is to be placed for the next shot,if the previous shot landed in the second row of pockets 46 and 48. Marker 84 is marked to read 250 yards and 10 feet from the pin. A fourth marker 86 is placed approximately one foot from marker 84 to indicate the position that the ball is placed for the next shot, if the previous shot landed in pocket 44 of the first row. Marker 86 is marked to read 300 yards and 5 feet from the pin. Thus, the degree of difficulty of a succeeding shot is determined by the success of the immediately preceeding shot.

Each of the markers 82, 84 and 86 are preferably color coded with the markers on the bottom wall of the depressed pockets. The markers 80, 82, 84 and 86 can be secured to grass strip 64 by suitable means such as a clip, or alternately, can comprise pieces of material that can be placed under grass strip 64, with the ends of the pieces extending beyond the sides of grass strip 64 so that they are visible.

A brief description of the play of the game will now be given.

The game is a simulation ofa complete round of golf but is played entirely with a putter. Each player completes the entire play on a hole before the next player begins. Each hole consists of drives, approach shots and putts. The first hole is always played as a par 4 hole. The next hole can be set up by the winner of the preceeding hole. He can select the par and set up any obstacles on the hole.

Beginning with a tee shot, the ball is placed in the tee area for the players drive to the hole. If the drive falls into one of the six pockets, the red colored markings of the pockets provide an explanation of the resultant drive. For example, if the ball falls into pocket 48, the drive shot went 250 yards in the right rough. The approach shot to the putting green must then be taken from the spot immediately adjacent the appropriate marker on synthetic grass strip 64. The approach shot is taken either in the center or on the right or left markers, depending upon where the drive has gone, in this case adjacent marker 84 indicating a 250 yard drive in the right rough. If the drive does not go into any of the six pockets, the ball is returned to the tee area and the stroke is counted.

After the position of the drive has been determined, the next shot is the approach stroke to determine the position of the ball on the putting green. This stroke is to be taken from the position indicated by the drive. If the approach shot falls into any one of the six pockets, the blue colored markings of the pockets provide an explanation of the players resultant approach shot. For

example, if the ball falls into a pocket of the third row marked Feet From Pin, the players position for putting on the putting green is at the 15 Feet From Pin" marker 82, either at the left, right or in the center of grass strip 64, depending upon which pocket of the third row the approach shot landed. If the approach shot does not go into any of the six pockets, the ball must be returned to the appropriate approach shot marker and the stroke counted.

After the distance of the putt is determined by the approach shot, the putt is made from the appropriate markeron the grass strip 64. If the putt falls into one of the six pockets, the player is assessed the number of putts as indicated by the number in the bottom of the pocket. For example, a player whose putt falls into the pocket 44 with the number 1 on the bottom, has concluded play of the hole by one putting the green. If the putt does not go into any of the six pockets, the ball must be returned to the appropriate putt marker on the grass strip 64, and the stroke counted.

A par three hole can e played be omitting the drive shot and taking only an approach shot and putt. The approach shot, however, is taken at the tee area. A par 5 hole can be played by taking two drive shots, with the second drive shot being taken from the marker indicated by the result of the first drive shot. To increase the difficulty of any hole', objects can be placed under grass strip 64 or flange 40 of base 12. Base 112 is preferably made of a plastic material by conventional molding techniques.

After play is completed, the golf course can be easily stored by rolling the grass strip 64 around base 10. Grass strip 64 folds to a small 29 X 19 X 5 inch area, so it is possible to easily store and transport the game.

The invention in its broader aspects is not limited to the specific details shown and described and departures may be made from such details without departing from the principles of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages.

What is claimed is:

l. A portable golf game comprising:

a. a base including a flat center panel having a front, back and two opposed sides; a rim surrounding the center panel at its back and sides; a plurality of depressed pockets in the center panel for receiving a golf ball, the pockets comprising a first row of a single pocket, a second row of two pockets between the first row and back of the center panel, and a third row of three pockets between the second row and back of the center panel; and a channel wall joining the rim to the center panel; and

. a synthetic grass strip secured to and overlying the center panel, the grass strip having a plurality of openings aligned with the depressed pockets of the center panel and extending past the front of the center panel to provide a longitudinal putting surface.

2. The game of claim 1 wherein the pockets of the second row are offset on opposite sides of the pocket of the first row so that they are closer to the sides of the center panel. 7

3. The game of claim 1 wherein two pockets of the third row are offset outwardly of the pockets of the second row so that said two pockets of the third row are closer to the sides of the center panel.

4. The game of claim 1 wherein a pocket of the third row is longitudinally aligned with the pocket of the first row.

5. The game of claim 1 wherein the diameter of the pockets of the first and second rows are equal, and the diameter of the pockets of the third row are larger than the diameter of the pockets of the first and second rows.

6. The game of claim 1 wherein the grass strip has a playing portion and an .intermediate portion joining the playing portion to the portion of the strip that overlies the center panel.

7. The game of claim 6 including a board under the intermediate portion to provide support for the intermediate portion and a smooth transition to the center panel.

8. The game of claim 1 wherein the grass strip is flexible and can be wrapped around the base.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1864030 *Aug 6, 1930Jun 21, 1932Ross Chester WPractice device for golf
US2144439 *Jan 16, 1937Jan 17, 1939Duffy Elmer LGolf practice and amusement apparatus
US2384723 *Jan 19, 1942Sep 11, 1945BrodzikPutting green
US2465418 *Jul 14, 1944Mar 29, 1949Baker David SPortable game device
US2539046 *Sep 12, 1949Jan 23, 1951Wright Donald PIndoor golf game
GB221168A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3856313 *May 4, 1973Dec 24, 1974Tierney DGolf putting apparatus with ball return
US3944232 *Dec 16, 1974Mar 16, 1976Tierney David PGolf game
US4743026 *Apr 15, 1986May 10, 1988Eady Gordon EGolf game
US4974857 *Oct 20, 1988Dec 4, 1990Arachnid, Inc.Electronic dart game
US5171016 *Dec 3, 1991Dec 15, 1992Kamal Charles JApparatus for practicing putting and chipping
US5954590 *Jul 28, 1995Sep 21, 1999Jill Frances NixeyGolf putting aid or game
US6302803Jan 28, 2000Oct 16, 2001David R. BarlowPortable golf putting green
US6669572Apr 3, 2002Dec 30, 2003David R. BarlowGolf putting and chipping practice green
US6672970Feb 7, 2002Jan 6, 2004David R. BarlowPortable golf putting practice green
US6672971Jan 14, 2002Jan 6, 2004David R. BarlowPortable golf putting training aid
US6793586Jan 22, 2003Sep 21, 2004David R. BarlowGolf putting and chipping practice green
US7294062 *Feb 21, 2006Nov 13, 2007James TingIndoor putting game device
US7306223 *Jun 28, 2006Dec 11, 2007James TingMarble game machine
US7744478 *Dec 12, 2008Jun 29, 2010Mark ChelakPortable bowling game kit
US20030190969 *Jan 22, 2003Oct 9, 2003David R. BarlowGolf putting and chipping practice green
US20050028475 *Sep 9, 2004Feb 10, 2005David R. BarlowInterlocked base and an overlaying surface covering
US20050197197 *Mar 2, 2004Sep 8, 2005Scott Ricky W.Golf chipping target and game
US20070197306 *Feb 21, 2006Aug 23, 2007James TingIndoor putting game device
US20080001354 *Jun 28, 2006Jan 3, 2008James TingMarble game machine
US20100151954 *Dec 12, 2008Jun 17, 2010Mark ChelakPortable bowling game kit
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/159
International ClassificationA63B67/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B67/02, A63B2208/12, A63B2210/50
European ClassificationA63B67/02