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Publication numberUS3727985 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1973
Filing dateJan 3, 1972
Priority dateJan 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3727985 A, US 3727985A, US-A-3727985, US3727985 A, US3727985A
InventorsReuter B
Original AssigneeCons Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic conveying apparatus automatically operable successively for weight responsive filling, and for activation, discharging, purging against back pressure, and venting
US 3727985 A
Abstract
The pressure vessel or fluid flow pump cycle of Reuter U.S. Pat. No. 3,355,221, issued Nov. 28, 1967, which has steps of filling, activation, discharging and purging, is disclosed as load cell or scale supported and vented, and is thus further adapted for lifting certain types of pulverulent material against back pressure, by placing check valve means in the purge line and/or in a pressurized gas line from source, the check valve means being substantially in adjacent communication with the discharge line downstream of the discharge valve. Thus the check valve may close and protect against back pressure urging material, (normally destined to be purged down the discharge line), back into the pressure vessel. The additional step of venting to atmosphere and/or to hopper any residual material not carried away by the purge step, is thus disclosed as an added step. The admission of pressurized gas from source can enter as when back pressure in some excess may be encountered. As check valves are subject to wear and failure, the employment of pressurized gas from source can act as a safeguard against the effects of back pressure. The added features set forth hereinabove may be employed with a variety of fluid flow pump structures, as agitator equipped pumps; also with pumps suspended below a load cell.
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Unite States Patent 1 [111 3,727,985 Reuter Apr. 17, 1973 PNEUMATIC CONVEYING {57] ABSTRACT APPARATUS AUTOMATICALLY OPERABLE SUCCESSIVELY FOR WEIGHT RESPONSIVE FILLING, AND FOR ACTIVATION, DISCHARGING, PURGING AGAINST BACK PRESSURE,

Primary Examiner-Evon C. Blunk Assistant Examiner-Hadd S. Lane Attorney-William E. Ford The pressure vessel or fluid flow pump cycle of Reuter US. Pat. No. 3,355,221, issued Nov. 28, 1967, which has steps of filling, activation,'discharging and purging, is disclosed as load cell or scale supported and vented, and is thus further adapted for lifting certain types of pulverulent material against back pressure, by placing check valve means in the purge line and/or in a pressurized gas line from source, the check valve means being substantially in adjacent communication with the discharge line downstream of the discharge valve. Thus the check valve may close and protect against back pressure urging material, (normally destined to be purged down the discharge line), back into the pressure vessel. The additional step of venting to atmosphere and/or to hopper any residual material not carried away by the purge step, is thus disclosed as an added step. The admission of pressurized gas from source can enter as when back pressure in some excess may be encountered. As check valves are subject to wear and failure, the employment of pressurized gas from source can act as a safeguard against the effects of back pressure' The added features set forth hereinabove may be employed with a variety of fluid flow pump structures, as agitator equipped pumps; also with pumps suspended below a load cell.

6 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures IO 3 Elk 2| 25 m 24 l t V 85a 3 I 25 8 25;. l i

872: 88 240 2.5V 11; 27c I I 1 2 27 13 M 1% 9 h 21 9| 25 25 ass Ha 2g 95 a 320' PATENTED APR I 71973 SHEET 1 [1F 4 an 88 34:1 90 25 27 27 2404 J 2c 21 1" 9 2 I 3 90 90a- 25 2c 15 38s MN. 2 9: 51 a 95 as:

PATENTEDAPR I 7 I973 SHEET 2 OF 4 m A T N A L a s Q 5 v a I H S 9U (If '2 In I 6 5 2 4 M Q I- Z P y 7 5 r: 3 I 2 a a MO, 1 & Iii, V ii 0) 8 A||| v I I I H a: m, 1 m 2 m. v II L .i m m a mi BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Kennedy et al. U.S. Pat. No. 2,032,367 issued Mar.

3, 1936, to Pneumatic Transport System disclosed valves controlling material inlet, the fluid pressure connection, and the exhaust outlet; Vogel-Jorgensen U.S. Pat. No. 2,124,018 issued July 19, 1938, disclosed circuitry operated by material level sensitive devices to operate valves corresponding with selective material levels; Vogel-Jorgensen U.S. Pat. No. 2,221,741 issued Nov. 12, 1940, disclosed mechanical operation of valves by level sensitive equipment; and Baresch U.S. Pat. No. 2,668,085, issued Feb. 1954, disclosed in particular, fill valve closure responsive to material level actuating the level sensitive equipment to control the fill valve. Reuter U.S. Pat. No. 3,555,221, issued Nov. 28, 1967, showed circuitry time actuated, pressure actuated, and electrically operated, to open fill valve, close fill valve, open activate valve and close purge valve, open discharge valve, close discharge valve and open purge valve, and as pressure drops to atmospheric, to repeat the cycle.

Before the Reuter U.S. Pat. No. 3,555,221 issued Nov. 28, 1967, a continuation-in-part Application Ser. No. 686,018 was filed on Nov, 28, 1969, with the fluid flow pump" structure of Reuter U.S. Pat. No. 3,555,221 mounted on a beam scale. While this application was still pending a continuation-in-part application was filed on May 6, 1969, (issued Dec. 22, 1970 as U.S. Pat. No. 3,549,206) showing the Reuter fluid flow pump with an agitator driven from a motor mounted centrally on top and with hopper filling the vessel through one side of the top, the discharge being from the bottom of the vessel. Also this application repeated the disclosure of the fluid flow pump on a beam scale. With the aforesaid application still pending a continuation-in-part application was filed on Oct. 21, 1969, which will issue Jan. 4, 1972, as U.S. Pat. No. 3,632,173. This patent covers the condition when the fluid flow pump discharges with falling pressure of discharge being opposed by back pressure action down the discharge line in direction of the pump.

Thus a check valve was installed in the purge line downstream from the purge valve and discharge valve, so that the check valve would close the purge line as the back pressure began to equal the purge line pressure. This necessitated a vent in the cycle to be opened, shortly after purge valve opening and then being check valve closed, thus to vent the vessel or pump so the pressure therein could drop to atmospheric, so the cycle could begin again. In this form of fluid flow pump the vessel was claimed as being mounted on a scale means to transmit a net weight or batch weight proportionate signal to set in operation fill valve closure.

Also, on Dec. 16, 1970, just before the issuance of U.S. Pat. No. 3,549,206 on Dec. 22, 1970, a continuation-in-part application was filed showing a wide range of improvements, with a load cell replacing the beam scale formerly disclosed as the means of transmitting a weight proportionate signal to close the fill valve. As

this application is filed the continuation-in-part application for U.S. Pat. No. 3,632,173, that issues Jan. 4, 1972, is still pending, along with the aforesaid Application Ser. No. 98,567, filed Dec. 16, 1970.

This application improves upon the invention of the patent that will issue Jan. 4, 1972, in that it either adds to, or substitutes for, the check valve protected purge line, a conduit from pressurized gas, or plant air source, that connects into the discharge line downstream of the discharge valve. This source air or gas conduit has a valve therein that is opened at the same time the purge valve is opened and closed. Also it has a check valve therein adjacent the point where it connects into the discharge line downstream from the discharge valve. Since the details of fill valve opening and closure are carried out by a load cell with much greater efficiency than by a beam scale, the structure of a load cell is injected into this application correspondingly as such is shown in the immediately preceeding application. Also, the agitator equipped fluid flow pump is shown supported upon a load cell, and with a check valve guarded, additional source air line provided.

As a primary object the invention provides a load cell mounted, vent equipped, pressure vessel or pump which either substitutes for, or adds, parallel with the purge line, a conduit from plant air or source of compressed gas, this conduit having a valve therein turned on and off with the purge line valve, and a protective check valve being provided in this conduit at its connection into the discharge line, downstream from the discharge valve.

As another important object, this invention provides a fluid flow pump type pressure vessel or pump, of the class discribed, which is supported by a load cell.

It is yet a further object of this invention to provide a fluid flow pump type pressure vessel, of the class described, which additionally includes a motor driven agitator, and which is supported upon a load cell.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a fluid flow pump type pressure vessel, of the class described, which is adapted to be seated upon a load cell, or which alternately may be adapted to be suspended below a platform supported load cell.

It is also another and additional object of the invention to provide safe guarding, or alternatively, level probe means with the types of fluid flow pump type pressure vessels, hereinabove described, to close the fill valve.

Other and further objects will be apparent when the specification herein is considered in connection with the drawings, in which:

SPECIFICATION DETAIL Other and further objects of the invention will be apparent when the specification hereunder is considered in connection with the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view, partially diagrammatic, showing a fluid flow pump,-on load cell equipped with vent valve, and with purge valve with check valve downstream thereabove communicating with discharge line downstream of discharge valve, thus to oppose back pressure; also as an alternative compressed air from source is shown additive to oppose back pressure;

FIG. 2 is smaller scale elevational view, substantially diagrammatic, showing fluid flow pump as shown in FIG. I and also the tower for receiving discharge; back pressure compressed air and purge line between pressure vessel and purge valve, both being shown in broken lines, as optionally employed features;

FIG. 3 is a sectional elevational view of the load cells shown supporting pressure vessels in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is an electrical and pressure circuitry diagram of the circuitry operative with the structures shown in FIGS. l-3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary elevational view, partially diagrammatic, showing a check valve with purge valve upstream therefrom, with compressed air from source indicated as the only purge and back pressure opposing fluid;

FIG. 6 is an alternative arrangement of hopper and pressure vessel as supported in suspension upon a load cell;

FIG. 7 is a sectional elevational view, partially diagrammatic, showing an agitator equipped pressure vessel in an arrangement including features shown in FIG. 6; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional elevational view taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 7.

Referring now to the drawings in which like reference numerals are applied to like elements in the various views, a material container, housing, pump or activator 10 is shown in FIG. 1 comprised of a shell 11 including a cylindrical main body 11a with upper end closed by a top comprised of a spherical segment or dome 12a and a bottom comprised of a spherical segment or lower closure 12b, the container being constructed after the general manner of conventional pressure vessels, and designed with safety factors, to

withstand the highest pressures that may be developed therein.

The pressure vessel or container 10 is supported on a load cell 14 which receives instrument air thereinto through an inlet conduit 95 and discharges air therefrom through a discharge conduit 92a at a predetermined signal intensity corresponding with the deposit of a predetermined batch weight of pulverulent material upon a gas permeable membrane or diaphragm l3 separating the container into an upper, or material plenum 15, and a lower, or gas plenum 16.

The dome 120 has an inlet flange or neck 17 connected centrally into the top thereof with an inlet gate valve orlower fill valve 18 being mounted thereon. A flexible nipple 19 is shown connecting the lower fill valve 18 to the lower flange of an upper fill valve 18a having its upper flange connected with a discharge flange 20 from a hopper 200. The nipple 19 is shown as a flexible member since the load cell 14 functions as a weight scale whereby the pump 10 supported thereon changes slightly in elevation between an upper, empty elevation and a lower, or batch material filled elevation.

Valve operators 23, 232, are shown diagrammatically, as disposed to open and close, respectively, the lower and upper fill valves 18, 18a. Pistons 23a, 23f, are shown in the respective valve operators 23, 23e. Conduits 23g, h, extend from a discharge tube or pipe 23d from the instrument panel box 40 mounted on the pump body 11a. The conduit 23g branches into conduits 23b and 23j, respectively, to admit instrument air into the respective valve operators 23, 23e, under the respective pistons 23a, 23f, to open the respective fill valves 18, 18a.

Also the conduit 23h branches into conduits 23c, 23k, for air passage from the outer ends of the valve operators 23, 23c, back in the closed compressed air circuit to its pressurized reservoir. Otherwise, such reservoir may be selectively supplied with compressed air, to carry out the respective compressed air functions hereinabove recited.

As indicated in FIG. 1, the vessel 10 is mounted on the load cell 14, to float thereon in elevation, and consequently, since the hopper 200 is supported stationarily by the support frame 194-, float allowance must be made in all connections between hopper 200 and vessel 10. Thus the compressed air or gas conduit 25 is shown connected to discharge into the gas plenum 16, through a flexible conduit 25b, the gas conduit2S being supported above floor level by a support post 14a.

Also, since the instrument panel 40 is rigidly carried by the shell 1 1a of the vessel 10, the air pressure signal emitting pipe 92a, which emits a pressure signal proportionate to batch weight of material impressed upon the load cell 14, has a flexible tubing 92b connecting it with pipe section or nipple 920, that extends from the panel40.

In like manner the aforesaid flexible nipple 19, between upper and lower fill valves 18a, 18, permits the lower fill valve 18 to move with some relation to the fixedly supported upper fill valve 18a. Hence the aforesaid conduits 23g, 23h, from the pipe nipple 23d above the panel 40 are indicated as being flexible, and also their respective branches 23b, 231', and 230, 23k, are indicated as being flexible. Since it is desirable in operation that the upper fill valve 18a should close before the lower fill valve 18, a check valve 23m is provided in the branch conduit 23b thus to check the rate of fluid forced upwardly through the branch conduit 23b with relation to the rate of fluid forced downwardly through the unobstructed conduit 23j.

As shown in FIG. 1, the gas, as compressed air, which activates and transports the material which enters the container, shell, or pressure vessel 11, arrives from its source, as a compressor or pressurized reservoir, and passes, via a source conduit 21, through a strainer 83 and a globe valve 84, on its way through a main conduit 25, to be regulated by pressure regulating valve 86, to the pressure at which it is to be supplied. Thus the gas is first measured by a high pressure gauge 85, in the top of a gauge pipe 85a, which upstands from the main gas line 25, through which the strained gas passes on downstream. Thus the gas is first measured by a high pressure gauge 85 in the top of the gauge pipe 85a which upstands from the main gas line 25 through which the strained gas passes on downstream. A smaller sized by-pass line 25a extends between the gauge pipe 85a and the aforesaid pressure regulating valve 86 in the main conduit 25, and has a pilot regulating valve or regulator 87 therein, thus to permit a finer and more responsive control of the pressurized gas on its way to the pressure vessel 11.

A by-pass line 87a conveys the reduced pressure gas from the pilot regulator 87 and connects with an upstanding gauge pipe 88 above the main conduit 25, a

low pressure gauge 89 being mounted on top of the gauge pipe 88 to indicate the lowered pressure of the gas. Finally, a valve 94, downstream of the regulating valve 86 and upstream of the gas inlet control valve 26, may be opened to permit plant gas, as compressed air, to pass to the aforesaid valve 26, as controlled by the valve operator 27.

Since the pressure vessel or pump is supported on a load cell or scale 14 which is depressed in elevation in correspondence with batch weight deposited in the pump, while the main gas conduit 25 is rigidly supported, as by support post 14a, a flexible conduit 25b is employed as that part of the main gas conduit 25, which connects the plant air or compressed gas into the spherical segment or bottom closure 12b of the pressure vessel 11 to discharge into the gas plenum 16.

A smaller sized by-pass line 25a, extends between the gauge pipe 85a, and the aforesaid pressure regulating valve 86, in the main conduit 25, and has a pilot regulating valve or regulator 87, therein, thus to permit a finer and more responsive control of the pressurized gas on its way to the pressure vessel 11. A by-pass line 87a, conveys the reduced pressure gas from the pilot regulator 87, and connects with an upstanding gauge pipe 88, above the main conduit 25, a low pressure gauge 89, being mounted on top of the gauge pipe 88 to indicate the lowered pressure of the gas.

A pressure fluid conduit 90 extends from the lower closure 12b of the pressure vessel 11, to convey pressurized fluid therefrom through a strainer 91, a pressure gauge 90a downstream of strainer upstanding from the conduit 90, and the conduit 90 then being rigidly connected into the instrument panel 40. Via this means the pressurized fluid from within the vessel is brought to bear upon, and to cause switch actuation of switch means within the instrument panel 40, to be hereinbelow described. The instrument air required by the pressure sensitive switches, as contra-distinguished from the actuating air or gas, and any other air or gas required to actuate any of the apparatus, including that required to operate the valve operators shown in FIG. 1, may be carried to the panel box 40 by means of a conduit 93, which is connected through the connection nipple 93a into the panel box 40 for selective distribution. Also, the power conductors 41, 42, from a source of electrical power, as a 60 cycle, I15 A.C. voltage source, may be brought to the panel box 40 through an insulated conductor cord 95.

Thus operative air, gas or fluid, is admitted selectively into the conduits 27b or 270; selectively into the conduits 33b or 33c; and selectively into the conduits 36b or 36c; selectively to open or close the aforesaid compressed gas valve 26, materials delivery valve 29, and purge valve 35. Also, to be hereinbelow described, a solenoid actuates a valve within the panel box 40 to open or close the aforesaid upper and lower fill valves 18a, 18, as above explained.

The pressure vessel or pump 10, shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 discloses a vent conduit 31a extending from the top closure or dome 12a of the pump 10 to a vent valve 230 from which rises a vent pipe 231 to discharge via a connection nipple 232 into the hopper 200, against atmospheric pressure usually prevailing in hopper. Optionally, the discharge may be into the atmosphere, as indicated by reference numeral 233. Although not shown, Conventional means as stop cocks, caps or chokes may be provided whereby all, non, or any part of the discharge may be directed through either nipple 232, selectively, into the hopper 200, or to the atmosphere through the nipple 233.

The vent valve 230 is shown as opened and closed'by a valve operator 234 with piston 234a therein moved outwardly to open the valve 230, as pressure fluid enters conduit 234b behind the piston 234a to move it outwardly, the pressure fluid outwardly of the piston 234a being returned to the panel box 40 by way of conduit 234c. Closing of the valve 230 by the valve operator 234 obviously entails reversal of direction of fluid movement.

As shown in FIG. I, a conduit 34 extends from the upper portion of the pressure vessel 11 to convey purge materials under falling pressure, to be hereinbelow described, to and through a purge valve 35 and then through a check valve 235, (yieldably urged seated in direction of the purge valve 35), into a pipe section 32, 31, upwardly flexible in FIG. 1. The pipe section 32 is just downstream of the discharge valve 29, which communicates with a discharge nipple or outlet 28 from the upper closure or dome 12a of the pressure vessel 11. In FIG. 2 the purge conduit 34 is shown in broken lines as conveying purge material to the purgevalve 35 having the check valve 235 just downstream thereof and communicating into the lower portion 31 of the discharge conduit 30. Also in FIG. 2 the discharge conduit lower portion 31 includes the flexible section 32, and also the check valve 235 communicates in FIG. 2 into the rigid conduit portion 31.

As shown more or less diagrammatically in FIG. 2, a pressure vessel or pump 10 is shown weighed for predetermined net weight by a'load cell 14, shown in small scale detail in this view. Plant air is indicated as entering the bottom ofthe vessel 10 via the compressed air line 25. Also, the material, as granular or pulverulent material, is admitted from the hopper 200 to the pump 10 by means of the upper fill valve 18a, flexible nipple 19, and lower fill valve 18. The discharge valve 29 operates to discharge through conduit system 30, to discharge the activated material from the pump 10 upwardly into a catalyst regenerator tower 236.

In FIG. 1, respective conduits 27b, 33b, and 36b connect into the respective compressed gas, materials delivery and purge valve operator cylinders 27, 33, and 36, under the respective piston heads 27a,"33a, and 360, while respective conduits 27c, 33c, and 360 connect into such cylinders above the respective piston heads therein. Thus, conductor cords or sleeves 27d, 33d, and 36d for the respective conduits for the respective valve operator cylinders aforesaid, are provided to extend from the control or panel box 40, where conventional instrument air, as from the instrument air conduit 93, may pass through respective conventional solenoid actuated valves, now shown, within the panel box 40, as operated by respective solenoids to be hereinbelow described.

Having set forth the background for operation of the pump 10 when discharge is to be made against back pressure, and when the net weight of material, as batches, from the hopper 200 into pump 10 is to be impressed upon a load cell 14, reference may now be made to FIG. 3 which sets forth the details of load cell construction and operation.

Referring now to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the load cell 14 on which the pump 10 is supported, is shown as a scale of the type disclosed in co-pending Application Ser. No. 98,567, filed Dec. 16, 1970, the last of the preceding applications from which this application is a continuation-impart. This type of load cell is also set forth in details of Bullivant and Kane U.S. Pat. No. 3 ,425503. issued Feb. 4, 1969. Such a load cell 14 is shown comprising a weighing anvil 350 connected centrally to an upper tare weight space defining diaphragm 351 and held peripherally between upper or hold-down ring 352 I and the peripheral annular area of a bored and counterbored tare weight ring 353 comprising the two uppermost structural rings of the load cell body 355. The weighing anvil 350 is dished for the lower portion of a ball member 354 to seat therein, while as best shown in FIG. 3, the lower or gas plenum closure spherical segment 12b of a pressure vessel or fluid flow pump 10 has an inverted, dished out cup member 356 on the lower.- most area thereof to guide the pump 10 into a centered seated position on the ball member 354.

The tare weight ring 353 peripheral annular area serves as hold-down for, and seats upon a lower defining diaphragm 358 of a tare weight chamber 357, with the peripheral annular area of the diaphragm 358 seating upon the peripheral annular area of an inverted bored and counterbored section or ring 359 of an upper dampening chamber 360. The peripheral annular area of the inverted bored and counterbored ring 359 serves as hold down for, and seats upon, a lower defining diaphragm 361 of the upper dampening chamber 360. A bored and counterbored ring or body section 362 has the peripheral annular area of the diaphragm 361 supported thereon, and this diaphragm 361 defines in part the upper surface of a second dampening chamber 363.

The ring or body section 362 comprises the holddown for a diaphragm 364 which in part defines the second dampening chamber 363 thereabove, with the vent chamber 366 being disposed immediately therebelow, the annular peripheral area of the diaphargm 364 seating upon the inverted bored and counterbored ring or body section 365. This ring 365 acts as hold-down upon the annular peripheral area of a lowermost diaphragm 367 which in part defines the vent chamber 366 thereabove. A vent passage 368 is shown from the vent chamber 366 through the ring 365 to the exterior of the load cell body 35 5.

Alternately inverted and upright solid flange shaped guide members 369, 370, 371 and 372 are disposed centrally of the load cell body 355, with flange members of the same diameter as the anvil 350, with flange of member 369 under diaphragm 351, with flange of member 370 upon diaphragm 361, and with flange of member 371 under diaphragm 361, and with flange of member 372 upon diaphragm 367. Thus the heads of flanges 369, 370 abut across diaphragm 358 and the heads of flanges 371, 372 abut across diaphragm 364.

A connection screw 373 passes threadably through the anvil 350, and through central bores through the diaphragms, and through central bores through the flange members 369, 370, 371, 372, for threaded connection centrally into the upper portion of a cage 374 on which bears centrally the lowermost diaphragm 367. The cage 374 extends downwardly with clearance into a balancing chamber 375 formed by boring and counterboring a lowermost body section or housing member 376 on which seats the peripheral annular area of the lower diaphragm 367. The cage 374 is bored upwardly from its lower end to provide a chamber 377 for a spring 378 which seats upon a plunger 379 that serves as the valve seating member of a balancing chamber escape valve, with the valve seat thereof comprising a nozzle 380 fixed in a bore directed centrally upwardly through the bottom of the housing member 376, and above an escape slot 381 thereacross. Preferably a bleed passage 382 is provided through the valve member or plunger 379 to relieve against cushioning.

A horizontally extending passage 383a, 383b, is shown as being drilled diametrically across the housing member 376 at a predetermined elevation therein, as with axis at some predetermined elevation with relation to the fixedly located upper surface of the nozzle 380. A pressure regulator 384, of conventional design as shown in the aforesaid Bullivant and Kane U.S. Pat. No. 3,425,503, or as shown in Stein U.S. Pat. No. 3,371,732, is shown connected to discharge into the balancing chamber passage 383a, with instrument air being supplied from an instrument air conduit for the rate of flow therefrom into the load cell 14 to be regulated by the aforesaid pressure regulator 384.

A conventional outlet pressure regulator 385, as shown in the above identified U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,425,503 and 3,37l,732, is connected to receive instrument air from conduit 95, and the regulated air communicates through a passage 386 through the tare weight ring 353 which provides therein the tare weight chamber 357. The pressure regulator 385 is opened at the start of operation to permit the introduction of pressurized gas,

as air, into the tare weight chamber 357 tooffset the weight of any container or the like so that only a net load is transmitted for effectiveness in the balancing or net load chamber 375. I

An air signal that is proportionate to net weight or batch weight, as will be hereinbelow described, passes from the balancing chamber 375 through passage 383b and leaves the housing member 376 through a discharge pipe 92a, a pressure gauge 387 being connected into the discharge pipe 92a todisplay indicia of the force of the signal transmitted. The under surface of the valve element 379 in the cage 374 provides a valve seating surface to seat upon the top, flat. surface of the nozzle 380 when a minimum air is to be bled off through the nozzle 380 to the atmosphere, or when a maximum force air signal is to be transmitted in correspondence with the maximum batch weight or'net weight transmitted through the anvil to the cage 374. Conversely, the less net or'batch weight impressed through the anvil 350, the greater distance between nozzle and plunger surfaces, the more air that is bled to atmosphere, and the weaker the signal transmitted through the conduit 92a and on to the panel box 40, H6. 1.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the operation of the apparatus hereinabove described may be described, in accordance with the immediately preceding structure,

' now under issue, the circuitry of the preceding invention being in substantial correspondence with the circuitry for the continuation-in-part features added by this application:

A normally open control switch 237 in the positive power line 241, having the fuse 239 therein, is closed. Current is thus admitted through normally closed switch 243 of latch relay 258a, 258b; also through normally closed vent pressure switch VPS or 247; also through normally closed fill pressure switch FPS or 248; and also through conductors 241a, 241b to double pole, double throw switch 250 and relay LR or 251 of timer latch relay 251, 252. Also current is admitted to flow in the TIME CIRCUIT containing TDR or time delay relay 276, which urges TDS or TIME DELAY switch 277 closed, thus energizing the clutch solenoid 278 to start the MOTOR 280 or M that runs according to the preselected numbers of hours or parts of hours batches of material are to be successively delivered by the pump 10.

The energized timer latch relay 251 now actuates the closing of normally open switch 253a of the switches 253a, 253b and thus the fill light or green light G or 254 goes on and the solenoid 255 in the panel 40 actuates valve operators 23, 23e to open fill valve or fill valves 18, 18a, FIG. 1. Also the solenoid 256 in the panel 40 actuates the valve operator 234, FIG. 1, to open VENT VALVE 230, and the VENT LIGHT or white light W or 257 goes on. Material now enters the vessel 10 from the hopper 200.

The pressure signal that now passes from the load cell 14 via the succession of conduits 92a, 92b, 92c, FIG. 1, is indicated by the reference numeral 92c being applied to the pressure switch NOPS, thus indicated as being normally open, FIG. 4. This switch NOPS, 920, is closed upon this predetermined preset say l p.s.i. being attained as batch load is built up on the diaphragm 13, as aforesaid. This energizes the latch coil 258a of the fill latching relay 258a, 258b, to open the normally closed relay switch 243 and close the normally open relay switch 244. This operates to CLOSE FILL VALVE and also serves to lock in ACTIVATE CYCLE, the whole fill circuitry being broken. Thus the solenoid 256 closes the vent valve 230, FIGS. 1-2, and the white light 257, indicating vent open, goes out. Also the solenoid 255 closes the fill valves 18 and 18a, as aforesaid, and the green light 254 goes out.

As the relay switch 244 closes circuit from the positive side, parallel positive conductor 259 carries circuit to the FILL VALVE TIME DELAY relay TDR designated 261, which, after a preset time interval, closes the time delay relay TDRS or switch 262, whereby the solenoid 263 in the panel 40 operates to shift fluid direction to the valve operator 27, FIG. 1, to OPEN ACTIVATE VALVE or the valve 26, (FIGS. 1 and 2), to admit plant air into the gas plenum chamber beneath the diaphragm 13, FIG. 1, thereby to activate the material, or full batch, that is supported above the diaphragm, as aforesaid. Also, as the solenoid 263 has operated to open the compressed air supply or plant air valve 26, at the same time, the solenoid 264, adjacent thereto in the panel 40, has shifted fluid direction to the valve operator 36, FIG. 1, to CLOSE PURGE VALVE 35. Thus, at this point the fill valve(s) 18, 18a, the vent valve 230, the purge valve 35, and the discharge valve 29 are all closed, while the plant compressed air is entering the vessel to build up pressure therein, and to activate the granular or pulverulent material, or set it in violent motion above the diaphragm 13. Circuit has also been completed so that the blue light B or 265 is turned on as the ACTIVATE LIGHT.

The pressure continues to rise in the vessel until a pressure approaching say 50 p.s.i. is attained therein, whereupon the discharge pressure switch DPS indicated by reference numeral 266 closes, as has been predetermined. As this switch 266 closes, circuit is completed through the red DISCHARGE LIGHT R or 267, which comes on, and through the solenoid 268, in the panel 40, which changes fluid direction to and from the valve operator 33 to OPEN DISCHARGE VALVE 29, FIGS/l and 2.

Also, circuit through the control relay 270 is closed to energize this relay to HOLD DISCHARGE CYCLE by closing the normally open switch 269a of the pair of switches 269a, 269b. Also, the control relay 270 operates to close the normally open switch 2710 of the pair of switches 271a, 271b, thereby circuit is completed through the purge pressure switch PPS or 272 which is set to close at a lower pressure, say 28 p.s.i., than the discharge pressure switch 269a. Thus, at this point thepurge pressure switch PPS or 272 is open, as indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 4. Therefore it is closing circuit through the time latch (LR) relay 252, whereby this relay is actuated to put the contacts of the time latch relay switches 253a, 253b in their original positions with switch 2530 open, thus to LOCK OUT FILL CYCLE.

The material now flows out through the open discharge valve 29 and through the discharge conduit 30 to the predetermined point of delivery, as up into the catalyst regenerator 236. As the materials are in good part removed from the vessel 10, the pressure therein starts to drop, and falls to the preset pressure at which the purge pressure switch PPS or 272 is set to close to full line position shown in FIG. 4. As this occurs, the unlatch coil 258b of the fill latch relay 2580, 258b, is energized to put the fill latch relay contacts 243, 244 back into their original position, with contacts of switch 243 closed, contacts of switch 244 open to LOCK OUT ACTIVATE CYCLE.

Since the vent pressure signal 247 is still open, the amber light A or PURGE LIGHT 273 comes on when the contacts of switch 243 are latched closed, and since the purge valve 35 is a normally open valve, the falling pressure sweeps clean the purge line 34 and discharge line 30 until such time as the back pressure in the discharge line 30, acting through the purge line 34,

builds up back pressure to seat the check valve 235. When the pressure in the vessel 10 now falls to say 20 p.s.i. the vent pressure switch 247 closes, to full line position shown in FIG. 4, thus activating the solenoid 256 to change fluid direction in the panel 40 to OPEN VENT VALVE 230, FIGS. 1 and 2, the light W or VENT LIGHT in parallel circuit also turning on. Then the residual material may be ventedthrough the vent pipe 231 and through its upper end 232 to the atmosphere, or into the hopper 200 by way of the alternate vent path 233.

complete through the latch relay LR or 251 so that it can operate once during each single batch handling period to close the normally open switch contact 2530, as aforesaid.

Then when the motor times out, the switch 279 is thrown open, to break circuit through the motor 280, the switch 250 then being moved to up position by the timing out of the motor 280, thus circuit cannot be made through the fill cycle lock in relay LR or 251 to actuate it. Thus when the motor 280 times out, the fill valve solenoid 255 cannot be energized to open the fill valve until the motor running cycle has been reset, and until the double pole double throw switch 250 is manually returned to the position shown in FIG. 4. At this time the motor 280 is again reset to run for some selected cycle exit ending over a number of batch transferring operations by the pressure vessel 10.

A fail safe or warning safe guard is provided against the pump or pressure vessel 10 being over filled by an entering batch. This resides in a PUMP FILL LIGHT, as a white light W or 281, and a motor M or 282 or LEVEL DETECTOR, these being connected in parallel circuits which extend between the negative power line 242 and the positive side conductor 2410. A normally open switch 2830 is shown in circuit with the white light W or 281 and a normally closed switch 283!) is shown in circuit with the motor M or 282. The motor 282 may have conventional paddle means thereon to be contacted by the material of a batch rising to the safeguarding level of the motor 282, whereby the paddle is stopped. Then, conventionally, there may be overtravel of parts related with the motor shaft, as the paddle mounting part stops, so that by this overtravel or lost motion movement, the normally closed switch 283b is opened to stop the motor 282, while the normally open switch 283a is closed, to turn on the white light 281 or W to indicate that the material set for a batch rises too high in the pressure vessel or pump.

The motor 282, FIG. 4, may be considered as disposed in the value support body 37, FIG. I, with the conductor 2410, FIG. 4, being contained in the insula tive conductor cord 39 which encloses the particular circuitry for the motor vibrated paddle 38, and carries such circuitry, for operation, to the panel box 40, FIG. 1.

A vibratory paddle type safeguarding or fail safe" device is shown in FIG. 3 of Reuter U.S. Pat. No. 3,355,22l, issued Nov. 28, 1967, and other disclosures thereof have been repeated in subsequent applications in the chain. In particular, at least two separate types of level detector type safeguarding, or fail safe" devices are disclosed in the immediately preceding application Ser. No. 98,567, filed Dec. l6, 1970. In the use of any form of devices of this class the circuitry diagram will be as shown in FIG. 4.

In the form of invention shown in FIG. 5, the purge valve 35 is shown in the source gas or plant compressed air line 21a, and the purge line 34, shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, is this form of the invention. However, this change involves no change in the circuit diagram of FIG. 4 except that the solenoid 264 in the panel board or panel box 40, FIG. 1, may be disconnected, or redesignated 246a, as for the broken line printed CLOSE B.P. AIR VALVE. In this form of invention it is found to be more expedient to have available the full opposing force of the plant air or source compressed gas, to protect the check valve 235, and to oppose the back pressure from acting down the discharge conduit system 30, 31, 32, and back purging material that otherwise should be forced onwardly down, or rather up the discharge system.

As shown in FIG. 6, the purge line 34, purge valve 35, and the check valve 235, and also the source gas line 21, source gas control valve 245, and check valve 242, both check valves of which connect into the discharge line section 32 downstream of the discharge valve 29, are shown in broken lines, indicative that either, or both of the back pressure opposing structures may be employed with this form of load cellsupported, fluid flow pump structure 10. In this form of the invention, the pump 10 is supported below, or suspended beneath a load cell 14, a novel type of hopper 201 being provided to make this possible, with the hopper being designed for disposition, centrally, axially above the load cell 14 and pump 10 therebelow. This comprises a decided improvement over the type of pumphopper arrangement whereby the hopper must be disposed to the side of the pressure vessel or pump 10 to discharge thereinto at a spaced distance from the otherwise occupied pump top central area.

This arrangement is arrived at by providing uprights or posts 388 with successively reduced upper portions 388a, 388b, the posts 388 being spaced symmetrically outwardly of the periphery of the pump 10. Next, a lower platform 389 is provided with openings therethrough snugly to fit guidably over the post sections 388a to shoulder on top of the posts 388. Then the load cell 14 may be disposed exactly axially and centrally above the pressure vessel or pump 10. Then a central platform 390 having openings therethrough snugly to fit over the turned down upper ends of pressure vessel suspension rods 391, may be positioned to shoulder upon the rods 391, the pressure vessel 10 being jacked up from beneath to the proper elevation for this disposition, nuts 3910 then being threaded upon the reduced diameter, threaded upper ends of the rods 391 to take the pump weight off of the jacks, thus to place the pump 10 in concentrically disposed suspension below the load cell 14.

Then the lower fill valve 18, flexible nipple 19, upper till valve 18a may be installed above the pump10, and a lower hopper section 201a, of inverted, frusto-conical shape may be installed upon top of the upper fill valve 18a. Then downspouts 201d from the hopper central section 201b, may be passed downwardly through concentrically disposed openings through the center platform 390, and through openings therebelow through the lower platform 389, for connection to a closure plate upon the top of the lower hopper section 201a, whereby the hopper is disposed axially, centrally above the pressure vessel or pump 10. However, to prevent the weight of the hopper 201a to be disposed upon the lower hopper section 201a, an upper platform 392 is first disposed with corner openings therethrough to fit snugly over the upper post sections 388b to shoulder upon the tops of the post sections 388a.

A tapered, central opening is provided through the upper platform 392 to receive the inverted frusto-conical portion of the hopper central section 20lb to bear for support upon the platform 392 which is firmly and rigidly post supported above floor or ground line. This platform 392 is concentrically fixed with relation to vertical axis of hopper, load cell, and pump, by nuts 388C threaded upon the upper ends of the post sections 388b to bear upon the upper surfaces of the upper platform 392. Noticeably, a cone 201C is included centrally to upstand from the bottom of the hopper section 20lb equally to disperse the descent of material into the four downspouts 201d, two of the downspouts diametrically disposed with relation to the two that are shown, being omitted from the elevational view of FIG. 6 for purposes of clarity.

With the arrangement hereinabove described for FIG. 6, the piping, electrical, timer, and pressure switch circuitry are the same as set forth with relation to FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, a signal proportionate to batch weight or net weight being transmitted from the load cell 14 to panel box, not shown, to actuate fill valve closing. Also as the pressure in the pressure vessel falls to a predetermined value, there is pressure switch actuation within the panel box, not shown, for valve operator actuation to open the vent valve 230, benting occurring through the discharge nipple 233 to atmosphere, or through discharge nipple 232 and flexible connection 232a into the upper section 201a of the hopper 201, or in part through both of these vent paths.

Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, a conventional fluid flow pump pressure vessel 10 is shown with exception that the discharge 17 from the hopper is into the vessel top segment 12a to one side of the central area thereof to permit an agitator drive motor support flange 324e to be installed through a central opening through the dome 12a. A top plate 326 is installed upon the flange 3242 and a base 322 extends therefrom to support the agitator drive motor 321 which drives a gear, reducer 324 which is connected to drive a vertical shaft 324a that extends centrally downwardly in the pressure vessel or pump 310.

The vertical shaft 324a is indicated as being centered at its lower end by connection thereto of three equally, angularly spaced apart agitator blades or pipes 324b which extend upwardly and outwardly at the slope of the diaphragm 13. Below the junction of these three pipes 324!) a discharge pipe or nipple 28 extends downwardly through the diaphragm l3 and through the inverted spherical segment 12b comprising the bottom of the gas plenum l6, and also the bottom of the pressure vessel 11. The flange of the discharge nipple 28 is connected to an upper platform 393 supported by posts 394 which are connected to a lower platform 395. This lower platform 395 carries on its under surface the hereinabove described upwardly dished, inverted cup, FIG. 3, that receives the upper portion of the ball member that, in turn, bears upon the central, downwardly dished cup member of the anvil of a load cell 14 that supports the pressure vessel or pump 10 thereabove.

This hereinabove described arrangement permits a central bore through the upper platform 393, of diameter to permit a flexible nipple 32 to extend upwardly therethrough for connection with the material discharge nipple 28, thus to transfer material downwardly into the receiving end or elbow of a horizontally extending discharge conduit member 320 which carries centrally therein the discharge valve 29. This conduit member 32:: is shown in FIG. 7 as rigidly supported upon post 14a.

In this form of the invention the purge line 34 extends downwardly from conventionally disposed purge valve 35, operated by purge valve operator 36, and has a flexible section or nipple 34a at the lower end thereof which connects with the pipe section 34!) carrying the conventional purge line check valve 235 which in turn is connected into the discharge pipe section 32b of the discharge line 30. Noticeably a flexible nipple 31 is shown installed in the discharge line 30 because it is indicated that there is some substantial length of discharge line to the point of discharge, such as a tower, corresponding with the tower 236 shown in FIG. 2. Thus such flexible nipple 31 can accommodate expansion or contraction of such length of line, respectively, in hot or cold weather.

Correspondingly, as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 5 and 6, a compressed air or source gas line 21a, extending horizontally for support above ground or floor level, as by post 14b, FIG. 7, has back pressure control valve 245 therein, operated by valve operator 246, as shown in FIG. 1, with a check valve 242 downstream of the control valve 245, and connected into the aforesaid pipe section 32b of discharge line 30 downstream of discharge valve 29. Also, in FIG. 7, a vent line 31a is shown rising from the top or dome 12a of the pump 10, with a vent valve 230 installed in the top thereof and operated by a valve operator 234, correspondingly as shown in FIG. 1. Also, in this view of FIG. 7, a fail safe or safeguarding structure is shown in level detector paddle or sensor 38, motor housing 37, (for motor 282 shown in FIG. 4) and conductor cored or sheath 39 which includes therein the conductor 2410, FIG. 4.

The electrical diagram for the form of invention shown in FIG. 4, with the exception of that for the agitator drive motor 321, is the same as for the apparatus disclosed in FIGS. 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 hereinabove. A conductor 395 connects the motor 321 between the positive side 241 and the negative side 242 of the source of electrical power and has a switch 396 therein whereby the agitator motor may be turned on, selectively, to run as desired.

Alternately, a parallel line 397 may be employed, with the switch 396 open, and the switch 398 in the line 397 closed, and the movement of the latching relay LR or 251, that closes the latching relay switch 253a, may close the switch 398, to start the motor 321 at the same time the fill valve opens. Then as the purge valve 235, FIG. 1, is opened, by reverse actuation of the latching relay switch 253a, the switch 398 is opened and the motor 321 is stopped.

The various features, as valve operators, safe guarding or fail safe features, may be used selectively as desired. Also in the form of invention shown in FIGS. 7

and 8, the hopper, not shown, may be a hopper or the type shown in FIG. 6, with downspouts disposed to discharge directly through the dome 12a, into the pressure vessel, and in this case the pressure vessel, agitator driven, may be suspended below a load cell that is platform supported above the pressure vessel or pump 10.

The invention is thus shown as adapted to be practiced through a variety and range of structural variations and circuitry changes as involve manner of valve opening and closing, and treatment and handling of material. The invention is thus set forth in exemplary detail and spirit, with the appended claims being in outline.

lclaim:

1. Material transporting apparatus comprising a pressure vessel including a gas permeable diaphragm bridging the lower part of said vessel above the bottom thereof and dividing it into a material plenum thereabove, and a gas plenum therebelow, a fill valve to admit flowable material through the top of said vessel into said material plenum to upstand from said diaphragm, a compressed gas inlet including a gas valve into said gas plenum, a discharge connection from the upper part of said material plenum including a discharge valve disposed in said discharge connection, a purge by-pass connecting said material plenum and said discharge connection downstream from said discharge valve, a purge valve disposed in said purge by-pass, also a check valve therein downstream of said purge valve and adapted to be urged closed in direction of said purge valve by back pressure acting thereagainst from downstream thereof, a vent discharge from said vessel including a vent valve, pressure sensitive control means including weight responsive means, operative circuitry including said pressure sensitive control means and being automatically operable to open said fill valve, said circuitry then being actuated by said weight responsive means to close said fill valve, said circuitry then closing said purge valve while opening said gas inlet valve to admit pressurized gas substantially uniformly through said diaphragm and to activate said material to a high state as the pressure rises in excess of a predetermined high pressure to actuate said pressure sensitive control means to open said discharge valve for said material to pass upwardly and onward through said discharge connection, the pressure falling below a predetermined lower pressure to actuate said pressure sensitive control means to close said discharge valve and said gas inlet valve and to open said purge valve, the compressed gas at falling pressure purging through said purge by-pass including said purge valve and said check valve, and onwardly through said discharge connection, the pressure continuing falling to a still lower predetermined level to act throughsaid circuitry to close said purge and to open said vent valve, said check valve guarding against back pressure urging gas'bearing purge material back up said purge connection, the residual compressed gas purging upwardly through said vent discharge, and the pressure falling to approximately atmospheric whereby to open said fill valve, as aforesaid.

2. The method of transporting pulverulent material comprising the steps of, disposing by weight one predetermined batch of the material at a time into a container for support upon a gas permeable diaphragm,

closing the material inlet upon a pressure signal responsive to the batch weight attained therein, and, with the container closed, admitting a pressurized gas thereinto below the diaphragm to pass upwardly therethrough to activate the material therein, opening a discharge conduit from the container while closing gas admission, a closeable by-pass conduit being provided from container to the container discharge conduit and being closed prior to gas admission; as the pressure in the container drops to predetermined value, closing the discharge conduit and opening the by-pass conduit to by-pass the material to be purged through the by-pass and back into the discharge conduit downstream from the container, and as the pressure in the container falls to a still lower predetermined value, employing a check valve in the by-pass conduit between by-pass conduit closure and discharge conduit to protect against back pressure from the discharge conduit downstream thereof, closing the by-pass and opening a vent from the container through which the residual pressurized gas and any residual material may be vented as the container pressure returns to substantially atmospheric,

then repeating the aforesaid cycle of steps.

3. Material transporting apparatus comprising a pressure vessel including a gas permeable diaphragm bridging the lower part of said vessel above the bottom thereof and dividing it into a material plenum thereabove, and a gas plenum therebelow, a fill valve to admit flowable material through the top of said vessel into said material plenum to upstand from said diaphragm, a compressed gas inlet including a gas valve into said gas plenum, a discharge connection from the upper part of said material plenum including a discharge valve disposed in said discharge connection, a purge by-pass connecting said material plenum and said discharge connection downstream from said discharge valve, a purge valvedisposed in said purge by-pass also a first check valve therein downstream of said purge valve and adapted to be urged closed in direction of said purge valve by back pressure acting thereagainst from downstream thereof, a back pressure opposing connection from compressed gas inlet source and connecting with said discharge connection downstream from said discharge valve, a back pressure gas control valve disposed in said back pressure opposing connection, also a second check valve therein downstream from said back pressure gas control valve and adapted to be urged closed in direction of said back pressure gas control valve, a vent discharged from said vessel including a vent valve, pressure sensitive control means including weight responsive means, operative circuitry including said pressure sensitive control means and being automatically operable to open said fill valve, said circuitry then being actuated by said weight responsive means to close said fill valve,

said circuitry then closing said purge valve and said sensitive control means to close said discharge valve and said gas inlet valve and to open said purge valve and said back pressure gas control valve, the container compressed gas at falling pressure purging through said purge by-pass including said purge valve and said first check valve and onwardly into said discharge connection, and the back pressure control gas passing from source through said back pressure opposing connection including said back pressure gas control valve and said second check valve and onwardly into said discharge connection, the pressure continuing falling to a still lower predetermined level to act through said circuitry to close said purge valve and said back pressure gas control valve and to open said vent valve, said check valves guarding against back pressure urging back pressure gas and purge material down said purge connection and said back pressure opposing connection, the residual compressed gas purging upwardly through said vent discharge, and the pressure falling to approximately atmospheric whereby to open said fill valve, as aforesaid.

4. The method of transporting pulverulent material comprising the steps of, disposing by weight one predetermined batch of the material at a time into a container for support upon a gas permeable diaphragm, closing the material inlet upon a pressure signal responsive to the batch weight attained therein, and, with the container closed, admitting a pressurized gas thereinto below the diaphragm to pass upwardly therethrough to activate the material therein, opening a discharge conduit from the container while closing gas admission, a closeable first by-pass conduit being provided from container to the container discharge conduit and being closed prior to gas admission, pressurized gas being connected for selective admission to pass through a second by-pass conduit to discharge conduit; as the pressure in the container drops to predetermined value, closing the discharge conduit and opening the by-pass conduits respectively, to by-pass the material to be purged through the first by-pass conduit and into the discharge conduit downstream from discharge conduit closure, as abetted by the aforesaid pressurized gas also selectively admitted into the second by-pass conduit at this point, and into the discharge conduit downstream from discharge conduit closure; and, as the pressure in the container falls to a still lower predetermined value, employing check valves in the by-pass conduits between by-pass conduit closures and discharge conduit to protect against back pressure from the discharge conduit downstream thereof, closing the bypass conduits, and opening a vent from the container through which the residual pressurized gas and any residual material may be vented as the container pressure returns to substantially atmospheric, then repeating the aforesaid cycle of steps.

5. Material transporting apparatus comprising a pressure vessel including a gas permeable diaphragm bridging the lower part of said vessel above the bottom thereof and dividing it into a material plenum thereabove, and a gas plenum therebelow, a fill valve to admit flowable material through the top of said vessel into said material plenum to upstand from said diaphragm, a compressed gas inlet including a gas valve into said gas plenum, a discharge connection from the upper part of said material plenum including a discharge valve disposed in said discharge connection, a compressed gas by-pass connecting compressed gas and said discharge connection downstream from said discharge valve, a valve operator actuated, compressed gas by-pass valve disposed in said compressed gas bypass, also a check valve therein downstream of said compressed gas by-pass valve and adapted to be urged closed in direction of said compressed gas by-pass valve by back pressure acting thereagainst from downstream thereof, a vent discharge from said vessel including a vent valve, pressure sensitive control means including weight responsive means, operative circuitry including said pressure sensitive control means and being automatically operable to open said fill valve, said circuitry then being actuated by said weight responsive means to close said fill valve, said circuitry then closing said compressed gas by-pass valve by valve operator actuation while opening said gas inlet valve to admit pressurized gas substantially uniformly through said diaphragm and to activate said material to a high state as the pressure rises in excess of a predetermined high pressure to actuate said pressure sensitive control means to open said discharge valve for said material to pass upwardly and onward through said discharge connection, the pressure falling below a predetermined lower pressure to actuate said pressure sensitive control means to close said discharge valve and said gas inlet valve and to open said compressed gas by-pass valve by valve operator actuation, whereby compressed gas may pass through said compressed gas by-pass including said compressed gas by-pass valve and said check valve, and onwardly through said discharge connection in opposition to back pressure, the pressure continuing falling to a still lower predetermined level to act through said circuitry to close said purge and to open said vent valve, said check valve guarding against back pressure urging gas bearing purge material back up said purge connection, the residual compressed gas purging upwardly through said vent discharge, and the pressure falling to approximately atmospheric whereby to open said fill valve, as aforesaid.

6. The method of transporting pulverulent material comprising the steps of, disposing by weight one predetermined batch of the material at a time into a container for support upon a gas permeable diaphragm, closing the material inlet upon a pressure signal responsive to the batch weight attained therein, and, with the container closed, admitting a pressurized gas thereinto below the diaphragm to pass upwardly therethrough to activate the material therein, opening a discharge conduit from the container while closing gas admission, a valve operator valve closed by-pass conduit being provided from compressed gas source and including a check valve therein at connection to container discharge conduit, said by-pass conduit being closed prior to gas admission; as the pressure in the container drops to predetermined value, closing the discharge conduit and opening the by-pass conduit by valve .operator valve opening to by-pass compressed gas therethrough, including through the check valve and back into the discharge conduit downstream from the container in opposition to back pressure, and as the pressure in the container falls to a still lower predetermined value, closing the by-pass by valve operator valve closing and opening a vent from the container

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3937521 *Dec 3, 1973Feb 10, 1976Consolidated Engineering CompanySelf-purging pneumatic conveying apparatus and varied means of operation
US4118075 *Jun 1, 1977Oct 3, 1978Waeschle Maschinenfabrik GmbhBulk material delivery apparatus
US4544306 *Feb 18, 1982Oct 1, 1985Acf Industries, IncorporatedAutomatic unloading outlet assembly
US4685810 *Oct 21, 1985Aug 11, 1987Matsui Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Mixing apparatus for powdered or granular materials
US4718795 *May 18, 1987Jan 12, 1988Acf Industries, IncorporatedUnloading outlet assembly
US4862649 *Aug 28, 1986Sep 5, 1989Ltv Aerospace & Defense Co.Material transfer system
US7544018 *Feb 20, 2007Jun 9, 2009Cleancut Technologies LimitedApparatus for pneumatic conveying of drill cuttings
Classifications
U.S. Classification406/15, 406/25, 406/30, 406/124
International ClassificationB65G53/34, B65G53/66
Cooperative ClassificationB65G53/66
European ClassificationB65G53/66