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Publication numberUS3729021 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 24, 1973
Filing dateSep 16, 1971
Priority dateSep 16, 1971
Publication numberUS 3729021 A, US 3729021A, US-A-3729021, US3729021 A, US3729021A
InventorsF Humphrey
Original AssigneePolypump Curacao Nv
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High-pressure pump and check-valve
US 3729021 A
Abstract
A high-pressure pump or check-valve in which solid tubular flexible members cooperate with slot-like openings in pressure chambers to provide one-way valves. The usual inlet and outlet ports are also provided.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States atent 1 m1 9 Humphrey 1 Apr; 24, 1973 HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP AND CHECK- [56] References Cited VALVE UNlTED STATES PATENTS [75] Inventor: Frederick Harold Humphrey, Mark- 2,614,793 10/1952 Storm ..251/DIG. l UX ham, Ontario, Canada 1,397,700 11/1921 Petsche ..l37/525 2,355,862 8/1944 Harper v ..l37/525 X [73] Assrgnee: Polypump Curacao N.V., W1llem- 3,127,906 4/1964 Balster ..l37/525 X stad Curacao, Netherlands Antilles I Primary Examiner-Alan Cohan [22] Flled' Sept' 1971 Assistant Examiner-Gerald A. Michalsky [21] Appl. No.: 181,046 Atz0rney-Sim & McBumey [57] ABSTRACT [52] US. Cl ..137/525, l37/DlG. 1, 417/560 [51] Int. Cl ..Fl6k 15/14 A high'pressure Pump or check'valve in whlch Solid [58] Field of Search ZSI/DIG 137/525 tubular flexible members cooperate with slot-like 137/5253 openings in pressure chambers to provide one-way valves. The usual inlet and outlet ports are also provided.

4 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures Patented April 24, 1973 3,729,021

2 Sheets-Sheet l \QQ F l G 9 I INVENTOR.

FREDERICK HAROLD BY HUMPHREY PATENT AGENT Patented April 24, 1973 3,729,021

2 Sheets-Sheet?) INVENTOR. FREDERICK HAROLD HUMPHREY PATENT AGENT HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP AND CHECK-VALVE This invention relates generally to the field of highpressure liquid-handling devices such as pumps and check valves, and relates specifically to a device of this type which is adapted to utilize a single integral elastomeric moulding clamped between two major housing parts, and is capable of use under pressures in excess of 3,000 p.s.i.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In present-day technology, pumps and check valves of all kinds and constructions are in use. The great majority of constructions for the conventional pumps or check valves are intended for use only at relatively low pressures, generally not exceeding 100 p.s.i., and as a consequence the designs of the conventional pumps and check valves are simply not capable of withstanding pressures in the higher range. A great many of the conventional liquid-handling devices which embody one-way valves utilize a number of components, such as springs, tubes, ball valves, pistons, trigger assemblies, etc. Devices of the latter type generally fail to function under higher pressures because ofjamming of the different parts. Again, many conventional devices include chambers and passageways which would be exploded if subjected to higher pressures. One of the most significant problems, however, in relation to the prior art is its general failure to provide, on the one hand, adequate valve openings to ensure a large liquid flow, and on the other hand, a sufficiently secure seating of the valve member against the seat to substantial inhibit flow in the back direction. Those prior art devices which are capable of handling pressures in the higher range usually must incorporate rather small port openings to ensure a substantially complete seal against back flow. High pressure liquid handling devices conventionally known often involve spherical valves, such as ball valves because, (a) being spherical, the ball valves can be permitted to seat in any orientation (since all are the same), and (b) the sphericity of the valve permits it to withstand radial crushing pressure from a high-pressure medium. Serious disadvantages, however, derive from the use of ball valves in highpressure applications. One of these relates to the very fact that the ball valve is free" and not tied down at any point. Under heavy pressures and rapid movement, the ball valve often bangs around inside its chamber with tremendous impact energy, leading to the possible interior destruction of the device. Another disadvantage is, of course, that as a general rule the size of the ball valve determines the maximum size of the port which it seals. Because of the Law of Cubes, a doubling of the diameter of the port requires an eight-fold increase in the volume, and thus the mass, of the ball valve. Hence, the mass of the ball valve goes up much faster than the area of the port, and this fact places an upper limit on the size of the port. Naturally, the number of ports could be multiplied, but this would involve additional parts and consequently greater expense, as well as the greater liklihood of breakdown with a larger number of parts.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION In view of the disadvantages of the prior art enumerated in the foregoing section, it is one object of this invention to provide a high-pressure liquid-handling device incorporating a one-way check-valve wherein the mass of the valve closure member varies only linearly with the area of the port it closes, rather than logarithmically as in the prior art.

A further object of this invention is to provide a liquid-handling device for high pressure operation which includes a one-way check-valve of which the valve closure member is radially symmetrical so as to provide the optimum resistance to crushing pressure as a result of the high-pressure medium being handled.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION To achieve the above object, this invention provides a high-pressure liquid-handling device, comprising an enclosure defining an elongated chamber having an outlet port and an inlet port. The inlet port is a longitudinal slot parallel with the elongated chamber, and there is a resilient substantially cylindrical elongated member in the chamber, the elongated member having a diameter large enough to resist extrusion through said slot but small enough to permit movement toward the slot to seal the same and away from the slot to open the same.

By combining two such chambers, and by making one of them integral with a piston-and-cylinder, it is possible to provide a high-pressure pump which utilizes two one-way check valves.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Three embodiments of this invention are shown in the accompanying drawings, in which like numerals denote like parts throughout the several views, and in which:

FIG. la is a view from beneath of a top member forming part of the first embodiment of this invention, constituting a check-valve, the view being taken at the line lala in FIG. lb;

FIG. lb is a sectional view taken at the line lb-lb in FIG. la;

FIGS. 2a and 2b are a plan view and a sectional view respectively of an integral elastomeric molding utilized in the first embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 3 shows, in cross-section to a larger scale, the closed position of the first embodiment;

FIG. 4 is similar to FIG. 3 and shows the open posi-' tion of the first embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the integral elastomeric molding utilized in the first embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view through the second embodiment of this invention, constituting a high-pressure pump;

FIG. 7 is a view from underneath of a top member forming part of the second embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the integral elastomeric molding utilized in the second embodiment of this invention; and

FIG. 9 is a plan view of an integral elastomeric molding utilized in the third embodiment of this invention.

PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGS. 2a and 2b show an elastomeric molding in the form of a resilient annulus 12 having across the major diameter a cylindrical, elongated member 13 of the same cross-section as that of the annulus. In FIGS. 1a and 1b, a flat top surface 15 of a steel base member 17 is joined to the flat under-surface 18 of a steel top member 20. The base member 17 has been provided with an outlet port 22 and an inlet port 23. The surface 18 of the top member is provided with an annular recess 25 to accommodate and compress the resilient annulus 12. The annulus 12, which has been shown in place in FIG. 1a, thus acts as a hydraulic seal against leakage in the manner of a conventional O ring. The annular recess 25 can have any appropriate cross-section. although a rectangular or U-shaped section is preferable.

FIG. 3 shows the check-valve in the closed position, and FIG. 4 shows the check-valve in the open position. Referring specifically to FIGS. 1a, 1b, 3 and 4, the top member 20 is provided with an elongated chamber 26 which has an arm 27 communicating the elongated chamber 26 with the outlet port 22. The elongated chamber 26 is in part defined by a projecting ridge 28 which is spaced in parallel relation from the top surface 15 of the base member 17 and defines therewith an elongated slot 29 through which the elongated chamber 27 communicates with the inlet port 23. The top member 20 is also provided with a gathering chamber 30 adjacent the inlet port 23 for distributing incoming liquid uniformly along the slot 29. The top member 20 also has recess means for permitting the ends of the elongated member 13 to join integrally with the resilient annulus 12, while tightly pinching the ends in order to minimize leakage from the elongated chamber 26. The annular recess 25 for the annulus 12 as shown in FIG. 1a does not allow for any movement of the annulus 12. It is preferably slightly shallower than the diameter of the ring in order to provide for some compression of the ring when the body 18 and the table 20 are bolted together. The central portion of the cross-member 13 is free to move because the elongated chamber 26 in the top member 20 is larger than the diameter of the member 13. Thus, the elongated member is capable of movement toward the slot 29 to seal the same and away from the slot to open the same. When the elongated member 13 is in the open position shown in FIG. 4, fluid can flow past the member. When the flow is reversed as in FIG. 3, the flow is stopped because the member 13 is forced against the ridge 28 in the top member 20. The diameter of the member 13 is sufficiently large that the pressure cannot extrude the member 13 into the slot 29, and thus the member 13 provides an effective seal against passage of the fluid. FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the elastomeric molding 10. Preferably, it is a one-piece molding.

Attention is now directed to the high pressure pump embodiment shown in FIGS. 6, 7 and 8. FIG. 6 is a cross-section through a high-pressure pump 31. A cylindrical piston 32 operates within a top member 33 and is provided with an O ring seal 34 of conventional design. An elastomeric ring molding 36 is located between the top member 33 and the base member 38. As in the case of the check-valve, base member 38 has a flat top surface 40 and has an inlet port 42 and an outlet port 43. On the under side the ports are threaded for pipe connections. FIG. 8 shows a perspective view of the elastomeric ring molding 36. It includes a resilient annulus 46 with two parallel elongated members 47 and 48 preferably having the same circular cross-section as the annulus 46. As in the case of the check-valve embodiment, the elongated members act as valves within appropriate chambers. The elongated members 47 and 48 are preferably related to the resilient annulus as parallel chords to a circle.

The under surface 37 of the top member 33 is provided with a first elongated chamber 49 and a second elongated chamber 50. The first elongated chamber 49 communicates with the outlet port 43 and is in part defined by a downwardly projecting ridge 51 which is spaced in parallel relation from the top surface 40 and defines therewith a first longitudinal slot 52 which opens into the first elongated chamber 49 and is parallel therewith. The first elongated chamber 49 communicates through the first longitudinal slot with the second elongated chamber 50. The top member 33 also has a second downwardly projecting ridge 53 which is spaced in parallel relation from the top surface 40 and defines therewith a second longitudinal slot 54 opening into the second elongated chamber 50 in alignment therewith. The second elongated chamber 50 communicates through the second longitudinal slot 54 with the inlet port 42. The top member 33 is also provided with a gathering chamber 55 adjacent the inlet port 42 for distributing incoming liquid uniformly along the slot 29. The top member 33 also has recess means for permitting the ends of the elongated members 47 and 48 to join integrally with the resilient annulus 46, while tightly pinching the ends in order to minimize leakage from the elongated chambers 49 and 50. The resilient annulus 46 of the elastomeric molding 36 acts as a hydraulic seal and rests in a circumferential groove 56 in the top member 33 which is slightly shallower than the diameter of the annulus 46. The elongated members 47 and 48 are thus restricted from movement in the regions where they join the annulus 46. The central portions of the members, however, are free to move since they are located in the elongated chambers 49 and 50, which are of larger section than the members 47 and 48. Thus, each elongated member 47 and 48 is capable of movement toward its respective slot to seal the same and away from its respective slot to open the same. The elongated members 47 and 48 therefore function as one-way check-valves exactly in the manner of member 13 in the first embodiment.

The pump shown in FIG. 6 operates by the reciprocal movement of the piston 32 within the cylinder body 33. As can be seen, the cylinder in which the piston 32 reciprocates is part of the second elongated chamber 50, so that movement of the piston 32 effectively changes the volume in the chamber 50. On the upstroke, the piston 32 causes fluid to be drawn into the chamber 50 from the inlet port 42; the elongated member 47 would be closed, and the elongated member 48 open. FIG. 6 shows the pumping stroke. The piston 32 is descending in the cylinder. The member 48 is closed. The pressurized fluid opens member 47, and the fluid flows to the outlet port 43. At rest, the valves are normally closed.

In both embodiments disclosed above, the resilient annuli 12 and 46 and the elongated members 13, 47 and 48 are preferably made of styrenebutadiene rubber, with the following materials as alternatives: plasticized PVC, ethyl acetate, butyl rubber, natural rubber, silicone rubber.

As can be seen in FIGS. lb and 6, bolts 60 are provided to fasten the parts and 33, respectively, to the parts 17 and 38.

Attention is now directed to FIG. 9, which shows the form of an integral elastomeric molding utilized in the third embodiment of this invention, which constitutes a pump essentially similar in construction and operation to the pump of the second embodiment described above. Thus, the third embodiment pump includes a top member similar to member 33, a base member similar to member 38 with suitable inlet and outlet ports, ridges similar to ridges 51 and 53, and a piston similar to piston 32. The only real dissimilarity is the shape of the elastomeric ring molding. Whereas in FIG. 8 the elastomeric molding 36 has a circular annulus 46 with two parallel elongated members 47 and 48 along chords of the annulus 46, FIG. 9 shows an elastomeric molding 70 which includes two integrally intersecting annuli 72 and 74 of the same diameter, both of substantially circular section and lying in the same plane. With the FIG. 9 embodiment, the stresses placed upon the internal arcs 76 and 78 when the pump is working against high pressures are partially converted into longitudinal forces at the ends of the arcs, and these forces are transferred readily to the external arcs 79 and 80 due to the fact that the latter are direct extensions or continuations of the internal arcs 76 and 78. Furthermore, there are four arcs extending from each junction rather than three as is the case with the FIG. 8 embodiment, and this extra member at the junction provides additional resistance to rupture arising from the high stresses. Also, the double-circle configuration of the FIG. 9 embodiment permits easy machining of the top member in which the elastomeric molding 70 is adapted to lodge.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A high-pressure liquid-handling device, comprisa base member exhibiting a flat surface,

an inlet port and an outlet port opening through said flat surface,

a top member defining with said base member an elongated chamber which communicates freely with said outlet port, the top member having a downwardly projecting ridge which is spaced from said flat surface and defines therewith a longitudinal slot which opens into said elongated chamber and is parallel therewith, the longitudinal slot communicating with said inlet port,

and a resilient, substantially cylindrical, elongated member in said chamber, the elongated member having a diameter large enough to resist extrusion through said longitudinal slot under high pressure but small enough to permit movement toward the slot to seal the same and away from the slot to open the same, the resilient cylindrical elongated member being connected at either end to a resilient closed loop of substantially circular crosssection, the elon ated member extending across the closed loop, t e top member defining with the base member a closed loop sealing recess surrounding said ports and said elongated chamber, said sealing recess being dimensioned to receive said closed loop and compress the same to provide a seal around the ports and the elongated chamber.

2. The invention claimed in claim 1, in which the elongated member is made of a material chosen from the group: styrene-butadiene rubber, plasticized PVC, ethyl vinyl acetate, butyl rubber, natural rubber, silicone rubber.

3. The invention claimed in claim 1, in which the closed loop and the sealing recess are annular.

4. The invention claimed in claim 3, in which the elongated member is disposed substantially diametrally to the closed loop.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1397700 *Nov 2, 1920Nov 22, 1921Gustav B PetscheNon-return valve for pumps and similar uses
US2355862 *Apr 6, 1942Aug 15, 1944Omega Machine CompanySelf-closing valve
US2614793 *Dec 23, 1948Oct 21, 1952Lynn W StormOne-way seal
US3127906 *Aug 20, 1962Apr 7, 1964Wagner Electric CorpCheck valve assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4136853 *Apr 19, 1976Jan 30, 1979Atlas Copco AktiebolagSlide valve
US4311437 *Dec 3, 1979Jan 19, 1982Zahnradfabrik Friedrichshafen, AgRadial piston pump
US4585026 *Oct 30, 1980Apr 29, 1986Lear Siegler, Inc.Seal for coupling or valve assemblies
US7458392Sep 13, 2005Dec 2, 2008R. Conrader CompanySpring actuated check valve
US7540304Apr 18, 2005Jun 2, 2009R. Conrader CompanyElastomeric check valve
US7896024Jan 10, 2007Mar 1, 2011Moen IncorporatedBackpressure relief valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/852, 137/900, 417/560, 251/900
International ClassificationF16K15/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10S137/90, F16K15/14, Y10S251/90
European ClassificationF16K15/14