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Publication numberUS3729193 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 24, 1973
Filing dateFeb 18, 1971
Priority dateFeb 18, 1971
Publication numberUS 3729193 A, US 3729193A, US-A-3729193, US3729193 A, US3729193A
InventorsLabis G
Original AssigneeLabis G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic racing game
US 3729193 A
Abstract
A method and system for racing a plurality of motor driven units along a track which combines a random factor, not subject to control, with manually actuated means for establishing odds between the racing units at the beginning of each race. In a preferred embodiment, the heart of the system comprises two pulse sources operating at substantially different nonharmonic frequencies which are characterized by built-in frequency drifts. The higher frequency pulse source drives a system of stepping selectors through a repetitive cycle. The initial manual arrangement of a group of odds selector dials determines the number of times a power circuit is completed to any specific racing unit as the stepping system proceeds through its cycle. At random contacts during the stepping cycle, depending on the operation of the second pulse source, electrical current passes through one of the power circuits momentarily completed, to drive one or another of the racing units to spurt ahead. This continues until one or more of the units cross an arbitrary finish line. In a preferred embodiment, the racing units are motor driven horses. The odds manually set on each of the horses at the beginning of the race are also indicated on an electronic tote board, which is electronically triggered to indicate Win, Place and Show, at the end of each race, and also, the amount paid on each of the winning horses. Additional features include means for setting and counting races of more than one lap.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Labis [45] Apr. 24, 1973 [5 ELECTRONIC RACING GAME driven units along a track which combines a random [76] Inventor: George H. Labis 27 Possum Way factor, not subject to control, with manually actuated Murray Hill Union County, NJ means for establishmg odds between the racing units 07971 at the beginning of each race. In a preferred embodiment, the heart of the system comprises two pulse Filedl 1971 sources operating at substantially different nonhar- 21 Appl. No.: 116,347

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,193,947 6/1970 Great Britain ..273/86 F Primary ExaminerAnton O. Oechsle Attorney-Martha G. Pugh [5 7] ABSTRACT A method and system for racing a plurality of motor monic frequencies which are characterized by built-in frequency drifts. The higher frequency pulse source drives a system of stepping selectors through a repetitive cycle. The initial manual arrangement of a group of odds selector dials determines the number of times a power circuit is completed to any specific racing unit as the stepping system proceeds through its cycle. At random contacts during the stepping cycle, depending on the operation of the second pulse source, electrical current passes through one of the power circuits momentarily completed, to drive one or another of the racing units to spurt ahead. This continues until one or more of the units cross an arbitrary finish line. In a preferred embodiment, the racing units are motor driven horses. The odds manually set on each of the horses at the beginning of the race are also indicated on an electronic tote board, which is electronically triggered to indicate Win, Place and Show, at the end of each race, and also, the amount paid on each of the winning horses. Additional features include means for setting and counting races of more than one lap.

24 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures LABIS DOWNS 6 WIN PLACE SHOW WIN PLACE SHOW Patented April 24, 1973 3,729,193

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Patented April 24, 1973 3,729,193

14 Sheets-Sheet 14 FIG.

SO HORSES WIND UP HERE LINE UP HORSES HERE FIG. /2

SUMMARY OF CIRCUIT- BOARDS CIRCUIT BOARD Y CIRCUIT BOARD W CIRCUIT BOARD R CIRCUIT BOARD V FIG. 3 FIG. 4A FIG. 5A FIG. 6

FIG. 48 FIG. 5B

CIRCUIT BOARD S CIRCUIT BOARD T CIRCUIT BOARD Z CIRCUIT BOARD K FIG. 8 FIG. 9A 7 FIG. IO FIG. 7A FIG. 78

ELECTRONIC RACING GAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates in general to electronic methods and apparatus for random selection, and more specifically, to electronically controlled races, specifically simulated horse races, operating at preselected odds.

Horse racing and various other games of chance rely on the unpredictability of the result to attract the interest and bets of participants. In attempting to simulate the chance factorof an actual race, various means have been employed, such as the spinning of a wheel, the throwing of dice, etc. Such means are, at best, crude, and, at worst, lend themselves to patterned repetition which is predictable, and which can be dishonestly manipulated by the operator and others. Furthermore, such methods of chance selection cannot be combined readily with the preselective setting of odds for individual racing units, which is a salient feature of an actual horse race.

Accordingly, it is a general object of this invention to provide a method and apparatus for random selection of contest winners which is highly unpredictable, and not readily subject to patterned repetition or manipulation. A more specific object of the invention is to provide an electronic racing game in which the racing units can be operated at preselected odds, but without the winner being predictable, and more particularly, one

which closely simulates by electronic means the random factors, together with techniques for preselecting odds, which combine to generate interest and betting on horse races.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION These and other objects and features are attained in the present invention by operating a pair of pulse actuated timing sources at two substantially different nonharmonic frequencies, each subject to a slight frequency drift, to control a plurality of racing units by means of a complex system of stepping selectors which move through a repetitive cycle of steps. Random bursts of power for moving one or another of the racing units forward are derived whenever there is a coincidence between the pulses of the two timing sources. Each of the racing units may have associated with it a switch which, at the onset of the race, can be positioned to vary the odds between the respective racing units by changing the number of steps during the stepping cycle at which a specific unit is connected to receive the random bursts of power.

The illustrative embodiment under description takes the form of an electronic horse race having six motor driven horses, each of which moves on an individual pair of conducting rails around an oval race track. For the sake of simplicity, circuits relating to only three of the horses are described. It will be understood that the principle of the invention can be applied to systems having a larger number or smaller number of horse units. In the system under description, each horse unit has an associated dial, by which its individual odds can be preset between one-to-one and lO-to-one, at the beginning of each game. Adjacent the finish line is a tote board which lights up to show the odds on each horse and which also lights up to indicate instantaneously, as they cross the finish line, which of the horses are in the Win, Place and Show positions, and the money payable to the bettors on each. Additional circuits are included which provide for the possibility of multiple laps around the track, and means for indicating the results. of the multilap races on the tote board.

These and other objects, features and advantages will be apparent to those skilled in the art, upon a detailed study of the present invention in connection with the attached drawings.

SHORT DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective showing of the finish line of a race track, in accordance with the present invention, with horses in Win, Place and Show positions and the corresponding indications on the tote board;

FIG. 2 is a schematic showing of the circuit of individual driving units used in connection with the horses shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 (Circuit Board Y) shows in schematic a track section near the finish line with circuit connecting points to the individual horse circuits of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4A, 43 (Circuit Board W), combined as indicated in FIG. 12, show schematically the First Timer and the Second Timer, the pulse sources and the Sequential Selector system for controlling the racing units ofFIG. 1;

FIGS. 5A, 58 (Circuit Board R), combined as indicated in FIG. 12, show schematically the Odds Selectors, ganged in groups of four, for controlling connection to the power circuits of the individual racing horses of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 (Circuit Board V) shows schematically the individual power relays and related circuits for driving the horses of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 7A, 7B (Circuit Board S), combined as indicated in FIG. 12, are schematic showings of the manually actuated Win, Place and Show switches wired to the tote board, and Lap Counter Switches for the race track of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 (Circuit Board T) shows schematically the I Lap Counter Relays for the race track of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 9A, 9B (Circuit Board Z), combined as indicated in FIG. 12, show schematically the Tote Board Relays and interconnections for the tote board indicated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 (Circuit Board K) constitutes a schematic showing of the back of the tote board in lamps for the race track of FIG. 1',

FIG. 11 illustrates the line up of the horses for calibrating speeds prior to beginning the race; and

FIG. 12 is a coordinated list of the Circuit Boards and the Figure numbers, showing how the latter are combined.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS PRELIMINARY DESCRIPTION To simplify the description of the complex circuitry of the present illustrative embodiment, the circuit has been divided into eight Circuit Boards, each designated by an identifying capital letter and a specific Figure number, as indicated in FIG. 12 of the drawings. To clarify reference characters, a separate set of numbers is used on each Circuit Board. When tracing circuits which lead from one Circuit Board to another, the

reference number is preceded by a capital letter, indicating the Circuit Board, as Wl80," although the identifying letter is omitted when it is clear that the cited reference numerals are on the same Circuit Board.

In the embodiment under description, the game consists of six motor driven plastic horses; but it can be modified to accommodate a greater or lesser number, all disposed on an eight foot by four foot, six lane, two rail oval track. Each horse has a selector switch associated with him which can vary his odds from one-toone to lO-to-one. (This can also be modified to accommodate greater odds.) The greater the odds on the horse the less chance he has to win; but he nevertheless has some chance to win. The odds for each horse light up on a tote board at the time they are selected prior to the race. When the race is started, the horses race in short bursts of speed around the track until they reach the finish line. Upon crossing the finish line, the first three horses automatically light up their numbers on the tote board in their respective order of finish, Win, Place and Show. The prices associated with the odds of these three horses also light up automatically for Win, Place and Show-The third horse to cross the finish line also turns the game off; but the numbers and prices remain'lighted on the tote board until the tote board reset switch is activated.

OVERALL ARRANGEMENT FIG. 1 of the drawings is a perspective showing of three horses crossing the finish line in the electronic racing game in accordance with a described embodiment of the presentinvention, with the electronically actuated tote board in the background, showing the selected odds, indicating which of the horses is in Win, Place and Show position, and the winning money to be paid on each.

In the embodiment under description, as actually constructed, there are six separate pairs of tracks, one pair for each of the six horses in the race. The two tracks forming each pair, which are spaced five-eighths inch apart, are formed of highly conductive, durable metal, each track having a highly polished, low friction upper surface designed to provide substantially uniform electrical contact with the slidably engaging lateral contact members on the two ends of an individual horse circuit of the form shown in FIG. 2. In the present embodiment, the outermost track (Horse No. 6) forms an external oval about four feet by eight feet, with the innermost track (Horse No. 1) defining an oval about three and one-fourth feet by seven and one-fourth feet. It will be apparent that in the alternative a single, bar rail could be substituted for the two rail track described with reference to the present embodiment.

HORSE MOTOR CIRCUITS Referring to FIG. 2 of the drawings, there is shown in schematic the driving circuit which fits under each of the plastic shells for Horses No. 1 through No. 6 to drive each horse along its specific lane of the track. Each of the circuits includes a small alternating current motor 2a of conventional design, which, for example, may be operated with 0.004 to 0.006 horsepower, drawing one-quarter ampere current, at -20 volts.

The motor 2a is shorted across by a conventional diode 2b. The latter permits current for the Tote Board Relays (shown in Circuit Board Z, FIGS 9A, 9B) to bypass the motor 2a, while blocking the motor current, forcing it to pass through and run the horse, as will be described hereinafter.

THE TRACK AND CONNECTIONS Referring now to FIG. 3 (Circuit Board Y), there is shown, as formed in the present illustrative embodiment, six track lanes. For convenience of description hereinafter, the circuits relating to Horses No. 1, No. 2 and No. 6are described in detail, whereas the circuits relating to Horses No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 have been omitted in order to simplify the description and reduce repetition.

The track sections indicated in FIG. 3 (Circuit Board Y) include the Finish Line Connections, the Lap Counter Connections and the Power Connections Seetions 3a, 3b and 30, containing the Finish Line Connections, and sections 3d, 3e and 3]", containing the Lap Counter Connections, are each insulated from the other sections of track in each of the lanes so that they do not receive any power from or through the track.

In section 3a (Horse Lane No. l) the finish line contacts 1 and 2 are respectively connected to contacts Z171 and Z189 on Circuit Board Z (FIGS. 9A, 9B); in section 3b (Horse Lane No. 2) the finish line contacts 3 and 4 are respectively connected to contacts Z172 and Z190; and in section 30 (Horse Lane No. 6) the finish line contacts 11 and 12 are respectively connected to contacts Z176 and Z194. On Circuit Board Z these contacts lead through terminal strip 9p to an appropriate dial on the ganged Lap Counter Switches of Circuit Board S (FIGS. 7A, 7B), ultimately passing through the contacts of the Lap Counter Relays on Circuit Board T (FIG. 8), as will be described hereinafter.

Returning to FIG. 3, the purpose of the Lap Counter Connections indicated in sections 3d, 3e and 3f, for Horse Lanes No. 1, No. 2 and No. 6, respectively, is to provide contacts through the appropriate ganged dials of Circuit Board S (FIGS. 7A, 7B), so that if the operator desires to set the game up for more than one lap, the proper relays will be actuated to carry the horses through the finish line sections on the first lap around without actuating the Win, Place and Show indications on the tote board, the showing of which is deferred until the last lap. The Lap Counter Connections include contacts 13 and 14 on section 3d (Horse Lane No. 1) which are respectively connected to contacts T101 and T on the terminal strip 8h of Circuit Board T. Likewise, on section 3e (Horse Lane No. 2) lap counter connections 15 and 16 respectively lead to contacts T103 and T102; and in section 3f(Horse Lane No. 6) lap counter connections 23 and 24 respectively lead to contacts T1 1 l and T1 10. The T connections all lead through the contacts and to the energizing circuits of the Lap Counter Relays which will be described in detail hereinafter with reference to Circuit Board T.

The Power Connections in each of the lanes lead to the power circuits for each of the specific horses which are shown on Circuit Board'V (FIG. 6). These power circuits function to energize the motor 2a (FIG. 2) in each of the horses, driving a specific horse forward along its track lane. In section 3g (Lane No. 1) power contacts 25 and 26 are respectively connected to contacts V74 and V75 on terminal strip 60 of Circuit Board V (FIG. 6). Likewise, in section 3h (Lane No. 2) power contacts 27 and 28 are respectively connected to contacts V71 and V72 on terminal strip 6b; and in section 3i (Lane No. 6) power contacts 35 and 36 are respectively connected to contacts V59 and V60 on terminal strip 6c. On Circuit Board V, the foregoing contacts lead through switches to the rheostats controlling the speed on each of the individual horses and through the normally open contacts of the horsepower relays, the operation of which will be described hereinafter.

PULSE TIMING AND SELECTOR SYSTEMS We will now pass from the track sections to a description of the complex electrical circuit which drives the individual racing horses along the track. The heart of this system is shown in detail in FIGS. 4A, 4B which are combined as indicated to form Circuit Board W. This shows the master start-stop switches of the circuit, plus the pulse operated timing circuits, one of which drives a stepping selector system which operates respectively through a total of 48 contacts.

Referring to FIGS. 4A, 4B (combined to form Circuit Board W), there are shown three double-pole manually operated switches 4h, 4p and 4q, which put the set in operating condition. In the tote board reset switch 4h, contact 180 is connected in Circuit Board T (FIG. 8) to one terminal T1 of the 12 volt, 2 ampere rectifier 8a which supplies power for the Lap Counter Relays. Contact 182 is connected to contact Z3, one terminal of the 6.3 volt, 1.2 ampere rectifier 9aa on Circuit Board Z (FIGS. 9A, 9B). When switch 4h is in of position,vpower from these sources to the set is cut off. When this switch is in on position, power connections are respectively made between contacts 180 and 179, and between contacts 182 and 181. Contact 179 leads to normally closed contacts T5 of lap counter relays 8b, 8c and 8d (Circuit Board T, FIG. 8), and to normally open contacts T4 of lap counter relays 8e, 8f and 8g. The operation of the lap counter circuits will be described in detail hereinafter. Contact 181 leads to the normally open contacts Z5 (Circuit Board Z, FIGS. 9A, 9B) of the Win, Place and Show relays.

In switch 4p, contact 184 is connected to contact W112 of the 24 volt, l ampere rectifier 4bb for supplying power to stepping selectors 4a and 4b; and contact 186 is connected to contact W110 of rectifier 4cc for supplying power to stepping selectors 4c, 4d, 4e and 4f. In off" position, these contacts are open; whereas, in on position, contact 184 is connected to contact 183; and contact 186 is connected to contact 185. Contact 183 leads through the normally open contact W160 of relay 4: of the First Timer, which closes periodically when the latter is energized. Contact 160 leads in parallel through energizing coils of relays 4a and 4b of the Primary Stepping Selectors. Thus, when coil 41' of the First Timer is actuated, current will pass from rectifier 4bb to simultaneously step both of the primary stepping selectors 4a and 4b.

Contact 185 leads to contact W147 of the terminal strip 4dd, which is ultimately connected to the selector arm W138 of stepping selector relay 4a. Thus, when the switch 4;; is closed, power is provided through selector arm 138 and through whichever contact it rests on at the time, to energize the corresponding auxiliary selector 4c, 4d, 4e or 4f, causing it to move through a single step at the beginning of the race. This will break up the formation of any repetitive pattern of operation from one race to the next.

In switch 4q, contact 190 is connected to contact W176 of the 6 volt, 1.2 ampere rectifier 4m, which supplies current for the First Timer and the Second Timer. When this switch is in an on position, current passes from rectifier 4m through contact 189 which leads through the normally closed contacts Z146 and Z of the cut-off relay 9m shown on Circuit Board Z (FIGS. 9A, 9B). This circuit is connected to both the normally closed and normally open contacts W157 and W163 of relays 4i and 4j of the First Timer, each of which is interconnected with the energizing circuit of the opposite relay. Also, the circuit through the normally closed contacts Z146 and Z145 of the cut-off Relay (Circuit Board Z) is connected both to the normally closed and normally open contacts W167 and W174 of relays 4k and 4] of the Second Timer (Circuit Board W, FIGS. 4A, 43), each of these contacts being connected through the energizing circuit of the opposite coil. The return circuit passes from contacts W156 and W162 at the ends of the relay coils 4i and 4j, to contact W175 at the other pole of rectifier 4m. Thus, when the switch 4q is closed, the relay coils 4i and 4j of the First Timer and 4k and 4l of the Second Timer are energized and deenergized in tandem relation in each Timer, at pulse rates which are controlled in each case by the size of the condensers across each of the respective coils.

In the First Timer, a 45'microfarad condenser is connected between points 156 and 155 across the energizing coil of relay 4i; and a 75 microfarad condenser is connected between points 162 and 161 across the energizing coil of relay 4j. In operation, the First Timer produces a mark pulse of one-half second, and a space pulse of slightly less than one-half second, pulsing at a rate of 68 to 70 pulses per minute.

In the Second Timer, a 1 l5 microfarad condenser is connected between contacts 166 and 165, across the energizing coil of relay 4k; and a microfarad condenser is connected between points 172 and 171 across the energizing coil of relay 4l.

In operation, the Second Timer produces a mark pulse of one-half second, and a space pulse of one second, and pulses at a rate of 38 to 40 pulses per minute.

A most important feature of each of the pulse Timers is that the pulse rates are nonharmonic, and each of the pulse sources has a built-in frequency drift, whereby the frequency of each varies one or two beats per second. This increases the randomness of the operatron.

It will be understood that in place of the First Timer and the Second Timer, of the form indicated, there can be substituted other types of pulsing circuits, of forms well known in the art, such as, for example, multivibrator circuits, adjusted to produce pulses of the desired pulse widths and relative frequencies, and each including a built-in drift of one or two beats per second as in the present system.

Whenever coil 4i of the First Timer is energized, closing contacts 159 and 160, a power circuit is completed from contact W112 of rectifier 4bb, supplying 24 volt, l ampere current, through switch 4p to W contacts 142 and 139 which are respectively connected to the parallel energizing circuits of primary stepping selector relays 4a and 4b, driving each of them to step in concert through a repetitive cycle of 12 contacts each. Primary stepping selector 4a steps through its contacts 113 through 124, making contact by means of selector arm 138. Second primary stepping selector 4b steps through its contacts 125 through 136, making 7 contact by means of selector arm 141. The stepping selector 4a is, in turn, connected to energize and cause to step, in sequence, four additional stepping selectors 4c, 40!, 4e and 4]", of 12 contacts each, as will be explained with reference to FIG. 4B.

The two selector coils of 4a and 4b are connected in parallel, contact 139 being connected to contact 142 at one end of the two coils, and contact 137 being connected to contact 140 at the other coil terminals. The common connection from contact 137 is connected to contact 111 of rectifier 4bb to supply 24 volt, l ampere current to the Stepping Selectors. Each of the selector coils 4a and 4b is shorted by a 0.25 microfarad condenser. The stepping selectors 4a and 4b respectively have selectorarms 138 and 141. Stepping selector arm 138 is connected to contact W147 on the terminal strip 4dd, which leads'through the switch 4p back to contact W110 of rectifier 400, when the switch is closed, supplying 24 volt, l ampere current to drive the stepping selectors 4c, 4d, 4e and 4f, as will be explained. The stepping selector arm 141 is connected to contact W169 of the Second Timer, the function of which connection will be explained presently.

Contacts 113 through 124 of primary selector 4a are interconnected together in groups of four, so that 113 through 1 16 are respectively connected to 117 through 120; and the latter group of four is respectively connected to contacts 121 through 124. Contacts 121 through 124 are respectively connected, in order, to-

four W contacts 143 through 146, along the terminal strip 411d.

The four auxiliary selectors 4c, 4d, 42 and 4f, which are operated in sequence by the selector 4a, have each of their coils shorted across by a 0.25 microfarad condenser. Selector coil 4c is connected between contacts 99 and 97; selector coil 4d is connected between contacts 102 and 100; selector coil 4e is connected between contacts 105 and 103; and selector coil 4f is connected between contacts 108 and 106. Contacts 99, 102, 105 and 108, atone end of each of the aforesaid coils 4c, 4d, 4e and 4f, are respectively connected to W contacts 143, 144, 145 and 146 on the terminal strip 4dd. The other terminals 97, 100, 103 and 106 of each of these respective coils are all connected together to complete the circuit to W contact 109 of rectifier 4cc.

Thus, the four coils 4c, 4d, 4e and 4f are energized to step in consecutive sequence, so that when primary selectors 4a, 4b take four steps, each of the auxiliary selectors takes one step in sequence.

Auxiliary stepping selector contacts 49 through 96 are respectively connected, in numerical order, to W contacts 1 through 48 on terminal strip 4n. These contacts are then combined by strapping into sixteen groups, consisting of six groups of four contacts each, four groups of three contacts each, and six groups of two contacts each. Each of these groups is connected to a specific one of contacts R289 through R304 0n terminal strip 5a of Circuit Board R (FIGS. 5A, 5B). These connections are indicated in Table l, which follows.

TABLE I Circuit Board W Grouping of Contacts For Regulation of Odds Circuit Board R Group Corresponding Designation Interconnected W Contacts R Contact 4, W37,W29,W2l,W3 R304 4 W43, W28, W14, W6 R303 4;, W42,W35,Wl7,Wl R302 4 W40, W26, W19, W9 R301 4 W45,W33,W15,W4 R300 4 W48, W32, W23, W8 R299 3, W44, W30, W18 R298 3,, W31, W20, W5 R297 3 W47, W27, W11 R296 3 W39, W13, W2 R295 2 W38, W10 R294 2 W36, W22 R293 2: W16, W7 R292 2., W46, W25 R291 2 W34, W12 R290 2 W41, W24 R289 The grouped contacts from the terminal strip 4n, arranged in the manner indicated in Table I, are connected to terminal board 5a of Circuit Board R (FIGS. 5A, 5B), which shows the Odds Selector Dials which are set up to control the number of individual circuit wires connected in succession to each of the horsepower circuits during a specific selector cycle. This will be described presently.

Before passing to a description of Circuit Board R, let us return to Circuit Board W (FIGS. 4A, 4B) for a description of the function of the Second Pulse Timer, which in the present embodiment is arranged to provide pulses at the rate of 38 to 40 pulses per minute, as opposed to a pulsing rate of 68 to 70 pulses per minute for the First Timer. As previously described, the latter energizes the two primary stepping selector coils 4a and 4b to step through their simultaneous cycle of twelve steps, operating to energize, in tandem, coils 4c, 4d, 4e and 4f of the auxiliary stepping selectors to control the sequential stepping of these selectors through their steps 49-96. I

Stepping selector coil 4b actuates selector arm 141 to step through steps through 136, while selector arm 138 of coil 4a is stepping through steps 113 through 124. It will be apparent that selector steps 125 through 136 are also connected in groups of four, each of which groups is connected to a contact on terminal strip 4dd. Thus, W contacts 125, 129 and 133 are connected to W contact 149 on terminal strip 4dd; contacts 126, and 134 to terminal strip contact 150; contacts 127, 131 and 135 to terminal strip contact 151; and contacts 128, 132 and 136 to terminal strip contact 152. Each of the terminal strip contacts 149, 150, 151 and 152 is respectively connected through a diode to the respective selector arms 98, 101, 104 and 107 of the four auxiliary selectors 4c, 4d, 4e and 4f.

It will be apparent that when relay coil 4k in the Second Timer is energized, closing its contacts 169 and 170, a 6 volt, 2 ampere current passes from contact 177 of the rectifier 4aa, through selector arm 141, into one of the four selector arms 98, 101, 104 or 107 of the auxiliary selectors, and into one of the 48 contacts 49 through 96, depending upon which step the auxiliary selector has reached at that moment.

This random shot of current passes through one of the 48 contacts of terminal strip 4n, selected by pure chance, and into the horsepower circuit of one of the horses on the track, causing it to move forward. The number of times the driving circuit for any specific horse will be in position to receive a shot of current from the random pulse source, Second Timer, will be determined by the manual arrangement of the Odds Selector Dials, which will now be described with reference to Circuit Board R (FIGS. 5A, 5B).

ODDS SELECTOR SYSTEM Referring now to Circuit Board R, there is shown a plurality of manually operated rotary selector dials, each of which is equipped with eleven contacts and a selector arm which is manually movable in a clockwise direction from a null position, with no connection, to engage any of the remaining positions which are connected in a manner to set up the desired odds. The rotary selectors are arranged in sections or gangs of four, one selector being assigned to each of the horses running in the race. The selector arms of each section of four are ganged together so that the four arms simultaneously make contact at the same angular position on the face of the dial. As seen, the dial contacts are numbered in order, clockwise around the dials, reading from bottom to top of each of the columns of dials.

1n the illustration under description, detailed circuit arrangements are indicated for the dial selectors connected to the horsepower circuits No. 1, No. 2 and No. 6 (from left to right on Circuit Board R, FIGS. 5A, 5B), the selector dial contacts for horsepower circuits No. 3, No. 4 and No.5 having been omitted in order to simplify the description. It will be understood, however, that the connections not shown will be substantially similar in arrangement to those indicated with reference to Horses No.1, No.2 and No.6.

Each of the selector dial arms shown on Circuit Board R is respectively connected to a contact on the terminal strip 5a. For example, ganged selector dial arms 305, 306, 307 and 308, relating to Horse No. 1, are respectively connected to R contacts 265, 266, 267 and 268 on terminal strip 5a; ganged selector dial arms 309, 310, 311 and 312 relating to Horse No. 2 are respectively connected to R contacts 269, 270, 271 and 272 on terminal strip 5a; selector dial arms 325, 326, 327 and 328 relating to Horse No. 6 are respectively connected to contacts 285, 286, 287 and 288 on terminal strip 5a. It will be noted that each of the mentioned contacts on terminal strip 5a has a diode connected between it and the designated selector dial arms, to maintain unidirectional current passing from the selector dial arm into the terminal strip.

Contacts 265 through 268 on terminal strip 5a are connected together to contact V76 on Circuit Board V (FIG. 6) leading to the energizing circuit of the horsepower relay 6d of Horse No. l, as will be described later; contacts 269 through 272 on terminal strip 5a are connected together to contact V73 on Circuit Board V, leading to the energizing circuit of the horsepower relay 6e of Horse No. 2; and contacts 285 through 288 on terminal strip 5a are connected together to contact V61 on Circuit Board V leading to the energizing circuit of the horsepower relay 6fof Horse No. 6.

As indicated previously, the dial selectors for the Horse circuits No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 have been omitted; and likewise, the intermediate connections on terminal strip 5a to the contacts 273 through 284 relating to these omitted horses have not been shown or described, although it will be understood that they are substantially similar to the circuits shown.

The contacts at the right-hand end on the lower side of terminal strip 5a, numbered 289 through 304, lead from terminal strip 4n of Circuit Board W (FIGS. 5A, 5B). These are grouped as indicated in Table I hereinbefore, so that the first six contacts 289 through 29 4 are respectively connected to each of the six two-wire groups, designated as 2 2 2,, 2 2 and 2,, respectively; the next four contacts 295 through 298 are connected to each of the four three-wire groups designated as 3 3 3 and 3,, respectively; and the last six contacts on the terminal strip, namely 299 through 304, are connected in order to each of the six four-wire groups, designated as 4 4 4 4 4, and 4,, respectively.

In order to better understand the theory behind the operation of the odds selectors, one is referred to Table 11. It will be understood that although in Table 11 specific numerical odds have been assigned to the wire total for each cycle, a particular wire total can readily be adjusted on the tote board to produce a higher or lower percentage of wining favorites at any given odds.

TABLE 11 Theoretical Grouping of Circuits for Odds Selection Horse No. 1 Wire Groups Wire 4 3 2 Total Odds 1,3 4 10-1 Horse No. 2 Wire Groups Wire 4 3 2 Total Odds 2,3 2 2 13 1-1 2 2,3 4 12 2-1 2 3 2,4 11 3-1 2 2,3 10 4-1 2 2 2 9 5-1 2 2,5 8 6-1 2 4 7 7-1 2 6 6 8-1 3 2 5 9-1 Horses Nos. 3,4, and 5 have been omitted.

Horse No.6 Wire Groups Wire 4 3 2 Total Odds 6,1 4 1 l3 l-1 6 1,4 2 12 2-1 6 4 1,2 11 3-1 6 1,4 10 4-1 6 3 6 9 5-1 6 1,5 8 6-1 6 2 7 7-1 6 4 6 8-1 4 2 5 9-1 This Table includes a section for each of the horses under description (No. 1, No.2 and No.6), showing, in

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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/6, 463/60, 463/62
International ClassificationA63F9/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/143
European ClassificationA63F9/14E