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Publication numberUS3729273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 24, 1973
Filing dateNov 23, 1970
Priority dateNov 23, 1970
Publication numberUS 3729273 A, US 3729273A, US-A-3729273, US3729273 A, US3729273A
InventorsShimrony Y
Original AssigneeBendix Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
In-tank fuel pump reservoir
US 3729273 A
Abstract
A fuel reservoir arranged about the intake or suction conduit of a fuel pump supply line in a fuel tank utilized by internal combustion engines, consisting of a cylindrical container having a bottom and open top and to which a venturi nozzle is mounted. The venturi receives the return fuel and injects it into the reservoir. The auxiliary fuel is provided through an inlet opening at the throat of the venturi. The return flow of excess fuel delivered by said fuel pump creates a low pressure zone at the throat of the venturi thereby sucking the auxiliary fuel into the venturi causing both auxiliary fuel and return fuel to be injected into the reservoir in a vortical motion about said suction conduit.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 191 Shimrony 1451 Apr. 24, 1973 [54] IN-TANK FUEL PUMP RESERVOIR 2,077,024 4/1937 Tanner et al. ..417 1s1 [75] Inventor: Yoram Shimrony, Elmira, NY.

I Primary ExaminerCarlton R. Croyle [73] Assignee: The Bendix Corp0rati0n,Southf1eld, Assistant Examiner Richard Gluck Mlch- Att0mey-William S. Thompson et al. [22] Filed: Nov. 23, 1970 (Under Rule 47) Appl. No.: 91 ,733

[ 57] ABSTRACT A fuel reservoir arranged about the intake or suction conduit of a fuel pump supply line in a fuel tank utilized by internal combustion engines, consisting of a cylindrical container having a bottom and open top and to which a venturi nozzle is mounted. The venturi receives thereturn fuel and injects it into the reservoir. The auxiliary fuel is provided through an inlet opening at the throat of the venturi. The return flow of excess fuel delivered by said fuel pump creates a low pressure zone at the throat of the venturi thereby sucking the auxiliary fuel into the venturi causing both auxiliary fuel and return fuel to be injected into the reservoir in a vortical motion about said suction conduit.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures FUEL PUMP ENGINE Patented April 24, 1973 3,729,273

2 Sheets-Sheet l l0 FUEL PUMP l2 4 2o I L I ll 2| ENGlNE Pl GU RE 2 FIGURE 3 YORAM SH/MRONY INVENTOR.

Patented April 24, 1973 3,729,273

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FlGURE 4- FIGURE 5 YORAM JH/MRONY INVENTOR.

IN-TANK FUEL PUMP REsERvorR FIELD OF THE INVENTION DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART It is known in the prior art to provide installations for use in fuel tanks of internal combustion engines which serve the purpose of damming-up, collecting and storing, especially with a relatively low fuel level in the tank, the fuel present within the tank during breaking and acceleration as well as during curve drives. These prior art devices dam-up, collect and store the fuel within the region of the fuel suction line, and are used, for example, in the form of relatively low partition walls extending in a transverse direction of the fuel tank and secured to the tank bottom ahead and/or behind the suction line. With such an installation, fuel under the influence of accelerating and decelerating forces is effectively dammed-up and collected by these partition walls.

Other prior art arrangements are known in which an S-shaped vertically extending guide sheet metal strip is provided above the suction line in the fuel tank at the bottom thereof, whereby the fuel which runs off along the outer leg portions of the S-shaped strip is dammedup and is thereby effectively conducted to the fuel suction line.

Furthermore, fuel tank constructions are known in the prior art, the inner space of which is subdivided in an S-shaped manner by means of sheet metal walls whereby an outlet is provided in each individual space. Additionally, it is known to form such S-shaped subdivisions by means of anti-roll baffle plates, also provided with a large number of small apertures.

It is also known in the prior art to arrange an anti-roll baffle box about the fuel supply line with the four side walls of the baffle box rigidly connected with the fuel tank bottom, which is thereby provided with apertures in proximity to the fuel tank bottom to enable therethrough the flow of fuel.

All of these prior art installations mentioned hereinabove, however, exhibit for the most part, considerable short comings and disadvantages.

For example, no definite assurance is given by the use of the particular damming-up walls and/or guide walls known in the prior art which are arranged only transversely to the driving direction, that a sufficient supply of fuel for the internal combustion engine is provided reliably under all possible conditions. Since it can be safely assumed that under normal driving conditions more accelerating forces for the fuel occur which are directed in the transverse direction of the vehicle in the form of centrifugal forces than in the longitudinal direction of the vehicle by reason of the more frequent occurrence of curved drives often times no appreciable damming-up of the fuel or none at all take place with the occurrence of centrifugal forces to assure a safe and reliable supply of fuel with the prior art installations.

Additionally, there exists also the danger that the fuel will flow out of the immediate vicinity of the fuel outlet with the prior art constructions utilizing individual baffle plates provided with small connecting passages, not to mention the high constructional costs and expenses necessitated by such prior art installations.

Many of the short comings and disadvantages of the prior art devices mentioned above were surportedly obviated by even later devices. These devices consisted essentially of a damming-up and storage housing having an outer curved wall and an inner curved wall forming therebetween a spiral shaped inlet channel for the fuel in communication at the outer end thereof with the inside of the fuel tank, and in communication at the inner end thereof with the inside of the storing housing. The excess fuel is returned to the housing by means of a return line that discharges the excess fuel either directly into the inner housing of the storage housing, or by discharging the excess fuel from the fuel return line essentially tangentially into the inlet of the storage space. The inlet channel of these devices is formed by an inner and outer wall mounted directly to the fuel tanks bottom. However, these devices also had major disadvantages.

For example, the provision of a spiral shaped channel formed by at least one wall is difficult to mount or assemble to the fuel tank s bottom. Furthermore, the lack of a unitary design would cause these devices to be unstable, i.e., a shifting of components with normal usage, or in the alternative would demand extensive supporting structure insuring proper alignment of the fuel return line. Also, the inlet channel formed by the double-wall spiral design is relatively large in cross section thereby permitting large quantities of return fuel and/or stored-up fuel to escape; this shortcoming extends unduly the length of time necessary to adequately fill the housing under conditions requiring a higher fuel level within the housing than is provided by the level of in-tank or auxiliary fuel.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is a fuel pump reservoir for a fuel tank utilized by internal combustion engines in which the fuel storage structure is of cylindrical form having a bottom and an open top to which a fuel venturi nozzle is attached. The venturi-like nozzle has a fuel return passage and an in-tank fuel inlet located adjacent the throat of the venturi so that the flow of said return fuel creates a low pressure zone at the auxiliary fuel inlet thereby sucking the auxiliary fuel into the nozzle causing the auxiliary fuel and return fuel to be introduced into the reservoir tangential of the wall thereof in a vortical motion.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a fuel pump reservoir having a relatively smooth continuous interior wall, and into which both return line fuel and in-tank fuel is injected. By the use of a venturi as an injecting nozzle, efficient use is made of the return line fuel. The creation of a vortex within the cylinder by the discharged fuel enables the fuel to defoam and degas before reaching the fuel pump tom of the fuel tank, practically complete consumption of the in-tank fuel is possible.

It is another object of this invention to provide a fuel collecting and storing arrangement of simple design lending itself to very economical construction.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a storing device within a fuel tank which is of relatively simply unitary design thus enabling the device to be molded from a plastic material.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a fuel collecting and storing reservoir of cylindrical form having only one continuous relatively smoothside wall.

A further object of the present invention resides in the provision of a collector and storage construction within the fuel tank for an internal combustion engine,

or similar moving vehicles and in particular for a fuel injection engine operating with a'fuel supply pump in which the fuel sucked in excess of the required amount is returned to the fuel tank through the return line.

Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a fuel collecting and return apparatus for the fuel tank of an internal combustion engine which apparatus comprises a cylindrical storage structure to which is attached or formed on the wall thereof a venturi-like nozzle having at least one opening therein providing an inlet for the auxiliary fuel so that the return fuel from the engine sucks auxiliary fuel into the nozzle through said opening thereby discharging both auxiliary and return fuel tangential of said cylinder wall in a whirling motion.

Further objects of this invention reside in the provision of a reservoir for the suction conduit of a fuel pump utilized by automotive vehicles which is of simple unitary design, easily installed in the fuel tank, operatively stable underall driving conditions, and having an auxiliary fuel inlet of relatively small cross-sectional area.

These and other objects and features and advantages of the present invention will become more obvious from the followingdescription when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which shows, for purposes of illustration only, two embodiments in accordance with the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an axial elevational cross-sectional view of a fuel collecting and storing device in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention taken along section line l-I of FIG. 2.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the device illustrated in FIG. l.v

FIG. 3 is a partial cross-sectional view of a venturi in accordance with the present invention taken along sec; tion line IIIIII of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a partial elevational cross-sectional view of 4 V DETAILEDDESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals are used throughout the views thereof to designate corresponding parts, reference numerals designates the bottom of the fuel tank. The in-tank fuel pump reservoir 10 is arranged essentially centrally within the fuel tank, at or near the fuel tank bottom I 10. The reservoir or housing 10 is of cylindrical form, having a circular base 11 and a side wall 12 extending upwardly therefrom. The fuel intake means, fuel pump or the intake line for a fuel pump, is arranged essentially centrally within reservoir 10 and is positioned at or near the base 11 of reservoir 10. The fuel intake means is shown as a filter 20 with a fuel intake line 21 extending upwardly therefrom.

Wall 12 of reservoir 10 has an aperture 13 therein which receives a venturi-like nozzle 30. Aperture 13 is cut through wall 12 such that the outlet 35 of venturi 30 is positioned essentially tangential to wall 12 and adjacent the base 11 of reservoir 10. The axis of venturi 30 is essentially parallel to base 11 of of reservoir 10. Where reservoir 10 is manufactured from metal, venturi 30 may be assembled to wall 12 in any conventional manner such as welding, or a snap type fitting may be made where venturi 30 would be put in place by snapping it into a receiving structure formed in wall 12. Where reservoir 10 is fabricated from a plastic material, the nozzle 30, base 11, and wall 12 are all one piece.

Referring specifically to FIG. 3, a return line (not shown) for the excess fuel is press-fitted onto nipple 40 of venturi 30 so that return fuel is discharged into the inlet passage 31 of venturi 30. Of course, many conventional methods of connecting the venturi line to venturi 30 may be used. Venturi 30. has an orifice or aperture 32 formed therein, which orifice 32 opens into the throat 33 of venturi 30. Venturi 30 is mounted to wall 12 of reservoir 10 such that aperture 32 is located external of reservoir 10. Although only one aperture 32 is shown in venturi '30, it is possible to have more than one opening in venturi 30 external of wall 12 of reservoir 10 therefor providing more than one access to auxiliary fuel. Both auxiliary fuel and return fuel are discharged from nozzle 30 by means of discharge passage 35.

DESCRIPTION OF AN ALTERNATIVE EMBODIMENT tangentially of wall 12 and adjacent base 11' as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. The venturi-like chamber with nozzle 30 is similar to the one described above and as shown by FIG. 3 with the exception of the bend in passage 31" as noted above.

OPERATION As pointed out supra, the present invention is of particular significance and advantage if used in connection with an internal combustion engine of the injection type, especially with a gasoline injection type engine which utilizes fuel injection for the gasoline. As is known with gasoline injection systems, even at full load or full throttle, only a fractional part of the supplied fuel quantity is injected into the engine whereas the considerably larger residual quantity of the fuel in the pump is discharged, for cooling purposes, and is conducted back into the fuel tank.

The fuel returns to the fuel tank by means of a return line connected to nipple 40 (40') of venturi 30 (30'). As the fuel passes through the inlet passage 31 (31') and into throat 33 (33) a low pressure zone is created; this low pressure zone sucks the auxiliary fuel into the venturi through the orifice 32 (32' and aperture 13'). Since the discharge passage 35 (35') is located generally tangential to wall 12 (12), the auxiliary fuel and return fuel is injected into reservoir (10) in a vertical motion. Thus, the return fuel is effectively defoamed and degassed by the whirling motion while simultaneously insuring that an adequate supply of fuel is maintained for the suction or fuel intake line 21 (21) located centrally in reservoir 10 (10). The relatively smooth continuous side wall 12 (12) provides a relatively long return path for the injected fuel and prevents any significant turbulence from developing.

By positioning the reservoir on or close to the bottom of the fuel tank, practically complete consumption of in-tank fuel is guaranteed.

Note, that with this invention, no fuel is allowed to escape from the reservoir while the engine is on, i.e., so long as there is return fuel flow.

It should also be noted, that both embodiments shown are of unitary design and are operatively independent of other supporting structure once the fuel return line is fitted onto nipple 40 (40').

While mention has been made throughout of a suction conduit, or a filter 20 (20') and on intake line 21 (21'), the supply fuel pump could itself be positioned or attached to base 11 (11) of reservoir 10 (10'); this is possible since with this invention a higher level of fuel in contact with the pump is maintained than would be possible through the use of prior art designs.

While I have shown and described two embodiments in accordance with the present invention, it is understood that the same is not limited thereto but is susceptible to many changes and modifications within the spirit and scope of the present invention and I, therefore, do not wish to be limited to the particular details shown and described herein but intend to cover all such modifications and changes as are encompassed by the scope of the appended claims.

lclaim:

1. A fuel reservoir for the intake of an internal combustion engine fuel pump or the like of the type delivering fuel to the engine in excess of the engine requirements and wherein the excess of fuel delivered to the engine is returned to the fuel tank by a return line, the intake for the pump being disposed within said reservoir, comprising:

a generally cylindrical structure having a base, a side wall, the side wall having an aperture; and a venturi for receiving said return fuel mounted to said wall adjacent said base, said venturi having a flow channel extending the rethrough dgenerally tangentially relative to said side wall an forming an inlet passage, a throat,-and a discharge passage respectively in the flow direction, said venturi also having at least one radial orifice therein opening into said throat, said venturi being mounted to said wall such that said radial orifice and said side wall aperture are aligned.

2. In combination with a fuel pump or an intake line for a fuel pump disposed within a fuel tank used by internal combustion engines, and having an excess engine fuel return line therein, a fuel reservoir arranged about said fuel pump or intake line comprising:

a cylindrical structure having a base and a relatively smooth continuous side wall extending upwardly therefrom, said wall having at least one aperture therethrough adjacent said base, and

a venturi mounted tangential to the interior of said wall, said venturi having a flow channel including a throat extending therethrough for receiving and delivering said return fuel to the reservoir, said venturi also having a radial orifice opening into said flow channel at the throat of said venturi, said orifice and said aperture in said wall being aligned one with the other.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2077024 *Sep 11, 1935Apr 13, 1937Francis Tanner WilliamSuction device
US2953156 *Aug 28, 1957Sep 20, 1960United Aircraft CorpFuel transfer system
US3020950 *Nov 10, 1959Feb 13, 1962Daimler Benz AgFuel tank construction, especially for motor vehicles
US3049171 *Apr 14, 1959Aug 14, 1962Daimler Benz AgFuel tank construction
US3143187 *Nov 26, 1963Aug 4, 1964Ford Motor CoLubricating system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4838307 *Sep 12, 1986Jun 13, 1989Nissan Motor Company, LimitedFuel tank arrangement
US4886031 *Jun 13, 1988Dec 12, 1989Daimler-Benz AktiengesellschaftDashpot with filter for fuel tanks
US4911134 *Jul 25, 1988Mar 27, 1990Saab-Scania AktiebolagArrangement for ejecting fuel in a vehicle fuel tank
US5527163 *Dec 9, 1994Jun 18, 1996Vdo Adolf Schindling AgMounting of sucking jet pump in plural chamber fuel tank
US5806560 *Oct 22, 1996Sep 15, 1998J. C. Carter Company, Inc.Aircraft fuel transfer pump with auxiliary fuel line scavenge pump
US6241883 *Jun 30, 1998Jun 5, 2001Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaVehicle fuel supplying apparatus
US6505644 *Jan 4, 2001Jan 14, 2003Delphi Technologies, Inc.Dual barrel jet fuel pump assembly for a fuel tank
US6705298May 20, 2002Mar 16, 2004Denso International America, Inc.Fuel pump module
US6718952Jul 17, 2002Apr 13, 2004Uis, Inc.Fuel module assembly
US7387112 *Mar 16, 2007Jun 17, 2008Denso CorporationJet pump, fuel feed apparatus having the same, and method for welding the same
US7429322 *Nov 3, 2004Sep 30, 2008Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Fuel tank with filters
US7913670 *Jun 17, 2008Mar 29, 2011Continental Automotive Systems Us, Inc.Venturi jet structure for fuel delivery module of a fuel tank
US8372278 *Mar 21, 2012Feb 12, 2013GM Global Technology Operations LLCLiquid fuel strainer assembly
WO2008105721A1 *Feb 6, 2008Sep 4, 2008Donald KristoferssonFuel tank arrangement for a vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/79, 96/178, 417/151, 417/171
International ClassificationF04D9/06, F04D29/00, F02M37/02, F04D29/70, F04D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M37/025, F04D9/06, F04D29/708
European ClassificationF04D29/70P, F02M37/02B, F04D9/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 7, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: SIEMENS-BENDIX AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS L.P., A LIMI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ALLIED-SIGNAL INC.;REEL/FRAME:005006/0282
Effective date: 19881202