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Publication numberUS3729600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 24, 1973
Filing dateAug 28, 1971
Priority dateSep 30, 1970
Also published asDE2148699A1, DE7136997U
Publication numberUS 3729600 A, US 3729600A, US-A-3729600, US3729600 A, US3729600A
InventorsBoxell A, Buzzard L, Godfrey N, Solomon N
Original AssigneeErg Ind Corp Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slide switch assembly with resilient bridging contact and terminal structure adaptable to 8/n pole configurations
US 3729600 A
Abstract
An improved miniature switch having a pack shape and size, and leadout configuration approximately the same as that of a dual-in-line integrated circuit pack, thus facilitating tooling operations in printed circuit board manufacture, and automatic insertion of components. There are eight pairs of corresponding terminals. Shorting links initially between adjacent terminals are selectively removed, and an appropriate length slider is provides with one, two, or four contacts coupling corresponding terminals, thus making the switch one pole-eight way, two pole-four way, or four pole-two way.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

States atent 91 Solomon et al.

[54] SLIDE SWITCH ASSEMBLY WITH RESILIENT BRIDGING CONTACT AND TERMINAL STRUCTURE ADAPTABLE TO 8/N POLE CONFIGURATIONS [75] Inventors: Nigel Allan Solomon, Wembley Park; Nelson Frederick .lohn Godfrey, Leighton Buzzard; Alan James Boxell, Bletchley, all of England [73] Assignee: ERG Industrial Corporation Limited, Dunstable, England [22] Filed: Aug. 28, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 184,507

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Sept. 30, 1970 Great Britain ..46,575/70 [52] U.S. Cl..... ..200/16 D [51] Int. Cl. ..HOlh 15/06 [58] Field of Search ..200/11 TW, 16 C,

200/16 D, 168 C, 6 BB [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,484,734 10/1949 Rahmel ..200/16 D X [4 1 Apr. 24, 1973 3,531,603 9/1970 Ashman ..200/11 TW UX 3,311,719 3/1967 Vananzi ..200/16 C 3,624,320 1 H1971 Eberhart et a1. ..200/168 C X 3,621,157 11/1971 Primary Examiner-J. R. Scott Attorney-Beveridge & De Grandi ABSTRACT four pole-two way.

1 1 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Schwab ..200/6 BB Patented April 24, 1973 3,729,600

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Patented April 24, 1973 I 3,729,600

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 7- 8 T"; "Ti Ii j 20 Ill/M77 SLIDE SWITCH ASSEMBLY WITH RESILIENT BRIDGING CONTACT AND TERMINAL STRUCTURE ADAPTABLE TO 8/N POLE CONFIGURATIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to switches and is particularly concerned with small switches having a leadout spacing substantially the same as that of an integrated circuit dual-in-line pack.

SUMMARY According to this invention there is provided a switch comprising a housing, a first set of eight terminals mounted on one side of the housing, a second set of eight terminals mounted on the opposite side of the housing, removable shorting links commoning adjacent terminals of each set, bridging means operable to electrically bridge corresponding terminals of the first and second sets, the terminals having leadouts protruding from the housing, with the leadout spacing being substantially the same as that of an integrated circuit dual-in-line pack.

Preferably the switch has all the shorting links of the first set removed, and selected shorting links of the second set removed to form n poles (where n is one of the numbers 1, 2, and 4, and there are eight, four, and two terminals in each of the number of poles, respectively), and the bridging means comprises a slider slidably mounted within the housing and carrying it slider contacts for electrically bridging said corresponding terminals.

The sets of terminals are formed with shorting links between adjacent terminals for ease of handling during assembly of the switch. -With all the shorting links of the second set of terminals in place and with the slider carrying only one slider contact, the switch performs as a single pole, eight way type. i

The switch can be arranged as a two pole, four way type by removing the central shorting link of the second set of terminals, and by providing a slider carrying two slider contacts.

Further removal of shorting links from the second set, to form four pairs of commoned terminals, and use of a slider carrying four slider contacts, would make the switch four pole, two way.

Conveniently the housing comprises an upper and lower portion and approximates the shape and size of a present-day dual-in-lineintegrated circuit package.

Switches in accordance with the invention will normally be inserted in printed circuit boards and soldered permanently in circuit. Alternatively they can be inserted into suitable sockets.

Because of the compatible leadout configuration no special tool is required for printed circuit board manufacture, and the compatible shape and size means that the switch is capable of being handled by the same automatic insertion tool as that for dual-in-line packs.

The slider can be mounted in the upper portion of the housing and arranged to protrude externally to allow the switch to be operated.

Preferably the slider is maintained in the correct positions by means of the engagement of a small projection on the slider with one of a number of corresponding notches in the upper portion of the housing. The spacing of these notches is substantially the same as the terminal spacing at the region of contact with the slider contact.

If a narrow slider contact is used then a break-before-make action will be obtained. Similarly make-before-break action will result from the use of a wide slider contact. I It will be seen that the length of the slider must be chosen to suit the type of switch. For example in a sin- 0 gle-pole, eight way switch assembly, a short slider carhaving interlocking elements so that they can be snapped together, the upper molding engaging in slots in a slider, which slider on its under surface has at least one contact spring so that corresponding tags in the two sets can be electrically connected.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side view of a two pole four way switch assembly;

FIG. 2 is a section on 22 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the assembly of FIG. 1

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a bottom molding of the assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a scrap section on 55 in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the molding of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a section on 7--7 in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an end view of a top molding of the assembly of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 9 is a view on 99 in FIG. 8.

FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 show a switch assembly comprising a bottom molding 10, a top molding 11, a slider 12 with attached slider contacts 13, and sixteen terminals 31 each with a leadout or tag 14. The terminals are initially formed in sets of eight with shorting links 15' between adjacent leadouts. FIG. 2 shows a slider contact 13 linking corresponding terminals across the switch, hence it can be seen that by removing all shorting links 15 on one side, the central shorting link on the other side, as shown in FIG. 1 and hereinafter called the pole side, and by fitting a slider 12 carrying two slider contacts 13 which are spaced apart by four terminal spacings then a two pole four way switch is obtained. The term terminal spacing is to be taken as meaning the distance between centers of adjacent terminals measured at the region of contact with the slider contact 13.

There are two other versions of the switch, one pole, eight way and four pole, two way. The former is obtained with all the leadouts on the pole side commoned together, the slide 12 being short, as shown by chain line 16 in FIGS. 1 and 3, and carrying one slide contact 13. The latter switch is obtained with links removed on the pole side to leave the leadouts linked in pairs. In

this case a longer slide 12, shown by chain line 17 in FIGS. 1 and 3, is used which carries four slide contacts 13 spaced apart by two terminal spacings.

FIGS. 4 to 9 of the top and bottom moldings enable the method of assembly to be seen more clearly.

In FIG. 9, notches 18 are shown which engage a small complementary protrusion (not shown) on the slider 12 to locate the slide contact accurately on one of the terminals.

The bottom molding has terminal mounting platforms 19 which are situated along each side. Between each pair of adjacent platforms 19 is a raised portion 2t) carrying two upstanding walls 21 to locate and grip a lower part 22 of a side wall of the top molding 11. FIGS. 4, 6 and 7 clearly show these parts and FIG. 2 shows how the lower parts 22 of the side walls of the top molding are engaged by the walls 21.

The switch assembly has an end wall at each end. One end wall 23 is carried by the bottom molding and the other end wall 24 is carried by the top molding. End wall 23 has two foot-like portions 25 extending inwardly from the top of the wall onto the upper surface of the top molding to prevent vertical separation of the top and bottom moldings at that end. Separation of the moldings at the other end is prevented by the engagement of a foot 26 on the bottom of end wall 24 with a complementary portion 27 on the bottom molding (FIG. 5). Lengthways relative movement between top and bottom moldings is prevented by the locating of upstanding keys 28 on the bottom molding into corresponding slots 29 in the top molding.

FIG. 2 shows the terminals 31 crimped over mounting platforms 19, and a slider contact 13 making electrical connection between terminals on opposite sides of the switch. The slider contact 13, secured to slider 12 by a projection 30, may be narrow giving break-before-make operation or wide giving make-before-break operation.

The top and bottom moldings 10, 11 and the slider 12 are made from glass filled nylon. The moldings are slightly resilient enabling the assembly to be snapped together. The assembly can be made more permanent by glueing the top and bottom moldings together.

We claim:

1. A switch comprising a housing having an upper portion and a lower portion, the upper portion having a longitudinally extending, horizontal, inwardly directed region on one side, and a corresponding region on the opposite side, the inner edge of each of the regions having a downwardly directed wall; a first set of terminals mounted on one side of the lower portion, a second set of terminals mounted on the opposite side of the lower portion, the terminals having leadouts protruding from the housing; a slider having a channel in each longitudinal vertical surface and being mounted for longitudinal movement with said walls of the upper portion slidably engaged in said channels; n bridging contacts carried by the slider where n is one of the numbers 1, 2 and 4, each of the bridging contacts being elongate and transversely extending such that each can make electrical connection between a terminal in the first set and the corresponding terminal in the second set; the length of the slider being such that it can be moved into any one of 8/n positions, in each of which positions the bridging contact(s) is aligned with a pair of corresponding terminals.

2. A switch as recited in claim 1 wherein the slider has a small projection on a surface adjacent a surface of the upper portion, and said surface of the upper portion has a number of corresponding notches, the projection and notches being arranged such that the slider can be accurately located in each of the 8/n positions.

3. A switch as recited in claim 1 wherein the upper and lower portions of the housing have interlocking elements, and at least one of the portions is formed of a resilient material so that they can be snapped together.

4. A switch as recited in claim 1 wherein the slider has a region which protrudes above the upper portion of the housing.

5. A switch as recited in claim 1 wherein the width of a bridging contact is less than the distance between adjacent terminals in a set, whereby a break-before-make action is obtained as the slider is moved longitudinally from one of said positions into an adjacent position.

6. A switch as recited in claim 1 wherein the width of a bridging contact is greater than the distance between adjacent terminals in a set, whereby a breakbe foremake action is obtained as the slider is moved longitudinally from one of said positions into an adjacent position.

' 7. A switch as recited in claim 1 wherein the leadouts of the terminals are formed with removable shorting links between adjacent leadouts of each set.

8. A switch as claimed in claim 1 wherein the leadout spacing is substantially the same as that of an integrated circuit dual-in-line pack.

9. A switch as recited in claim 1 wherein the switch approximates the shape and size of a dual-in-line integrated circuit pack.

10. A switch comprising an elongate base molding with upstanding longitudinal rims; a set of eight contacts crimped over each rim, each contact having a protruding tag; a corresponding upper molding, at least one of the moldings being slightly resilient, and both of the moldings having interlocking elements so that they can be snapped together the upper molding having a longitudinally extending, horizontal, inwardly directed region on one side, and a corresponding region on the opposite side, the inner edge of each of the regions having a downwardly directed wall; a slider having a channel in each longitudinal vertical surface and being supported by the upper molding for longitudinal movement with said walls slidably engaged in said channels,

at least one elongate transversely extending contact spring mounted on the upper surface of the slider for electrically connecting corresponding contacts in the two sets.

11. A switch comprising a housing having an upper and a lower molding, the moldings having interlocking elements, and at least one of the moldings being formed of a resilient material so that the moldings can be snapped together; a first set of eight terminals mounted on one side of the lower molding, a second set of eight terminals mounted on the opposite side of the lower molding; the terminals having leadouts protruding from the housing with the leadout spacing being substantially the same as that of an integrated circuit dual-in-line pack; removable shorting links commoning adjacent leadouts of each set; an elongate slider, n slider contacts carried by the slider on its undersurface, where n is one of the numbers I, 2 and 4, and where the two slider contacts are spaced apart by four terminal spacings and the four slider contacts are spaced apart 6 of each of the regions having a downwardly extending wall, which walls slidably engage in the channels in the slider; and the housing approximating the shape and size of an integrated circuit dual-in-line pack.

l l R i

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2484734 *Feb 11, 1948Oct 11, 1949Nielsen A C CoApparatus for determining the listening habits of wave signal receivers users
US3311719 *May 11, 1966Mar 28, 1967Continental Wirt ElectronicSlide switch with improved lever actuator
US3531603 *Dec 2, 1968Sep 29, 1970Plessey Co LtdMulti-position rotary electric switches
US3621157 *Jun 1, 1970Nov 16, 1971Mc Graw Edison CoMiniature switch with multiple cam-operated switch contacts
US3624320 *Dec 9, 1969Nov 30, 1971Eberhart BrunoSlide switch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3878344 *Feb 1, 1974Apr 15, 1975Amp IncCam operated switch assembly having split housing, double action wiping resilient contacts and detent structure
US3971903 *Nov 25, 1974Jul 27, 1976Wilentchik Jerzy JMulti slider switch
US3974347 *Mar 10, 1975Aug 10, 1976Amp IncorporatedSwitch assembly having rotatable, pivoted or slidable actuator and diode structure mounted between actuator contacts
US3999287 *Apr 20, 1976Dec 28, 1976Amp IncorporatedMethod of making a switch having a diode mounting feature
US4016377 *May 19, 1975Apr 5, 1977Alps Electric Co., Ltd.Slide switch assembly having improved fixed knife blade type contact structure
US4068202 *Jun 7, 1976Jan 10, 1978Walter F. Wessendorf, Jr.Reciprocable magnet switch
US4122317 *Apr 13, 1977Oct 24, 1978Alps Electric Co., Ltd.Multi-circuit switch
US4352966 *Feb 29, 1980Oct 5, 1982Cts CorporationSlide switch
US4454391 *Sep 29, 1982Jun 12, 1984Amp IncorporatedLow profile DIP switch
US5939690 *Dec 18, 1997Aug 17, 1999Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Structure of push-on switch
US7459647 *May 10, 2007Dec 2, 2008Excel Cell Electronic Co., Ltd.Electrical switch
US20080099316 *May 10, 2007May 1, 2008Excel Cell Electronic Co., Ltd.Electrical switch
DE3107316A1 *Feb 26, 1981Jan 14, 1982Cts Corp"schiebeschalter"
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/16.00D
International ClassificationH01H1/00, H01H23/00, H01H1/58, H01H13/70
Cooperative ClassificationH01H1/5805, H01H13/70, H01H23/006
European ClassificationH01H23/00D, H01H1/58B, H01H13/70