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Publication numberUS3730294 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1973
Filing dateNov 19, 1971
Priority dateNov 19, 1971
Publication numberUS 3730294 A, US 3730294A, US-A-3730294, US3730294 A, US3730294A
InventorsThurmond J
Original AssigneeThurmond J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foldable, readily-transportable seat
US 3730294 A
Abstract
A seat includes two sub-frames which are hinged together to enable that seat to be folded to fit into a small space. Straps are secured to one of those sub-frames to pass forwardly along the front of the upper portion of the body of a user to make that seat readily transportable; and those straps can depend downwardly from that one sub-frame to act as stirrups for the feet of that user when that seat is being used to support that user. A sturdy section of flexible material extends between the upper ends of the sub-frames of the seat to constitute the supporting surface of that seat; and also to serve as a closure for a receptacle which is located between those sub-frames and which can be used to store objects while that seat is being transported or is being used to support the user.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Thurmond F OLDABLE, READILY- TRANSPORTABLE SEAT [76] Inventor: James A. Thurmond, 1305 Honeywood Drive, Crestwood, Mo. 63105 [22] Filed: Nov. 19, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 200,381

52 vs. C]. ..182/20, 182/187, 224/9,

[451 May 1, 1973 10/1971 Parsons ..224/9 5/1972 Kerschner ..224/9 [5 7] ABSTRACT A seat includes two sub-frames which are hinged together to enable that seat to be folded to fit into a small space. Straps are secured to one of those subframes to pass forwardly along the front of the upper portion of the body of a user to make that seat readily transportable; and those straps can depend downwardly from that one sub-frame to act as stirrups for the feet of that user when that seat is being used to support that user. A sturdy section of flexible material extends between the upper ends of the sub-frames of the seat to constitute the supporting surface of that seat; and also to serve as a closure for a receptacle which is located between those sub-frames and which can be used to store objects while that seat is being transported or is being used to support the user.

16 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures Patented May 1, 1973 2 Sheets-Sheet l Patented May "1, 1973 3,730,294

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 2% FIG. 4.

" FIG 6 1a 62 70 FIG. /0.

, ,1 FOLDABLE, READILY-TRANSPORTABLE SEAT This invention relates to improvements in seats. More particularly, this invention relates to improvements in foldable, readily transportable seats which can be releasably secured to trees.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a foldable, readily transportable seat which can be releasably secured to a tree.

The seat provided by the present invention includes two sub-frames that are hinged together to enable the seat to be folded to fit into a small space. Straps are secured to one of those sub-frames to pass forwardly along the front surface of the upper portion of the body of a user to make that seat readily transportableon the back of the user. Those straps can depend downwardly from that one sub-frame to act as stirrups for the feet of that user when that seat is being used to support that user. As a result, those straps perform the dual functions of serving to hold that seat adjacent the back of that user when that seat is to be transported, and of serving as stirrups for the feet of that user when that seat is being used to support that user. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a foldable, readily transportable seat which has straps that can hold that seat adjacent the back of the user when that seat is to be transported or can serve as stirrups for the feet of that user when that seat is being used to support that user.

A receptacle is located between the sub-frames of the seat; and that receptacle can be used to store objects when that seat is being used to support the user. In addition, that receptacle can be used to store objects when that seat is adjacent the back of the user. As a result, that receptacle can be used to store objects whether that seat isadjacent the back of the user or is spans the space between the upper ends of the'subframes, inclines-downwardly and rearwardly from the upper end of the longer sub-frame toward the upper end of the short sub-frame at a steep angle, and thus acts to cause rain, sleet, snow and other precipitation fall away from the seat and not to enter the receptacle between those sub-frames. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a seat with a sturdy section of flexible material which inclines downwardly and rearwardly, whenever that seat is being transported on the back of that user, to cause rain, sleet, snow and other precipitation to fall away from that seat and not to enter the receptacle between the sub-framesof that seat.

, claims.

being used to support that user. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a seat which includes a receptacle that is located between the two subframes of that'seat'and which can be used to store objects whether that seat is adjacent the back of the user or is being used to support that user. i

The upper ends of the hinged sub-frames of the seat are spanned by a sturdy section of flexible material. That sturdy section of flexible material constitutes a yieldable and comfortable supporting surface for the user of the seat. Also, that sturdy secton of flexible material serves as a closure for the receptacle which is disposed between those sub-frames. In addition, that sturdy section of flexible material limits the angular displacement of those sub-frames relativeto each other. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a sturdy section of flexible material which spans the space between the upper ends of the hinged subframes ofa seat, which constitutes a yieldable and comfortable supporting surface for the user of that seat, which serves as a closure for a receptacle located between those sub-frames, and which limits the angular displacement of those sub-frames relative to each other.

One of the sub-frames of the seat provided by the present invention is shorter than the other of those subframes; and the upper end of that shorter sub-frame is spaced rearwardly of the back of the user when that seat is being transported on the back of that user. At such time, the sturdy section of flexible material, which seat of FIG. 1, and it is taken along the plane indicated DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING In the drawing,

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of one preferred em bodiment of seat that is made in accordance with the principles and teachings of the present invention, and it shows that seat being transported on the back of a user,

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the seat of FIG. 1,

as that seat appears when it is secured to a tree and is being used to support a user,

FIG. 3 is a sectional view, on a larger scale, through the seat of FIG. 1, and it is taken along the broken plane indicated by the broken line 3-3 in FIG. 2,

FIG. 4 is an elevational view, of the seat of FIG. 1, on t a scale intermediate those of FIGS. 1 and 3, and it is taken along the plane indicated by the line 4-4 in FIG. 2,

FIG. 5 is a broken elevational view, on the scale of FIG. 4, of the seat of FIG. 1, and it is taken along the plane indicated by the line 5--5 in FIG. l,-

FIG. 6 is a sectional view, on the scale of FIG. 3, through a portion of the seat of FIG. 1, and it is taken along the plane indicated by the line 6-6 in FIG. 4,

FIG. 7 is a sectional view, on the scale of FIG. 3, through another portion of the seat of FIG. I, and it is taken along the plane indicated by the line 7-7 in FIG. 4,

FIG. 8 is a further sectional view, on the scale of FIG. 3, through the seat of FIG. 1, and it is taken along the plane indicated by the line 8-8 in FIG. 4,

FIG. 9 is an additional sectional view, on the scale of FIG. 3, through the seat of FIG. 1, and it is taken along the plane indicated by the line 9-9 in FIG. 5, and

' FIG. 10 is a sectional view, on a scale intermediate those of FIGS. 3 and 4, through a further portion of the by the line l0-l0 in FIG. 5

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring particularly to FIGS. 1, 2, 4 and 8, the numeral denotes an elongated tube of square cross section, and the numeral 22 denotes a similar tube. An inverted U-shaped channel 24 telescopes downwardly over the upper ends of the tubes 20 and 22, as indicated particularly by FIGS. 1, 2 and 8. A bar 26, with openings 28 and 30 adjacent the opposite ends thereof, abuts the inner faces of the tubes 20.and 22 immediately adjacent the lower edge of the channel 24. Rivets 32 and 34 rigidly secure the channel 24 to the tubes 20 and 22, and rivets 36 and 38 rigidly secure the bar 26 to those tubes. A plate 40 abuts the inner faces of the tubes 20 and 22 adjacent the lower ends of those tubes; and rivets 42 rigidly secure that plate to those tubes. The tubes 20 and 22, the channel 24, the bar 26, and the plate 40 are preferably made from aluminum. Those tubes, that channel, that bar, that plate, and the rivets 32, 34, 36, 38 and 42 constitute a light-weight but sturdy and rugged sub-frame for the seat of FIG. 1.

The numeral 46 denotes an elongated tube of square cross Section which is longer than either of the tubes 20 and 22; and the numeral 48 denotes a similar tube. An inverted U-shaped channel 52 telescopes downwardly over the upper ends of the tubes 46 and 48, as indicated particularly by FIGS. 1, 2 and 9. An elongated plate 50 is secured to the outer faces of the tubes 46 and 48; and the lower end of that plate is close to the lower ends of those tubes but the upper end of that plate is close to the lower edge of the channel 52, as shown particularly by FIGS. 5 and 9. The numeral 54 denotes an elongated strap of sturdy fabric; and one end of that strap is interposed between the plate 50 and the tube 46, as shown particularly by FIGS. 5 and 9. The numeral 56 denotes a strap which can be identical to the strap 54; and one end of that strap is disposed between the plate 50 and the outer face of the tube 48. Rivets 58 fixedly secure the upper end of the plate 50 and the said one end of the strap 54 to the tube 46. Similarly, rivets 60 secure the upper end of the plate 50 and the said one end of the strap 56 to the tube 48. A buckle-equipped strap 62 has one end thereof disposed between the lower end of the plate 50 and the outer face of the tube 46, as shown particularly by FIGS. 5 and 10. Similarly, a buckle equipped strap 64, which can be identical to the buckle-equipped strap 62, has one end thereof disposed between the lower end of the plate 50 and the outer face of the tube 48. Rivets 66 fixedly secure the lower end of the plate 50 and the said one end of the buckle-equipped strap 62 to the lower end ofthe tube 46. Similarly, rivets 68 fixedly secure the lower end of the plate 50 and the said one end of the strap 64 to the lower end of the tube 48. The tubes 46 and 48, the plate 50 and the channel 52 are preferably made from aluminum. Those tubes, that plate, that channel, and the rivets 58, 60, 66 and 68 constitute a light-weight but rugged and sturdy sub-frame for the seat of FIG. 1. The free ends of the straps 54 and 56 can be held by the buckles of the buckle-equipped straps 62 and 64 to enable those straps to form loops that can extend along the front of the upper portion of a users body.

The numeral 70 denotes a pivot, in the form of a bolt and nut, which rotatably secures the lower ends of the tubes 22 and 46 to each other. The numeral 72 denotes a similar pivot which rotatably secures the lower ends of the tubes 20 and 48 to each other. Those pivots constitute a hinge that permits the two sub-frames of the seat of FIG. 1 to rotate toward and away from each other. Because the length of the plate 40, which 'is riveted to the lower ends of the tubes 20 and 22, is less than the distance between the confronting faces of the tubes 46 and 48, the two sub-frames can be rotated toward each other until the channel 24 at the upper end of the shorter sub-frame is very close to the inner faces of the tubes 46 and 48 of the longer sub-frame.

The numeral 76 denotes a rectangular section of sturdy and rugged flexible material; and one such material is canvas. The numeral 78 denotes a similar section of flexible material. One end of the section 78 is folded on itself to provide a folded edge 80, as indicated particularly by FIGS. 7 and 8. The corresponding edge of the section 76 is folded around a bar 82 to form a folded edge 84, as shown particularly by FIGS. 7 and 8. Rivets 86 extend through the upper layer of section 76, the bar 82, the lower layer of section 76, both layers of section 78, and the channel 24 to fixedly secure those sections of flexible material to the short sub-frame of the seat. The sides of the section 76 are folded inwardly to define folded edges 88, one of which is shown in FIG. 3. Similarly, the sides of the section 78 arefolded inwardly to define folded edges 90, one of which is shown in FIG. 3. Those edges are interconnected by stitches to effectively make the sections 76 and 78 act as a double-thickness section. A strap 92, which is equipped with a female-type fastener 94, has the upper end thereof disposed between, and stitched to, the folded edges 88 and 90, respectively, at one side of the sections 76 and 78. A strap 106, which is equipped with a female-type fastener 108, has one end thereof disposed between, and stitched to, the folded edges at the other side of the sections 76 and 78, as indicated particularly by FIG. 1.

The end of the section 78 of flexible material which is adjacent the upper end of the long sub-frame extends over the upper end of the channel 52 and is then folded on itself to define a folded edge 96, as shown particularly by FIG. 9. The edge of the section 76 which is adjacent the upper end of the long sub-frame is folded around a resilient strip and around a bar 98, as shown particularly by FIG. 9. Rivets 104 fixedly secure the bar 98, the section 76, the section 78, and the channel 52 together.

The material of which the sections 76 and 78 is made is flexible but is substantially inextensible. As a result, those sections can be, and are, used to limit the extent to which the sub-frames can rotate away from each other. Also, because that material is flexible but is substantially inextensible, those sections can provide a firm but sturdy supporting surface for the user of the seat of FIG. 1. While two sections 76 and 78 are shown, a single section of stronger material could be used in lieu of those two sections.

The numeral denotes a generally rectangular section of flexible material; and that section has a folded and stitched edge 112 at one end thereof, as shown particularly by FIGS. 7 and 8. Stitching 114 secures that one end of the rectangular section 110 to the sections 76 and 78, as shown particularlyby F IGS.

7 and 8. The other end of that rectangular section is secured to the sections 76 and 78 by stitching 116, as shown particularly by FIG. 9. A side panel 118, of generally triangular configuration, .is shown in FIG. 1; and it has the side and bottom edges thereof stitched to one edge of the rectangular section 110. A pocket 120 is stitched to the outer face of the side panel 118, as

shown by FIG. 1. A male-type fastener 122 is mounted on the side panel 118; and that fastener releasably receives the female-type fastener 108 on the strap 106. The numeral 124 denotes a side panel of generally triangular configuration; and the side and bottom edges of that panel are stitched to the opposite edge of the rectangular section 1 10. A pocket 126 is stitched to the outer face of the side panel 124, as shown by FIG. A male-type fastener 128 is mounted on the side panel 124; and that fastener releasably receives the femaletype fastener 94 on the strap 92. A pocket 130 is secured to the portion of the rectangular section 110 which is adjacent the tube 22, as shown particularly by FIG. 4. The rectangular section 1 and the side panels 118 and 124 coact to define an open-top, readily flexible receptacle. That receptacle is generally triangular in side elevation whenever the sub-frames of the seat are in the fully extended positions of FIGS. 1 and 2; but it readily flexes and folds whenever those sub-frames are rotated into essential parallelism with each other.

I The numeral 132 denotes a generally S-shaped connector which has one end thereof passed through the opening 28 in the bar 26 and then closed, as shown particularly by FIG. 6. The numeral 134 denotes a similar connector which has one end thereof passed through the opening 30 in the bar 26 and then closed. The numeral 136 denotes a chain which has the link at one end thereof hooked to the other end of the connector 134, and which has a link adjacent the other end thereof hookedto the other end of the connector 132.

, As indicated particularly by FIG. 1, the straps 54 and 56 can extend forwardly from the upper end of the longer sub-frame, can extend over the shoulders of the user, can extend downwardly along the front surface of the upper portion of the user's body, and can then be held by the buckles of the buckle-equipped straps 62 and 64. Those straps can be adjusted relative to those buckles to set and hold the seat at a comfortable position adjacent the users back. The strip 100 of resilient material would act as a cushion, in theevent any part of the users neck or shoulders tended to engage the front surface of the bar 98.

As shown by FIG. 1, the upper end of the short subframe is disposed rearwardly of, and below the level of, the upper end of the longer sub-frame whenever the seat is being carried on the back of the user. At such time, the combined sections 76 and 78 overlie, and serve as aclosure for, the receptacle which is defined by the rectangular section 110 and the side panels 118 and 124. Also at such time, those combined sections incline downwardly and rearwardly from the upper end of the longer sub-frame at a sharp angle; and this is desirable, because it enables those combinedsections to deflect rain, snow, sleet and other precipitation away from that receptacle.

Gravity will bias the short sub-frame into the position shown by FIG. 1; and the weight of that sub-frame will hold the side panels 118 and 124 in fully extended position. The extent to which that short sub-frame can pivot downwardly and away from the long sub-frameis fixed by the length of the combined sections 76 and 78. The sides of those combined sections are normally secured to the upper edges of the side panels 118 and 124 by the straps 92 and 106 and the fasteners therefor. However, freeing of either of those straps from the adjacent side panel will permit readyaccess to the interior of the receptacle which is defined by the rectangular section 110 and those side panels. Until such time as either of those straps is freed from the adjacent side panel, the receptacle will remain essentially closed and can be used to transport objects. The chain can be carried within the pocket 130, or within either of the pockets 120 and 126. The overall. result is that the user of the seat of FIG. 1 has the receptacle plus the three pockets therein in which he can store and transport those objects.

To secure the seat to a tree, it is only necessary to place the short sub-frame adjacent the trunk of the tree, as indicated by FIG. 2,-to connect a link at one end of the chain 136 to the S-type fastener 134, and then to connect a further link of that chain to the S- type fastener 132, as indicated particularly by FIGS. 4 and 6. Thereafter, the lower ends of the tubes 20 and 22 of the short sub-frame will bear against the trunk of the tree, and will coact with the chain l36 to solidly hold the seat in position adjacent that trunk. At such time, the user can climb the tree and sit atop the seat, as shownparticularly by FIG. 2. The user can easily climb the tree by using some of the small, readily-portable steps disclosed in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,598,20l, which was granted on Aug. 10,1971.

When the seat of FIG. 1 is secured to the trunk of a tree, the straps 54 and 56 will depend downwardly below the level of the long sub-frame of that seat. By

making those straps define long loops, the user can hook the heels of his shoes in those straps, as indicated particularly by FIG. 2. In doing so, the user can use those straps as stirrups, and thereby free his legs of any uncomfortable pressures.

The combined sections 76 and 78 are permanently attached to the channels 24 and 52 at the upper ends, respectively, of the short and long sub-frames of the seat. Those combined sections serve as a supporting surface for the user, they limit the extent to which the sub-frames can rotate away from each other, they act as a closure for the receptacle disposed between those sub-frames, and they act to deflect rain, snow, sleetand other precipitation away from that receptacle As a result, those combined sections perform quadruple functions during usage of the seat of FIG. 1.

The receptacle is in its fully extended position wheneverthe seat is being carried on the back of the user, as in FIG. 1. Also, that receptacle is in itsfully extended position whenever the seat is secured to the trunk of a,

tree, as inFlG. 2. Consequently, except when the seat is in its folded condition, the receptacle is able to receive and hold substantial numbers of objects. It will be noted that the front and rear surfaces of the receptacle are confined by the confronting surfaces of the subframes of the seat; and, as a result, those front and rear surfaces are confined within the dihedral angle that is defined by those confronting surfaces. However, whenever those sub-frames are rotated toward each other so the seat can fit into a small space, the receptacle will automatically flex and fold so it is essentially flat.

Whereas the drawing and accompanying description have shown and described a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes can be made in the form of the invention without affecting the scope thereof. 7

What I claim is:

l. A readily-transportable seat which can be releasably secured to the trunk of a tree and which comprises a sub-frame that can be disposed immediately adjacent said trunk of said tree whenever said seat is to be releasably secured to said trunk of said tree, a second sub-frame, means securing said sub-frames together to permit said sub-frames to be moved relative to each other, said means permitting said sub-frames to be moved into essential parallelism with each other whenever said seat is to be stored away, said means permitting said sub-frames to be angularly displaced from each other whenever said seat is to be releasably secured to said trunk of said tree, and a sturdy section of flexible material extending between the upper ends of said sub-frames, said sturdy section of flexible material serving as a supporting surface for the user of said seat whenever said seat is releasably secured to said trunk of said tree, said sturdy section of flexible material flexing and folding whenever said sub-frames are moved into essential parallelism with each other.

2. A readily-transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second sub-frame is formed and dimensioned to be immediately adjacent the back of said user whenever said seat is to be carried by said user, and wherein said second sub-frame inclines away from said trunk of said tree whenever said seat is releasably secured to said trunk of said tree.

3. A readily-transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein said sturdy section of flexible material serves as a stop to limit the angular displacement between said sub-frames, whereby said sturdy section of flexible material performs the dual functions of serving as a supporting surface and of serving as a stop.

4. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second sub-frame is longer than the first said sub-frame, wherein said first said sub-frame and said sturdy section of flexible material constitute two sides of a triangle, and wherein said second sub-frame constitutes the hypotenuse of said triangle.

5. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second sub-frame is formed and dimensioned to be immediately adjacent the back of said user whenever said seat is to be carried by said user, and wherein a strap extends forwardly of said second subframe and passes over part of the front of the body of said user to help hold said seat adjacent said back of said user. 1

6. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 I wherein said means is a hinge adjacent the lower ends of the first said sub-frame and of said second subframe. I

7. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein the first said sub-frame has a vertically directed portion and a horizontally directed portion, wherein said horizontally directed portion of said first said sub-frame is adjacent the upper end of said first said sub-frame and projects outwardly beyond both sides of said vertically directed portion of said first said sub-frame, wherein said second sub-frame has a vertically directed portion and a horizontally directed-portion, wherein said horizontally directed portion of said second sub-frame is adjacent the upper end of said second sub-frame and projects outwardly beyond both sides of said vertically directed portion of said second sub-frame, and wherein said sturdy section of flexible material is wider than said vertically directed portion of said first said sub-frame or said vertically directed portion of said second sub-frame.

8. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein the first said sub-frame has a vertically directed portion and a horizontally directed portion, wherein said horizontally directed portion of said first said sub-frame is adjacent the upper end of said first said sub-frame and projects outwardly beyond both sides of said vertically directed portion of said first said sub-frame,-wherein said second sub-frame has a vertically directed portion and a horizontally directed portion, wherein said horizontally directed portion of said second sub-frame is adjacent the upper end of said second sub-frame and projects outwardly beyond both sides of said vertically directed portion of said second sub-frame, and wherein said sturdy section of flexible material is secured to said horizontally directed portion of said first said sub-frame and to said horizontally directed portion of said second sub-frame.

9. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a receptacle is disposed between the upper end of said first said sub-frame and the upper end of said second sub-frame, wherein said receptacle is in extended position whenever said first said sub-frame and said second sub-frame are fully angularly displaced from each other, and wherein said receptacle flexes and folds whenever said first said sub-frame and said second sub-frame are moved into essential parallelism with each other.

10. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a receptacle is disposed between the upper end of said first said sub-frame and the upper end of said second sub-frame, and wherein said receptacle is generally triangular in cross section whenever said first said sub-frame and said second sub-frame are fully angularly displaced from each other.

1 1. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a receptacle is disposed between the upper end of said first said sub-frame and the upper end of said second sub-frame, and wherein said sturdy section of flexible material constitutes a closure for said receptacle whenever said first said sub-frame and said second sub-frame are fully angularly displaced from each other.

12. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a receptacle is disposed between the upper end of said first said sub-frame and the upper end of said second sub-frame, wherein said sturdy section of flexible material serves as a stop to limit the angular displacement between said first said sub-frame and said second sub-frame, and wherein said sturdy section of flexible material constitutes a closure for said receptacle whereby said sturdy section of flexible material performs the treble functions of serving as a supporting surface and of serving as a stop and of serving as a closure for said receptacle.

13. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a receptacle is disposed between the upper end tive to the back of said user whenever said seat is being carried on the back of said user, whereby said sturdy section of flexible material performs the dual functions of serving as a supporting surface and of serving to deflect precipitation away from the top of said receptacle.

14. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a receptacle is disposed between the upper end of said first said sub-frame and the upper end of said second sub-frame, wherein said sturdy section of flexible material constitutes a closure for said receptacle, and wherein the sides of said receptacle are flexible to permit access to said receptacle while said user is sitting on said sturdy section of flexible material.

15. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a carrying strap extends forwardly of said second sub-frame whenever said seat is being carried on the back of said user, and wherein said carrying strap depends downwardly below said second subframe whenever said seat is releasably secured to said trunk of said tree, said carrying strap being adapted to serve as a stirrup for said users foot whenever said seat is releasably secured to said trunk of said tree.

16. A readily transportable seat as claimed in claim 1 wherein a receptacle is disposed between the upper end of said first said sub-frame and the upper end of said second sub-frame, wherein said receptacle depends downwardly from the upper end of said second subframe whenever said seat is being carried on the back of said user, and wherein said receptacle depends downwardly from the upper end of said first said subframe whenever said seat is releasably secured to said trunk of said tree, whereby said receptacle has the upper end thereof up whether said seat is releasably secured to said trunk of said tree or is being carried on the back of said user.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3944022 *May 9, 1975Mar 16, 1976Ming Joseph WTree climbing stand
US4022292 *Aug 12, 1976May 10, 1977Gompel James J VanPortable tree stand or crows nest
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Classifications
U.S. Classification182/20, 297/188.1, 182/187, 224/155
International ClassificationA47C9/00, A45F4/02, A45F4/00, A47C9/10
Cooperative ClassificationA45F4/02, A01M31/02
European ClassificationA45F4/02, A01M31/02