Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3731271 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1973
Filing dateNov 26, 1971
Priority dateNov 26, 1971
Publication numberUS 3731271 A, US 3731271A, US-A-3731271, US3731271 A, US3731271A
InventorsEndo T, Muramatu A
Original AssigneeOmron Tateisi Electronics Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traffic signal control system
US 3731271 A
Abstract
A relatively wide area in which the traffic signals are to be controlled is divided into a plurality of local areas each having a local signal controller. There are provided a plurality of different cycle signals and a plurality of different synchronizing signals paired with the cycle signals. A master controller always watches the traffic condition in each of the local areas and causes each local controller to select that one of the pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals which is most suitable for control of the traffic signals in each local area under the present traffic conditions. In turn, each local controller uses the selected cycle and synchronizing signal to control a plurality of intersection controllers in the local area, each intersection controller being associated with an intersection traffic signal.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 [111 3,731,271

Muramatu et al. 1 May 1, 1973 54] TRAFFIC SIGNAL CONTROL SYSTEM 3,652,983 3 1972 Endo et al. ..340 35 [75] Inventors: Akira Muramatu, Osaka; Tadao Primary ExammerKathleen H. Claffy Endo Kyoto both of Japan Assistant ExaminerRandall P. Myers [73] Assignee: Omron Tateisi, Kyoto, Japan AttorneyChristensen & Sanborn [22] Filed: Nov. 26, 1971 [57] ABSTRACT [21] Appl. No.: 202,536

Related [1.8. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 828,645, May 28,

A relatively wide area in which the traffic signals are to be controlled is divided into a plurality of local areas each having a local signal controller. There are provided a plurality of different cycle signals and a 1969' abandoned plurality of different synchronizing signals paired with the cycle signals. A master controller always watches [52] [LS-Cl ..340/41, 340/35 the traffic condition in each of the local areas and [51] Int. Cl. ..G08g 1/07 causes each local controller to Select that one of the [58] Fleld of Search ..340/35, 40, 41, 37 pairs 0f cycle signals and synchronizing signals which is most suitable for control of the traffic signals in References C'ted each local area under the present traffic conditions. In UNITED STATES PATENTS turn, each local controller uses the selected cycle and synchronizing signal to control a plurality of Intersec- 3,482,208 12/1969 Auer,.lr.et al ..340l35 tion controllers in the local area, each intersection 3,252,133 5/1966 Auer, Jr. et al ....340/35 controller being associated with an intersection traffic 3,506,808 4/1970 Riddle, Jr. et al. ....340/35 ignal, 3,500,308 3/1970 Riddle, Jr. et al. ....340l35 3,423,733 1/1969 Auer, Jr. et al ..340/41 2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 40/ 7- mama-new l CDIYflWLLEE D I i 402, L 50/ 1 mrmscmn 2 LOCAL OI Waiter? I commie/2 403, I INTEIUECT/ON 20/ cwvrmtee /0)0 i LOCAL fi MASTER l C'0I/IA0LLER CDNTROLLEI? I l 0 1 202 l l 1 g 1 1 I LOCAL comouez 1/330 4 2'30 L f J CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part of copending application Ser. No. 828,645, filed May 28, 1969, Traffic Signal Control System, Muramatu et al., now abandoned which is also assigned to the assignee of the present invention.

This invention relates to a traffic signal control system, and more particularly to a system which controls traffic signals within a relatively wide area.

In traffic signal control, it is generally required to control the traffic signals at various intersections within a considerably wide area in a more or less correlated manner. Traffic conditions, however, differ locally at different places or intersections within the wide area. If the same type of control is employed at all the intersections within the wide area, it will become impossible to control the traffic signals at different places or intersections properly in accordance with the actual local traffic conditions.

As is usual, traffic is relatively heavy at one place while it is not so at another. In such a case, if the same signal cycle is used for controlling the traffic signals at these different intersections, the signal control cannot be conducted properly in such a manner as to meet different local traffic conditions, with resulting confusion to traffic in the area.

Accordingly, it is one object of the invention to provide a traffic signal control system which controls the traffic signals at various intersections over a considerably wide area in such a manner as to effect a smooth traffic flow throughout the area.

Another object of the invention is to provide a traffic signal control system in which a wide area in which the traffic signals are to be controlled is divided into a plurality of local areas, the traffic signals in each of which are controlled identically.

Another object of the invention is to provide a traffic signal control system in which a wide area in which the traffic signals are to be controlled is divided into a plurality of local areas each having a local controller to be controlled by a master controller, and wherein there are provided a plurality of different cycle signals and a plurality of different synchronizing signals each paired with one of the cycle signals, so that the master controller gives instructions to each local controller to select that one of the pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals which is most suitable for control of the traffic signals in each local area under the present traffic condition in that area, and to control the traffic signals in the local area by the selected cycle signal and synchronizing signal.

The term cycle signal, as hereinafter used, denotes a plurality of clock pulses supplied by the master controller to each of the local controllers whose periodicity or frequency is fixed. The master controller includes means producing a plurality of cycle signals, each having a different frequency or periodicity. The term "synchronizing signal", as hereinafter used, denotes a signal whose periodicity or cycle length determines the length of the traffic signal cycle provided by each local controller. One synchronizing signal may be produced for a predetermined number of clock pulses of a corresponding cycle signal. A plurality of synchronizing signals are provided by the master controller which correspond to different cycle signals and thus to different predetermined numbers of clock pulses thereof. The term offset signal", as hereinafter used, denotes the signal produced by a local controller coupled to the master controller whose periodicity is normally the same as the synchronizing signal being used by the local controller, and thus normally having a cycle length equal to the traffic signal cycle produced by that local controller. One offset signal is produced for every traffic signal cycle to terminate the green period thereof.

In accordance with the invention, the master controller always watches the traffic conditions in each local area and gives instructions (a cycle signal selection command signal) to the local controller to select that one of the pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals which is most suitable for control of the traffic signals in each local area under the existing traffic condition in the local area. As a result, each local controller controls the traffic signals in the area by the selected cycle signal and synchronizing signal so that an effective and smooth traffic control can be performed throughout the wide area.

FIG. 1 is a diagram of a traffic control system embodying the invention showing the interconnections between the master controller, local controllers and intersection controllers there'of;

FIG. 2 is a diagram of a portion of the system of FIG. 1, showing a portion of the master controller and portions of the local controllers thereof;

FIG. 3 is another diagram of a portion of the system of FIG. 1, showing other portions of the master controller and local controllers;

FIG. 4 is a diagram explaining the logic symbols used in FIGS. l-3 and 5; and

FIG. 5 is a diagram of yet another portion of the system of FIG. 1, showing a portion of one local controller and portions of its corresponding intersection controllers.

With reference now to FIG. 1, a single master con troller is used for controlling the traffic signals within thirty local areas 301, 302 330. In order to provide this control, master controller 100 receives information as to traffic conditions within each of the local areas from a plurality of vehicle detectors D located therein. In order to effect coordinated traffic control throughout the local areas 301-330, master controller 100 includes means for converting the information as to traffic conditions into corresponding traffic information parameters, such traffic volume, traffic congestion, and the like. In addition, the master controller 100 includes means providing a plurality of cycle signals and a plurality of synchronizing signals, as heretofore defined. In order to be uniquely related to the cycle signals, each of the synchronizing signals must be paired with and derived from a corresponding cycle signal. In accordance with calculations made'from the traffic information parameters, the master controller 100 then includes means for selecting one of the pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals that is most suitable for control of traffic signals in each local area. As a result of this selection, a cycle signal selection command signal is applied from the master controller 100 to each of the local controllers 201, 202 230. In addition, the plurality of cycle signals and synchronizing signals are also supplied from master controller 100 to each of the local controllers 201, 202 230.

Each local controller has associated therewith a plurality of intersection controllers. In FIG.'1, local controller 201 provides appropriate control signals to a plurality of intersection controllers 401, 402 and 403 in local area 301. Similar arrangements are provided for areas 302-330, but are not illustrated.

Each local controller includes means for coupling a pair of the cycle signals and synchronizing signals to the intersection controllers associated therewith in accordance with the cycle signal selection command signal that has been coupled thereto from the master controller 100. Means are also provided within each local controller for producing an offset signal whose periodicity is normally the same as the synchronizing signal that has been selected by the local controller. This offset signal, and signals derived from the selected pair of synchronizing and cycle signals, are coupled to the intersection controllers which in turn control the traffic signals at the intersections within the local area.

In the illustrated embodiment, it is assumed that the traffic signals in one light area controlled by master controller 100 are located in thirty local areas 301-330, and that there are provided different pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals.

In FIG. 2, master controller 100 is provided with an address register CA and a register CB. The address register operates to call the addresses No. 1 to No. 30 of the 30 areas 301-330. The addresses are expressed in binary code. A suitable computer CM receives traffic information from vehicle detectors D, calculates, if necessary, traffic information parameters such as traffic density, traffic volume, etc., in each local area and selects that one of the 10 pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals which is most suitable for control of the traffic signals in each local area under the present traffic condition, and applies a corresponding signal (the cycle signal selection command signal) ,to the register CB to be stored therein. The stored contents of the register C8 are also in binary code.

Corresponding to the 30 local areas 301-330, there are thirty local controllers 201-230 which are provided with shift registers CR1 to CR30, respectively. To that one of the shift registers CR1 to CR30 which has been selected by the address register CA, the register CB transfers its stored contents in the following manner. The address register is provided with eight output lines 2, 2 4, I; 8, 3 l6 and B. When a signal l" is produced on the line 2, 4, 8, or 16, a signal 0 is produced on the line designated by the same reference numeral with a bar on top thereof; and when a signal 0 is produced on the former line, a signal 1" is produced on the latter line. The signal l is a positive voltage. To the output lines of the address register CA there is connected a diode matrix DMl having 30 output lines L1 to L30 corresponding to the 30 local areas, respectively. An output appears on that one of the lines which corresponds to that one of the local areas that has been selected. Each of the output lines L1 to L30 is connected as one input to one of AND elements Al to A30. A line LC is connected to the other input of each of the AND elements A1 to A30. A suitable pulse generator PGl applies clock pulses to the line LC. The outputs from the AND elements A1-A30 are applied to the shift registers CR1-CR30, respectively, to cause them to store therein the contents transferred thereto from the storage register CB through a line LB.

Suppose that the register CA has selected, say, address No. 2 area. Then an output appears on the line L2, and whenever a clock pulse on the line LC coincides with the output on line L2, the AND element A2 produces an output in the form of clock pulses. As the clock pulses are applied to the register CR2, the stored contents of the register CB are transferred through the line LB to the register CR2 to be stored therein. Since no operating clock pulses are applied to the other shift registers CR1, CR3-CR30, the contents of the register CB are not transferred to these shift registers. Thus, in that one of the registers CR1-CR30 which corresponds to that one of the local areas that has been selected by the address register CA there have been stored the instructions to cause the local controller to effect the type of trafiic signal control selected by the master controller 100, that is, to select that one of the 10 pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals which is most suitable for signal control under the present traffic condition in that local area.

This selection is effected in each local controller by a circuit as shown in FIG. 3, in the following manner. Only local controller 201 is discussed. The register CR1 is capable of storing in binary code 10 numbers No. l-No. 10 as the above-mentioned selection command signal and is provided with eight output terminals 1,1, 2,5, 4,2", s and? Just like the register CA in FIG. 2, in the register CR1 when a signal l is produced on the line 1, 2, 4, or 8, a signal 0 is produced on the line TTZTor F; and when a signal 0 is produced on the former line, a signal l is produced on the latter line.

A diode matrix DMZ is connected to the eight output lines of the register CR1 and has 10 output lines [Al-L50. The outputs on these lines are applied as one input to AND elements A4l-A50 and at the same time to AND elements A51-A60, respectively.

Ten predetermined different cycle signals (which may be designated by reference Nos. 1-10) are applied to terminals C1-Cl0, respectively, and 10 predetermined different synchronizing signals to be paired with the cycle signals are applied to terminals Rl-R10, respectively. The cycle signals comprise pulses and have different frequencies.

To generate the cycle signals and the synchronizing signals, the master controller 100 includes a source of clock pulses comprising a pulse generator PG2, whose output is applied to a counter CCl. The outputs from the counter CCl comprise the ten cycle signals. Generally, the frequency of the cycle signals is variable within the range of 40-120 HZ. For example, the first cycle signal supplied to terminal Cl may have a frequency of 40 HZ. The cycle signal supplied to terminal C2 may have a frequency of HZ, and so forth. In order to be uniquely related to these cycle signals, each of the signals on terminals R1-R10 must be paired with and derived from its corresponding cycle signal on terminals C1-Cl0. To this end, the outputs from the counter CC! are also applied to a plurality of frequency dividers CC2-l, CC2-2 CC2-l0, whose outputs serve as the synchronizing signals on terminals Ill-R10. In one embodiment, each of the frequency dividers CC2-1, etc., comprise a counter providing an output pulse for every 800 input pulses thereto. Therefore, one synchronizing signal is produced for every 800 pulses of the cycle signal associated therewith. For

example, for the pair of signals on terminals C1-R1, the synchronizing signals on terminal R1 occur every 800/40 [-12, or seconds. For the combination of signals on terminals C2-R2, the synchronizing signals on terminal R2 are produced for every 800/50 H2, or 16 seconds.

The cycle signals on the terminals C1-Cl0 are applied as the other input to the AND elements A41-A50, respectively, and the synchronizing signals on the terminals R1-R10 are applied as the other input to the AND elements A5 1-A60, respectively.

Suppose that the register CR1 has received from the register CB a selection command signal to select cycle signal No. 2. Then, the AND element A42 receives one input from the register CR1. On the other hand, the cycle signal No. 2 applied to the terminal C2 is applied as the other input to the AND element A42. As a result, the cycle signal No. 2 is obtained as the output from the AND element A42. In like manner, the synchronizing signal applied to the terminal R2 appears as the output from the AND element A52. Thus, the cycle signal No. 2 and the synchronizing signal paired therewith appear at terminals SC and SR through OR elements 01 and 02, respectively, and will be used to control the traffic signals within the local area. Thus, in the local area selected by the master controller, the traffic signal is controlled by the cycle signal and the synchronizing signal paired therewith as selected by the master controller 100 to best meet the traffic condition in that area.

If the synchronizing and cycle signals were not so paired, and each local controller were free to count a predetermined number of clock pulses of the cycle signal to determine the duration of the local traffic signals cycle, loss of synchronism between the local areas would result.

FIG. 5 includes means to obtain from the cycle signal so selected, a reference cycle signal, a cycle signal having a period 12.5 percent longer than that of the reference cycle signal, and a cycle signal having a period 12.5 percent shorter than that of the reference cycle signal, and, from the synchronizing signal so selected, signals which show the lapse of times equal to 0, 4, 50 and 90 percent, respectively, of one signal cycle.

The pulses applied to the terminal SC are counted by heptal, octal and nonary pulse counters PCl, PC2 and PCS at the same time. When seven, eight and nine pulses have been counted by the counters PCl, PC2 and PC3, respectively, they produce one output pulse at their respective output terminals T1, T2 and T3. Suppose that one signal cycle length consists of 100 pulses at any of the terminals T1, T2 and T3. It is easily seen that 700, 800 and 900 pulses must be applied to the counters PCl, PC2 and PC3, respectively, to produce 100 pulses at the terminals T1, T2 and T3. This means that one signal cycle length as determined by the output pulses at the terminal T1 is 12.5 percent shorter than the reference signal cycle length as determined by the output pulses at the terminal T2, and that one signal cycle length as determined by the output pulses at the terminal T3 is 12.5 percent longer than the reference signal cycle length.

The output pulses from the counter PCZ are counted by a counter PC4 having four output lines 00, 04, 50

and 90, on which an output appears when the counter PC4 has counted 0, 40, 50 and 90 pulses, respectively. The output is taken out from terminals T00, T04, T50 and T90. The counter PC4 is reset by the synchronizing signal from the terminal SR. It will be seen that the signals at T00, T04, T50 and T90 appear upon lapse of times equal to 0, 4, 50 and 90 percent of one cycle length of the synchronizing signal, respectively.

The 12.5 percent shorter cycle signal, the reference cycle signal, and the 12.5 percent longer cycle signal on terminals T1, T2 and T3 are coupled to corresponding terminals C1, C2 and C3 in each of the intersection controllers 401, 402 and 403. In a similar manner, the signals on terminals T00, T04, T50 and T90 are supplied to corresponding terminals M0, M04, M50 and M90 of each intersection controller 401, 402 and 403.

The signals on terminals C1, C2 and C3 are applied as one input to AND elements 411, 412 and 413, respectively. A tristable circuit 425 applies its three outputs'Bl, B2 and B3 to the other input of the AND elements 411, 412 and 413, respectively, as will be described in more detail later.

The output pulses from the AND elements 411-413 are applied through an OR element 414 to a pulse counter 415. This counter is designed so that whenever it has counted 100 pulses applied thereto, it is reset. During its counting cycle, pulse counter 415 provides a plurality of successive outputs which are applied in turn to a signal light controller 426, which in turn uses these signals to control the traffic signal light 427 at an intersection.

Each local controller, such as local controller 201, includes means, not illustrated, for producing an offset signal, which determines the offset of each of the intersection controllers, such as intersection controllers 401, 402 and 403, associated therewith. This offset signal comprises a binary coded decimal number which is applied to terminal SO in FIG. 5. Terminal S0 is in turn coupled to the input of a register 416 which comprises a 7-bit register capable of storing decimal numbers up to 100. In this regard, pulse counter 415 is of a construction similar to register 416 and additionally has seven output lines, which are applied to a coincidence circuit 417-together with the seven outputs from register 416.

The signal on terminal M04 is applied as a set input to a flip-flop 418, to which the signal on terminal M90 is applied as a reset input. Therefore, the flip-flop 418 is kept set during the period of time from 4 percent to 90 percent of one signal cycle length. The signal M50 is applied as a set input to a flip-flop 419, to which the signal M00 is applied as a reset input. Therefore, the

flip-flop 419 is kept set during the period of time from 50 percent to percent of one signal cycle.

The circuit 417 compares the values stored in the register 416 and the counter 415 and produces an output on the line OS when the two values coincide. This signal on line OS is supplied as one input to four AND elements 421, 422, 423 and 424.

The set output from the flip-flop 418 is applied as a second input to the AND element 421, to which the set output from the flip-flop 419 is applied as a third input. Therefore, the AND element 421 produces an output only when the signal OS is produced by the coincidence circuit 417 during the period of time from 50 percent to 90 percent of one signal cycle length. In the following description, the expression such as the period of time for 50 percent to 90 percent of one signal cycle length" will be expressed simply as the 50-90 percent period of time". The reset output from the flip-flop 418 is applied as the other input to the AND element 422. Therefore, the element 422 produces an output only when the signal OS is produced during the 90-100 percent period of time, or the -4 percent period of time, of one signal cycle. The set output from the flip-flop 418 is applied as a second input to the AND element 423, to which the reset output from the flip-flop 419 is applied as a third input. Therefore, the AND element 423 produces an output only when the signal OS is produced during the 4-50 percent period of time of one signal cycle. Finally, the reset output of the flipflop 418 is applied as a second input toithe AND element 424, to which the set output from the flip-flop 419 is applied as the third input. Therefore, the AND element 424 produces an output only when the signal OS is produced during the 90-100 percent period of time of one signal cycle.

The outputs from the AND elements 421-423 are applied as three inputs to the tri-stable circuit 425. When the output from the AND element 421 is applied to the input F of the circuit 425, it produces an output signal on the line B1; when the output from the AND element 422 is applied to an input S of the circuit 425, it produces an output signal on the line B2; and, when the output from the AND element 423 is applied to an input T of the circuit 425, it produces an output signal on the line B3.

The output ST from the AND element 424 is applied as one input to the OR element 414. Therefore, so long as the output ST continues to be applied to the OR element 414, the counter 415 does not step forward even when any of the AND elements 411-413 apply pulses thereto.

Suppose that on the basis of the traffic information received from the vehicle detectors D, master controller 100 has decided that it is necessary to change the offset in the local areas. Accordingly, this offset change is provided to the local controller 201 and transmitted therethrough to each of the intersection controllers 401, 402 and 403, as an offset signal on the line S0. The signal on $0 is stored in register 416 as previously described. At this time, the counter 415 is stepping forward during the reference cycle pulses on terminal C2, as applied through AND element 412 and OR element 414. When the counter 415 has reached a count which coincides with the new offset value stored in the register 416, the coincidence circuit 417 produces an output on the line OS. Naturally, the relation between the signal OS and the synchronizing pulses being applied to the terminals M04, M50, M90 and M00 now becomes different from the relation existing before the new offset was stored in the register 416.

Suppose that the signal OS has been produced during the 50-90 percent period of time of the signal cycle. The moment the signal OS has been produced, the AND element 421 produces an output to be applied to the input F of the tri-stable circuit 425, so that an output signal is produced on line B1 and applied to the AND element 411. Then, the counter 415 begins to count the cycle pulses thereto appearing on terminal C1, whose frequency is lower by 12.5 percent than that of the reference cycle pulses on terminal C2. There fore, the time required for the counter 415 to count 100 pulses applied through the terminal C1 becomes 12.5 percent longer than the time required for the counter to count 100 pulses applied through the terminal C2. In other words, one signal cycle length has now become 12.5 percent longer than the normal signal cycle. It will be easily seen that as this length in signal cycle is repeated three or four times at most, the signal OS comes to appear within the -100 percent, or 0- 4 percent period of time of the normal signal cycle length, as defined by the synchronizing pulses applied to the terminals MOO-M90.

In the case that the signal OS has appeared within the 90-100 percent period of time, the AND element 424 produces an output on the line ST to be applied through the OR element 414 to the counter 415. So long as this signal ST is being applied to the counter 415, it does not step forward. During the 90-100 percent period of time, the AND element 422 produces an output so that an output signal is produced on terminal B2 from the circuit 425 and applied to the AND element 412. This causes the pulses on terminal C2 to be applied through the AND element 412 and the OR element 414 through the counter 415. However, the continuous application of the signal ST to the counter 415 prevents the pulses on terminal C2 from stepping the counter 415. When the 90-100 percent period of time has elapsed, however, the signal M00 causes the signal ST to disappear, whereupon the counter 415 begins counting the cycle pulses on terminal C2. Since pulses on the terminal are produced for every reference cycle length, the counter 415 is returned to zero count upon lapse of every reference cycle. Thus, the discrepancy between the synchronizing pulse M00 and the output pulses from the pulse counter 415 becomes equal to the new offset as stored in the register 416. From this time on, the counter 415 produces output pulses which are supplied to controller 426 on the basis of the new offset until the offset is again changed.

In the case that the signal ST has appeared within the 0-4 percent period of time, the AND element 422 produces an output on the line B2, whereupon the counter 415 begins counting the pulses on terminal C2.

Suppose that the signal OS from the coincidence circuit 17 is produced within the 4-50 percent period of time of the signal cycle. Then the AND element 423 produces an output to be applied to the input T of the tri-stable circuit 425, so that circuit 425 produces an output on the line B3 to be applied to the AND element 413. This causes the counter 415 to count the cycle pulses on terminal C3 applied thereto through the OR element 414 and AND element 413. Since the frequency of the signal on terminal C3 is higher by 12.5 percent than that of the reference signal on terminal C2, the time required for counter 415 to count 100 pulses of thecycle signal on terminal C3 becomes shorter by [2.5 percent than the reference signal cycle length. Therefore, while the shortened signal cycle is repeated three times at most, the signal OS comes to appear within the 0-4 percent period of time of the signal cycle as defined by the synchronizing pulses M00-M90, or, while the shortened signal cycle is repeated four times at most, the signal OS comes to appear within the 90-100 percent period of time of the normal or reference signal cycle. Then, the output pulses from the counter 415 are forwardly displaced from the signal MOO-M90 by the new offset as stored in the register 416. In other words, the counter 415 now produces pulses for control of the signal controller 426 on the included in each said local controller and operable in response to a command signal produced by said master controller to select one of said pairs of cycle signals and synchronizing signals; said master controller including a second pulse register for storing said command signal; means included in said local controller for obtaining from said selected cycle signal a plurality of cycle signals of different lengths; and means for applying said command signal to that one of said local controllers whose address has been called, so that the traffic signals in each said local area are controlled by the selected cycle signal and synchronizing signal.

2. The system of claim 1, wherein each said local controller further includes means for obtaining from said selected cycle signal and synchronizing signal a plurality of synchronizing signals indicating the lapse of times of different lengths within one signal cycle.

* t t I? g;,ggg- UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE QERTEFEICATE OF CORRECTIQN Patent No. 3,731,271 Dated May 1, 19 73 Inventor(s) Akira Muramatu et al It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent i and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below: I

I Under related U.- 8. Patent Application data, the following information concerning foreign priority should b i l d 5 Priority/application Japan, June 10, 1968,

Signed and sealed this 29th day of January 1974 (SEAL) 5 Attest:-

TCHER JR. RENE D. TEGlMEYER 1 i z t i ficer Acting Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3252133 *Nov 23, 1962May 17, 1966Gen Signal CorpControl system for vehicle traffic signals
US3423733 *Dec 19, 1967Jan 21, 1969Gen Signal CorpCode communication system
US3482208 *Feb 21, 1966Dec 2, 1969Gen Signal CorpTraffic signal control system
US3500308 *May 23, 1966Mar 10, 1970Bliss CoCoordination of full actuated traffic controllers
US3506808 *Mar 24, 1967Apr 14, 1970Bliss CoVolume-occupancy control of traffic flow
US3652983 *Feb 11, 1970Mar 28, 1972Omron Tateisi Electronics CoTraffic signal control system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3763466 *Apr 23, 1971Oct 2, 1973Coutellier JAutomatic traffic controller with plural input receiver circuit
US4322801 *Mar 18, 1980Mar 30, 1982Multisonics, Inc.Method for controlling traffic flow
US6188329Nov 22, 1999Feb 13, 2001Nestor, Inc.Integrated traffic light violation citation generation and court date scheduling system
US6281808Nov 22, 1999Aug 28, 2001Nestor, Inc.Traffic light collision avoidance system
US6573929 *Nov 22, 1999Jun 3, 2003Nestor, Inc.Traffic light violation prediction and recording system
US6647361Nov 22, 1999Nov 11, 2003Nestor, Inc.Non-violation event filtering for a traffic light violation detection system
US6754663Nov 22, 1999Jun 22, 2004Nestor, Inc.Video-file based citation generation system for traffic light violations
US6760061Apr 13, 1998Jul 6, 2004Nestor Traffic Systems, Inc.Traffic sensor
US6950789Sep 12, 2003Sep 27, 2005Nestor, Inc.Traffic violation detection at an intersection employing a virtual violation line
US7821422Aug 18, 2004Oct 26, 2010Light Vision Systems, Inc.Traffic light signal system using radar-based target detection and tracking
US8019372 *Dec 21, 2005Sep 13, 2011Ntt Docomo, Inc.Controller apparatus, mobile terminal, and communication control method
WO2000031706A1 *Nov 22, 1999Jun 2, 2000Nestor IncTraffic light collision avoidance system
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/913, 340/914
International ClassificationG08G1/07, G08G1/081
Cooperative ClassificationG08G1/081
European ClassificationG08G1/081