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Publication numberUS3731334 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1973
Filing dateJun 11, 1971
Priority dateJun 11, 1971
Publication numberUS 3731334 A, US 3731334A, US-A-3731334, US3731334 A, US3731334A
InventorsCarbonell M
Original AssigneeCarbonell M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bathtub scrubber
US 3731334 A
Abstract
A bathtub or sink scrubber is provided with an electric motor for rotating a brush or other polishing member. The motor is contained within a first dome-like housing and supported by a rigid support member. A second dome-like housing is provided in movable relation to the first dome-like housing and the second housing has a handle member extending therefrom which is adjustable about an axis within the second housing permitting the bathtub scrubber to be universally positioned in relation to the handle.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

EJite States Patet 1191 (Iarbonell 1 1 May 8, 1973 1 BATHTUB SCRUBBER [76] Inventor: Marlene Carbonell, 300 Knowles Avenue, Apt. 302, Winter Park, Fla.

[22] Filed: Junell,l97l

[21] Appl. No.: 152,175

[52] U.S. Cl. ..15/50 R, 15/144 A, 15/410 [51] Int. Cl. ..A47l 11/283 [58] Field of Search ..l5/49 R, 50 R, 51,

15/98, 144 A, 28, 29, D10. 1, 410, 411; 320/2; 306/17;5l/l77 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,763,517 9/1956 Strand ..15/144 A X 3,069,711 12/1962 Lappin ..15/50 R 3,071,792 1/1963 Rachlin 1.15/50 R Downey et al l 5/DlG. 1 Wheeler ..l5/l44 A X Primary Examiner-Edward L. Roberts Attorney-Roylance, Abrams, Berdo & Kaul [57] ABSTRACT A bathtub or sink scrubber is provided with an electric motor for rotating a brush or other polishing member. The motor is contained within a first dome-like housing and supported by a rigid support member. A second dome-like housing is provided in movable relation to the first dome-like housing and the second housing has a handle member extending therefrom which is adjustable about an axis within the second housing permitting the bathtub scrubber to be universally positioned in relation to the handle.

7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEDHAY' 8 ms SHEET 1 BF 2 N wt INVENTOR MARLENE CABONELL ATTORNEYS PATENTED M 8 975 SHEET 2 BF 2 INVENTOR MARLENE CARBOA/E L L B Y I Ms 5 {K4 ATTORNEYS BATHTUB SCRUBBER The present invention relates generally to scrubbers and specifically to mechanized bathtub or sink scrubbers. In the prior art, the traditional way of scrubbing a bathtub or sink has been to use a hand brush and soap or scouring powder. Such an approach involves a great deal of manual effort on the part of the person who is cleaning the bathtub or sink. This effort is often greater than that which an elderly or a disabled person is capable of exerting, making the scrubbing of a bathtub or sink a difficult or impossible task.

To overcome this problem, one would think that a device similar to a floor polisher might be employed to clean the bottom and sides of the bathtub. Such floor polishers, however, are not easily adapted to polishing vertical surfaces because of their considerable weight and because the support members are not adapted to being used on vertical surfaces. In addition, their size is not suitable for scrubbing a sink. As a consequence, the use of devices similar to floor polishers has not been generally employed for sinks or bathtubs.

Another problem which would arise in attempting to use such devices for cleaning of sinks and bathtubs is that devices such as electric polishers require long power cords connected to the household current supply. Because such devices employ the normal household current, there is an ever-present danger of electrical shock, making the use of such devices perilous since some water must be used in the cleaning of a bathtub or sink.

As a consequence of the aforementioned problems, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a mechanized scrubbing device which is particularly suited to the scrubbing of the side walls and the bottom ofa bathtub or sink. 1

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a mechanized scrubber which is operated from an electrical power source having a sufficiently low voltage to prevent any danger of electrical shock.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide scrubbing apparatus in which the handle is adjustable in such a way to permit the easy positioning of the scrubbing brush or polishing brush against the walls or bottom of a bathtub or a sink.

In order to accomplish the aforementioned objects of the present invention, a substantially waterproof domelike housing is provided to enclose an electric motor. The motor shaft passes through the bottom wall of the housing and has attached thereto a scrubbing or polishing brush. Adjustably though rigidly attached to the dome-like housing is a smaller dome-like housing with a handle member extending through a slot therein. The handle member is pivotal about an axis interior to the second dome-like housing and can be fixed in a plurality of adjustable positions by the turning of an adjustable knob which extends through an arched opening in the second dome. In addition, the second dome like housing, is rotable about the connection link between the first and second dome housings. This adjustable connection permits a second degree of freedom in the positioning of the handle of the scrubber. Thus, the device and more particularly the handle and polishing member thereof, can be universally adjusted.

The aforementioned objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following more particular description of a preferred embodiment thereof in connection with drawings which form a part of the original disclosure and in which:

FIG. 1 is an overall view of the scrubber in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of a motor and handle housing;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the handle housing; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view, partially broken away, of a bathtub with the scrubber of the present invention shown in various positions therein.

Referring now to FIG. 1, an overall view of the present invention is shown. The scrubber is comprised generally of a dome-shaped motor housing, shown generally as 10. Extending through an upper surface of the dome shaped motor housing 10 is the button 12 for an electrical switch which controls the flow of electrical current to the motor within the motor housing 10. Extending through the bottom wall 14 of the motor housing 10 is a motor shaft 16 which has a scrubbing brush or polishing member attached thereto, shown generally as 18. Extending rearwardly from the motor housing 10 is a handle support housing shown generally as 20 with a handle member 22 extending generally vertically therefrom through an elongated opening in the top of the handle support housing 20. The length of the handle member 22 is adjustable to permit the scrubber to be used to clean a bathtub or to clean a sink, the latter use being most easily achieved with a short handle. At the uppermost end of the handle member 22 is a molded grip 24 which permits the operator to easily grasp the handle and lift or position the scrubber as required.

An electrical power cord 26 for providing electrical current to the motor within the motor housing 10 exits from the motor housing through a grommet 28 and extends along the length of the handle member 22 to a point near the molded grip 24. Between the grommet 28 and the point on the handle where the power cord first contacts the handle is a slack loop in the power cord 26 to permit the handle to be adjusted without damaging the power cord. From near the molded grip, the power cord 26 is freely movable in any direction and is terminated in a male type plug 30. A power supply 32 is provided with a female type socket 34 for receiving the male type plug 30 and providing a source of electrical power, advantageously low voltage DC power for a DC motor contained within motor housing 10.

Also located upon handle member 22 near the moldedv grip 24 is a soap solution holder 36. The soap solution holder is in the form of a receptacle which has a pull ring 38 located in the top thereof which, when pulled upwardly opens a value (not shown) in the soap holder 36 permitting liquid soap or other cleaning solution contained therein to gravitationally flow into the dispensing tube 40. The dispensing tube 40 extends downwardly along the length of the handle member 22 and has a flexible slack portion in the region near the adjustable connection between the dome housings. This slack permits handle member 22 to be repositioned without causing damage to the dispensing tube 40. The dispensing tube 40 passes into the motor housing and out through the bottom 14 and into a generally vertical discharge section shown as 42. When the pull ring 38 is pulled upwardly by the operator, the solution from within the holder 36 flows through the dispensing tube 40 and out through the discharge section 42 onto the surface being cleaned.

- The dome shaped motor housing shown generally as 10 in FIG. 2 may be constructed out of a molded plastic or other light material and has a generally hemispherical wall 44 through which the button 12 of the switch 46 extends. The wall 44 is formed into a generally dome shaped configuration extending downwardly toward the button 14 and it has an inwardly directed flange portion 48 which is in continuous contact with and is attached by a plurality of screws 49 to the bottom 14, the screws 49 passing through the bottom 14 and into the flange portion 48.

Inside the closed chamber 50 formed by the dome shaped wall 44 and the bottom 14 is an electric motor 52, advantageously a low voltage DC motor, which is rigidly attached to a support member 54 which forms a generally horizontal planar surface of sufficient strength to support the other parts of the scrubber attached thereto. The bottom 14 is attached by screws 58 to the support member 54, the screws 58 passing through the bottom 14 and engaging with the support member 54. Extending downwardly from the motor 52 is a motor shaft 16 which passes centrally through the support member 54 and also through a bearing 56 in the bottom 14. The bearing 56 is provided in the bottom 14 to give lateral support to the motor shaft 16 which has attached thereto a rotary brush or polishing member shown generally as 18. The bearing 56 is also useful in preventing either soapsuds or water from entering the chamber 50 through the opening which must be provided in the bottom for the motor shaft 16.

The motor 52 is wired to a contact on switch 46 by a wire 60. A second wire 62 extends from the other contact on the switch 46 to the grommet 28. A third wire 64 extends directly from the motor 52 to the grommet 28. The power cable 26 passes through the grommet 28 and connects to the wires 62 and 64. While the power cable 26 is shown passing through a grommet 28 which is mounted in the wall 44 of the motor housing 10, the grommet 28 can be replaced by a plug and socket arrangement which would permit the power cable 26 to be disconnected from the motor simply by disconnecting the plug from the socket.

At one end of support member 54, there is provided a projecting member 66 which extends outwardly from the opening shown generally as 68 in the wall 44. The projecting member 66 is generally of cylindrical shape about a central axis 70 which is substantially parallel to the plane of the support member 54.

Mating with the projecting member 66 is a flange portion 72 which is an integral part of a handle support member 74. The flange portion 72 is of a generally cylindrical shape also having a central axis which is coaxial with axis 70, the flange portion 72 having an inner surface 76 which is slightly larger in diameter than is the outer surface 78 of the projecting member 66. A screw shown generally as 80, having a large knob 81 at its end, passes through threads 82 in the flange portion 72 and engages a grove 83 in the circumference of the mating member 66. Alternatively, the screw 80 may simply contact the circumference of the mating member 66. By tightening the screw 80, the handle support member 74 can be rigidly attached to the support member 54 within the dome shaped motor housing 10.

While the mating members have been described as having one physical configuration, it is perfectly clear that the mating members can be reversed without affecting the operability of the scrubber.

Referring now to FIG. 3. a crOss sectional view is' shown of the handle support housing, shown generally as 20, and the mechanism used to support the handle 22 which is shown as a tubular member having a molded grip 24 at its top end and connected at the bottom end to the handle support member 74. The handle member 22 is preferably formed of tubular material primarily to keep the weight of the scrubber to a minimum, however, certain materials may be used to make a solid handle member provided the weight is not so great as to make using the scrubber difficult.

A pivot member 84 passes through the handle 22 near the bottom end of the handle and continues through vertical portion of the handle support member 74 at an angle substantially perpendicular to the vertical portion of the handle support member 74. The pivot member 84 is provided with two flange portions 86 at its ends, the flange portions 86 serving to prevent the handle member 22 from being removed from the handle support member 74 though permitting free rotation of the handle about an axis through the pivot member 84. Located between the handle member 22 and'the handle support member and encircling the pivot member 84 is a washer 88 which is provided to separate the handle support member 74 from the handle member 22 and to facilitate the rotation of the handle member 22 and the axis of the pivot member 84.

The vertical portion of the handle support member 74 has an arcuate slot formed therein, as best seen in FIG. 2, such slot being large enough to permit the smallest diameter section 92 of the threaded screw 94 to pass therethrough. In addition, a hole is provided in the handle member 22 to permit the smallest diameter section 92 to pass therethrough. The threads 96 of the threaded screw 94 are used to secure nut 98 to the threaded screw 94. The threaded screw 94 is also provided with a shank portion having a diameter than that of the smallest diameter section 92, thus forming at the interface, a shoulder 100 capable of contacting the sides of a washer 102 when the threaded screw 94 is engaging the threads within nut 98. A second washer 104 encircles threaded screw 94 and separates the handle member 22 from the handle support member 74. By tightly screwing the threaded screw 94 into the nut 98, the handle member 22 can be rigidly secured to the handle support member 94, permitting the user of the scrubber to grasp the molded grip 24 and lift the whole unit. However, if the angle at which the handle member 22 joins the handle support member 74 is one which is undesirable for the particular surface being scrubbed, the handle member 22 may be rotated about the axis of the pivot member 84 by simply loosening threaded screw 94 from the nut 98. Since the handle support housing 20 is provided with an elongated slot 106 and an arced slot 108 through which the handle member 22 and the threaded screw 94 pass respectively, the handle member 22 is permitted to rotate about the axis of the pivot member 84. When the handle member 22 is in a position which is deemed appropriate for the scrubbing of the desired surface, the threaded screw 94 is again tightened into the nut 98, making the handle member 22 rigidly attached to the handle support member 74.

Located at the bottom end of the handle support member 74 are two laterally projecting flanges 110 which are generally perpendicular to the vertical section of the handle support member 74. Located directly beneath the flange portions 110 is the bottom 112 of the handle support housing 20. Passing through the bottom 112 and also through the flange portions 110 are a plurality of screws 114 which are threadably engaging a plurality of nuts 116 to permit the bottom 112 l of the handle support housing to be rigidly secured 5 to the handle support member 74. It will be recognized that the. nuts 116 and screws 114 are merely used to secure the bottom 112 to the handle support member 74 and that many other securing means would be acceptable.

The dome portion of the handle support housing is provided with a flange 118 which extends around the inside of the handle support housing 20. Passing through the bottom 112 is a plurality of screws 120 which threadably engage the bottom 112 to the flange 1 18 of the handle support housing 20, providing a rigid support for the dome portion of the handle support housing 20. Although the bottom 112 of the handle support housing 20 has been shown as a substantially flat surface, it is not a requirement that the bottom 112 be a flat surface and, in fact, the-bottom can also be constructed in the shape of a dome. Such a dome like configuration for the bottom 112, however, will necessitate certain changes to the structure of the handle support member to permit the bottom 1 12 to be rigidly attached thereto and will further necessitate certain changes to the means for connecting the bottom 1 12 to the dome portion of the handle support housing 20. These changes can easily be accomplished by those desiring to do so.

In order to particularly understand the advantages of the present invention, reference is made to FIG. 4 in which the scrubber of the present invention is shown in various positions for scrubbing various surfaces of the bathtub. In the position shown generally as 122, the handle member 22 is positioned substantially vertically to the bottom 124 of the bathtub. In such a position, the scrubber is capable of cleaning the whole bottom surface without an adjustment of the handle. For cleaning the sides 130 of the bathtub, however, the positions shown generally as 126 and 128 are more advantageous because the brush 18 can be positioned to contact the substantially vertical walls 130 of the bathtub while permitting the handle to be accessible to the user without undue reaching. It will also be recognized from FIG. 4 that the rotation of the handle support housing 20 about the axis 70 will further facilitate the positioning of the handle, as in the position shown as 128, to permit the scrubber operator to stand on one side of the bathtub and maintain the brush 18 in contact with the vertical wall portion of the bathtub.

From the foregoing description it will become obvious that the objects of the present invention have been achieved by the present scrubber in which a low voltage and preferably DC motor is housed in a motor housing, the motor having a rotating brush attached thereto. In addition, a handle support housing is provided in which the angle between the handle and the motor housing has two degrees of freedom, permitting the operator greater flexibility in its use.

While the foregoing invention has been described with particular reference to a preferred embodiment thereof, various modifications in form only may be readily made by those of skill in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A mechanized scrubber adapted to clean and polish sinks and bathtubs, and scrubber comprising:

first housing means having drive motor means mounted therein, said drive motor means including a drive shaft;

said drive shaft projecting from said first housing means and being adapted for mounting a brush member for polishing and cleaning said sinks and bathtubs which said brush member is rotated by said drive shaft;

second housing means adjustably connected with said first housing means to enable the position of said second housing means to be selectively positioned relative to said first housing means;

a handle for said scrubber; and

handle support means disposed within said second housing means;

said handle adjustably connected to said handle support means to enable the position of said handle to be selectively adjusted;

said second housing means having a slot formed in the top thereof through which the lower end of said handle can project into said second housing means;

said handle support means including a member to which said handle lower end is pivotally connected, said member having an arcuate groove formed therein to limit the motion of said handle, and further including a digitally operable screw to position said handle at a selected position by tightening of said screw.

2. A scrubber as defined in claim 1 wherein said drive motor means is a direct current electric motor and wherein said motor is electrically connectable with a rechargeable power supply remote from said scrubber.

3. A scrubber is defined in claim 2 wherein said rechargeable power supply comprises a battery box having at least one battery therein.

4. A scrubber as defined in claim 1 wherein said first housing means is generally dome-shaped and said second housing means is also domed-shaped but smaller than said first housing means.

5. A scrubber as defined in claim 1 wherein said screw projects through a side wall of said second housing means to facilitate digital manipulation thereof.

6. A scrubber as defined in claim 1 wherein said second housing means is rotatable relative to said first housing means to position said top of said second housing means and hence said handle at any desired location relative to said first housing means.

7. A scrubber as defined in claim 1 further including a cleaning solution dispenser attached to said handle and being digitally operable, said dispenser having a discharge conduit extending through said first housing means to enable the solution to be discharged adjacent said brush.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2763517 *Dec 28, 1953Sep 18, 1956Strand Karl IBroom or mop handle connection
US3069711 *Feb 14, 1961Dec 25, 1962Lappin Robert IApparatus for treating floors
US3071792 *Nov 4, 1960Jan 8, 1963Eastern Res CorpPolishing machine having resilient mount for aerosol dispenser
US3184775 *May 22, 1962May 25, 1965Electrolux CorpElectric carpet sweepers
US3214779 *Apr 27, 1964Nov 2, 1965Wheeler George CBathtub cleaning device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4040415 *Dec 19, 1975Aug 9, 1977Ruth KulischAir bubbling massaging apparatus
US4542551 *Sep 30, 1983Sep 24, 1985Mcgraw-Edison CompanyRotary floor maintenance device
US4783872 *Nov 25, 1986Nov 15, 1988The 3J CompanyFloor and baseboard treating machine
US5371912 *Sep 27, 1993Dec 13, 1994Hall; Stuart A.Floor and baseboard cleaning machine
US5381577 *Sep 3, 1991Jan 17, 1995Lilja; Bo V.Means for connecting a unit for treating floor surfaces with a rod like member intended for guiding said unit
US6725489 *Dec 27, 2001Apr 27, 2004Lothar J ZellAutomatic pool cleaner accessory
US7937792Oct 19, 2006May 10, 2011Black & Decker Inc.Pole scrubber
US8122555 *Sep 3, 2008Feb 28, 2012Kim Yong WookApparatus for cleaning floor
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/50.1, 15/144.2, 15/410, 15/29
International ClassificationA47L11/283, A47L11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/283, A47L11/4075, A47L11/408
European ClassificationA47L11/40N, A47L11/40L, A47L11/283
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 21, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: HOBART CORPORATION, WORLD HEADQUARTERS BUILDING, T
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:HOBART INTERNATIONAL INC., A CORP. OF OHIO;REEL/FRAME:004080/0758
Effective date: 19820528