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Publication numberUS3731585 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1973
Filing dateDec 4, 1970
Priority dateDec 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3731585 A, US 3731585A, US-A-3731585, US3731585 A, US3731585A
InventorsDemberg E, Ruffini S
Original AssigneeUs Army
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container for explosives
US 3731585 A
Abstract
An improved storage container is disclosed for the safe storage of materials such as sensitive explosives and pyrotechnic mixtures. The container is fluid tight with a removable cover and an internal support means in which the sensitive material is held while immersed in a desensitizing liquid. Gauging means are provided for monitoring the level of the desensitizing liquid and filling and pressure control means are included for maintaining the liquid level and for preventing a pressure build-up within the container as well as for providing for a controlled pressure release during storage or when the container is to be opened.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

nited States Pate Demberg et al. 1 May 8, 1973 CONTAINER FOR EXPLOSIVES Primary ExaminerBenjamin A. Borchelt [75] Inventors: Edmund Demberg, Wharton; Sylves- Assistant Examiner-H. J. Tudor tro Ruffini, Budd Lake, both of NJ. Attorney-Harry M. Saragovitz, Edward Jr Kelly and Herbert Berl [73] Assignee. The United States of America as rAelplazsented by the Secretary of the ABSTRACT [22] Filed: Dem, 1970 An improved storage container is disclosed for the safe storage of materials such as sensitive explosives PP and pyrotechnic mixtures. The container is fluid tight 7 with a removable cover and an internal support means 52 us. Cl. ..86/l, 220 17, 220/22, in which the Sensitive material is held While immersed 220/85 in a desensitizing liquid. Gauging means are provided [51] Int. Cl. .C06b 21/02 for monitoring the level of the desensitizing liq n [58] Field of Search ..86/l;220/17, 22, filling n pressure control means are included for 220/85, 89 A, 93 maintaining the liquid level and for preventing a pres- I sure build-up within the container as well as for [56] References Cited providing for a controlled pressure release during storage or when the container is to be opened. UNITED STATES PATENTS v The invention described herein may be manufactured ifiiiijll? $1132? 212 55595; 555/455; eeee end "eeeeed by ee fee he Geveeemeee fee Governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalties thereon.

5 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures CONTAINER FOR EXPLOSIVES BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an improved container for storing sensitive explosives or pyrotechnic mixtures and for facilitating the shipment and storage of such materials and more particularly to an improved container for storing and handling such mixtures which must be kept immersed in desensitizing liquid.

The continuing development of sensitive explosives and pyrotechnic mixtures has resulted in a variety of such materials which are particularly effective and which are characterized by having an insensitive or safe condition when they are immersed in or wetted by certain desensitizing liquids. These materials, which exhibit desirable explosive properties in a dry state and which may be made insensitive or safe in a wet state, provide a particularly practical and useful means for storing and handling explosives. Containers in accordance with the present invention provide safe storage, handling ease, and reliability.

As will be seen in the more complete description which follows, the container as provided by the present invention assures a physically stable support of the explosive material within the container and simultaneously assures the continuing immersion of the explosive materials within the desensitizing liquid. Novel and reliable means for checking the liquid level as well as means for controlling the liquid and vapor pressure within the container are also provided.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide an improved container for explosives and other pyrotechnic materials.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved container for storing explosives and other materials in a desensitizing liquid.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved container for permitting the safe storage and handling of explosives of the type which are desensitized by storage in certain liquids.

Other and further objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims,-and various advantages not referred to herein will occur toone skilled in the art upon employment of the invention in practice.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and is shown in the drawings which form a portion of the specification wherein:

FIG. I is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of a closed container in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the container of FIG. 1 illustrating sub-packs and a preferred support means for them;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view of the container of FIG. 1 taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of the container taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 1 illustrating the sight gauge means;

FIG. 5 is a top planview of the container of FIG. 1 with the cover removed;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating the underside of a preferred embodiment of the cover;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the cover used for storing explosive material when not using sub-packs; and

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view of the upper portion of a container sealed with the cover of FIG. 7 and storing material without using the sub-packs of the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 6.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The preferred embodiment of the container 1 as illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 6 includes a body 2 having side walls 3 and a bottom 4 forming a liquid-tight vessel which is sealed by a removable cover assembly 5. The cover assembly 5 is bolted to the body 2 by a series of generally equally spaced coupling bolts 6. These threaded bolts 6 engage suitably threaded apertures in a series of fixed anchor rods 7 (FIGS. 1 and 8) attached between spaced support flanges 8. A fluidtight seal is formed between the cover assembly 5 and the body 2 by a circular gasket 9 (FIG. 3) positioned between a circular flange 10 attached to the top of the body 2 and the underside of the cover plate 11. Suitable carrying handles 12 are provided on opposite sides of the container body 2.

A preferred means for supporting explosive or pyrotechnic materials within the above described outer container 1 comprises a plurality of smaller individual sub-packs 14 having closed bottoms and perforated removable covers 15. These sub-packs 14 may be metal as also may be the above described outer container 1 or the container 1 and sub-packs 14 may be made of other materials compatible with the particular desensitizing material being stored. A preferred material for the perforated sub-pack covers 15 is a molded plastic which is sufficiently resilient so the covers 15 may be snapped on and off the sub-packs 14.

The interior of the container 1 is arranged to insure continual coverage of the sub-packs 14 by the desensitizing liquid 16 while at the same time firmly supporting the material so that the sub-packs 14 are firmly but removably held in their stored position within the container 1. In order to provide for such a reliable physical positioning of the sub-packs 14 which, at the same time permits ready removal of the sub-packs 14, a preferred support arrangement comprises shaped base plates 17 for engaging and spacing the individual sub-packs -14. The base plates 17, as best illustrated in FIG. 2, may be formed of a suitably shaped metal or plastic so that they fit closely within the container body 2 with three or more spaced portions 18 of their outer edges engaging the inner surfaces of the body walls 3. Circular recesses 20 are provided to receive and contain the lower portions of the sub-packs l4 and several spring clips 21 are mounted with a generally vertical position adjacent each of thecircular recesses 20 to releasably engage the sub-packs 14. Each of the spring clips 21 preferably includes an inwardly projecting bulge 22 for engaging appropriately spaced circular grooves 23 on the subpacks 14. In order to facilitate the filling of the container l with the desensitizing liquid 16 and to eliminate any air pockets during or after filling, apertures 24 are provided in the recesses 20 and a seriesof channels 25 are formed on the lower surface of each base plate 17.

A preferred form of the container 1 provides for a number of layers of the sub-packs 14 as, for example, the two layers illustrated in the drawings. A separate base plate 17 is used to space and engage the several sub-packs 14 of each layer.

A preferred form of the cover assembly is best illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 6. This cover assembly 5 is seen to include the circular top cover plate 1 1 including spaced slots 26 for the coupling bolts 6. A downwardly extending spacer 27 is welded or otherwise attached to the cover plate 11 to engage the sub-packs 14 through resilient pressure equalizing support members 28 or other support members to hold the sub-packs 14 against vertical movement when the container 1 is sealed. The spacer 27, as illustrated in the drawings, includes vertical side flanges 29 and a plurality of generally horizontal pressure bars 30.

It will be seen that the above described support and spacing arrangement within the sealed container 1 holds a series of the sub-packs 14, in firm but releasable positions within the container body 2 and also assures that the sub-packs 14 are held down below the surface of the desensitizing liquid 16.

A removable filler plug, such as a threaded plug 31, is provided in the cover 5. In order to insure against a dangerous pressure build-up within the sealed container 1, a rupture plug 32 is also preferably included in the cover 5. As seen in FIG. 3, the threaded rupture plug 32 may be bolted to the cover with the particular plug being used having a rupture disc 33 selected to rupture and release the pressure at a predetermined point below the danger pressure for the particular material being stored.

In order to further protect against excess pressure and also to permit a controlled pressure release before the container is opened, a pressure relief valve 34 is also provided in the cover 5 which may be opened and closed as desired. In order to prevent unintentional manipulation of this valve 34, a circular protective flange 35 is preferably provided surrounding it.

Inspection means are provided so that a safe liquid level may be maintained. In its preferred form, this system includes a first transparent sighting gauge 36 positioned slightly above the critical liquid level. This positioning of the sight gauge 36 permits a rapid and definite check to assure that the desensitizing liquid is at least covering the explosive material. For long term storage where the containers are not being subjected to handling or other movement, such a liquid coverage is adequate. In a preferred embodiment, a second sighting gauge 37 is provided which, in the case of a relatively permanent storage, may be used as an upper indicator to maintain a safe liquid level. Where the container is to be shipped or otherwise handled and where it may be tilted, the gauge 36 may be used in checking to insure that a sufficient liquid level exists within the container to provide a safe coverage of the stored material.

The second or upper gauge 37 and the pressure relief valve 34 may also be used during the filling to provide for a complete container filling with no air space for containers which may be subjected to shipment or other rough handling. Filling is accomplished through filler plug 3].

Certain explosive or pyrotechnic materials lend themselves to storage in larger quantities so that they may be stored directly in the container body 2 without the use of individual sub-packs. Such materials, which may be supplied in the form of relatively large granules or in other particulate form for example, may be advantageously stored in this manner. FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate another embodiment of a container 40 which has a body 2 similar to that described above but having a differing cover assembly 41 which includes a disc-like separator plate 42 mounted in spaced relationship below the cover plate 11. This cover assembly 41 includes the outer cover plate 11 with filler and rupture plugs 31 and 32 and a relief valve 34 similar to those described above and is similarly attached to the container body 2 using bolts 6. The separator plate 42 has its outer edge shaped to conform closely to the interior of walls 3 of the container body 2 and includes a number of apertures 47 to insure the passage of liquid therethrough. A preferred rigid separator plate mounting is illustrated in FIG. 7 including metal brackets 48 which are welded or otherwise attached to the cover plate 11 and which support the depending separator plate 42 by means of several generally vertical support and spacing rods 49.

It will be seen that an improved container has been provided for explosives or other pyrotechnic materials for assuring their safe storage and handling. The container is particularly useful for such materials which are kept for safety in a desensitizing liquid. The container, in accordance with the present invention, provides for safe stationary storage as well as for safe shipment or other handling of explosive materials. The container, including its various safety and checking features, has a novel design facilitating its formation from a variety of materials including any particular material which may be compatible with a particular explosive and desensitizing liquid.

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificing any of its advantages, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described our invention, we claim: 7

1. An improved storage means for storing explosive material in a desensitizing liquid comprising the combination of a container body, a removable cover for said body adapted for forming a fluid-tight container, a material spacer means depending from said cover, pressure release means in said cover, liquid sight gauging means positioned in said container body adjacent its top, a plurality of sub-pack containers positioned within said container body and holding the explosive material, and means for supporting said sub-pack containers in spaced relation to one another and below said cover.

2. The storage means as claimed in claim 1 in which said means for supporting said sub-pack containers comprises a plurality of plates, and each plate supporting a plurality of sub-pack containers.

3. The storage means as claimed in claim 1 in which said sub-pack containers comprise hollow vessels having removable perforated tops.

4. The storage means as claimed in claim 2 in which said plates comprise a plurality of recesses shaped to engage the bottoms of said sub-pack containers, and resilient clip means positioned adjacent said recesses to releasably engage said sub-pack containers.

5. The storage means as claimed in claim 4 in which said sub-pack containers include a groove means for 5 engaging said clip means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2335779 *Jun 20, 1943Nov 30, 1943Alberto MazzelSafety carrier for nitroglycerin or other explosives
US3121993 *Dec 5, 1960Feb 25, 1964William PenningtonRocket propellant support
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4027601 *Apr 19, 1976Jun 7, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyContainer for explosive device
US4199057 *Jun 23, 1978Apr 22, 1980Eric GruazContainer for explosive cartridges
US4878415 *Aug 18, 1988Nov 7, 1989The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceBomb pallet design with hydraulic damping and fire suppressant
US5216965 *Jun 15, 1992Jun 8, 1993The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyRelocatable explosives storage magazine
US5271520 *Mar 2, 1993Dec 21, 1993Mcafee E JohnFishing pail system
US5545841 *Sep 28, 1994Aug 13, 1996The Penn State Research FoundationAcclimatized experiment container for controlled biochemical and biological investigations
US5911323 *May 8, 1998Jun 15, 1999Figgie International Inc.Packaging and method for transporting oxygen generators
US6334529 *Jan 5, 2000Jan 1, 2002Lucent Technologies Inc.Corrosion protection system for anti-tank ammunition
US7416076 *Jan 12, 2004Aug 26, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Apparatus and method for packaging and shipping of high explosive content components
US8118157 *Nov 21, 2007Feb 21, 2012Piccolin Attilio MFirework launching platform apparatus
US8833591 *Mar 22, 2012Sep 16, 2014Steve KotevskiAmmunition can with safety valve
US20050150781 *Jan 12, 2004Jul 14, 2005Barton John A.Apparatus and method for packaging and shipping of high explosive content components
WO1996007073A1 *Aug 29, 1995Mar 7, 1996International Mul-T-Lock B.V.Security container
WO2010003858A1 *Jul 1, 2009Jan 14, 2010Dynaenergetics Gmbh & Co. KgMethod for preparing hollow charges for transport, ensuring safe shipment
Classifications
U.S. Classification86/1.1, 206/499, 206/3, 220/694
International ClassificationF42B39/14, F42B39/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B39/14
European ClassificationF42B39/14