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Publication numberUS3732718 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1973
Filing dateApr 1, 1971
Priority dateApr 1, 1971
Publication numberUS 3732718 A, US 3732718A, US-A-3732718, US3732718 A, US3732718A
InventorsBarberio L, Cornacchio A
Original AssigneeKings Electronics Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cable crimping die tool
US 3732718 A
Abstract
A cable crimping die tool is provided in which the split halves of the die are adapted to be moved together to perform a crimping operation. One or more bores are provided in one of the halves of the die, and corresponding pins are provided in the other adapted to engage the bores to insure proper alignment of both portions of the die during a crimping operation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Barberio et a1.

1 1 May 15, 1973 1541 CABLE CRIMPING DIE TOOL [75] Inventors: Louis Barberio, Bronx; Americo Cornacchio, Mount Vernon, both of NY.

Kings Electronics Co., Inc., Tuckahoe, NY.

[22] Filed: Apr. 1,1971

[21] App1.No.: 130,123

[73] Assignee:

[52] US. Cl ..72/4l0, 29/203 H, 81/426 [51] Int. Cl. ..B21d 9/08 [58] Field of Search ..72/409, 410; 81/418,

81/419, 421, 426; 29/200 H, 203 H, 203 HC, 203 HM, 203 HT, 212 R, 212 D, 280

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,968,202 1/1961 Evans et a1. ..81/15 3,470,728 10/1969 Polidori.... 72/410 3,075,198 1/1963 Over ....29/212 D 2,765,688 10/1956 Evans... ..72/409 3,359,779 12/1967 Filia ....72/412 3,576,122 4/1971 Churla, Jr ..72/413 3,328,872 7/1967 Reem et a1. ..29/203 HT Primary ExaminerCharles W. Lanham Assistant ExaminerM. J. Keenan A tior nefl l-larry C Bierm anjjordan B. Bierman.

Bierman & Bierman [57] ABSTRACT A cable crimping die tool is provided in which the split halves of the die are adapted to be moved together to perform a crimping operation. One or more bores are provided in one of the halves of the die, and corresponding pins are provided in the other adapted to engage the bores to insure proper alignment of both portions of the die during a crimping operation.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures CABLE CRIMPING DIE TOOL This invention relates to crimping tools, and more particularly, to alignment means for crimpingdies.

In accordance with the present invention, a split crimping die is provided, each portion adapted for mounting on a crimping tool of well-known conventional design. The crimping die may be provided with one or more chambers adapted to crimp objects onto cables, electrical or otherwise.

Crimping dies are generally mounted on a crimping tool of the type which maintains one portion of the die fixed, while permitting the other portion of the die to move towards and away from the fixed portion to permit insertion of the cable to be crimped. The movable portion of the die is then urged towards the fixed portion and pressure applied to perform the crimping operation. Conventional structures place the movable die in a keyway provided in the crimping tool. As is the case with most conventional key and keyway connections, considerable slop exists in the mounting to permit friction-free movement without binding of the movable portion of the die. Rather huge pressures are brought to bear on the crimping die during the crimping operation. The slop engendered by the use of a key and keyway mounting often results in misalignment of the two die portions due to the. high pressures used. As a result, somewhat ineffective and misaligned crimps result which maytendto destroy the utility of the crimp connection.

In accordance with this invention, one or more bores or openings areplaced in one of the die portions, and one or more pins adapted to mate with the said bores are provided in the other die portion. In this manner, when pressure is applied to move the movable die portion into crimping contact with a cable, the pins are adapted to enter the bores and provide exact alignment for both portions of the crimping die. Of course, the pins are made somewhat longer than the diameter of the cable to be crimped to permit the pins to enter the bores prior to the exertion of heavy pressures in the crimping operation. This assures alignment during the crimping action. For best results, the heads of the pins facing the bores are of somewhat smaller diameter or decreasing diameter to provide for positive entry of the pins into the bores.

Referring now to the drawings in which like numerals refer to like parts:

FIG. 1 is an isometrical view of the crimping die of the instant invention shown in open position;

FIG. 2 is an isometrical view similar to that of FIG. 1 showing the crimping die in its closed position;

FIG. 3 is a side view in partial section of the crimping dies of the instant invention;

FIG. 4 is a view taken along 4 4 of FIG. 3 showing the pin and bore alignment means; and

FIG. 5 is a side view similar to FIG. 3 showing another embodiment of the crimping dies of this invention.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and'2: l0 denotes a crimp ing tool having a cavity 14 therein adapted to receive a crimping die denoted. by the numeral 16. Crimping die I6 has two symmetrical portions Band portion 20 being affixed to the crimping tool at 22 by means to be hereinafter described. Portion I8 is affixed to' a movable pressure applying ram 24, also by means to be hereinafter described.

Each of the die portions 18 and 20 has a plurality of recessed areas, 26 and 28 respectively, which define depending flanges 30 and 32, respectively, in both the upper and lower portions of the dies.

The upper portion of the crimping die defines a small polygonal chamber 38, and the lower portion of the die when in the closed position defines a larger polygonal chamber 40. Die portion 18 is provided with a key 42 (FIG. 3) adapted for mounting in a keyway 44 so that movement of ram 24 will move die portion 18 towards die portion 20 in a fairly straight manner. However, to prevent misalignment of the two die portions l8'and 20 during a crimping operation, a plurality of bores 46 (FIGS. 3 and 4) are provided in the stationary die portion 20, and a corresponding plurality of pins 48 are mounted on the forward face 50 of the movable die portion 18. Only two bores and two pins are shown, but it is to be understood that any number of bores and pins may be used. In addition, the number of pins need not equal the number of bores. In this manner, a universal type of crimping die may be made without changing the bore-making machinery or by having to specify the addition or deletion of pins on one of the dies.

For best results, the pin 48 is made somewhat longer than the diameter of the largest cable to be crimped to ensure entrance of the pin 48 into the bore 46 prior to the exertion of heavy pressure by the ram 24. To ease insertion of the pin 48 into the bore 46, the pin is provided with a hemispherical head 52. The crimping die described above may be mounted in the crimping tool by means of the depending flexible post 54, most readily seen in FIG. 4. Insofar as the stationary die portion is'concerned, a bore 56 is provided in one portion of the crimping tool into which the flexible post 54 is inserted. By being made flexible, post 54 frictionally engages the interior of the bore 56 to retain the die portion 20 in position in the crimping tool. For mounting the movable die portion 18, ram 24 is made hollow (not shown) to receive flexible post 54 mounted on the movable die portion 18. Again, the flexible quality of the post 54 permits insertion of the post into ram 24 with frictional retention thereof being ensured.

In operation, the movable die portion 18 is maintained in the open die position when handle 57 of the crimping tool is in the position shown in FIG. 1. Upon movement of the handle downwardly in the direction of the arrow shown in FIG. 2, ram 24 will extend as shown in FIG. 2 to close and apply pressure to the crimping die to perform the crimping operation. To aid in applying pressure, a conventional ratchet mechanism 60 is provided on the handle 56.

FIG. 5 depicts an embodiment of this invention similar to that shown and described in FIGS. 1 through 4', with the exception that three chambers 38 of varying size are provided in the crimping die to permit crimping three different size cables.

As can be readily appreciated from the drawings, the largest chamber, namely, chamber 40, is provided in the portion of the crimping die adjacent the keyway 44 in in the crimping tool. This chamber is some distance above the keyway 44 to permit the pins 48 and bores 46 to be provided between the chamber 40 and the keyway 44. In operation, the greatest pressure will of course be required to crimp the larger cable, and it is for this reason that the chamber 40 is displaced from the keyway to make'provision for the bores and pins in the region of greatest stress. Of course, the bores and pins may be provided in any other location of the crimping die, but the farther these are removed from the keyway, the greater the chance for misalignment due to flexing or tilting of the die portions 18 or 20 about the keyway. Angular tilting motion of the die portions is of course more aggravated the farther one moves from the point at which angular motion occurs, and the problem of misalignment not only of the die portions but of the pins and bores 48 and 46 'respectively, is eliminated by placing the pins and bores as close to the keyway as possible.

Although a plurality of crimping chambers 38 and 40 are shown, it is to be understood that the instant invention need not be provided with more than one such chamber if this is desired.

What is claimed is:

1. A crimping die for use in a crimping tool having a keyway comprising a first and a second portion movable with respect to each other from a first position in which said portions are spaced apart and a second position in which said portions are adjacent each other,

a key on at least one of said portions, said key being adapted to fit into the keyway on the crimping tool such that said portion is movable along said keyway,

a plurality of different sized chambers in one of said portions each of said chambers aligned with a corresponding chamber on said other die and means for preventing transverse movement of said portions with respect to each other and between said portions and the crimping tool,

said preventing means comprising at least one bore in one of said portions located at a point between said chambers and said key and a corresponding number of pins in said other portion, said pins being aligned with said bores and having a length shorter than the distance between said portions when said portions are in the first position.

2. The die according to claim 1 wherein said pins are tapered to facilitate entry into said bore.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2765688 *Mar 13, 1953Oct 9, 1956Aircraft Marine Prod IncWork locating mechanism for connector crimping tools
US2968202 *Apr 11, 1958Jan 17, 1961Amp IncHydraulic crimping tool for crimping t-tap connectors
US3075198 *Dec 4, 1961Jan 29, 1963Amp IncCrimping tool
US3328872 *Jan 7, 1966Jul 4, 1967Amp IncApparatus for making crimped electrical connections
US3359779 *Jun 16, 1965Dec 26, 1967Sargent & CoMultiple-stroke hand tool
US3470728 *Apr 13, 1967Oct 7, 1969Amp IncElectrical connector crimping tool
US3576122 *Mar 26, 1969Apr 27, 1971Thomas & Betts CorpCrimping tool
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4025998 *Feb 3, 1976May 31, 1977Thomas & Betts CorporationWire slitting and installing apparatus
US4118971 *Sep 27, 1977Oct 10, 1978David TeschnerCrimping apparatus
US4337635 *Jul 3, 1980Jul 6, 1982Teledyne Penn-UnionCompression tool
US4387746 *Mar 14, 1980Jun 14, 1983Slater Electric Inc.Wire separation tool and method of preparing multiconductor cable
US4557034 *Oct 25, 1983Dec 10, 1985General Machine Products Company, Inc.Tool for mounting connectors to multi-conductor cords or wires
US4567647 *Mar 21, 1984Feb 4, 1986Raines Gordon LClamping tool for drawing together a pair of insulators
US4604890 *Mar 25, 1985Aug 12, 1986Teledyne Penn-UnionCompression tool
US4790068 *Dec 4, 1987Dec 13, 1988Hirose Electric Co., Ltd.Termination tool
US4797988 *Mar 27, 1986Jan 17, 1989Slater Electric, Inc.Method and tool for preparing multi-conductor cable
US5062290 *Jun 25, 1990Nov 5, 1991Burndy CorporationHydraulic crimping press for electrical connectors
US5195352 *Nov 8, 1991Mar 23, 1993Molex IncorporatedCrimping tool system for optical fiber cables
US5274903 *Mar 30, 1993Jan 4, 1994Molex IncorporatedCrimping tool system for optical fiber cables
US6253449 *Nov 18, 1998Jul 3, 2001Molex IncorporatedCombination tool for optical or electrical cables
US6415499 *Sep 29, 2000Jul 9, 2002Holland Electronics, LlcCoaxial cable stripping and crimping tool
US7823271 *Feb 11, 2005Nov 2, 2010John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Connector compression tool
US8112876Nov 1, 2010Feb 14, 2012John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Method of compressing a connector
US8112877Nov 1, 2010Feb 14, 2012John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Connector compression tool
US8230715 *Feb 26, 2009Jul 31, 2012Wezag Gmbh WerkzeugfabrikHead of pliers
US8307544Oct 15, 2010Nov 13, 2012John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Coaxial cable connector tool
US8356402Nov 1, 2010Jan 22, 2013John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Connector compression tool
US8519267 *Feb 16, 2009Aug 27, 2013Carlisle Interconnect Technologies, Inc.Terminal having integral oxide breaker
US20090217791 *Feb 26, 2009Sep 3, 2009Wezag Gmbh WerkzeugfabrikHead of Pliers
US20100107843 *Nov 4, 2009May 6, 2010Hubbell IncorporatedCutter
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/409.16, 72/409.8, 29/751, 81/426
International ClassificationH01R43/04, H01R43/042
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/042
European ClassificationH01R43/042