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Publication numberUS3732842 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1973
Filing dateMay 10, 1971
Priority dateMay 10, 1971
Publication numberUS 3732842 A, US 3732842A, US-A-3732842, US3732842 A, US3732842A
InventorsA Vara
Original AssigneeA Vara
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Road safety device and accessories
US 3732842 A
Abstract
A road safety marker featuring an improved marker stabilizing base removably connected thereto and safety accessories.
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ilnited States Patent 1 Vara, Sr.

[11] 3,732fi42 1 May 15, 1973 [54] ROAD SAFETY DEVICE AND ACCESSORIES [76] Inventor: Arthur G, Vara, Sr., 115 Westview Avenue, Hamburg, NY.

22 Filed: May 10,1971

21 Appl.N0.: 141,729

[52] US. Cl. ..116/63 P, 40/125 N, 94/1.5,

340/114 [51] Int. Cl. ..E0lf 9/10 [58] Field of Search ..116/63, 63 P;

40/125 N, 125 J, 145 A, 130; 94/1.5; 340/114, 321,115,119;240/10.6l

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,360,516 10/1944 Schmidling ..116/63 P Primary ExaminerLouis J. Capozi A ttorney- Bean & Bean [5 7] ABSTRACT A road safety marker featuring an improved marker stabilizing base removably connected thereto and safety accessories.

23 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEBHAY 1 51975 SHEET 1 [1F 2 I NVENTOR. ARTH UR G. VAPA SR.

A T'I'OPNEYS PATENTED HAY] 51975 SHEET 2 BF 2 INVENTOR. flPTHU/P G. VAPA 5R.

ROAD SAFETY DEVICE AND ACCESSORIES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A recent type of road safety marker, which has enjoyed wide acceptance, features a hollow, brightly colored plastic cone, which is designed to break away from a supporting base when struck by a vehicle. Since the cone itself is very light in weight, it is necessary to fill the supporting base with a flowable material, such as water and/or sand, in order to stabilize the marker. This marker is a considerable advance over prior conically shaped safety markers, which include a permanently affixed solid base or require the utilization of sand bags to maintain the marker in place.

However, as will be readily appreciated, it is off-times a great nuisance and/or expense to fill and/or empty for storage the supporting bases of a large number of these markers, and their supporting base may be split open when run over by heavy vehicles. Moreover, experience with commercially available markers of this type has shown that even when the supporting base is completely filled, the marker will not return to its normal upright position when tipped past about 31. The utilization of supporting bases of greater width and/or height dimensions with a view to achieving greater stability, would of course be undesirable from the standpoint of road safety.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to road safety markers and more particularly to a hollow cone type road safety marker having an improved base and accessories for use with such marker.

The present invention features the utilization of a plastic cone marker supporting base in the form of a steel supporting ring having a plurality of coil spring legs affixed thereto; the legs being utilized to resiliently retard tipping of the marker. The supporting base may be readily applied to the cone marker, as by dropping the supporting ring downwardly over the cone to position the supporting ring in engagement with an annular bottom flange formed integrally with the cone and the legs in engagement with a marker supporting surface, such as the ground or a road surface.

The present supporting base may be in either of two forms, namely, a light weight spring base suitable for use on low speed highways or secondary roads, and a heavy weight spring base for use on high speed highways.

The light weight spring base is characterized as having its legs formed of relatively flexible coil springs, which are fixed to the supporting ring by means of threaded bolts passing through holes in the ring and threaded into the inner end of each leg. A particularly important feature of this construction is the utilization of resiliently deformable sleeves of plastic or like material, which are friction fitted over the inner end of each leg, such as to extend from adjacent the supporting ring outwardly past the end of the bolt. The sleeves serve to distribute stress in order to prevent the bolt ends from cutting through the relatively light weight spring coils. A commercial form of this type of base having six legs of about twelve inches in length will weigh on the order of about four and one-half pounds and be effective in returning the marker to an upright condition after being tilted through angles of upwards of about 57.

The heavy weight spring base is characterized as employing relatively inflexible coil spring legs, which are weakened or made flexible at a point adjacent the inner ends thereof, as by spreading or opening several of the spring coils. By this arrangement, the legs may flex at this point sufficiently to permit the outer ends of the legs to conform to the surface of the ground. In this construction, the leg attaching devices, such as lag screws, are free to turn within their respective receiving openings in the supporting ring, thereby to permit the attaching devices and their associated legs to freely rotate in the event a car wheel runs over the legs. A commercial form of this type of base having six legs of about twelve inches in length will weigh on the order of about seven and one-half pounds and be effective in returning the marker to an upright condition after being tilted downwardly into engagement with the ground.

A desirable feature of both constructions is the utilization of threaded fasteners whose threads per inch and diameter is sufficient to produce slight axial spreading and radial expansion of the spring coils with which they are engaged. This simple operation results in positively locking the legs on the fasteners and thus to the supporting ring; rotations of the legs, as a result of being run over by the wheels of vehicles, being ineffective in unscrewing the legs from the fasteners.

There are also disclosed several safety accessories having particular utility in combination with the present marker construction. One such accessory in the form of a pair of light reflective sleeves axially spaced by a non-reflective member has broader utility in that it may be used as an improved and low cost replacement for conventional highway prism reflectors.

DRAWINGS The nature and mode of operation of the present invention will now be more fully described in the following detailed description taken with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a highway safety marker formed in accordance with the present invention, additionally showing in phantom line the manner in which the marker is tilted under high wind loading conditions:

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the cone shaped marker portion breaking away from the supporting base portion when the former is struck by a vehicle;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken generally along line 3-3 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 44 in FIG. 1, but showing an alternative supporting base construction;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view showing an accessory adapted for use with the marker of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the area designated as FIG. 6 in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a partially sectionalized view illustrating another accessory, which may be used with the marker of the present invention; and

FIGS. 8A and 8B are views illustrating variations of another type of accessory, which may be employed with the marker of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Reference is now made particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2,

wherein a road safety marker formed in accordance with the present invention is generally designated as 10. Marker generally includes a hollow, frusto-conically shaped marker portion 12 open adjacent its top and base ends, and a supporting base portion 14. Preferably, marker portion 12 is of relatively light weight translucent plastic construction and is formed adjacent its relatively large diameter base end with a radially outwardly extending annular ledge or flange 16. Base portion 14 is intended to normally retain marker portion 12 upright with its base end in engagement with a supporting surface, such as the ground or roadway surface, while being adapted to return the marker portion to its normal upright position when tilted by wind loading conditions, as shown generally in FIG. 1.

Preferably, ledge 16 is sufficiently pliable to permit marker portion 12 to break away from supporting base 14 whenever the former is subject to a high impact loading condition, while permitting base 14 to remain flatwise in engagement with the supporting surface, such as is generally illustrated in FIG. 2. However, it will be understood that ledge 16 possesses sufficient rigidity to maintain the marker portion and supporting base assembled when the marker is tilted as a result of high wind loading conditions. Marker portions of the type having utility in the present construction are sold by Borg-Warner Corporation under the Trademark Safety Guide and identified by part numbers SG-25033 and SG-25034. Such marker portions have a height of thirty-six inches, a base diameter of twelve inches, a top diameter of 2.1 inches, a wall thickness of 0.090 inches and a weight of 2.75 pounds. provided In accordance with the present invention, supporting base portion 14 includes a supporting angular ring 20, which is formed of a relatively heavy and rugged material, such as iron or steel; a plurality of steel spring legs 22; and a plurality of attaching devices 24, which serve to connect the inner ends of spring legs 22 to ring 20, such that the legs extend radially outwardly in opposite directions therefrom. Preferably, ring 20 is dimensioned to be freely fitted downwardly over marker portion 12, so as to rest on ledge portion 16; and spring legs 22 made flexible relative to ring 20 and to each other, so as to permit the spring legs to flex downwardly into engagement with the ground when the marker is upright. Preferably, a number of spring legs in excess of four are provoded and such spring legs are arranged in a substantially equally spaced relationship peripherally of ring 20, thereby to permit several spring legs to be effective in retarding tipping of the marker portion and returning same to upright condition regardless of the direction of tipping.

A first embodiment of the present invention, which is illustrated in FIGS. l-3, is particularly adapted for use along relatively low speed highways or city streets and features a relatively light weight, inexpensive spring base construction.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 3, it will be seen that in the relatively light weight spring base construction, spring legs 22 are formed of relatively light weight coil springs, which are characterized as being relatively free to flex vertically under their own weight and the weight ofa lead or steel slug 26 fixed within their flared outer ends 28, as generally indicated in phantom line in FIG. 1. In this construction, the inner end of each of spring legs 22 is attached to ring 20 by means of attaching device 24 in the form ofa threaded stud or bolt 30,

which extends radially outwardly through ring aperture 32 and is threadably received within the coils 34 of the inner end of the spring leg. A sleeve 36 of resiliently deformable material, such as nylon, is friction fitted over the inner end of each spring leg, such as to extend lengthwise thereof inwardly and outwardly relative to the outer end of bolt 30. Sleeve 36 effectively serves to resiliently constrain flectures of the spring leg adjacent to the outer end of bolt 30, thereby to prevent the latter from cutting through and/or deforming the relatively light weight spring coils adjacent thereto. As will be apparent, this arrangement may be reversed, as by replacing bolt 30 with an internallythreaded sleeve suitably fixed to ring 20 and as by replacing sleeve 36 with a deformable cylindrical insert arranged concentrically inwardly of the spring leg. The light weight construction of these spring legs permits them to readily uncoil without damage when run over by the wheels of a low speed vehicle, even though their inner ends are non-rotatably fixed to ring 20.

In use, the light weight spring base construction would appear to principally rely on the weight of slugs 26, which are carried by spring legs arranged opposite relative to the direction of tipping, to prevent tipping over of the marker. Preferably, the spring legs are sufficiently flexible to permit slugs 26 to remain in engagement with the ground until the critical tipping angle is reached, as shown in FIG. 1. While the weight of ring 20 and resilient deformation of the spring legs arranged in the direction of tipping assist in retarding tipping, they are principally relied upon to return the tipped marker to upright condition.

A preferred form of this embodiment features six twelve inch long spring legs, weighs about four and one-half pounds, and is effective in returning the commercially available cone marker mentioned above to an upright position after its having been tipped through upwards of about 57 by wind loadings. It has been found that greater stability may be achieved by adding more legs, but that the marker is unsuitable for high speed road conditions, since the spring legs are readily susceptible to damage by wheels of vehicles traveling at high speeds.

While it will be readily apparent that legs 22 may be merely welded to ring 20 or to non-threaded studs projecting therefrom, the utilization of threaded fasteners is preferably in that it facilitates assembly of the supporting base. It is a feature of the present invention that expected unthreading of the legs attached to ring 20 in this manner, as a result of rotations imparted thereto when run over by the wheels of a vehicle, 15 effectively prevented by the proper selection of stud diameter and number of threads per inch. In this respect, I have found that ifl employ a fastener characterized as having fewer threads than there are coils 34 per inch and a diameter slightly in excess of the ID. of the coils 34, the spring leg may be positively and essentially permanently locked on the fastener. In closing a fastener, it is only necessary to insure that it will produce very slight or just visually perceivable axial separations and radial expansion of coils 34 with which it engages.

Reference is now made particularly to FIG. 4, which illustrates a relatively heavy weight spring supporting base construction, which is particularly adapted for use on high speed highways, whereon relatively high wind loading conditions are occasioned by the passage of trucks traveling at a high speed and damage would likely occur to light weight spring legs, as mentioned above. In this construction, the spring legs will normally have larger and fewer coils per inch when compared to the spring legs discussed in connection with FIG. 3, and will normally not deflect vertically under their own weight. However, in order to permit these spring legs to flex relative to each other and the ring for engagement with the ground, one or more coils are opened up or spaced apart at a point slightly beyond the end of stud 30, as indicated by coils 34.

This construction also differs from that discussed with reference to FIG. 3, in that ring 20 is heavier and has its aperture 32 formed of a diameter sufficient to permit free rotation of stud 30 therewithin; this permitting free rotation of the spring legs when run over at high speeds in order to prevent damage thereto. In that these spring legs do not readily flex immediately adjacent the outer end of stud 30, the resilient outer sleeve described in connection with FIG. 3 may be omitted. However, it is preferable to employ a fastener in the form of the illustrated lag screw, which tapers towards its end and thus permits gradual flexing of the spring leg at this point, if required. As in the construction previously described, it is preferable to close a lag screw or other fastener, which will result in positive locking the spring leg to the supporting ring.

In use, when a marker employing the heavy weight spring base is tipped, opened coils 34' permit the outer ends of the spring legs arranged opposite relative to the direction of tipping to flex and remain in engagement with the ground through a limited portion of the tipping arc. Thereafter such ends leave the ground and the whole of the marker pivots about the ends of the legs arranged in the direction of tipping movement. Thus, inthis form, reliance is placed upon the greater weight of the legs and ring, together with the greater spring rate of the legs to both retard tipping and to return the marker to upright position. Of course, for any given wind loading condition, a marker employing the heavy weight spring base will be tipped to a lesser extent than one employing the light weight base.

A preferred form of this latter embodiment features six 12 inch long spring legs, weighs 7% pounds, and is effective in returning marker portion 12 to an upright condition even when tipped over into engagement with the ground.

Reference is now made to FIG. 5, wherein marker is shown as being provided with accessories in the form ofa fixture 40 for supporting a blinking or flashing light source 42 within marker portion 12; and a cap 44 for weather sealing the open upper end of marker portion 12 and removably locking fixture 40 in position. Light source 42 may be of any suitable construction, such as one of many battery operated types conventionally employed as a motorist or pedestrian warning. Fixture 40 includes a bracket portion 46, which is suitably constructed to receive the light source; and at least a pair of spring legs 48, which are fixed to extend codirectionally from bracket portion 46. Each of legs 48 is formed adjacent its free end with a hook 50, which is adapted to overlie the upper bounding edge of the marker portion for the purpose of suspending fixture 40 therewithin. Preferably, as indicated in FIG. 6, legs 48 are essentially parallel when non-deformed, except for having the outer ends bend, as at 48a, through about in order to initially space hooks 50 a distance apart greater than the distance between the legs adjacent bracket portion 46 and the diameter of the upper end opening of marker portion 12. Fixture 40 is assembled by first passing hooks 50 upwardly through the open base end of marker portion 12; legs 48 being progressively and resiliently deformed towards one another by engagement of the hooks with the inner conically shaped wall of the marker portion. When hooks 50 are passed through the upper end opening of marker portion 12, legs 48 are permitted to immediately flex and position the hooks in overlying relationship to the bounding edge of the upper end opening. Of course, the overall length of legs 48 and bracket portion 46 is less than the height of marker portion 12 in order to position the light source above the ground and permit a limited degree of swinging movement of the fixture.

Cap 44 is preferably in the form ofa plastic sleeve 54 having its upper end closed by suitable means, such as a rubber plug 56; sleeve 54 having an internal diameter sufficient to permit it to be friction fit downwardly over hooks 50 when in fixture suspending position. By this means, unseating of books 50 is prevented even during maximum tipping orientation of the marker. Preferably, the outer cylindrical surface of sleeve 54 is formed or coated with a material, which is highly reflective to light; the cap thereby acting as a vehicle light reflector to warn a motorist of the presence of the marker during the night even if the light source should fail.

FIG. 7 illustrates a modified form of marker cap 44a, which includes a pair of upper and lower sleeves 62 and 64 maintained in an axially spaced relationship by means of a spacer member 66 having its ends fixed, as by adhesive, one within each of sleeves 62 and 64. The outer cylindrical surfaces of sleeves 62 and 64 are formed or coated with a highly reflective material whereas the outer cylindrical surface of spacer member 66 is formed of a material which is relatively nonreflective to light. Cap 44a is mounted on marker portion 12 by friction fitting lower sleeve 64 downwardly over the upper end. It will be understood that cap 44a provides an improved and low cost replacement for conventional circular glass prisms reflectors 68 of the type shown in FIG. 8a. In this respect, more reflected light will be obtained from cap 440 than from a pair of conventional circular prisms of the same diameter and cap 44a is always functional regardless of its orientation relative to oncoming traffic. Moreover, due to its light weight plastic construction cap 44a, as well as cap 44, will not constitute a dangerous projectile, if broken loose and propelled through the air as a result of a vehicle accident.

As will be apparent, cap 44a has general utility as a traffic warning or signal, that is, it may be used wherever pairs of glass prisms have heretofore been used; the manner of supporting the cap being dependent on its installation.

FIGS. 80 and 8b illustrate respectively, circular glass prism reflectors and flag type warning device accessories, which may be employed with the safety marker 10. Each of these accessories comprises a tapered base 70, which is formed of a soft elastomeric material, and a standard 72, which is formed of a resiliently deformable plastic material, such as nylon, and imbedded in base 70. Glass prism reflectors 68 and flag 74 may be fixed to standards 72 in any desired manner, as by adhesive. The utilization of the above mentioned materials in forming base 70 and standard 72 will greatly reduce the likelihood of these warning devices causing injury or damage, if propelled through the air as a result of a vehicle accident.

I claim:

1. A safety marker for highways or the like comprising in combination:

a generally cone-shaped marker portion having a ledge portion arranged to extend radially from adjacent a relatively large diameter base end thereof; and

a supporting base portion for stabilizing said marker portion when said base end thereof is supported by engagement with a marker supporting surface, said base portion including metallic supporting ring means dimensioned to be fitted downwardly over said marker portion to rest on said ledge portion, a plurality of supporting surface engaging spring legs, and means for affixing an inner end of each of said legs to said ring means to extend radially outwardly in opposite directions therefrom, said legs being flexible relative to said ring means and relative to each other.

2. A marker according to claim 1, wherein said legs are of a number and arranged about said ring means such that any adjacent pair of said legs cooperate to define an angle less than 90.

3. A marker according to claim 2, wherein at least six of said legs are fixed to said ring means and said legs are substantially equally spaced peripherally of said ring means.

4. A marker according to claim 1, wherein said legs are formed from coil springs characterized as being readily flexible substantially throughout the length thereof, and said means for affixing said legs to said ring means includes a plurality of stud means extending radially outwardly from said ring means and fixed one concentrically of said inner end of each of said legs and a plurality of resiliently deformable means arranged one concentrically of said inner end of each of said legs to extend lengthwise thereof inwardly and outwardly beyond a radially outer end of said stud means, each said leg being arranged concentrically intermediate its associated stud means and resilient means.

5. A marker according to claim 4, wherein said stud means is fixed to extend concentrically inwardly of its associated leg and said resilient means is in the form of a sleeve.

6. A marker according to claim 5, wherein each of said stud means is threadably joined to coils of said inner end of its associated leg and each of said sleeves is a plastic sleeve friction fitted over its associated leg, said stud means being characterized as producing slight axial separation and radial expansion of the coils to which it is joined, thereby to positively lock said leg on said stud means automatically upon threading of said stud means thereinto.

7. A marker according to claim 1, wherein said legs are characterized as being formed of relatively rigid coil springs made flexible by opening adjacent coils of said springs adjacent said inner ends thereof.

8. A marker according to claim 7, wherein said means for affixing said legs to said ring means includes means to journal said legs for rotation about an axis extending lengthwise of said inner end thereof.

9. A marker according to claim 7, wherein said attaching means includes a plurality of stud means fixed one to each of said inner ends of said legs, each of said stud means being rotatably supported by said ring means, each of said stud means terminating at a point lengthwise of its associated leg spaced relatively radially inwardly from said point at which said adjacent coils are opened.

10. A marker according to claim 9, wherein each of said stud means is threadably received within coils adjacent said inner end of its associated leg and extends radially outwardly through a receiving opening in said ring means dimensioned to accommodate for free rotational movement of said stud means therewithin, said stud means being characterized as producing slight axial separation and radial expansion of the coils within which it is received thereby to positively lock said leg on said stud means.

11. A marker according to claim 1, wherein said marker portion is of hollow frusto-conical construction and formed of a light weight translucent plastic material, said marker portion having an opening through said base end thereof and an opening through a relatively small diameter upper end thereof; and said marker additionally includes means for suspending a battery operated light source within said marker portion, said suspending means including bracket means for supporting said light source and at least two spring leg members fixed to and extending co-directionally from said bracket means for suspending said bracket means within said marker portion, said leg members having hook-shaped free end portions normally spaced one from another a distance in excess of the diameter of said upper end opening, whereby when said hook end portions are moved upwardly through said base end opening said leg members are resiliently deformed towards one another by engagement of said look end portions with inner wall surfaces of said marker portion and when said hook end portions are moved outwardly through said upper end opening said leg members are operable to position said hook end portions in overlying relationship to an upper edge of said marker portion bounding said upper end opening, said leg members being dimensioned such that when said hooked end portions are disposed to rest on said bounding upper edge, said bracket means is suspended within said marker portion above said supporting surface.

l2.'A marker according to claim 11, wherein said marker additionally includes a light reflecting device for removably closing said upper end opening, said device comprising at least one sleeve closed adjacent an upper end thereof and dimensioned to be friction fitted downwardly over said hook end portions and about said upper end of said marker portion, said sleeve being covered throughout substantially the whole of the cylindrical outer surface thereof with a relatively highly reflective material.

13. A marker according to claim 1, wherein said marker portion is of frusto-conical construction; and said marker additionally includes a light reflecting device mounted on an upper end of said marker portion, said light reflecting device including at least two sleeves having the cylindrical outer surfaces thereof covered with relatively highly reflective material and a spacer member having its outer cylindrical surface formed of a relatively non-reflective material, said spacer member being fixed adjacent opposite ends thereof within said sleeves to maintain said sleeves in axially spaced relationship, at least one of said sleeves being dimensioned to be slip-friction fitted downwardly over said upper end of said marker portion.

14. A marker according to claim 1, wherein said marker portion is of hollow frusto-conical construction having an operning through said base end and an opening through an upper end thereof, and said marker additionally includes means for mounting an auxiliary warning device on said upper end of said marker portion, the last said means including a tapered plug formed of a soft elastomeric material and dimensioned to be slip-friction fitted into said upper end opening and a standard for mounting said auxiliary warning device above said plug, said standard being formed of a resiliently deformable plastic material and having a lower end thereof imbedded within said plug.

15. A supporting base for a highway or like marker of the type including a generally cone-shaped marker portion having a ledge portion arranged to extend radially from adjacent a relatively large diameter base end thereof for base supporting said marker portion in engagement with a supporting surface, said supporting base comprising in combination:

metallic supporting ring means dimensioned to be freely fitted downwardly over said marker portion to rest on said ledge portion;

a plurality of supporting surface engaging spring legs;

and

means for affixing an inner end of each of said legs to said ring means to extend radially outwardly in opposite directions therefrom, said legs being flexible relative to said ring means and relative to each other.

16. A supporting base according to claim 15, wherein at least six of said legs are affixed to said ring means and said legs are substantially equally spaced peripherally of said ring means.

17. A supporting base according to claim 15, wherein said legs are formed from coil springs characterized as being readily flexible substantially throughout the length thereof; and

said means for affixing said legs to said ring means includes a plurality of stud means extending radially outwardly from said ring means and fixed one concentrically of said inner end of each of said legs and a plurality of resiliently deformable means arranged one concentrically of said inner end of each of said legs to extend lengthwise thereof inwardly and outwardly beyond a radially outer end of said stud means, each said leg being arranged concentrically intermediate its associated stud means and resilient means.

18. A supporting base according to claim 17, wherein each of said stud means is threadably joined to coils of said inner end of its associated leg and each of said resilient means is a sleeve formed of a plastic material and friction fitted over its associated leg.

19. A supporting base according to claim 15, wherein said legs are characterized as being formed of relatively rigid coil springs made flexible by opening adjacent coils of said springs adjacent said inner ends thereof; and

said means for affixing said legs to said ring means includes a plurality of stud means fixed one to each of said inner ends of said legs, each of said stud means being rotatably supported by said ring means and terminating at a point lengthwise of its associated legs spaced relatively radially inwardly from said point at which said adjacent coils are opened.

20. A supporting base according to claim 19, wherein each said stud means is threadably received within coils adjacent said inner end of its associated leg and extends radially outwardly through a receiving opening in said ring means dimensioned to accommodate for free rotational movement of said stud means therewithin.

21. A safety marker for highways or the like comprising in combination:

a hollow frusto-conically shaped v marker portion formed of a light weight translucent plastic material, said marker portion having an opening through a relatively small diameter upper end and an opening through a relatively large diameter base end thereof, said base end serving to support said marker portion in engagement with a supporting surface and having a ledge portion arranged to extend radially outwardly thereof;

a supporting base portion for stabilizing said marker portion to maintain said base end in engagement with said supporting surface, said base portion having an opening therethrough dimensioned to permit said base portion to be fitted downwardly over said marker to rest on said ledge portion, said base portion extending radially outwardly of said ledge portion; and

means for suspending a battery operated light source within said marker portion, said suspending means including bracket means for supporting said light source and at least two spring metal leg members fixed to and extending co-directionally from said bracket means for suspending said bracket means within said marker portions, said leg members having hook shaped free end portions normally spaced one from another a distance in excess of the diameter of said upper end opening, whereby when said hook end portions are moved upwardly through said base end opening, said leg members are resiliently deformed towards one another by engagement of said hook end portions with inner wall surfaces of said marker portions and when said hook end portions are moved through said upper end opening said leg members are operable to position said hook end portions in overlying relationship to an upper edge of said marker portion bounding said upper end opening, said leg members being dimensioned such that when said hook end portions are disposed to rest on said upper bounding edge, said bracket means is suspended within said marker portion above said supporting surface.

22. A safety marker according to claim 21, wherein a pair of leg members are provided and relatively arranged to position said hook end portions thereof in overlying relationship with diametrically opposite sides of said upper bounding edge thereby to permit swinging movement of said bracket means within said marker portion; and said marker additionally includes a light reflecting device for removably closing said upper end openings, said device comprising at least one sleeve closed adjacent an upper end thereof and dimensioned to be friction fitted downwardly over said hook end portions about said upper end of said marker portion, said sleeve being covered throughout substantially the whole of its outer cylindrical surface with a light reflecting material.

23. A safety marker according to claim 21, wherein said leg members when non-deformed extend from said bracket means in an essentially parallel relationship, and are bent adjacent said hook end portions thereof, whereby said leg members when non-deformed tend to maintain said hook end portions spaced a distance apart in excess of the spacing of said leg portions adjacent said bracket means.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification116/63.00P, 40/612, 116/63.00C, 404/10, 340/908.1, D10/109.1, D10/113.2
International ClassificationE01F9/012
Cooperative ClassificationE01F9/0122
European ClassificationE01F9/012A