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Publication numberUS3732894 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1973
Filing dateJan 11, 1971
Priority dateJan 11, 1971
Also published asCA938950A1
Publication numberUS 3732894 A, US 3732894A, US-A-3732894, US3732894 A, US3732894A
InventorsC Botsolas
Original AssigneeC Botsolas
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pipefitting cover
US 3732894 A
Abstract
A pipefitting cover comprised of two half sections pivotally connected together at a single point so that one half section may be revolved into superimposed, nested relationship within the other half section for storage and shipping, and thereafter revolved out of nested relationship to a position of opposed relationship where the two half sections take the shape of the fitting to be covered. The two half sections preferably are formed from a flexible, resilient material, each having a continuously curved portion overlapping the longitudinal centerline of the cover and also are each provided with integral, continuously extending end wall portions which may be of restricted diameter to accommodate adjacent reduced-size piping and/or to space the cover from the fitting to allow for insulation between the fitting and the cover.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Botsolas [111 3,732,894 [45] May 15, 1973 [54] PIPEFITTING COVER [76] Inventor: Chris J. Botsolas, 56 Woodridge [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,495,629 2/1970 Botsolas ..138/178 X 276,044 4/1883 Holt ..138/178 3,153,546 10/1964 Dunn ..285/183 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1/1968 Switzerland ..138/156 3/1913 Germany ..138/158 204,220 7/1959 Austria ..138/157 6,539 1892 GreatBritain....., 138/158 Primary Examiner-Herbert F. Ross A ttorney- Morgan, Finnegan, Durham & Pine [57] ABSTRACT A pipefitting cover comprised of two half sections pivotally connected together at a single point so that one half section may be revolved into superimposed, nested relationship within the other half section for storage and shipping, and thereafter revolved out of nested relationship to a position of opposed relationship where the two half sections take the shape of the fitting to be covered. The two half sections preferably are formed from a flexible, resilient material, each having a continuously curved portion overlapping the longitudinal centerline of the cover and also are each provided with integral, continuously extending end wall portions which may be of restricted diameter to accommodate adjacent reduced-size piping and/or to space the cover from the fitting to allow for insulation between the fitting and the cover.

13 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures PATENTED 3.732894 SHEET 1 [1F 3 I N VEN TOR (m/s .1 60790445 ATTORNEYS PATENTEUHAYISIQYS $732,894

SHEET 2 BF 3 PATENTEB HAYI 5l973 3 732 894 SHEET 3 BF 3 I N VEN TOR Can/5 150750143 ATTORIVEKF PIPEFITTING COVER BACKGROUND AND OBJECTS OF TH INVENTION The present invention relates generally to pipefitting covers, and relates more particularly to certain new and useful improvements providing such pipefitting covers with integral, continuously extending, end walls while permitting the covers to be stacked in superimposed relationship for storage and shipping and to be rapidly and neatly installed by a single person who need not be a skilled worker.

It is desirable in the insulation industry for a single worker to be able to install and cover pipefittings rapidly and neatly and yet make a permanent installation not subject to failure.

Conventional practices for insulating pipefittings, such as elbows, Ts, valves, flanges, return bends, Y- branches, reducing fittings, strainers, unions, various specialty fittings and the like, have often been essentially manual, time consuming operations and the completed project generally has been unsightly in appearance.

An early insulating practice was to spread several layers of asbestos cement in place over the fitting and then adhere a fabric thereover, followed by additional coatings or paints. Another early method employed aluminum sheet metal or other metallic covers in individual half sections installed over suitable insulation material installed about the fitting. The half sections were each positioned on the fitting, shaped and aligned in an attempt to properly fit the cover to the fitting, and thereafter mechanically fastened together, as by drilling holes and inserting sheet metal screws or rivets. The application of metallic pipefitting covers in half sections in this manner is generally considered to be a two-man job and required numerous supplemental tools and equipment to accomplish the installation. Furthermore, the installed fitting is generally unsightly and the seam between the two half sections tends to catch dirt and is leak-prone, permitting water to penetrate to the insulation in many applications, resulting in failure of the insulation.

A recent improvement in pipefitting covers described in US. Pat. No. 3,495,629 issued Feb. 17, 1970, employs a single, integral structure of flexible, resilient material formed in the shape of the fitting to be covered, having an unsealed seam which can be spread apart to an open position for placing the cover about the insulation-wrapped fitting and which thereafter may spring back into a closed position about the fitting and then sealed in place. While pipefitting covers of this nature are an improvement over the early prior practices, they have shortcomings in that they cannot be stored and shipped in stacked, superimposed relationship and some damage may be caused to the cover in spreading it apart far enough to encompass the fitting about which it is to be installed.

It is also desirable for the pipefitting covers to be provided with integral, continuously extending end wall portions for covering an adjacent portion of the piping connected to the pipefitting, which end wall portions may be of restricted diameter to accommodate reduced-size piping and/or to space the cover from the fitting to allow for insulation between the fitting and the cover.

Thus, for example, where the connecting piping is screwed into the pipefitting, the fitting must be of an increased thickness in order to accommodate the threaded opening. Hence, upon application of a standard thickness of insulation to the adjoining piping, its outside diameter approximates that of the bare pipefitting and it is necessary to space the pipefitting cover from the fitting to allow room for the application of a layer of insulation to the pipefitting.

Heretofore, pipefitting covers have not been made to allow for a thickness of insulation between the fitting and the cover, and it has been necessary to build insulation collars on each end of the fitting to which the ends of the cover are secured in order to provide space for insulation about the fitting. The insulation collars generally have been either built up with insulating cement and the ends coated with mastics, canvas, fiberglass, or asbestos cloths, or have been formed from a molded insulation fitting and then the entire surface coated with mastics, canvas, fiberglass or asbestos cloth. These practices have been unsightly, costly and laborious.

Another marked improvement in pipefitting covers for elbow joints is also described in US. Pat. No. 3,495,629, wherein a single, integral structure is formed from a flexible resilient material in a first elongated, open-ended trough-like shape which may be folded into the shape of the elbow joint at the time of installation. While pipefitting covers formed in this manner provide an extremely neat, fast and reliable finished product and may be stored and shipped in stacked, superimposed relationship, they cannot be formed with integral continuously extending end walls nor with continuously extending end walls which are of restricted diameter.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved pipefitting cover.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved pipefitting cover which overcomes the disadvantages and shortcomings of the prior art insulating practices and pipefitting cover constructions.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved pipefitting cover which can be easily and accurately adjusted from a first compact position for storage and shipping to a second position for installation in the shape of the fitting to be covered.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved pipefitting cover which is formed from two overlapping half sections pivotally connected together at a single point so as to be easily and accurately adjustable from a first compact position for storage and shipping to a second position for installation in the shape of the fitting to be covered.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved pipefitting cover which upon installation is sufficiently spaced from the fitting to provide space for insulation between the fitting and the inmay be learned by practice of the invention, the same being realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities, steps, processes, and combinations pointed out in the appended claims.

The invention consists in the novel parts, constructions, arrangements, steps, combinations and improvements herein shown and described.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly described, the pipefitting cover of the present invention is comprised of two half sections pivotally connected together at a single point so that one half section may be revolved into superimposed, nested relationship within the other half section for storage and shipping, and thereafter revolved out of nested relationship to a position of opposed relationship where the two half sections take the shape of the fitting to be covered. Upon revolving the half sections into an opposed position, the pipefitting cover is installed in position about a pipefitting by spreading the sections apart along the seam opposite the pivot point. Upon installation, the inner and outer seams are suitably sealed.

In the preferred embodiment, the two half sections each have a continuously curved portion overlapping the longitudinal centerline of the cover and also are each provided with integral, continuously extending end wall portions. The continuously extending end wall portions may advantageously be of restricted diameter to accommodate adjacent reduced-size piping and/or to space the cover from the fitting to allow for insulation between the fitting and the cover.

The pipefitting cover also is preferably made of a thin-walled material, which may be metallic or plastic, having sufficient flexibility to permit the structure to be spread apart for easy positioning about the pipefitting. Alternatively, the pivotal connection may advantageously be sufficiently elastic to permit the pipefitting cover to be made from a substantially rigid metal or plastic, and yet be sufficiently spread apart for installation.

It will be apparent from the foregoing general description that the objects of the invention specifically enumerated herein are accomplished by the invention as here embodied.

Thus, by providing a pipefitting cover in two pivotally joined half sections, the half sections may be revolved into a space-saving nested relationship for storage and shipping. Thereafter, the cover may be easily and rapidly installed by revolving the half sections into opposed relationship to form the pipefitting cover, spreading the cover apart at the unconnected seam and placing it about the pipefitting, and then suitably sealing the inner and outer seams.

It has been found that the provision ofa single pivotal connection permits the two half sections of the pipefitting cover to be spread apart with increased flexibility for installation without distorting or otherwise damaging the cover and yet permits the cover to be easily and quickly manipulated by a single worker into accurate alignment about the fitting being covered.

Where the overlapping portions of the two half sections are continuously curved beyond the longitudinal centerline of the pipefitting cover, the overlap is closefitting, provides mutually reinforcing support to the cover, and may be easily and effectively sealed by any suitable conventional sealing means.

In addition, while maintaining the space-saving feature, vital for efficient storage and shipping, by forming a pipefitting cover from two pivotally connected half sections, the cover may be fabricated with integral, continuously extending end wall portions for covering adjacent piping connected to the pipefitting. The end wall portions may be of varying restricted diameters to accommodate reduced-size piping and/or to space the cover from the fitting to allow for insulation between the fitting and the cover.

It will be understood that the end wall portions may be suitably restricted in diameter to provide continuous coverage of the pipefitting between the fitting and the adjoining connecting pipes, while allowing the pipefitting to be adequately insulated beneath the fitting cover, such as, for example, in the case of, threaded pipefittings. In the case of a covering for a reducing fitting, the extended restricted end walls form necks about the smaller size adjoining pipes, the edges of which may then be simply sealed in the same suitable manner as the pipefitting cover seams are sealed, completely eliminating the disadvantageous prior practices involved in building insulation collars and sealing the ends of the collars.

The provisions of continuously extending end wall portions in a pipefitting cover is particularly advantageous where pre-insulated connecting piping is used, where a length. of bare pipe (necessary for soldering, welding, etc.) extends between the pipefitting and the piping pre-insulation. Thus, the end wall portions of the pipefitting cover of the present invention may be of a length and diameter to extend continuously to, and fit snugly about, the pre-insulated portion of the piping and simply taped or glued into place and the seams suitably sealed. It will be understood that the bare piping may be insulated by wrapping, cementing or with premolded urethane foam prior to installation of the cover or, alternatively, that the cover may first be installed over the bare piping and the annular space about the bare piping then filled with liquid urethane foam.

A further advantage of the pivotal connection in a pipefitting cover is that the cover may be constructed from either a plastic or metal material and, where the pivotal connecting means is elastic, the plastic or metal material of the pipefitting cover may be substantially rigid and yet be sufficiently spread apart for installation.

It will be understood that the foregoing general description and the following detailed description as well are exemplary and explanatory of the invention but are not restrictive thereof.

The accompanying drawings, referred to herein and constituting a part hereof, illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention, and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a pipefitting cover for an elbow joint constructed in accordance with the present invention, illustrated in a closed position for installation, the figure further having intersecting planes passing through the transverse and longitudinal centerline ofthe pipefitting cover superimposed thereon to show the preferred location of the pivotal connection between the cover half sections;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the pipefitting cover of FIG. 1, illustrated in an open position for storage and shipping, wherein one half section of the cover has been revolved into superimposed, nested relationship within the other half section of the cover;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are perspective views of thepipefitting cover of FIG. 1, illustrating one half section of the cover being revolved out of its nested relationship with the other half section and towards an opposed relationship thereto for subsequent installation;

FIG. 5 is another view of the pipefitting cover of FIG. 1, taken from a different perspective, with the two half sections in the closed position, fully opposed to each other, ready for installation;

FIG. 5a is an enlarged, partial sectional view taken along line 5a5a of FIG. 5, illustrating a preferred embodiment of the pivotal connection between the cover half sections and the continuous curvature overlap beyond the longitudinal centerline of the cover;

FIG. 5b is an enlarged, partial sectional view similar to FIG. 5a, illustrating an alternate embodiment of the pivotal connection between the cover half sections;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the pipefitting cover of FIG. 1 in closed position installed about an elbow joint pipefitting;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 77 of FIG. 6, illustrating the piping, insulation and pipefitting cover and specifically illustrating the continuous curvature overlap on both the inside and outside seam of the pipefitting cover;

FIG. 7a is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a pipefitting cover constructed in accordance with the invention wherein two half sections are pivotally connected together along the inner radius or short seam of the pipefitting cover;

FIG. 7b is a side elevational view of a further alternative embodiment of a pipefitting cover constructed in accordance with the invention and installed about an elbow joint pipefitting, wherein the one end thereof has two reduced diameter portions of different size;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a pipefitting cover for a T-fitting constructed in accordance with the present invention, illustrated in a closed position for installatron;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the pipefitting cover of FIG. 8, illustrated in an open position for storage and shipping, wherein one half section of the cover has been revolved into superimposed, nested relationship with the other half section of the cover;

FIGS. 10 and 11 are perspective views of the pipefitting cover of FIG. 8, illustrating one half section of the cover being revolved out of its nested relationship with the other half section and towards an opposed relationship thereto for subsequent installation;

FIG. 12 is another view of the pipefitting cover of FIG. 8, taken from a different perspective, with the two half sections in the closed position, fully opposed to each other, ready for installation, the figure further having intersecting planes passing'through the transverse and longitudinal centerlines of the pipefitting cover superimposed thereon to show the preferred location of the pivotal connection between the cover half sections; and

FIG. 13 is a side elevational view of the pipefitting cover of FIG. 8 in closed position installed about a T- fitting.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS For the purposes of this specification, unless otherwise specified, the term pipefitting" shall be intended to refer to a fitting in general, whether or not specifically a part of a pipe, per se, both insulated and noninsulated, including, but not limited to, elbows, Ts, valves, flanges, return bends, Y branches, reducing fittings, strainers, unions, as well as various specialty fittings. Also, unless otherwise specified, the term piping is intended to refer to both insulated and noninsulated piping.

Referring now more particularly to the embodiment of the pipefitting cover of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 17 of the accompanying drawings, there is illustrated a pipefitting cover, indicated generally by reference numeral 10, in the general shape of an elbow (FIGS. 1 and 6), for covering a elbow joint pipefitting.

Pipefitting cover 10 is preferably comprised of two substantially identical half sections 12,14.

In accordance with the invention, means are provided for pivotally connecting together the individual half sections 12,14 to allow pivotal movement of these sections with respect to each other between a position of superimposed, nested relationship for storage and shipping and a position of opposed relationship, where the two half sections take the shape of the fitting to be covered.

To this end, as here preferably embodied, a rivet device 16 pivotally connects half sections 12,14 together at a point located on the outer, longer seam 18 at the intersection C of a pair of perpendicular planes A and B passing through the longitudinal and transverse centerlines, respectively, of the pipefitting cover in its closed position, shown in FIG. 1. Thus, half sections 12,14 may be nested one within the other, as shown in FIG. 2, or revolved about pivot 16 until they are opposed to one another, shown in FIGS. 3-5, where they take the shape of the fitting to be covered.

As shown in FIG. 5a, rivet device 16 may suitably be formed from a rigid metal material when cover 10 is formed from a flexible material, more fully described herein below. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 5b at 16a, the rivet device may advantageously be formed from an elastic material, such as rubber, thereby permitting the pipefitting cover to be made from a substantially rigid metal (shown in FIG. 5b) or plastic material and yet be revolvable between the aforedescribed positions for storage and use.

It will be understood that, while in the embodiment of the pipefitting cover of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1-7, rivet 16 is positioned along the outer, longer seam 18 of pipefitting cover 10, rivets 16 or 16a could instead be positioned along the smaller seam 18a of cover 10 at the intersection of a pair of perpendicular planes passing through the longitudinal and transverse centerlines of the cover with equally satisfactory results, as shown at 17 on FIG. 7a. It will also be understood that other fastening devices equivalent to rivets l6 and 16a, whether separate or formed integrally with the cover, permitting pivotal movement of sections 12,14, may also be employed with equally satisfactory results.

As here preferably embodied, pipefitting cover 10 is constructed from a material having sufficient flexibility and resiliency to allow limited bending under stress and yet maintain the pre-formed shape of each half section when no stress is applied. Advantageously, this material is a vinyl resin, such as polyvinyl chloride, although it will be understood that other equivalent plastic or metal materials may be employed equally satisfactorily.

In accordance with the invention and as preferably embodied, as best seen in FIGS. a, 5b and 7, outer edges 20,22 and inner edges 24,26 of sections 12,1 4, respectively, overlap at the outer and inner seams 18,18a in a continuing curve past the longitudinal centerline of the pipefitting cover, providing a smooth, tight overlap. The smooth, close-fitting overlap is advantageous as it provides mutually reinforcing support to the cover and may be easily and effectively sealed by any suitable conventional sealing means, such as, for example, sealing tape 36, shown in FIGS. 6-7. Other suitable sealing means include adhesives, bands and annularly serrated thumb tacks, and still other suitable sealing means will be apparent to those in the insulating art.

Also in accordance with the invention as preferably embodied, sections 12,14 are provided at each end thereof with integral, continuously extending end wall portions 28. While end wall portions 28 may be of equal diameter to that of the pipefitting, they can also be of restricted diameter, forming necks 30 when sections 12,14 are positioned to form pipefitting cover 10, as in FIGS. 1 and 5.

As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, necks 30 of cover are adapted to fit closely around the piping 32 adjacent to the fitting to be covered, thereby spacing the cover 10 from the pipefitting to allow room for insulation 34 while providing continuous coverage of the pipefitting and the adjacent pipes. Alternatively, where there exists a pronounced step between the pipefitting and the adjacent connecting piping, as in the case of reducing fittings, the pipefitting cover of the present invention similarly may be used to provide continuous coverage of the pipefitting and adjacent piping.

It will be understood that each end wall portion 28 of pipefitting cover 10 may be continuously extended through more than one restricted diameter and that one end may, have one or more restrictive portions of different diameters than the restrictive portions of the other end.

This is illustrated in FIG. 7b where piping 32a has two differently-sized diameters adjacent the fitting to be covered and cover 10 includes correspondingly restricted diameter portions 30 and 30a.

It will be seen that, as the edges of end wall portions 28 fit closely about the connecting piping 32, they may be easily and effectively sealed in the same manner as previously described for seams 18,18a, as, for example, by sealing tape 36.

Referring now more particularly to the embodiment of the pipefitting cover of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 8-13 of the accompanying drawings, there is illustrated a pipefitting cover, indicated generally by reference numeral 38, in the general shape of a T-fitting (FIGS. 8 and 12), for covering a similarly shaped T- fitting joint.

As in the case of the elbow joint pipefitting cover ilconnected together by suitable pivot means, as by rivet device 44.

Rivet 44 preferably connectshalf sections 40,42 together on the outer, straight seam 45 at a point where a plane A passing through the longitudinal centerline of the cover intersects a plane B normal thereto passing through the transverse centerline of the cover, the line of intersection being indicated by the reference letter C. Thus, half sections 40,42 may be nested one within the other, as shown in FIG. 9, or revolved about pivot 44 until they are in opposed relationship to one another, shown in FIGS. 10-12, where they take the shape of the fitting to be covered.

Also similarly to the previous embodiment, as preferably embodied, half sections 40,42 are provided with continuous curvature overlap portions at all seams, as is best shown on seam 45 in FIGS. 8 and 12.

As previously mentioned in connection with pipefitting cover 10, it will be seen that the end wall portions of pipefitting cover 38 are adapted to accommodate different sized connecting pipes, as is best seen in FIG. 13. Thus, in FIG. 13, pipe 46 is larger than pipes 48 and 50. These differently sized pipes are accommodated by cover 38, whose continuously extending opposed end wall portions 52 are of restricted diameter to form necks 54 which fit closely about each of pipes 48 and 50, while the third continuously extending end wall 56 is not of a restricted diameter and forms neck 58 which fits closely about the larger pipe 46.

It will be understood that pipefitting cover 38 in its various and alternative embodiments may otherwise be constructed of the same materials as that described for pipefitting cover 10.

The invention in its broader aspects is not limited to the specific embodiment herein shown and described but departures maY be made therefrom within the scope of the accompanying claims, without departing from the principles of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages What is claimed is:

1. A pipefitting cover comprising:

two substantially identical half sections;

means pivotally connecting said half sections together at a single point so that one of said half sections may be revolved about the pivot point into superimposed, nested relationship within the other half section or into opposed relationship with the other section;

said half sections forming the shape of the fitting to be covered when in the position of opposed relationship;

each of said half sections including edge portions which overlap a plane passing through the longitudinal centerline of the pipefitting cover when said half sections are in said position of opposed relationship; and

said means pivotally connecting said half sections together being located along said overlapping edge portions and extending on the line of intersection of a pair of perpendicular planes passing through the longitudinal and transverse centerlines of said pipefitting cover when said half sections are in said position of opposed relationship.

2. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 1, wherein said half sections include integral, continuously extending end wall portions extending from at least one common end, said end wall portions adapted to closely surround at least a portion of the piping connected to the pipefitting to be covered by said pipefitting cover,

whereby said pipefitting cover provides continuous coverage of the pipefitting and at least a portion of the piping connected thereto.

3. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 1, wherein said half sections include integral, continuously extending end wall portions at both ends thereof, at least a portion of said end walls at at least one common end of said half sections having a reduced diameter.

4. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 1, wherein said half sections are formed from a flexible, resilient material; and

each of said half sections includes continuous curvature edge portions adapted to overlap the longitudinal centerline of the pipefitting cover when said half sections are in said position of opposed relationship.

5. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 1, wherein said half sections are formed from a substantially nonflexible, non-resilient material and said means for pivotally connecting said half sections together comprises an elastic pin member.

6. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 1, wherein said half sections form an elbow joint upon being revolved into opposed relationship to one another; and wherein said half sections are pivotally connected together on the long seam of the pipefitting cover at a point located at the intersection of a pair of perpendicular planes passing through the longitudinal and transverse centerlines of the pipefitting cover.

7. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 1, wherein said half sections form an elbow joint upon being revolved into opposed relationship to one another; and

wherein said half sections are pivotally connected together on the short seam of the pipefitting cover at a point located at the intersection of a pair of perpendicular planes passing through the longitudinal and transverse centerlines of the pipefitting cover.

8. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 1, wherein said half sections form a T-joint when revolved into said position of opposed relationship to one another; and wherein said half sections are pivotally connected together on the outer, straight seam of the pipefitting cover at a point where a plane passing through the longitu' dinal centerline of the cover intersects a normal plane thereto passing through the transverse centerline of the cover.

9. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 2, wherein at least a portion of said integral, continuously extending end wall portions at said at least one common end of said pipefitting cover are of a reduced diameter.

10. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 2, wherein said integral continuously extending end wall portions are configured to continuously reduce in diameter as they extend from the pipefitting cover to the piping.

11. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 4, wherein said means pivotally connecting said half sections together comprises a rivet member.

12. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 11, wherein said rivet member is formed from an elastic material.

13. A pipefitting cover as claimed in claim 2, wherein said integral continuously extending end wall portions include. a plurality of reduced diameters of varying sizes.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3960180 *Jan 14, 1974Jun 1, 1976Aktiebolaget M. Anderssons IsoleringProtection cover for pipe bends
US4054985 *Jun 3, 1976Oct 25, 1977Isolerings Aktiebolaget IsentaMethod for the application of a protection cover around heat or cool insulated tube bends
US4553308 *Sep 26, 1983Nov 19, 1985Carol BostolasPipe fitting cover and method for covering pipe fittings
US4830060 *Nov 20, 1987May 16, 1989Proto Corp.Specialized pipefitting cover for insulated Y-shaped joint
US4840201 *Apr 22, 1988Jun 20, 1989Carol M. BotsolasTwo piece pipe fitting cover
US4869293 *Apr 22, 1988Sep 26, 1989Botsolas Chris JEnd cap
US4915153 *Jul 6, 1987Apr 10, 1990Toti Andrew JVertical window covering systems
US4981630 *Apr 5, 1989Jan 1, 1991Carol BotsolasPoly(vinyl chloride) pipe insulation fittings
US5024249 *May 17, 1989Jun 18, 1991Carol BotsolasSpecialized one-piece pipefitting cover for insulated strainer and lateral 45 degree -Y
US5158114 *Apr 22, 1988Oct 27, 1992Carol M. BotsolasSpecialized pipefitting cover for insulated Y-shaped joint
US5363517 *Jan 13, 1994Nov 15, 1994Carol M. BotsolasProtective covers for P-shaped traps and for water supply valves
US5379804 *Nov 5, 1992Jan 10, 1995Dunn; Victor S.Pipe fitting cover
US5921283 *Sep 30, 1996Jul 13, 1999Alvern-Norway A/SProtective cover for a fuel pump filler gun and method for protecting same
US6000420 *Jul 16, 1998Dec 14, 1999Horizon Resources CorporationInsulating jacket for hot and cold piping systems and method of use
US6283158Jun 28, 2000Sep 4, 2001Proto Corp.Insulation coverage system and method for inhibiting biological contamination
US6582655Jul 5, 2001Jun 24, 2003Jeff RebholzInsulation coverage system and method for inhibiting biological contamination
US7758795 *Dec 17, 2002Jul 20, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyMethod of making a polluction control device and a self-supporting insulating end cone
US7896943Feb 7, 2008Mar 1, 2011Bgf Industries, Inc.Frustum-shaped insulation for a pollution control device
US7913718Jan 6, 2009Mar 29, 2011Cornwall Kenneth RNoise reduction system
US8182751Jun 10, 2010May 22, 20123M Innovative Properties CompanySelf-supporting insulating end cone liner and pollution control device
US8632727May 18, 2012Jan 21, 20143M Innovative Properties CompanySelf-supporting insulating end cone liner and pollution control device
US8741200Dec 13, 2013Jun 3, 20143M Innovative Properties CompanyMethod of making self-supporting insulating end cone liners and pollution control devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification138/178, 138/110, 285/183, 220/3.92, 138/160
International ClassificationF16L59/11
Cooperative ClassificationF16L59/11
European ClassificationF16L59/11