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Publication numberUS3733008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1973
Filing dateMay 17, 1971
Priority dateMay 17, 1971
Publication numberUS 3733008 A, US 3733008A, US-A-3733008, US3733008 A, US3733008A
InventorsChurchill J, Mcbride W, Thompson T
Original AssigneeLife Support
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carrying case for oxygen generators
US 3733008 A
Abstract
Lightweight, compact, attractive, reliable and convenient to use carrying cases for replaceable oxygen generating cells or candles having mechanism for activating or igniting the cells or candles for delivering oxygen through a carrying strap to a canula or breathing mask. The carrying cases of this invention are suspended from a strap also serving as an oxygen conduit and are worn in the manner of a binoculars case to supply instant oxygen when needed by the wearer. These carrying cases with their replaceable oxygen generators or candles release heart and emphysema patients from heretofore required confinement to the vicinity of large heavy oxygen bottles.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

54] I CARRYING CASE FOR OXYGEN GENERATORS [75] lnventors: John P. Churchill, lndiatlantic;

Tommy Lewis Thompson, .Mel-

bourne; William S. McBride, Melbourne Beach, all of Fla.

[73] Assignee: Life Support, lnc., Melbourne, Fla.

[22] Filed: May 17, 197] 21 Appl. No.2 143, 51

s2 u.s. Cl ..zz z/s, 128/203 [51] Int. Cl...... ..A6lm 15/00 [58] Field of Search ..222/6, 129, 5, 175, 222/88, 128/203, 142.2, 142.3; 62/371,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES-PATENTS 2,644,430 7/1953 Lang .Q. ..222/88 X May 15, 1973 3,245,586 4/1966 Haggit i ..222/88 1,364,889 1/1921 Rupp ..222/88 3,194,436 7/1965 Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves fli itt m E2minr...Th9rw Kszsqvs y A mirney- Hill, Sherman, Meroni, Gross and Simpson 571 ABSTRACT Lightweight, compact, attractive, reliable and convenient to use carrying cases for replaceable oxygen generating cells or candles having mechanism for activating or igniting the cells or candles for delivering oxygen through a carrying strap to a canula or breathing mask. The carrying cases of this invention are suspended from a strap also serving as an oxygen conduit and are worn in the manner of a binoculars case to supply instant oxygen when needed by the wearer. These carrying cases with their replaceable oxygen generators or candles release heart and emphysema patients from heretofore required con finement to the vicinity of large heavy oxygen bottles.

18 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures Jaynes ....222/5 CARRYING CASE FOR OXYGEN GENERATORS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention deals with carrying cases adapted to be worn in the manner of a purse or binoculars case detachably mounting a plurality of oxygen generator cells or candles and having mechanism for triggering the ac tivation or ignitions of the cells or candles to supply oxygen as needed for breathing by the wearer. Specifically, the invention relates to lightweight, compact, easy to use, heat dissipating carriers for oxygen generating candles having push-button actuated igniters for the candles and an oxygen delivery manifold delivering Oxygen through the carrying strap to a canula or oxygen mask and having sealing seats for the candles insuring delivery of all of the oxygen from the candles to the manifold. The carrying cases with their replaceable oxygen generator cells of this invention are also useful for emergency oxygen supply sources in rescue work and in mountain climbing, high altitude aircraft usage, mining, and submarine usage.

2. Description of the Prior Art Oxygen generator apparatus for breathing purposes is known, for example, in the prior art I-Iausmann US. Pat. NO. 2,121,347 dated June 21, 1938 and the C. E. Jackson et al. US. Pat. No. 2,558,756 dated July 3, 1951. These prior generators, however, were cumbersome, had only a single cell or candle and were unsuited for carrying as a personal accessory by a person who might require oxygen at unpredictable times.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to this invention, there is now provided carrying cases adapted to be worn as a personal accessory in the manner of a purse or binoculars case by a person who might be in need of oxygen to sustain life. The cases of this invention detachably mount a plurality of cells which are more easily replaced than flashlight batteries and have mechanism for selectively triggering or igniting each cell whenever oxygen is needed. The preferred cells are in the form of relatively small tin cans, each carrying a chlorate type oxygen generating candle and having its own candle igniting mechanism triggered by push-button controls on the carrying case. Each tin can cell has an oxygen delivery orifice registering with and sealingly surrounded by a flexible lip-type seal serving as the entrance mouth to a manifold delivery system supplying all of the oxygen without leakage to the carrying strap Of the case from which it is delivered tO a mask or canula fitting the nose of the wearer. The carrying cases are vented through the top and bottom to create a chimney around the cells for dissipating heat generated by the ignition and burning Of the candles. The cases of this invention are preferably made of lightweight heat dissipating materials such as aluminum, magnesium or the like.

The preferred carrying cases of this invention have top lids which when opened expose open topped supports into which the can-like cells are easily dropped. When the lid is closed, the cells are resiliently clamped in fixed position so that their outlet orifices can only deliver to the outlet manifold system and so that their candle igniting mechanism will be positioned for actuation from the case carried push-button actuators.

In one embodiment of the invention, the carrying case has an electrical firing arrangement for selectively igniting the oxygen generating cells. This arrangement ing through push-button like switches to a bridge wire in each cell which will ignite a pyrotechnic mixture to ignite the candle and initiate the decomposition of the chlorate to liberate the oxygen. A separate switch is provided for each cell. Three cells are preferably mounted in the case, each capable of delivering about a ten-minute supply of substantially pure oxygen for breathing.

In another embodiment of the invention the cells are activated by injection of a chemical and the carrying case has push-buttons for effecting the chemical injection.

While it is preferred to mount three cells in a carrying case, it will be readily appreciated that any number of cells may be accommodated without departing from this invention.

It is then an object of this invention to provide carrying cases for replaceable oxygen generator cells having mechanism for activating the cells and a carrying strap for conveying oxygen from the cells to a canula or oxygen mask.

Another object of the invention is to provide an easily worn personal accessory carrying case for oxygen generator cells with mechanism for selectively triggering the cells and with a manifold delivery system insuring delivery of all of the oxygen from the cells to the desired point ofdelivery.

Another object of this invention is to provide a lightweight, attractive, compact, heat dissipating carrying case for replaceable oxygen generator cells.

A further object of the invention is to provide a carrying case detachably mounting a plurality of small oxygen generating canisters, each with its own oxygen delivery outlet registering with a manifold system of the case and each with its own firing mechanism registering with an activator on the case.

A further object of this invention is to provide a lightweight, personal accessory carrying case for Oxygen generator cells acting as a chimney to dissipate heat generated by the cells.

A further object of the invention is to provide a strap suspended carrying case for oxygen generator cells which delivers oxygen through the strap.

A specific object of the invention is to provide a carrying case for a plurality of oxygen generator cells having an electrical system for activating the cells.

Another specific object of the invention is to provide a carrying case for detachably mounting a plurality of oxygen generating cells and having push-buttons for triggering the activation of the cells.

A still further specific object of the invention is to provide a carrying case for a plurality of oxygen generator cells having an easily opened and closed top lid and open topped receptacles into which the cells can be dropped when the lid is opened, together with mechanism on the lid for activating the: cells.

Other and further objects of this invention will become apparent to those skilled in this art from the following detailed description of the annexed sheets of drawings which, by way of preferred examples, illustrate two embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of one form of carrying case according to this invention in its closed position;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 but showing the opened position of the carrying case;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the carrying case of FIG.

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of the carrying case of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a fragmental top perspective view with the button covering lid in open position to show the pushbutton actuators of the case of FIGS. 1 to 4;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the cell holders in the case of FIGS. 1 to 5 and showing the manifold oxygen delivery assembly to the carry strap;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view along the line VII- VII of FIG. 1 with an oxygen generator cell in position;

FIG. 8 is a wiring diagram of the electrical system of the carrying case of FIGS. 1 to 5;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of another form of carrying case according to this invention in closed position;

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 9 but showing the carrying case in opened position; and

FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view along the line XIXI of FIG. 9.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS with The carrying case 10 of FIGS. 1 to 5 is composed of a kidney-shaped open topped upright housing 11 with a hinged top cover or lid 12 and a perforate bottom 13 from which depends a plurality of legs 14. The housing 11 has a generally cylindrical upright front wall 15 of relatively large radius which cylindrical rear end walls 16, 16 of smaller radius merged into the ends of the front wall 15 and also joined by a central bridge wall 17 of outwardly bowed cylindrical configuration as best shown in FIGS. 2 and 5. The front and rear walls cooperate to define three communicating open topped generally cylindrical wells 18, 19 and 20.

The lid or cover 12 is also kidney-shaped to fit the open top of the housing 11 and has a flat perforated top wall 21 from which depends a flange 21a for overlying the top marginal end of the housing 11. A pair of hinges 22 connect the lid 12 with the tops of the cylindrical walls l6, 16.

A rear wall 23 overlies the central rear wall portion 17 and extends from the bottom 13 into spaced relation from the top of the housing to provide a narrow compartment 24 having a top wall 25 supporting three push-button switches 26 as shown in FIG. 5. A cover or lid 27 hinged to the rear wall 23 by means of hinges 28 covers and uncovers the top wall 25 and switches 26.

The cover 12 has three circular disk stacks 29 mounted thereon, and each disk stack is composed of three circular plastic plates 30, 31 and 32.

As shown in FIG. 7, the bottom plate 30 of the disk stack 29 is relatively thin and underlies a thicker plate 31 which is under the top wall 21 of the cover. The top plate 32 overlies the top wall of the cover 21. The plate 30 is connected to the plate 31 by snap-in headed buttons 33 extending from the top face of the plate 30 and seated in mating recesses 34 in the bottom face of the plate 31. In turn, the plate 31 has a headed button tab 35 extending through a hole 36 in the cover wall 21 and snapped in a button conforming recess 37 in the top plate 32 which rests on top of the wall 21. In this manner, a top plate 29 overlies the wall 21 while a bottom plate 31 underlies this wall and clamps the stack 29 to the cover while also carrying the thinner plate 30. The plate 30 is preferably composed of Teflon, while the plates 31 and 32 are somewhat thicker and are composed of polycarbonate plastic insulators.

A copper contact disk 38 is secured on the bottom face of the Teflon" plate 30 at the center thereof and has a lead wire 39 connected thereto and extending between the plates 30 and 31 to be connected into the circuit shown in FIG. 8 as will be more fully hereinafter described.

As best shown in FIG. 3, the top wall 21 of the cover 12 is slotted around each disk stack 29 as at 40 to provide vents for the top of each well 18, 19 and 20 when the cover is closed.

As shown in FIG. 4, the bottom 13 of the housing has similar slots or ports 41 aligned with the ports 40 to provide chimney-like ventilation through each well 18, 19 and 20.

The cover 12 is held in closed position on the housing 11 by any suitable spring latch and keeper assembly 42 including, for example, a latch 43 on the flange 21a of the cover 12 and a catch on the front wall 15 of the housing 1 1.

A manifold assembly 45 shown in FIG. 6 is mounted on the bottom wall 13 of the housing 11 and includes three cylindrical base members 46, each resting on the bottom 13 surrounded by the ports or slots 41. Each base member 46, as shown in FIG. 7, has a circular recess 47 in the top face thereof snugly receiving a silicone rubber tube 48 with an outwardly flared mouth 49 converging to a central passage 50 that mates with an upstanding bore 51 in the base member 46. The bore 51 has a valve seat 52 receiving a spring pressed ball check valve 53 thereagainst controlling flow to lateral passages 54.

The passages 54 of the base members 46 are connected by tubing 55 and a passage 54 in one end base member 46 is connected to a discharge tube 56 as shown in FIG. 6. It will be understood that the passage 54 in the base member 46 at the righthand end of FIG. 6 is joined through the tube 55 with the center base member 46 which in turn has a through passage 54 connected to the other tube 55. The base member 46 at the lefthand end of the assembly has its passage 54 communicating not only with the tube 55 but also with the tube 56. The tube 56 spans the length of the housing 11 and follows the contour of the front wall 15 thereof adjacent the bottom wall 13. The tube 56 is in heat transfer relation with the casing walls 13 and 15 and serves as a heat dissipating coolant tube for the oxygen, as will be hereinafter described.

Each base member 46 has four wire guides 57 with horizontal base portions 57a radiating from the side walls thereof in spaced relation and with upstanding elongated legs 57b extending in each well 18, 19 and 20 into closely spaced relation adjacent the open top of the housing 11. The upper ends of the wires are hooked outwardly and downwardly as at 57c. The wire portions 57b are so spaced as to form a cage tightly engaging the side walls of an oxygen generator canister or cell 58 as best shown in FIG. 7. The canisters 58 contain oxygen generating sodium chlorate candles and are easily pressed into the open top ends of the cages formed by the wire guides 57 to rest on the bevelled mouths 49 of the rubber tubes 48.

The case is conveniently carried by a shoulder strap 60 secured to the ends of the housing 11. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 6, the strap 60 preferably has one end portion 61 composed of molded plastic with a plurality of impervious cylindrical passages 62 therethrough in side-by-side relation. A manifold fitting 63 is secured over the open end of the tube 56 and has a slotted leg 64 piercing the strap portion 61 with a slot 65 registering with the passages 62. The leg 64 may be cemented in sealed relation with the strap so that all of the oxygen flow from the tube 56 will enter the passages 62.

At a convenient level in the strap, an outlet manifold fitting 66 has a slotted leg 67 piercing the strap with the slot 68 thereof registering with all of the passages 62. The fitting 66 has a nipple end 69 over which the plastic feed tube 70 of an oxygen mask or canula may be easily fitted as shown in FIG. 1. The fitting 66 may be transparent and, as shown in FIG. 6, a flow indicator ball 71 is mounted therein to show when oxygen is passing into the inlet tube 70 of a canula 72.

The canula 72 or oxygen mask may be conveniently stored in a small pouch or casing 73 snapped on the strap 60 as shown in FIG. 1. 7

in place of the molded strap portion 61, the strap 60 may have the feed tube 70 extending therethrough from the tube 56 to a convenient level for supplying the mask or canula.

The case 10 of this invention is wired to have a circuit 75, shown in FIG. 8, with a flashlight type battery 76 mounted in the compartment 24. The three switches 26 are connected in this circuit 75 to selectively energize the lead wires 39 to the contact spots 38 of each disk assembly 29. A resistance coil 77 is provided in the circuit with a capacitor 78. Each canister 58 has a contact point 78 engaging the contact 38 and connected through a bridge wire 79 with a pyrotechnic igniting cone 80 in the canister.

In operation, the oxygen generating canisters 58 are dropped into the cages in the wells l8, l9 and of the casing 11 to be held by the guide wires 57 so that orifices 81 in the bottoms of the canisters will register with the passage 50 through the rubber tube 49. When the lid or cover 12 is closed, the Teflon" plates 30 will seat in the recessed tops of the canisters 58 and each contact 38 will engage a canister contact 78. Then when a switch 26 is closed to energize a particular contact point 38, current will flow through the bridge wire, heating the same sufficiently to ignite the pyrotechnic starting cone for the sodium chlorate oxygen candle in the canister 58. This will cause the chlorate to decompose, liberating oxygen through the orifice 81 in the bottom of the canister. The oxygen discharged through the orifice will flow through the manifold tubing into the strap to be discharged as needed through the canula or oxygen mask. The candle in the canister will burn at a desired flow rate to produce oxygen at slightly above ambient pressure for depressing the check valve 53. When the oxygen supply from one canister is exhausted, another canister can be ignited to continue the oxygen flow. The ball check 53 and each base 46 will permit replacement of a spent canister without loss of oxygen from a generating canister.

The wire guides 57 hold the canisters in the central portions of each well l8, l9 and 20 so that each canister has an open air gap therearound vented both at the bottom and top to provide a chimney for free flow of hot air upwardly from the ports in the bottom through the ports in the lid. The legs 14 hold the bottom 13 above a supporting base for free like circulation through the case. The covers 32 of the disk stacks 29 serve as insulators above the hottest portions of the lid.

The rubber tubes 48 with their bevelled mouths 49 serve not only as resilient supports for the canisters 58 to sealingly engage the bottoms of the same surrounding the orifices 81, but the lips of the tapered mouths of these tubes can deflect in the event of sudden increases in pressure to serve as relief valves.

From the above description it will be understood that the carrying case 10 conveniently receives three replaceable oxygen generator cells and has its own circuitry for selectively igniting these cells together with a manifold distribution assembly discharging the oxygen through a shoulder carrying strap to the breathing apparatus as needed. The canisters are easily dropped into and removed from the case.

In the second embodiment of this invention shown in F165. 9 to 11, the carrying case has a rectangular lightweight metal housing 91 with an overlying rectangular metal lid or cover 92 hinged thereto at the back end thereof. The housing has an open grid bottom 93 with depending legs 94 adjacent the corners thereof. The housing 91 has generally flat elongated imperforate front the rear walls 95 connected by flat imperforate end walls 96. The lid 92 has an open grid top 97 with a dependent peripheral flange 98 overlying the open top of the housing 91. Hinges 99 connect'the rear flange 98 with the rear wall 95 and a spring latching device 100 secures the lid in closed position over the top of the housing with a latch 101 secured on the front flange 98 fitting in a spring catch 102 secured on the front wall 95 of the housing 91.

Three sets of guide wires 103 similar to the wires 57 of the carrying case 10 are mounted on the bottom 93 of the housing 91 and project upwardly therefrom adjacent the open top of the housing to receive three oxy gen generator cells or canisters 104 in spaced side-byside reiation as shown in FIG. 10. These canisters 104 differ from the canisters 58 of the device 10 in that they have closed bottoms with the outlet orifices 105 in the tops thereof. These orifices are arranged in a ring surrounding a central plunger 106 carried by each canister.

The lid 92 carries three push-button actuated pin assemblies 107 aligned with the plungers 106 of the canisters 104.

As shown in FIG. 11, each actuator 107 includes a rigid plastic plug 108 with a cylindrical top lug 109 pressed into recesses formed in grid walls 97 surrounding one of the grid openings that is aligned with the center of an underlying canister when the lid is closed. The plug 108 has a central open topped well 110 slidably supporting a push-button 111. The bottom wall 112 of the well has a ring of openings 113 therethrough covered by a flexible rubber-like washer 114 forming a flap valve permitting only upward flow through the orifices l 13.

The plug 108 has a circular depending rim bottom 115 with a flat end 116 resting on the top lid of the canister 104. Radial grooves 117 are formed through this face 116 to vent an open bottom recess 118 surrounded by the rim 115. The central portion of the top of the recess 118 is counterbored at 119 and a rubber tube 120 is sealed in this counterbore to depend therefrom below the level of the flat bottom 116 of the rim 115. The rubber tube has a flared mouth 121 providing a lip seal 122 resting on the lid of the canister 104 and surrounding the orifices 105 in the lid. The tube thus forms a cylindrical seal isolating an inner recess 123 over the top of the canister which is vented through the orifices 113 to the flap valve 1 14. The recess 1 above the flap valve 114 communicates with nipples 124 extending radially therefrom and having connecting passages 125 communicating with the recess.

The button 1 11 has a frusto-conical side wall 126 terminating in a rounded external shoulder 127. A rubber O-ring 128 is seated in a groove 129 in the lug portion 109 of the plug 108 and extends into the recess 110 to seal against the side wall 126 of the button and to form an abutment for the shoulder 127 limiting the outward movement of the button.

A compression coil spring 130 surrounds a central stem 131 in the button and acts between the button and the inner marginal portion of the washer flap 1 14 to simultaneously hold the flap on the wall 112 and to urge the button 11 1 to its extended position with its shoulder 127 bottomed on the O-ring 128.

A metal pin 132 has one end threaded in the stem 131 and depends therefrom through a bore 133 in the wall 112 to terminate in a rounded nose 134 in the recess 123 that is surrounded by the rubber tube seal 120.

The lid of each canister 104 has a thimble 135 depending from the central portion thereof and soldered to the lid in sealed relation. The thimble slidably supports the plunger 106 with a piercing pin 136 depending therefrom. The plunger 106 is composed of a plastic such as Teflon and has deformable teeth-like circular beads 138 therearound providing seals between the thimble and the plug.

The end or bottom wall 139 of the thimble 135 is relatively thin and is adapted to be pierced by the pin 136 when the plunger 106 is depressed in the thimble.

A chemical 140 is sealed in the thimble 135 under the plunger 106.

The nose 134 of the button actuated pin 132 is adapted to engage the top end face of the plunger 136 and force the plunger to the bottom of the thimble 135 whereupon the pin 136 will pierce the thin bottom wall 139 of the thimble forcing the chemical 140 into the interior of the canister. The chemical 140 will initiate a chemical reaction generating heat to ignite the chlorate candle in the canister releasing oxygen through the orifices 105 into the recess 123 and thence through the orifices 113 to unseat the flap valve 114 and enter the recess 110 for flow through the nipples 124 and through connecting tubing 141 as shown in FIG. 10 to an outlet 142 at one end of the lid. This outlet 142 registers with a resilient sealing mouth 143 of an outlet tube 144 extending through an end wall 96 of the housing 91. This tube 144 discharges through passages in the carrying strap 145 for the casing as described in connection with the device 10. The oxygen can then be bled off from the strap passages at any desired level into the feed tube to a canula or oxygen mask as described above. I

It will thus be understood that the carrying case 90 of FIGS. 9 to 11 detachably mounts three oxygen genorator cells activated by a chemical injected into the chlorate candle of the cell by buttons carried in the grid-like top or lid 92 of the case. The open grid top and bottom of the case and the spaced wire supports for the canister cells provide open chimneys surrounding each canister for rapid dissipation of heat. In addition, the casing itself is preferably composed of heat dissipating metal such as aluminum or magnesium, but it should also be understood that temperature resisting plastics can be used. To ready the casing for instant generation of oxygen it is only necessary to drop the canisters in the wire guides, snap the lid closed and depress one of the buttons 107. Upon exhausting the oxygen supply from one of the canisters, another button is depressed to initiate oxygen generation from another canister. The oxygen flow through the rigid plastic plugs 108 cannot flow back through the bottom of the plug because the flap valves in each plug will permit oxygen flow only from the canister immediately underneath the plug. Excessive pressures from the canister are released past the lip seal end 122 of the sealing tube 120 and then vented through the grooves 1 17 in the rim as described above.

It will be understood that many variations in shapes, sizes and designs of the casings can be made without departing from the scope of this invention. It will also be understood that while the carrying cases are especially adapted for chemical oxygen generators, they are also useful for other gaseous generators.

We claim as our invention:

1. A heat dissipating case for receiving a plurality of heat releasing oxygen generating canisters each with an outlet in one end thereof which comprises a housing having an open end through which the canisters are easily inserted, a lid closing said open end and cooperating with said housing to clamp the canisters in position surrounded by the housing and lid with air spaces around each canister, said case having ports providing chimney ventilation for said air spaces around the canisters in the case, a canister engaging seal means surrounding the outlet of each clamped canister in the housing, a common outlet for the housing receiving oxygen from each seal means, and actuators on the case to individually activate oxygen generation in each canister in the case.

2. A case for replaceably receiving at least one oxygen generating canister with a port in one end to deliver oxygen from the port to an outlet which comprises a housing having an open end through which an oxygen generating canister can be inserted, a lid closing said end and cooperating with the housing to clamp the canister in the housing with an air space around the canister vented to the exterior of the case, seal means in the housing surrounding the port of the clamped canister, a conduit conveying oxygen from the seal means to the outlet, and means accessible from outside the housing for activating the canister in the housing to generate oxygen.

3. A carrying case for heat releasing chemical oxygen generator canisters adapted to be worn as a personal accessory and activated to instantly supply oxygen which comprises a housing, means in the housing for replaceably mounting a plurality of disposable oxygen generator orificed canisters in spaced relation from the housing to provide air spaces around each canister vented to the outside of the housing, a separate seal in the housing for surrounding the orifice of each canister, conduit means in the housing for conveying oxygen generated by the canisters from the separate seals to an outlet adapted to deliver oxygen to the wearer of the case, and means carried by the case to activate the canisters individually when oxygen is needed.

4. A carrying case for a plurality of replaceable oxygen generating canisters each with an outlet port in an end thereof which comprises an open topped housing, a lid hinged to the open top of the housing, a plurality of canister supporting cages in the housing holding canisters spaced from the housing walls and from each other to provide air spaces around the canisters, deformable seal means surrounding the outlet ports of the canisters and cooperating to hold the canisters in fixed position in the casing, manifold tubing connecting the seal means with a single outlet from the housing, and mechanism carried by the case for selectively activating the canisters.

5. A lightweight compact portable case for carrying as a personal accessory to release a gas when needed which comprises a housing, a closure for said housing, said closure and housing being sized and shaped to hold a plurality of gas releasing cans, a tube having an inlet in the case for each can and a common outlet, seal means at each inlet to sealingly engage the adjacent can so that gas from each can must flow into the tube, and a separate manually actuated means on the case for each can to selectively release gas from the cans to the tube.

6. A lightweight compact portable case adapted to be worn as a personal accessory to dispense oxygen when needed by the wearer which comprises a housing, a closure for the housing cooperating therewith to surround a plurality of chemical oxygen generator cans in sideby-side up-right position with each can having a discharge orifice in one end thereof, sealing inlets in the case position to surround each can orifice for sealingly engaging the orificed end of the can, a carrying strap for said case having an oxygen flow conduit associated therewith receiving oxygen from the inlets, and a sepa-.

rate generator activating means on the case for each can adapted to be manually actuated from outside the housing and closure to selectively activate each generator.

7. The case of claim 6 wherein said activating means are manually operated singly or in multiple for sequential or simultaneous release of oxygen from the cans.

8. A lightweight carrying case for wearing as a personal accessory to dispense oxygen when needed from a plurality of relatively small lightweight orificed cans each containing a chlorate candle releasing oxygen to the orifice when activated which comprises a housing having an open top and a ported bottom, a ported lid hinged to said housing to close the open top, a plurality of can supports in said housing for holding the cans in upright spaced relation from the housing walls and from each other to provide air spaces around the cans vented to the ports in the bottom of the housing and to the ports in the lid, seals in the case engaging each can in the case around the orifice thereof, a manifold tube in the housing having inlets communicating with the seals and a common outlet, and means manually operated from outside the case to activate each chlorate candle in the cans for generating oxygen and releasing it through the can orifices to the tube inlets for flow to the common outlet.

9. The case of claim 8, wherein. the means manually operated from outside of the case is a button actuated pin for each can.

10. The case of claim 8 including a carrying strap and a tube extending through said strap connected with said common outlet.

11. A carrying case for chemical gas generator cells which comprises a housing having an open end through which the cells may be inserted and a ported opposite end, a ported lid selectively overlying said open end and cooperating with the ported end to provide a free air passage through the housing, cell support means in the housing, a carrying strap for the housing having a gas passage therein, a conduit having inlet means receiving gas from a cell in the support means communicating with the gas passage in the strap, and mechanism accessible from outside of the casing selectively acti vating a cell in the support means to flow gas therefrom through the conduit to the strap passage.

12. The carrying case of claim 11 wherein a plurality of cells in the case generate oxygen for breathing and the strap passage has a fitting adapted to be connected with a breathing device.

13. The carrying case of claim 11 wherein the lid when closed clamps the cells in position in the support means.

14. The carrying case of claim 11 wherein the cell support means are spaced upright wires defining cell receiving cages.

15. The carrying case of claim 11 wherein the con duit includes a resilient cup for each cell surrounding the cell outlet to sealingly connect the outlet with the conduit.

16. The carrying case of claim 11 wherein said mechanism includes a battery charged electric circuit and a separate switch for each cell.

17. The carrying case of claim 11 wherein said mechanism includes a manually depressed button for each cell.

18. The carrying case of claim 11 wherein the lid is hinged to the open end of the housing and has depend ing plugs bottomed on the lid of each cell.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/6, 128/202.26
International ClassificationA62B7/08, A62B25/00, A62B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62B7/08, A62B25/00
European ClassificationA62B25/00, A62B7/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 25, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: LIFE SUPPORT, INC.
Effective date: 19830427
Owner name: MPM LIFE SUPPORT, 1250 TOWER LANE, ERIE, PA 16505,
May 25, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: MPM LIFE SUPPORT, 1250 TOWER LANE, ERIE, PA 16505,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:LIFE SUPPORT, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004134/0447
Effective date: 19830427
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LIFE SUPPORT, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004134/0447