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Publication numberUS3733168 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1973
Filing dateMar 24, 1970
Priority dateMar 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3733168 A, US 3733168A, US-A-3733168, US3733168 A, US3733168A
InventorsM Marsh, R Marsh
Original AssigneeM Marsh, R Marsh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Smoke dissipating ashtray lamp
US 3733168 A
Abstract
A lamp assembly includes a fuel tank with a lower portion for enclosing liquid fuel and an upper wick guide portion, with a burner affixed to the top of the wick. A globe extends above the burner. An ashtray rests on the fuel tank, or individual cigarette-supporting clips can be attached to a smoke hood just below apertures in the hood, with the ashtray positioned on the table within the hood. The smoke hood directs smoke rising from the ashtray unit to a location adjacent the flame for virtual dissipation of the smoke.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ 51 May 15, 1973 ited States Patent 1 v Marsh et al.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS [54] SMOKE DISSIPATING ASHTRAY LAMP [76] Inventors: Milton M. Marsh, 11130 South Parnell, Chicago, 111. 60628; Robert A.

131/238 ......431/322 12/194] Hartje........................... ...131/238X 3,490,466 1/1970 Marsh, 4948 W. 78th Street, Oak 1,604,588 10/1926 Le Grand et al. vLawn, lll. 60495 2,265,903

Mar. 24, 1970 App]. No.: 22,335

Primary Examiner-Edward G. Favors A homey-James J. Jennings Jr.

[22] Filed:

ABSTRACT A lamp assembly includes a fuel tank with a lower Related US. Application Data portion for enclosing liquid fuel and an upper wick guide portion, with a burner affixed to the top of the wick. A globe extends above the burner. An ashtray rests on the fuel tank, or individual cigarette-supporting clips can be attached to a smoke hood just below apertures in the hood, with the ashtray positioned on the table within the hood. The smoke hood directs smoke rising from the ashtray unit to a location adjacent the flame for virtual dissipation of the smoke.

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2 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTED 51975 3.733.168

sum 1 BF 2 inventors lVIili'on IVI. Marsh Robert A. Marsh Ar'r rney I BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION There has always been a need in environment-control systems to remove irritating and noxious gases from the atmosphere. For example in a restaurant or other public place where many people may smoke cigars, cigarettes or pipes, the accumulated smoke gradually builds SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A smoke dissipating ashtray lamp constructed in accordance with the invention includes a fuel tank and wick guide assembly, having a lower receptacle portion for containing liquid fuel and an upper wick guide portion. The burner assembly includes an upper portion defining an exit aperture for the wick, and a lower portion constructed to engage the wick guide. The ashtray, in one embodiment, is within the hood to receive ashes dropped from a cigarette, cigar or pipe positioned on asupport ledge affixed to the hood. In another embodiment the ashtray is constructed to rest on the fuel tank; the ashtray extends substantially around the wick guide. A smoke hood has a lower skirt or bell-shaped portion and an upper channel portion. A generally circular globe includes a lower cylindrical portion for fitting in the smoke hood, and an open upper area or chimney portion to pass the: gases which rise from the ashtray through the smoke hood and the globe.

THE DRAWINGS In the several figures of the drawings like reference numerals identify like elements, and in the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective illustration of a lamp constructed in accordance with a first embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view, taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1 and on a scale slightly enlarged with respect to that of FIG. 1, depicting details of this embodiment;

FIG. 3 is another sectional view, taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2, illustrating a central portion of the lamp;

FIG. 4 is another perspective illustration, on a reduced scale, depicting another ashtray arrangement for use with the first embodiment;

FIG. 5 is a front view of a second embodiment of the invention;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are top views of a component of the assembly of FIG. 5, shown before and after shaping to the desired contours; and

FIG. 8 is a top view of another component of the assembly shown in FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE FIRST EMBODIMENT FIG. 1 illustrates five major assemblies and components of the invention, which are numbered 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50. A fuel tank and wick guide assembly 10 is shown at the base of the lamp. Assembly 10 includes a lower portion or fuel tank 11, having a relatively flat base, circular sidewall and flat upper portion (not visible) to which the cylindrical wick guide 12 is affixed by soldering, threaded engagement or other suitable fastening means. A handle member 13 is joined by welding or other suitable means to the outer wall of fuel tank 11 to facilitate lifting and moving the lamp assembly.

The burner assembly 20 has a central platform portion 21 on which an upper portion 22 is fastened. The upper portion 22 is hemispherically shaped and defines a slit 23 through which the end of a wick emerges, forming the path for carrying fuel from the tank 11 upwardly through wick guide 12 to the combustion area. A lower portion of the burner assembly (not visible in FIG. 1) is affixed beneath the central platform 21 and includes a threaded portion or other suitable locking means for securely aflixing burner assembly 20 to the top of wick guide 12. An adjusting means 24, shown as a simple knurled knob 25 affixed to a shaft 26, is provided to adjust the vertical position of the wick by displacement of another wheel (not visible) within the upper portion of the wick guide and in engagement with the wick itself, to facilitate wick positioning in a well known manner.

A generally circular ashtray assembly is provided, and has a base portion for resting on the upper cover 1 of fuel tank 11. In the embodiment of FIG. 1 ashtray 30 is formed of two semicircular portions 31 and 32, and

. a spring member 33, of spring steel or brass, is fastened by a small rivet to each ashtray portion 31 and 32. Thus the ashtray assembly can be simply removed without disengaging other portions of the lamp assembly. Each of. the ashtray halves has an upper support ledge 34 channeled at intervals to provide a plurality of cigarette rests 35, a central ash receiving floor portion 36, and a semi-circular collar portion 37 dimensioned to encircle half of the wick guide 12. Various other arrangements of the ashtray are possible: for example, three or more sections can be provided. Alternatively a channel can be provided in the ashtray- 30 of slightly greater width than the wick guide 12 to afford simple removal, as will be explained hereinafter in connection with FIG.

A smoke hood 40 is provided to direct smoke rising from the extremity of a burning cigarette on the ashtray upwardly through the hood to the interior of globe 50. The smoke hood 40 has a lower skirt-shaped portion 41 which flares outwardly to a diameter approximately that of the outer dimension of ashtray 30. The hood also includes an upper channel portion 42 dimensioned slightly larger than the central platform 21 of the burner assembly to afford a good fit. It is thus apparent, and is shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, that central platform 21 of the burner assembly is provided with a multiplicity of small apertures 27 between the inner and outer rims to allow air and smoke to pass freely upwardly through apertures 27 into globe 50.

The globe itself is generally circular and has a lower cylindrical portion 51 of only slightly smaller diameter than the diameter of the upper channel portion 42 of smoke hood 40. The uppermost portion of globe 50 is cut out to define an aperture or open area 52 through which the hot gases can escape above the flame as represented by the arrows 53. Thus the globe can be simply inserted so that its lower cylindrical portion 51 is indexed within channel portion 42 of the smoke hood 40 and rests upon the outer rim of central platform portion 21 of the burner assembly 20.

In FIG. 2 the details of burner assembly are better illustrated. As there shown the upper portion 22 defines the exit aperture for a wick 60 so that a flame can be sustained after ignition of the fuel carried by the wick. The central platform portion 21 has a depending portion 27, the extremity of which defines threads 28 for mating engagement with a correspondingly tapped portion at the upper end of wick guide 12. The adjusting means 24 is shown as having an inner shaft 29 tapped to receive the threaded extremity of the outer shaft 26, which passes through an aperture 43 in the channel portion of smoke hood 40. The knurled knob driven by shaft 29 to engage and displace wick 60 is not visible, but its provision and operation is well known and understood in the lamp burner art. It is also apparent that instead of an aperture 43, a channel extending upwardly from shaft 26 to the upper end of channel 42 can be provided, so that one continuous shaft can replace components 26, 29. FIG. 2 also illustrates the extension of the wick 60 downwardly into the liquid fuel 62 retained within the lower receptacle portion of assembly 10.

The sectional view of FIG. 3, looking upwardly from the hood area, shows the multiplicity of apertures 27' in the central platform 21 of the burner assembly 20. Also shown are three locking clips 44, each affixed to the underside of central platform 21 of the burner assembly. Three right-angle members 45 are provided and attached to the interior of channel portion 42 of the hood, so that a simple angular displacement of the hood securely positions it to the burner assembly. Other locking components can of course be utilized to provide the requisite indexing and support. The term locking means as used herein and in the appended claims embraces a single locking assembly 44, 45, or a plurality of such assemblies as shown in FIG. 3, as well as equivalent structures.

In operation, a lighted cigar or cigarette, or a pipe in which the tobacco is burning, is placed in the ashtray. The smoke rises upwardly into the lower skirt portion 41 of the smoke hood, and is drawn upwardly by the draft produced by the lamp construction, which is aided by the draft created as the flame burns within globe 50. The smoke passes through the lower portion of hood 40, and through the multiplicity of apertures 27 in central platform portion 21 of burner assembly 20 into the area of globe 50. The draft draws the smoke into and around the flame, thus consuming the smoke. Any smoke not drawn toward and consumed by the flame tends to be returned by the cold air down draft, as represented by the arrows 54, along the inner sides of the globe 50 and returned to the area of the flame to complete the consumption of the smoke and the purification of the atmosphere.

FIG. 4 depicts another embodiment of the ashtray arrangement in which the entire ashtray assembly 70 comprises a generally circular well portion 71 for receiving the ashes. The ashtray assembly is machined, stamped or otherwise shaped to define a channel 72 extending from the center outwardly to the circumference of the ashtray. The upstanding wall portions 73 both prevent ashes from falling into the channel, and index the ashtray assembly to slide in around wick guide 12. In this way the ashtray assembly 70 can be readily removed to discard the contents, and then replaced around the wick guide 12.

It will be apparent that although a transparent glass globe 50 is illustrated in the drawings, a metal globe can be utilized where the illumination level provided by the lamp is not important to the environment. With either globe arrangements effective smoke and odor removal from the air is achieved. By providing a scented fuel 62 within fuel reservoir 11, a pleasant scented aroma can be added to the atmosphere. The amount of tar and smoke deposits in the adjacent area is reduced with a corresponding decrease in the discomfort to the eyes and respiratory systems of persons in the area. Accordingly the level of air exchange can be reduced with an attendant saving in the expense of operating the heating and/or air conditioning system.

The cleaning and refueling operation is simple. Globe 50 is lifted upwardly and removed, and the ashtray assembly also removed. The hood 40 is turned to the right to release the spring clips 44 from engagement with the members 45, and the hood assembly 40 is eased downwardly to rest on the top of fuel tank 11. Burner assembly 20 is turned counterclockwise and unscrewed from the top of wick guide 12. As the burner assembly 20 is lifted upwardly, wick 60 is also removed. The hood assembly 40 is then removed and fuel can be added through the center of wick guide 12 into the receptacle 11.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE SECOND EMBODIMENT FIG. 5 shows the arrangement which at this time is considered the preferred embodiment of the invention. In describing this arrangement reference numerals similar to those used for corresponding items in FIGS. l4, but in the series of numbers, will be employed. For example, globe 150 corresponds in general with the globe 50 depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2. However, the globe 150 in FIG. 5 includes a chimney portion 152 extended above the central, generally circular portion 153, to enhance the draft operation. In other respects the globe arrangement is closely related to'the previous embodiment.

The burner assembly likewise is generally similar to the earlier described burner arrangement 20, and includes an upper portion 122 defining an exit aperture for the wick 60. As better shown in FIG. 8 a multiplicity of apertures 127' are provided in the interior of central platform portion 121 of the burner assembly in FIG. 5. These apertures 127 generally control the amount of air passing upwardly to the support combustion within globe 150.

An important change is that the platform 121 of the burner assembly in FIG. 5 includes four larger holes or channels 160, spaced at 90 intervals around the outer part of the platform 121. In one embodiment these holes were made A inch in diameter and positioned about inch inwardly from the periphery of the central platform 121 of the burner assembly. At present it appears that the major portion of the rising tobacco smoke passes through these holes 160, and thus close to the flame location. There is a rolling, mixing action of the air currents in the vicinity of the flame, and virtually all of the smoke is consumed at this location.

Smoke hood is generally bell-shaped as shown in FIG. 5, and its lower outwardly-flared base portion 141 provides a support which can rest directly on the table or other support base. The upper portion 142 of the smoke hood is dimensioned to receive the central platform 121 of the burner assembly and, over this platform, the lower cylindrical portion 151 of globe 150. It is important to note that a bead or indentation 143 is provided in the proper location to support platform 121 of the burner assembly, and the globe rests on platform 121. This simple and economical provision of the bead obviates the need for a locking arrangement such as 44, 45 of the earlier embodiment.

Fuel tank and wick guide assembly 110 includes a lower fuel-holding portion 111, which is generally cylindrical. The upper portion 112 of assembly 110 is of smaller diameter than the lower receptacle portion 111, and includes an interior tapped portion (not shown) for threaded engagement with the burner assembly as explained above in connection with FIG. 2. Adjusting means 124, including knob 125 and shaft 126, is generally similar to that already described. A vertical slot or channel (not shown) is provided in the upper portion 142 of the smoke hood to receive shaft 126 and facilitate insertion of the burner assembly. Thus when the fuel tank is filled the wick is readily inserted, and assembly 110 is then threaded into engagement with the depending portion of burner 120. The entire assembly 110, 120 is then lowered downwardly until platform 121 is seated on bead 143, thus supporting the fuel tank and burner assemblies. Globe 150 is then lowered into position until its lower portion 151 rests on platform 121 and is retained within the uppermost portion 142 of the smoke hood.

The ashtray portion of the present invention is divided into the ash receptacle and cigarette-support portions. f course, the term cigarette as used herein also includes other forms of tobacco for burning, such as cigars and pipe tobacco. In FIG. the ash receptacle portion 131 can be a conventional ash tray positioned on the table before the smoke hood is placed over it. Thus the insertion, and the removal for cleaning and subsequent replacement, of the ash tray 131 is a simple and rapid procedure. By sizing the vertical dimension of the ashtray interior relative to the cylindrical fuel tank 111, a safety feature is provided. That is, if the lamp fuel leaks from the assembly 110, it will drip downwardly and be collected in the ashtray 131.

Another distinct feature of the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 5 is the provision of four support ledges 132 around the body of the smoke hood, adjacent the corresponding arch-shaped cutouts 133. That is, the arch-like apertures 133 are provided at 90 spacings around the central body portion of smoke hood 140. A small hole 134 is then punched just below each opening 133.

The provision of the assemblies 132 for supporting a cigarette, cigar, pipe or other article will be described in connection with FIGS. 6 and 7. FIG. 6 shows the outline of a piece 170 stamped out for appropriate bending operations to produce a support ledge 132. After providing the properly shaped piece 170, the piece is placed in a first die and portion 171 is bent upwardly along the bend line 172. This leaves the central portion 173 as that part which will be in the horizontal plane, after being affixed to the smoke hood. In a second bending operation in another die, the tab portion 174 is bent downwardly along the bend line 175. Tab portion 174 is punched to define an aperture 176 sized to conform with the aperture 134 below each opening 133 in the smoke hood. After both bending operations the top view of the support ledge 132 is that shown in FIG. 7. The ledge is then placed against the body of smoke hood 140 with apertures 176 and 134 in alignment. A rivet 180 or other suitable fastening means is provided to join each of the support ledges 132 to the smoke hood adjacent one of the arch-shaped openings 133.

It appears that the embodiment of FIGS. 5-8 has much better fuel-feeding action and provides improved smoke dissipation as contrasted to the embodiment of FIGS. ll-4. The embodiment of FIGS. 5-8 is not affected by cross drafts from air conditioning or heating systems, or from rapid movements of people adjacent the lamp assembly. A large capacity ash tray can be utilized with this embodiment, providing for ash removal only once a day in normal use. In addition, the lamp is readily refueled, simply by removing the assemblies 1 10, 120 and unscrewing the empty fuel receptacle and wick guide assembly 110. A filled receptacle is then screwed into the burner head and the lamp is immediately ready for operation.

While only particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the invention in its broader aspects. Therefore the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as may fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A smoke dissipating ashtray lamp, comprising:

a fuel tank and wick guide assembly, having a lower receptacle portion for containing liquid fuel, an upper wick guide portion affixed to the lower portion, and wick adjusting means extending from a position within the upper wick guide portion of the fuel tank and wick guide assembly to facilitate vertical positioning of the wick;

a burner assembly, including an upper portion defining an exit aperture for a wick, a central platform having an inner portion defining a multiplicity of small apertures to allow air to pass through and an outer portion defining a plurality of holes to direct the rising tobacco smoke closer to the flame location than would otherwise be possible, and a lower portion constructed to engage the upper portion of the fuel tank and wick guide assembly, which lower portion includes a threaded portion, and said upper wick guide portion of the fuel tank and wick guide assembly includes a tapped portion for mating engagement with said threaded portion of the burner assembly such that after the fuel tank and wick guide assembly is engaged with the burner assembly, the fuel tank and wick guide assembly is supported from the burner assembly; smoke hood, having an upper channel portion, an intermediate portion defining a bead extending around its inner periphery such that said central platform of the burner assembly rests on said bead to support the burner assembly, and further defining a slot for the wick adjusting means, and a lower body portion, said lower body portion defining a plurality of apertures, and having a plurality of support ledges, each affixed just below one of said plurality of apertures in the smoke hood, to afford placement of a cigarette, cigar or pipe on one support ledge with the burning tobacco inside the smoke hood, so that the tobacco smoke passes upwardly and adjacent the burner assembly for substantial consumption in the flame area;

a generally circular globe, having a lower cylindrical portion for fitting in the smoke hood, and an upper chimney portion which affords egress of the gases which pass upwardly from the ashtray through the smoke hood and the globe; and

an ashtray, positioned within the bottom of the smoke hood and below the receptacle portion of 10 the fuel tank and wick guide assembly, to catch falling ashes.

2. A smoke dissipating ashtray lamp, comprising:

a fuel tank and wick guide assembly, comprising a lower receptacle portion for containing liquid fuel, and an upper cylindrical portion afi'ixed to the lower portion;

a burner assembly, including an upper portion defining an exit aperture for a wick, and a lower portion constructed to engage the upper cylindrical portion 8 of the fuel tank and wick guide assembly;

an ashtray assembly, constructed to rest on said lower receptacle portion of the fuel tank and wick guide assembly, and extending substantially around the upper cylindrical portion of that assembly, which ashtray assembly comprises two substantially semicircular portions, to afford easy insertion and removal of the ashtray;

a smoke hood, having a lower skirt portion and an upper channel portion, with locking means affixed to at least one portion of said upper channel for mating engagement with a complementary locking means on said burner assembly; and

a generally circular globe, having a lower cylindrical portion for fitting in the smoke hood, and an apertured area in the upper portion of the globe to afford egress of the gases which pass upwardly from the ashtray through the smoke hood and the globe.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1604588 *Oct 29, 1925Oct 26, 1926Reich GeorgeLamp-burner connecter
US2265903 *Dec 5, 1939Dec 9, 1941Hartje Richard ASmoke raiser lamp
US3490466 *Apr 15, 1968Jan 20, 1970Warnock SamuelSmoke incinerator for ash trays
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3831263 *Aug 11, 1972Aug 27, 1974Aluminum Co Of AmericaMethod of soldering
US4043776 *Oct 30, 1975Aug 23, 1977Orel Jeannette VSmoke sorbing device
US4569655 *Dec 30, 1983Feb 11, 1986Charette Jacqueline MPocket sized portable smoke raiser
US20070111149 *Jan 10, 2007May 17, 2007Susumu MatsuyamaLamp With Means For Controlling Air And Fuel Near The Flame
US20120200236 *Aug 9, 2012Hannspree, Inc.Table lamp having ash-alerting and ash-extinguishing functions
EP2311331A1 *Oct 11, 2010Apr 20, 2011Bernd WagnerSmoke-free ash tray
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/253, 131/238
International ClassificationF21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00
European ClassificationF21V33/00